Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
BetterYou's revolutionary daily oral vitamin spray could boost vitamin D levels in children with epilepsy

BetterYou's revolutionary daily oral vitamin spray could boost vitamin D levels in children with epilepsy

A revolutionary daily oral vitamin spray by health pioneers BetterYou can boost vitamin D levels in deficient children, particularly common in those with epilepsy. [More]
Incidence and severity emerging CVD risk factors may differ between genders

Incidence and severity emerging CVD risk factors may differ between genders

The incidence and severity of both traditional and emerging cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors as well as the response to treatment may differ between genders. In this narrative review, several emerging CVD risk factors (i.e. inflammatory and haemostatic markers, endothelial dysfunction, homocysteine, lipid disorders, microalbuminuria/proteinuria, coronary artery calcium score, arterial stiffness, periodontitis, inflammatory bowel syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, impaired glucose metabolism, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) are discussed in the context of gender differences. [More]
New method could help scientists conduct in-depth research on malignant tumors in cancer patients

New method could help scientists conduct in-depth research on malignant tumors in cancer patients

Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern have pioneered a new method for conducting in-depth research on malignant tumors in patients, in the process discovering new complexities underlying cancer biology and overturning a nearly century-old perception about cancer metabolism. [More]
BMPR2 mutations affect outcomes of PAH patients

BMPR2 mutations affect outcomes of PAH patients

Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II gene affect not only the risk of developing pulmonary arterial hypertension but also the severity and outcomes of the disease, shows a meta-analysis of individual patient data. [More]
Diffusion tensor imaging ‘should be routine’ in SVD assessment

Diffusion tensor imaging ‘should be routine’ in SVD assessment

Gait speed and microstructural brain damage may be the best indicators of mortality risk in patients with small vessel disease, say researchers. [More]
Duke researchers identify promising target for renal cell carcinomas

Duke researchers identify promising target for renal cell carcinomas

All cells need nutrients, but cancer cells are notoriously power hungry. As a result, cancer cells must alter their metabolism to provide the additional fuel needed for them to survive, grow and spread. [More]
Scientists explore how antidepressants affect fetuses during pregnancy

Scientists explore how antidepressants affect fetuses during pregnancy

Depression is a serious issue for expecting mothers. Left untreated, depression could have implications for a fetus's health. But treating the disease during pregnancy may carry health risks for the developing fetus, which makes an expecting mother's decision whether to take medication a very difficult one. [More]
Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height is largely genetically determined, but in recent decades the height of children and adults has steadily increased throughout the world: In adulthood the children are almost always significantly taller than their parents. [More]
New gene cut-and-paste methods help correct disease-causing mutation in animal model

New gene cut-and-paste methods help correct disease-causing mutation in animal model

For the first time, researchers have treated an animal model of a genetic disorder using a viral vector to deliver genome-editing components in which the disease- causing mutation has been corrected. [More]
Continuing weight loss from midlife predicts MCI risk

Continuing weight loss from midlife predicts MCI risk

Increasing weight loss from middle age through the later stages of life may be an indicator of mild cognitive impairment, suggest study findings. [More]
Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

As the study shows, a high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in the offspring. These changes affect metabolic pathways regulated by the gut hormone GIP, whereby the adult offspring are more susceptible to obesity and insulin resistance, the precursor to type 2 diabetes. Similar mechanisms cannot be ruled out in humans, according to Pfeiffer. [More]
Irregular sleep schedules linked to adverse metabolic health in midlife women

Irregular sleep schedules linked to adverse metabolic health in midlife women

A new study suggests that frequent shifts in sleep timing may be related to adverse metabolic health among non-shift working, midlife women. [More]
Study provides vital information about mechanisms governing DNA repair

Study provides vital information about mechanisms governing DNA repair

DNA damage can lead to gene inactivation or deregulation and cause various diseases such as cancer; however, many DNA repair mechanisms allow cells to survive against such damage. A study lead by Antoine Simoneau of the laboratory of Dr. Hugo Wurtele, a researcher in immunology-oncology at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital (CIUSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal) and professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, and recently published in the prestigious journal Nucleic Acids Research, provides valuable information about certain mechanisms governing DNA repair. [More]
FDA-approved blood pressure drug reduces cell damage linked to Alzheimer's disease

FDA-approved blood pressure drug reduces cell damage linked to Alzheimer's disease

In laboratory neuronal cultures, an FDA-approved drug used to treat high blood pressure reduced cell damage often linked to Alzheimer's disease, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health. [More]
New SBP research may lead to novel approach to treat heart failure

New SBP research may lead to novel approach to treat heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
CNIO team uses network theory to build and study first epigenetic communication network

CNIO team uses network theory to build and study first epigenetic communication network

One of the big questions for which there is still no clear answer in biology is how, based on the four universal letters that make up DNA, it is possible to generate such different organisms as a fly or a human, or the different organs and tissues they comprise. In recent years, researchers have discovered that the system is much more complicated than was originally thought. [More]
Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers reveal how CDK4/6-inhibitors alter pancreatic cancer cell metabolism

UT Southwestern researchers reveal how CDK4/6-inhibitors alter pancreatic cancer cell metabolism

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found that cancer drugs known as CDK4/6-inhibitors alter the metabolism of pancreatic cancer cells, revealing a biologic vulnerability that could be exploited for therapeutic gain. [More]
IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

Despite continuing reports that methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy can lead to behavioral and emotional problems in children, pregnant women continue to abuse the illicit drug. Nearly one-fourth of pregnant women seeking treatment at federal facilities were methamphetamine users. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for Humulin R U-500 KwikPen

Lilly receives FDA approval for Humulin R U-500 KwikPen

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Eli Lilly and Company's Humulin R U-500 KwikPen(insulin human injection) 500 units/mL, a pre-filled device containing Humulin R U-500, a highly concentrated formulation of insulin. [More]
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