Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Investigators have found that young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have slower brain growth compared to children without diabetes. A new study, published in the December issue of Diabetes, now available ahead of print, suggests that continued exposure to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugars, may be detrimental to the developing brain. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered that brain tumors are capable of burning acetate for fuel, providing a new potential target for halting tumor growth. [More]
Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published online in Diabetes. [More]
New study highlights importance of generating awareness about HCV testing, support and care

New study highlights importance of generating awareness about HCV testing, support and care

A new study shows that many patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are lost during different stages of health care to manage the disease. This real-life' view of the HCV patient care continuum in a major U.S. urban area is published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and highlights the importance of generating awareness among clinicians and at-risk groups about appropriate HCV testing, referral, support and care. [More]
Eating bilberries reduces adverse effects of high-fat diets

Eating bilberries reduces adverse effects of high-fat diets

Eating bilberries diminishes the adverse effects of a high-fat diet, according to a recent study at the University of Eastern Finland. For the first time, bilberries were shown to have beneficial effects on both blood pressure and nutrition-derived inflammatory responses. [More]
Secrets of success for pioneering research revealed

Secrets of success for pioneering research revealed

The British Pharmacological Society has announced the secrets of success for pioneering research along with the outcome of its annual 'Putting UK Pharmacology on the Map' vote. The vote selects sites of special scientific interest linked to achievements in pharmacology based on a ballot of MPs, peers and senior members of the scientific community. [More]
Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Premature ovarian failure, also known as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), affects 1% of all women worldwide. In most cases, the exact cause of the condition, which is often associated with infertility, is difficult to determine. [More]
Maf1 protein that makes other proteins also controls fat levels in the body

Maf1 protein that makes other proteins also controls fat levels in the body

Like a smart sensor that adjusts the lighting in each room and a home's overall temperature, a protein that governs the making of other proteins in the cell also appears capable of controlling fat levels in the body. [More]
Gout attacks are most common at night

Gout attacks are most common at night

Research, published today, has shown that an acute gout attack is more than twice as likely to occur during the night or early morning hours as during the day. The increased prevalence of gout attacks at night time was observed even after 24 hours with no alcohol and low purine intake. [More]
Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

A team of investigators from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and other leading biomedical research institutions has pinpointed rare mutations in a gene called APOA5 that increase a person's risk of having a heart attack early in life. These mutations disable the APOA5 gene and also raise the levels in the blood of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, a type of fat. [More]
Prolongz drug achieves No. 1 spot in the personal care category

Prolongz drug achieves No. 1 spot in the personal care category

Prolongz, the all-natural FDA registered over-the-counter homeopathic drug that helps in the prevention of premature ejaculation, has been ranked No. 1 in the personal care category for July, August and September of 2014 by the Jordan Whitney Greensheet. [More]
Study: Long-term endurance training alters epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle

Study: Long-term endurance training alters epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle

A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that long-term endurance training in a stable way alters the epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle. The research team behind the study, which is being published in the journal Epigenetics, also found strong links between these altered epigenetic patterns and the activity in genes controlling improved metabolism and inflammation. [More]
Genetic variations may contribute to treatment-related cognitive problems in children with ALL

Genetic variations may contribute to treatment-related cognitive problems in children with ALL

Common variations in four genes related to brain inflammation or cells' response to damage from oxidation may contribute to the problems with memory, learning and other cognitive functions seen in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to a study led by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, and Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. [More]
Weight loss surgery and exercise lower risks of serious health problems

Weight loss surgery and exercise lower risks of serious health problems

Throughout the past year, studies on the positive effects of weight loss surgery have been published in a variety of medical journals in the US and abroad. We learned that weight loss surgery is relatively safe, and that it is effective in improving serious health conditions. More recently, we also learned that it is a factor in preventing Type 2 diabetes from developing in people considered to be pre-diabetic. [More]
McMaster University researchers identify hormone that contributes to obesity, diabetes

McMaster University researchers identify hormone that contributes to obesity, diabetes

Researchers from McMaster University have identified an important hormone that is elevated in obese people and contributes to obesity and diabetes by inhibiting brown fat activity. [More]
Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals initiates CPI-613 Phase I trial in patients with B-cell NHL

Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals initiates CPI-613 Phase I trial in patients with B-cell NHL

Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical stage company and leader in the growing field of cancer metabolism-based therapeutics, today announced the initiation of a Phase I clinical trial assessing the safety and efficacy of escalating doses of CPI-613, in combination with bendamustine and rituximab, in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). [More]
Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Physical activity increases oxidative stress, and therefore, as an antioxidant vitamin C might have particularly evident effects on people who are participating in vigorous exercise. In several studies, vitamin C administration attenuated the increases in oxidative stress markers caused by exercise. Furthermore, vitamin C is involved in the metabolism of histamine, prostaglandins, and cysteinyl leukotrienes, all of which appear to be mediators in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. [More]
iTeos Therapeutics, Pfizer form strategic collaboration for cancer immunotherapeutics

iTeos Therapeutics, Pfizer form strategic collaboration for cancer immunotherapeutics

iTeos Therapeutics SA announced today a strategic collaboration with Pfizer Inc. pursuant to which iTeos will license to Pfizer rights to iTeos' pre-clinical compounds targeting Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) and Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO2). Pfizer will be responsible for the development and commercialization of IDO1 and TDO2 drug candidates. [More]
Weight-loss surgery may reduce lower urinary tract symptoms

Weight-loss surgery may reduce lower urinary tract symptoms

Metabolic syndrome is linked with an increased frequency and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms, but weight loss surgery may lessen these symptoms. The findings, which come from two studies published in BJU International, indicate that urinary problems may be added to the list of issues that can improve with efforts that address altered metabolism. [More]
New type of cancer therapy shows promise in patients with advanced leukemia

New type of cancer therapy shows promise in patients with advanced leukemia

A new type of cancer therapy that targets an oncometabolite produced dramatic results in patients with advanced leukemia in an early-phase clinical trial. The study, led by Eytan M. Stein, MD, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, was presented today at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology. [More]