Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
Researchers uncover new clues about role of glucosamine in early embryonic development

Researchers uncover new clues about role of glucosamine in early embryonic development

Most pregnant women with well-controlled diabetes give birth to healthy children. But their babies run much higher risks of birth defects than babies born to women without diabetes, because very early in embryonic development, the babies are exposed to higher levels of glucose in maternal blood. [More]
HCC predictors identified for chronic HBV patients with newly diagnosed cirrhosis

HCC predictors identified for chronic HBV patients with newly diagnosed cirrhosis

In patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection who have been newly diagnosed with cirrhosis, the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development can be ascertained using several clinical and molecular factors, study findings indicate. [More]
Hops show promise in reducing breast cancer risk

Hops show promise in reducing breast cancer risk

Hops, the flower cones used in beer-making, are also found in dietary supplements designed to help treat post-menopausal symptoms and other conditions. Scientists are now investigating whether an extract from the plant could also help fend off breast cancer. [More]
Microbial community less stable and less diverse in antibiotic-treated children

Microbial community less stable and less diverse in antibiotic-treated children

The DIABIMMUNE project followed the development of 39 Finnish infants from birth to the age of three. Half of the children received 9-15 antibiotic treatments during the research period, and the other half did not receive any such treatments. [More]
SORLA protein makes fat cells oversensitive to insulin

SORLA protein makes fat cells oversensitive to insulin

SORLA is a protein that influences the balance of metabolic processes in adipose tissue, a particular form of fat. Too much of it makes fat cells overly sensitive to insulin, which leads them to break down less fat. SORLA was previously known for its protective role in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study shows Alzheimer's disease can lead to diabetes

Study shows Alzheimer's disease can lead to diabetes

Drugs used to treat diabetes could also be used to treat Alzheimer's disease, and vice versa, according to new research from the University of Aberdeen. [More]
Clinical trial finds pioglitazone drug safe and effective for NASH patients

Clinical trial finds pioglitazone drug safe and effective for NASH patients

Researchers have found that an existing diabetes drug can be used to halt progression of another disease that is a leading cause of liver transplants. [More]
Low mammographic breast density linked to worse prognosis in breast cancer patients

Low mammographic breast density linked to worse prognosis in breast cancer patients

Even though dense breast tissue is a risk factor for breast cancer, very low mammographic breast density is associated with a worse prognosis in breast cancer patients. [More]
Highly efficient bacterial agent could improve treatment of Wilson disease

Highly efficient bacterial agent could improve treatment of Wilson disease

In the 'Journal of Clinical Investigation', scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München describe a small peptide that very efficiently binds excess copper from liver cells. This molecule comes from a bacterium's bag of tricks and could be suitable for treating Wilson disease. [More]
Study links brain chemistry and fluid intelligence in living humans

Study links brain chemistry and fluid intelligence in living humans

A new study begins to clarify how brain structure and chemistry give rise to specific aspects of "fluid intelligence," the ability to adapt to new situations and solve problems one has never encountered before. [More]
TUM researchers uncover molecular mechanism of thalidomide

TUM researchers uncover molecular mechanism of thalidomide

In the 1950s, thalidomide (Contergan) was prescribed as a sedative drug to pregnant women, resulting in a great number of infants with serious malformations. Up to now, the reasons for these disastrous birth defects have remained unclear. [More]
IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

The International Osteoporosis Foundation is calling on doctors in the Asia-Pacific region to prepare for an immense rise in the number of elderly people suffering broken bones as a result of osteoporosis. [More]
Delivery mode, exposure to antibiotics and feeding method linked to change in baby's microbial communities

Delivery mode, exposure to antibiotics and feeding method linked to change in baby's microbial communities

Birth by C-section, exposure to antibiotics and formula feeding slow the development and decrease the diversity of a baby's microbes through the first year of life. That is the finding of a study led by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and published June 15 in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Mother's obesity can impair health of future generations

Mother's obesity can impair health of future generations

New research suggests that mothers who eat high-fat, high-sugar diets can predispose multiple generations to metabolic problems, even if their offspring consume healthy diets. [More]
Mice study highlights vital role of liver in balancing fats and sugars

Mice study highlights vital role of liver in balancing fats and sugars

Sugar in the form of blood glucose provides essential energy for cells. When its usual dietary source — carbohydrates — is scarce, the liver can produce it with the aid of fat. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
Simple blood test could help diagnose endometriosis

Simple blood test could help diagnose endometriosis

Endometriosis is a chronic, often painful disease affecting up to 10 percent of women of reproductive age in the U.S. How it develops is not well understood, and detecting it with certainty requires surgery. [More]
Potential non-invasive screening biomarker for SSc-PAH

Potential non-invasive screening biomarker for SSc-PAH

Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine may be an effective non-invasive screening biomarker for systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension, study findings indicate. [More]
Diet modification could help improve quality of life in women with ovarian cancer

Diet modification could help improve quality of life in women with ovarian cancer

New research conducted at the University of Alabama at Birmingham has shown that a particular type of diet could help women with ovarian cancer to lose weight and improve their quality of life and cancer-related measures. [More]
CD38 enzyme linked to age-related metabolic decline

CD38 enzyme linked to age-related metabolic decline

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified the enzyme, called CD38, that is responsible for the decrease in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) during aging, a process that is associated with age-related metabolic decline. [More]
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