Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
New study shows 92% of measured restaurant meals exceed calorie requirements

New study shows 92% of measured restaurant meals exceed calorie requirements

Meals consumed at fast-food restaurants are often seen as one of the biggest contributors to the obesity epidemic. But according to a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 92 percent of 364 measured restaurant meals from both large-chain and non-chain (local) restaurants exceeded recommended calorie requirements for a single meal. [More]
Study findings may help explain why risk of stroke changes after menopause

Study findings may help explain why risk of stroke changes after menopause

Risk of stroke in women may come down to a compound the body produces from estrogen known as 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME). Furthermore, the compound's therapeutic potential may extend beyond treating stroke in women to healing brain injuries in men, a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism reports. [More]
Immune killer cells use microptosis pathway to kill intracellular parasites

Immune killer cells use microptosis pathway to kill intracellular parasites

The immune system's killer cells deliver a tightly controlled, 3-phase knockout punch that kills intracellular parasites through a novel pathway that an international team led by researchers from the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine (PCMM) at Boston Children's Hospital have named "microptosis." [More]
Simple blood test could help eliminate B12 deficiencies among older adults in long-term care homes

Simple blood test could help eliminate B12 deficiencies among older adults in long-term care homes

A high proportion of older adults entering long-term care homes in Ontario are B12 deficient, with more developing deficiencies over the course of their first year in residence, according to research from the University of Waterloo. There is a connection between B12 deficiency and several serious health conditions. [More]
Estrogen helps women fight flu virus better than men

Estrogen helps women fight flu virus better than men

Estrogen dramatically reduced the amount of flu virus that replicated in infected cells from women but not from men, a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows. [More]
Researchers identify protein that could protect against toxic degeneration of cells in ALS

Researchers identify protein that could protect against toxic degeneration of cells in ALS

J. Gavin Daigle, a PhD candidate at the LSU Health New Orleans School of Graduate Studies, is the first author of a paper whose findings reveal another piece of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) puzzle. [More]
Phthalate DEHP could lead to weight gain

Phthalate DEHP could lead to weight gain

In cooperation with the Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases at the University of Leipzig and the University Hospital Leipzig, researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research have now published a study in the PLOS ONE journal showing that the phthalate DEHP leads to weight gain and revealed the metabolic processes involved. [More]
MGH researchers find how metformin drug prevents progression of pancreatic cancer

MGH researchers find how metformin drug prevents progression of pancreatic cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may have uncovered a novel mechanism behind the ability of the diabetes drug metformin to inhibit the progression of pancreatic cancer. [More]
Help beat the blues this Monday with a B12 Boost

Help beat the blues this Monday with a B12 Boost

Boost your mood and energy levels this Blue Monday (18 January) by topping up your vitamin B12, say natural health pioneers BetterYou. [More]
New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

Buck Institute faculty Judith Campisi, PhD, says age researchers need to stop thinking of cellular senescence, now accepted as an important driver of aging, as a single phenotype that stems from genotoxic stress. Research from her lab reveals that cellular senescence, a process whereby cells permanently lose the ability to divide, is also induced by signaling from dysfunctional mitochondria - and that the arrested cells secrete a distinctly different "stew" of biologically active factors in a process unrelated to the damaging free radicals that are created in mitochondria as part of oxygen metabolism. [More]
CPMC study discovers six genes that affect sleep duration

CPMC study discovers six genes that affect sleep duration

The Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative, a research initiative exploring the utility of genetic information in the clinical setting, has published a study and identified six noteworthy genes that affect human sleep duration. [More]
NIH-funded analysis identifies three genes that contribute to most common form of glaucoma

NIH-funded analysis identifies three genes that contribute to most common form of glaucoma

An analysis funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, has identified three genes that contribute to the most common type of glaucoma. The study increases the total number of such genes to 15. [More]
Study opens new door on the causes of vision issues in astronauts

Study opens new door on the causes of vision issues in astronauts

Just when you think you've seen it all, our eyes look to be victims of a low-gravity environments, too. According to new research published in the January 2016 issue of The FASEB Journal, two significant genetic differences in enzymes that direct the one-carbon pathway of metabolism can affect astronaut vision. [More]
Excess folic acid intake causes lowered immune function in aged mice

Excess folic acid intake causes lowered immune function in aged mice

Previous studies have shown an association between high folic acid intake and a reduction in the immune system defenses needed to fight viral infections and cancer. In a new study in mice published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University set out to determine if excess folic acid intake caused adverse changes in the immune system. [More]
UTA researchers map out chemical mechanism of key enzyme found in autism, Alzheimer's and Down syndrome

UTA researchers map out chemical mechanism of key enzyme found in autism, Alzheimer's and Down syndrome

Biochemists at The University of Texas at Arlington are mapping the catalytic processes of sulfur-oxidizing enzymes to improve understanding of the chemical imbalances found in patients with autism, Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. [More]
Research shows link between lead exposure and ADHD symptoms in children with HFE C282Y gene mutation

Research shows link between lead exposure and ADHD symptoms in children with HFE C282Y gene mutation

Exposure to small amounts of lead may contribute to ADHD symptoms in children who have a particular gene mutation, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Oxygen sensor PHD1 identified as potential target for treatment of ischemic stroke

Oxygen sensor PHD1 identified as potential target for treatment of ischemic stroke

Scientists at VIB and KU Leuven have identified the oxygen sensor PHD1 as a potential target for the treatment of brain infarction (ischemic stroke). Despite (minor) improvements in stroke treatment, stroke remains the fourth leading cause of death and the most common reason of severe disability. [More]
Eliminating the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer

Eliminating the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer

Researchers have found the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer and believe they could one day reprogram them to remain responsive to cancer treatment, a new study has found. [More]
Common antibiotics can promote C. diff infections by killing off bile acid-altering microbes

Common antibiotics can promote C. diff infections by killing off bile acid-altering microbes

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of Michigan finds that bile acids which are altered by bacteria normally living in the large intestine inhibit the growth of Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. C. diff is a harmful bacterium that can cause painful and sometimes fatal infections. [More]
UF researchers reveal link between chronic stress and fat metabolism

UF researchers reveal link between chronic stress and fat metabolism

In cell and mouse model experiments, University of Florida Health researchers have discovered that chronic stress stimulates production of betatrophin, a protein that then goes on to inhibit an enzyme involved in fat metabolism. [More]
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