Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
Prune consumption may prevent bone mineral density loss in older population

Prune consumption may prevent bone mineral density loss in older population

As the demographic shift to an older population continues, a growing number of men and women will be diagnosed with osteoporosis. In addition to existing drug therapies, certain lifestyle and nutritional factors are known to reduce its risk. [More]
Study compares effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function

Study compares effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function

The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. [More]
Salk scientists show how microenvironment signals encourage growth of pancreatic tumors

Salk scientists show how microenvironment signals encourage growth of pancreatic tumors

Just as an invasive weed might need nutrient-rich soil and water to grow, many cancers rely on the right surroundings in the body to thrive. [More]
Type 1 diabetes patients show distinct signs of gut inflammation, study reveals

Type 1 diabetes patients show distinct signs of gut inflammation, study reveals

People with Type 1 diabetes exhibit inflammation in the digestive tract and gut bacteria¬—a pattern that differs from individuals who do not have diabetes or those who have celiac disease, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Study examines differences in liver damage between binge drinkers and heavy drinkers

Study examines differences in liver damage between binge drinkers and heavy drinkers

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) occurs on a spectrum of severity. The majority of people who drink excessively develop a fatty liver, which though often symptom free, can progress to a state of inflammation, fibrosis, and cell death that can be fatal. [More]
UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists have turned to amphibian sources -- specifically frogs and tadpoles -- to help shed light on how early stressors in the womb and shortly after birth may play a part in the onset of adult diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Scientists harness rabies viruses for assessing connectivity of nerve cell transplants

Scientists harness rabies viruses for assessing connectivity of nerve cell transplants

Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bonn have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. [More]
Endogenous peptide inhibits atherosclerosis by reducing cholesterol levels

Endogenous peptide inhibits atherosclerosis by reducing cholesterol levels

Cells of the innate immune system that play an important role in development of atherosclerosis contain a protein that reduces levels of cholesterol in mice - and thus helps to inhibit or mitigate the disease. [More]
Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which the stress hormone FGF21 keeps digestive enzymes from damaging the pancreas. [More]
Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Obesity has been linked to "letter" changes at many different sites in the genome, yet these differences do not fully explain the variation in people's body mass index (BMI) or why some overweight people develop health complications while others don't. [More]
New review discusses about care for pediatric liver transplant recipients

New review discusses about care for pediatric liver transplant recipients

A new review discusses important consideration when caring for children who have received liver transplants. [More]
Study provides insights into CPEB4 gene and fatty liver disease

Study provides insights into CPEB4 gene and fatty liver disease

This condition generally leads to chronic inflammation (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis), which can trigger fibrosis, cirrhosis and ultimately liver cancer. This study on the basic biology of the liver paves the way to examine therapeutic strategies to fight and prevent fatty liver disease. [More]
Epigenetic changes drive successful metastases of pancreatic cancer cells

Epigenetic changes drive successful metastases of pancreatic cancer cells

A multicenter team of researchers reports that a full genomic analysis of tumor samples from a small number of people who died of pancreatic cancer suggests that chemical changes to DNA that do not affect the DNA sequence itself yet control how it operates confer survival advantages on subsets of pancreatic cancer cells. [More]
Every meal triggers short-term inflammatory responses in healthy individuals

Every meal triggers short-term inflammatory responses in healthy individuals

When we eat, we do not just take in nutrients - we also consume a significant quantity of bacteria. The body is faced with the challenge of simultaneously distributing the ingested glucose and fighting these bacteria. [More]
Researchers explore how metastatic pancreatic cancer gets ‘reprogrammed’ for optimal malignancy

Researchers explore how metastatic pancreatic cancer gets ‘reprogrammed’ for optimal malignancy

Metastatic pancreatic cancer -- cancer that has spread from the pancreas to other tissues and is responsible for most patient deaths -- changes its metabolism and is "reprogrammed" for optimal malignancy, according to new findings reported Jan. 16 in Nature Genetics. [More]
Spectroscopy and computer help RUB scientists gain new insights into workings of protein switches

Spectroscopy and computer help RUB scientists gain new insights into workings of protein switches

Using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. [More]
Researchers discover underlying cause for formation of granulomas

Researchers discover underlying cause for formation of granulomas

Granulomas are tissue nodules of immune cells that occur in diseases such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis and can damage many organs. [More]
Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Research by Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero has found that a balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet that includes intermittent fasting not only achieves long-term weight loss, but also helps release toxins in the form of PCBs from the body fat stores, in addition to enhancing heart health and reducing oxidative stress. [More]
Ecologists reveal reasons for regional differences in Lyme disease prevalence

Ecologists reveal reasons for regional differences in Lyme disease prevalence

The ticks that transmit Lyme disease to people die of dehydration when exposed to a combination of high temperature and lowered humidity, a new USGS-led study has found. [More]
Study: Four out of five endocrinologists have never received formal training on transgender care

Study: Four out of five endocrinologists have never received formal training on transgender care

Four out of five physicians who specialize in treating hormone health conditions have never received formal training on care for transgender individuals, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
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