Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
Second-hand smoke exposures before conception affect fetal brain development

Second-hand smoke exposures before conception affect fetal brain development

Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke -- even before conception -- appears to have a lingering impact that can later impair the brain development of a fetus, researchers at Duke Health report. [More]
How does the brain control appetite?

How does the brain control appetite?

Energy balance between energy intake and expenditure in our bodies is important for maintaining energy homeostasis to keep our bodies functioning properly. The appetite determines how much we eat, the energy intake, by communication between the brain and body. [More]
Review shows how nanocarriers can solve problems with drug delivery in ocular tissues

Review shows how nanocarriers can solve problems with drug delivery in ocular tissues

Most ophthalmic diseases are usually treated with topically administered drug formulations (e.g. eye drops). [More]
Commercial program that offers diet and exercise leads to greater improvements in metabolic syndrome

Commercial program that offers diet and exercise leads to greater improvements in metabolic syndrome

If losing weight is on your list of New Year resolutions, be sure to include both diet and exercise. [More]
AMSBIO offers extensive products to study metabolic pathways in cells

AMSBIO offers extensive products to study metabolic pathways in cells

AMSBIO offers an extensive range of proteins, antibodies, assays and kits covering every single target of major cellular metabolic pathways including folate metabolism, pyruvate metabolism (with and without oxygen), citrate metabolism, O2 consumption and toxicity, oxidative stress and fatty acid oxygen measurement. [More]
Pittcon 2017: Topics for Conferee Networking sessions announced

Pittcon 2017: Topics for Conferee Networking sessions announced

The Pittcon Organizing Committee has recently released the topics for Conferee Networking during Pittcon 2017, which will be in Chicago, Illinois, March 5-9. [More]
Modest increase in dietary zinc reduces oxidative stress and damage to DNA, study shows

Modest increase in dietary zinc reduces oxidative stress and damage to DNA, study shows

A new study by researchers from the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Research Institute shows that a modest 4 milligrams of extra zinc a day in the diet can have a profound, positive impact on cellular health that helps fight infections and diseases. [More]
AAV-based gene therapy to treat liver disorders advances into human testing

AAV-based gene therapy to treat liver disorders advances into human testing

Liver-directed gene therapy delivered using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to treat diseases such as hemophilia have advanced into human testing. [More]
Study examines how ApoE gene may function differently in infectious environment

Study examines how ApoE gene may function differently in infectious environment

You've likely heard about being in the right place at the wrong time, but what about having the right genes in the wrong environment? In other words, could a genetic mutation (or allele) that puts populations at risk for illnesses in one environmental setting manifest itself in positive ways in a different setting? [More]
Two research studies on new molecules could potentially treat Alzheimer's disease

Two research studies on new molecules could potentially treat Alzheimer's disease

This year, results have been published of two significant research studies about molecules that could potentially treat Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Physical inactivity in obese mice linked to dopamine signaling defects

Physical inactivity in obese mice linked to dopamine signaling defects

Starting a regular program at the gym is a common New Year's resolution, but it's one that most people are unable to stick with for very long. [More]
Myc genes play key role in self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells

Myc genes play key role in self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells

Sperm are constantly replenished in the adult male body. Understanding the workings of stem cells responsible for this replenishment is expected to shed light on why male fertility diminishes with age, and possibly lead to new treatments for infertility. [More]
Research reveals how microbial context during infectious disease can compromise antibiotic therapy

Research reveals how microbial context during infectious disease can compromise antibiotic therapy

Bacteria that are susceptible to antibiotics can survive when enough resistant cells around them are expressing an antibiotic-deactivating factor. [More]
FDA grants permission to assess safety of investigational drug for Alzheimer's disease in humans

FDA grants permission to assess safety of investigational drug for Alzheimer's disease in humans

Vanderbilt University scientists have received notification from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that testing in humans may proceed for an investigational new drug for Alzheimer's disease after more than 10 years of research by scientists at Vanderbilt University and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. [More]
Novel murine model helps shed light on mechanisms involved in reversible infantile liver failure

Novel murine model helps shed light on mechanisms involved in reversible infantile liver failure

Reversible infantile liver failure (RILF) is a heritable mitochondrial condition that causes severe liver dysfunction in infancy, but those who survive the acute stage typically recover and have no further problems. [More]
New research points to lncRNA's key role in helping control cellular processes

New research points to lncRNA's key role in helping control cellular processes

Scientific research over the past decade has concentrated almost exclusively on the 2 percent of the genome's protein coding regions, virtually ignoring the other 98 percent, a vast universe of non-coding genetic material previously dismissed as nothing more than 'junk.' [More]
New discovery could lead to effective drugs to prevent excessive lymphatic growth in cancer

New discovery could lead to effective drugs to prevent excessive lymphatic growth in cancer

Cancer cells spread to other sites in the body through promoting the growth of new 'roads' to travel on. [More]
Making muscles burn more fat and less glucose could cause diabetes, say researchers

Making muscles burn more fat and less glucose could cause diabetes, say researchers

Making muscles burn more fat and less glucose can increase exercise endurance, but could simultaneously cause diabetes, says a team of scientists from Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions. [More]
High BMI leads to epigenetic changes, study shows

High BMI leads to epigenetic changes, study shows

The extra pounds you gain during the holidays will not only show up on your hips but will also affect your DNA. [More]
Scientists discover link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of subthalamic nucleus

Scientists discover link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of subthalamic nucleus

Northwestern Medicine scientists identified a link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of the subthalamic nucleus, a component of the basal ganglia, a group of brain structures critical for movement and impulse control. [More]
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