Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
Inhibiting key protein involved in glucose production may help in treating type 2 diabetes

Inhibiting key protein involved in glucose production may help in treating type 2 diabetes

Some treatments for type 2 diabetes make the body more sensitive to insulin, the hormone that lowers blood sugar. But new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests a different strategy: slowing the production of glucose in the liver. [More]
Gut bacteria play major role in diabetes, obesity depending on host’s genetic makeup

Gut bacteria play major role in diabetes, obesity depending on host’s genetic makeup

The trillions of bacteria in your digestive system play a major role in your metabolism, and they're linked to your risks of type 2 diabetes, obesity and the related conditions that make up "metabolic syndrome," which has become a global health epidemic. [More]
Prenatal exposure to historical Ukraine Famine increases risk for Type 2 diabetes

Prenatal exposure to historical Ukraine Famine increases risk for Type 2 diabetes

Men and women exposed in early gestation to the man-made Ukrainian Famine of 1932-33 in regions with extreme food shortages were 1.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in adulthood. [More]
Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier could potentially be a new drug target to treat diabetes

Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier could potentially be a new drug target to treat diabetes

High blood sugar is a defining characteristic of Type 2 diabetes and the cause of many of the condition's complications, including kidney failure, heart disease, and blindness. Most diabetes medications aim to maintain normal blood sugar (glucose) levels and prevent high blood sugar by controlling insulin. [More]
Valerion announces positive results from non-clinical pilot study of VAL-1221 for treatment of Pompe disease

Valerion announces positive results from non-clinical pilot study of VAL-1221 for treatment of Pompe disease

Valerion Therapeutics, LLC yesterday announced positive results from a non-clinical "proof of concept" pilot study for a novel humanized antibody and acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) fusion candidate for the treatment of Pompe disease. [More]
Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

A research team led by Kezhong Zhang, Ph.D., at the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, has discovered that exposure to air pollution has a direct adverse health effect on the liver and causes liver fibrosis, an illness associated with metabolic disease and liver cancer. [More]
Huntington’s disease prevention breakthrough? An interview with Professor Lesley Jones

Huntington’s disease prevention breakthrough? An interview with Professor Lesley Jones

Huntington’s disease is an inherited disease which, whilst quite rare, is one of the more common inherited neurodegenerative diseases. About 1 in 6,000 people in the UK are at risk and what’s horrible about this disease is that if one of your parents has it, then you have a fifty-fifty chance of inheriting it. [More]
TGen scientists identify potential gene associated with NAFLD-related liver damage

TGen scientists identify potential gene associated with NAFLD-related liver damage

In a first-of-its-kind exploratory study, the Translational Genomics Research Institute has identified a potential gene associated with the initiation of the most common cause of liver damage. [More]
A unique perspective on health and exercise

A unique perspective on health and exercise

For over 30 years, Terrie Williams has been studying exercise physiology in wild animals: African lions and wild dogs, dolphins and whales, coyotes and mountain lions, as well as a few human athletes. [More]
Treating cancer cells with quizartinib inhibits key metabolic pathway, activates macroautophagy

Treating cancer cells with quizartinib inhibits key metabolic pathway, activates macroautophagy

A study published in The Journal of Cell Biology describes a way to force cancer cells to destroy a key metabolic enzyme they need to survive. [More]
Adequate intake of choline essential for good health and physical performance

Adequate intake of choline essential for good health and physical performance

Athletes and physically active people of all ages can benefit from choline not only for their overall health, but also because it supports muscle performance during exercise, and can improve stamina. [More]
Redefining malnutrition to improve treatment for pediatric patients

Redefining malnutrition to improve treatment for pediatric patients

In recent years, an effort has been underway to redefine malnutrition in pediatric patients to include both the acute clinical population and the more traditional ambulatory populations. Identifying and treating malnutrition in pediatric patients is important from an acute standpoint and to ensure that children have enough nutrition to reach optimal final height and development. [More]
AMRI, Saneca Pharmaceuticals collaborate to develop and market opium-derived APIs

AMRI, Saneca Pharmaceuticals collaborate to develop and market opium-derived APIs

AMRI and Saneca Pharmaceuticals, a.s. today announced a strategic collaboration focused on the development, manufacture and marketing of a portfolio of opium-derived active pharmaceutical ingredients, ("APIs"). [More]
Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Coffee drinking is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events (mainly heart attacks) in young adults (18-45) with mild hypertension, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos, a cardiologist at Hospital of San Daniele del Friuli in Udine, Italy. [More]
Fish oil diet modifies gut bacteria to boost health

Fish oil diet modifies gut bacteria to boost health

Diets rich in fish oil versus diets rich in lard produce very different bacteria in the guts of mice, reports a study from Sahlgrenska Academy published in Cell Metabolism. The researchers transferred these microbes into other mice to see how they affected health. The results suggest that gut bacteria share some of the responsibility for the beneficial effects of fish oil and the harmful effects of lard. [More]
Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Women who are obese have a higher risk and a worse prognosis for breast cancer, but the reasons why remain unclear. A Cornell study published this month in Science Translational Medicine explains how obesity changes the consistency of breast tissue in ways that are similar to tumors, thereby promoting disease. [More]
New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

A new study has an important implication for tweens and young teens as they head back to school: Taking a gadget to bed could really hurt their sleep. [More]
Optimal aerobic exercise training may benefit patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

Optimal aerobic exercise training may benefit patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

A physical therapy researcher with the IU School of Health and Rehabilitation Services at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has been awarded a $465,000 National Institutes of Health grant to optimize aerobic exercise training for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, a goal data suggests could reduce morbidity and mortality among those with the disease. [More]
UH research points to promising target in treatment of pancreatic cancer

UH research points to promising target in treatment of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is extremely deadly and often has a poor prognosis. Ranked as the fourth deadliest cancer in the U.S. and poised to move up within the next few years, pancreatic cancer is very difficult to detect in its early stages. Seldom diagnosed early and typically spreading rapidly, the disease has no effective treatment once it advances. [More]
High dietary iron intake suppresses hormone that regulates appetite

High dietary iron intake suppresses hormone that regulates appetite

Here's one more reason to cut down on the amount of red meat you eat. Using an animal model, researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have found that dietary iron intake, equivalent to heavy red meat consumption, suppresses leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite. [More]
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