Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
University of Michigan, Biomed Central to publish new journal, Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology

University of Michigan, Biomed Central to publish new journal, Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology

BioMed Central and the University of Michigan are pleased to announce an agreement to publish a new open access journal, Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology, which is now open for submissions and will begin publishing in the first quarter of 2015. [More]
Study shows healthy fat in olive oil may revive a failing heart

Study shows healthy fat in olive oil may revive a failing heart

Oleate, a common dietary fat found in olive oil, restored proper metabolism of fuel in heart cells in an animal model of heart failure. [More]
West Virginia University receives NIH award as part of BRAIN initiative

West Virginia University receives NIH award as part of BRAIN initiative

In its first wave of funding awards, a new presidential project aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain has pledged its support to a group of researchers led by West Virginia University faculty working to change the future of brain imaging. [More]
Research performed in anemic mice shows acetate stimulates the formation of red blood cells

Research performed in anemic mice shows acetate stimulates the formation of red blood cells

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers seeking novel treatments for anemia found that giving acetate, the major component of household vinegar, to anemic mice stimulated the formation of new red blood cells. [More]
Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

The number of days an expectant mother was deprived of electricity during Quebec's Ice Storm (1998) predicts the epigenetic profile of her child, a new study finds. [More]
More predictive model for early stage drug screening of cancer therapeutics introduced in new application note

More predictive model for early stage drug screening of cancer therapeutics introduced in new application note

A new application note** from AMSBIO, previously presented at both the 2014 Beatson International Cancer conference and the ELRIG Drug Discovery 2014 meeting in Manchester UK, introduces a more predictive and realistic model for early stage drug screening of cancer therapeutics. [More]
TSRI study points way to potential therapies for hereditary spastic paraplegia

TSRI study points way to potential therapies for hereditary spastic paraplegia

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that a gene mutation linked to hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disabling neurological disorder, interferes with the normal breakdown of triglyceride fat molecules in the brain. The TSRI researchers found large droplets of triglycerides within the neurons of mice modeling the disease. [More]
Research: Gut bacteria may cause animals to gain weight

Research: Gut bacteria may cause animals to gain weight

A species of gut bacteria called Clostridium ramosum, coupled with a high-fat diet, may cause animals to gain weight. The work is published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Repeated exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics in the first two years of life is associated with early childhood obesity, say researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in a retrospective study based on data from electronic health records from the extensive CHOP Care Network. [More]
Study provides support for new understanding of the immune system

Study provides support for new understanding of the immune system

A study published in the journal Science provides support for a new-and still controversial-understanding of the immune system. The research was conducted by collaborators in the U.S. and Europe, including Robert Cramer, PhD, an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at the Geisel School of Medicine and member of the Dartmouth Lung Biology Center, and Kelly Shepherdson, PhD, at the time a graduate student in Cramer's lab. [More]
NeuroEM begins study to test Transcranial Electromagnetic Treatment in aged primates

NeuroEM begins study to test Transcranial Electromagnetic Treatment in aged primates

NeuroEM Therapeutics, Inc., a Phoenix-based medical device R&D company, announced today that it has begun a study with a premiere research university to test its Transcranial Electromagnetic Treatment (TEMT) in aged primates. [More]
More reliable cardiorespiratory fitness data can be obtained using lean mass proportional measures

More reliable cardiorespiratory fitness data can be obtained using lean mass proportional measures

A recent study by the University of Eastern Finland shows that scaling maximal oxygen uptake and maximal workload by body weight confounds measures of cardiorespiratory fitness. It has been a common practice in exercise testing to scale the results by body weight and, according to researchers, this practice should be abandoned. More reliable data on cardiorespiratory fitness can be observed by using lean mass proportional measures. [More]
Pitt researchers awarded new $5.8 million NIH grant to develop microfluidic 3D liver model system

Pitt researchers awarded new $5.8 million NIH grant to develop microfluidic 3D liver model system

With a new $5.8 million, three-year award from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will further develop a state-of-the-art, microfluidic 3D model system that mimics structure and function of the liver to better predict organ physiology, assess drug toxicity and build disease models. [More]
Absence of thyroid hormone during development can cause congenital deafness

Absence of thyroid hormone during development can cause congenital deafness

Fatigue, weight gain, chills, hair loss, anxiety, excessive perspiration - these symptoms are a few of the signs that the thyroid gland, which regulates the body's heart rate and plays a crucial role in its metabolism, has gone haywire. [More]
Rosuvastatin promotes bone growth in mice with achondroplasia symptoms

Rosuvastatin promotes bone growth in mice with achondroplasia symptoms

Skeletal dysplasia is a group of rare diseases that afflict skeletal growth through abnormalities in bone and cartilage. Its onset hits at the fetal stage and is caused by genetic mutations. [More]
Researchers discover new molecular mechanism that plays crucial role in age-dependent diabetes

Researchers discover new molecular mechanism that plays crucial role in age-dependent diabetes

Ageing of insulin-secreting cells is coupled to a progressive decline in signal transduction and insulin release, according to a recent study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. [More]
Disrupting cancer regulator MYC: an interview with Professor Kim Janda

Disrupting cancer regulator MYC: an interview with Professor Kim Janda

MYC is an oncogenic member of the basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor family. In its monomeric form, MYC’s tertiary structure is intrinsically disordered and the protein is transcriptionally inactive. [More]
Zebrafish may hold key to unlocking a leading cause of respiratory diseases

Zebrafish may hold key to unlocking a leading cause of respiratory diseases

A small freshwater fish found in many tropical aquariums may hold the key to unlocking one of the leading causes of respiratory diseases in humans. [More]
Dairy products contribute to overall metabolic health

Dairy products contribute to overall metabolic health

Dairy is considered part of a healthy diet and dietary guidelines recommend the daily consumption of 2-4 portions of milk-based products such as milk, yogurt, cheese, cream and butter. [More]
Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites

Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites

Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit a more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites, which is associated with reduced risk for breast cancer, compared to women with less microbial variation, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). [More]