Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
Metabolon announces launch of fourth-generation metabolomics platform

Metabolon announces launch of fourth-generation metabolomics platform

Metabolon, Inc., a leader in metabolomics-driven biomarker discovery, announced today the launch of DiscoveryHD4, the company's fourth-generation metabolomics platform. [More]

Findings may help develop targeted drugs to fight cancer, neurodegenerative diseases

The molecular details of how zinc, an essential trace element of human metabolism, interacts with the enzyme caspase-3, which is central to apoptosis or cell death, have been elucidated in a new study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University. The study is featured on the cover of the April issue of the journal Angewandte Chemie's International Edition. [More]

Drinking two or more cups of coffee each day reduces risk of death from liver cirrhosis by 66%

New research reveals that consuming two or more cups of coffee each day reduces the risk of death from liver cirrhosis by 66%, specifically cirrhosis caused by non-viral hepatitis. Findings in Hepatology, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that tea, fruit juice, and soft drink consumption are not linked to cirrhosis mortality risk. As with previous studies heavy alcohol use was found to increase risk of death from cirrhosis. [More]

Thorne Research launches NiaCel that supports endurance, energy and healthy aging

Thorne Research today announced the launch of NiaCelâ„¢, an innovative nutritional supplement that supports endurance, energy, and healthy aging. [More]
Expert in gene therapy joins The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Expert in gene therapy joins The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Beverly L. Davidson, Ph.D., a nationally prominent expert in gene therapy, is joining The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) today. [More]
Study of diet and aging in monkeys shows significant reduction in mortality

Study of diet and aging in monkeys shows significant reduction in mortality

The latest results from a 25-year study of diet and aging in monkeys shows a significant reduction in mortality and in age-associated diseases among those with calorie-restricted diets. [More]
Study: Obesity causes changes in colon that may lead to colorectal cancer

Study: Obesity causes changes in colon that may lead to colorectal cancer

Obesity, rather than diet, causes changes in the colon that may lead to colorectal cancer, according to a study in mice by the National Institutes of Health. The finding bolsters the recommendation that calorie control and frequent exercise are not only key to a healthy lifestyle, but a strategy to lower the risk for colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. [More]
Study shows link between breast-feeding and risk of child developing obesity

Study shows link between breast-feeding and risk of child developing obesity

Many studies have focused on the influence of breast-feeding on child health. From analysis of data from the ELANCE cohort, Marie Fran-oise Rolland-Cachera, former researcher at Inserm and her co-workers in the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN) have shown that breast-feeding has a protective effect on the risk of obesity at 20 years of age. [More]

FORMA Therapeutics signs second strategic collaboration and option agreement with Celgene

FORMA Therapeutics, an innovative R&D organization in pursuit of ground-breaking medicines in oncology and other therapeutic areas, today announced a second strategic collaboration and option agreement with Celgene Corporation, a leader in addressing high unmet medical needs. [More]
New research implicates that RNA processing is central to ALS disease process

New research implicates that RNA processing is central to ALS disease process

In work supported by The ALS Association, researchers have discovered a new ALS-causing gene and have linked its function to that of another prominent disease gene. The study was published in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
New textbook provides facts and dispels myths on sugar/fructose consumption

New textbook provides facts and dispels myths on sugar/fructose consumption

A new textbook, Fructose, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Sucrose and Health, published this month by Springer Press, under their Humana Press imprint, provides one of the most comprehensive scientific analyses on the closely-watched issue of caloric sweetener consumption. [More]

Prognostic study shows genetic polymorphisms modify bladder cancer recurrence and survival

While patients diagnosed with bladder cancer usually face a favorable prognosis, many experience recurrence after treatment. Because frequent, painful screenings are needed to identify recurrences, the ablility to identify patients at high risk of recurrent cancer could help to improve quality of life for all bladder cancer patients. [More]
Bariatric surgery patients report better quality of life

Bariatric surgery patients report better quality of life

A study by Cleveland Clinic researchers shows bariatric surgery is a highly effective and durable treatment for type 2 diabetes in obese patients, enabling nearly all surgical patients to be free of insulin and many to be free of all diabetic medications three years after surgery. [More]
Mechanical circulatory assist device may have untapped potential in heart surgery patients, say physicians

Mechanical circulatory assist device may have untapped potential in heart surgery patients, say physicians

The most frequently used mechanical circulatory assist device in the world may have untapped potential, physicians say. [More]

Carb breakdown gene linked to obesity, researchers find

Researchers at King's College London and Imperial College London have discovered that people with fewer copies of a gene coding for a carb-digesting enzyme may be at higher risk of obesity. The findings, published in Nature Genetics, suggest that dietary advice may need to be more tailored to an individual's digestive system, based on whether they have the genetic predisposition and necessary enzymes to digest different foods. [More]
New high-risk cancer causing mutation identified for melanoma development

New high-risk cancer causing mutation identified for melanoma development

Researchers have discovered that mutations in a specific gene are responsible for a hereditary form of melanoma. [More]
Study links effect of gastric bypass surgery on glucose metabolism and islet function in hypoglycemia patients

Study links effect of gastric bypass surgery on glucose metabolism and islet function in hypoglycemia patients

University of Cincinnati (UC) researchers have discovered that altered islet cell function and reduced insulin clearance contribute to excessive post-meal insulin response in patients experiencing low blood sugar symptoms (hypoglycemia) following gastric bypass surgery. [More]

Certain inherited DNA sequences may affect prognosis of bladder cancer patients

While patients diagnosed with bladder cancer usually face a favorable prognosis, many experience recurrence after treatment. Because frequent, painful screenings are needed to identify recurrences, the ablility to identify patients at high risk of recurrent cancer could help to improve quality of life for all bladder cancer patients. [More]
UT Southwestern professor honored with 2014 Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research

UT Southwestern professor honored with 2014 Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research

Dr. Benjamin P. Tu, associate professor of biochemistry at UT Southwestern Medical Center, was honored today with the 2014 Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research. Dr. Tu was recognized for innovative studies of once-unappreciated molecules that may someday improve treatments for cancer or conditions associated with aging. [More]

Study: Overweight and obese teenagers have higher risk of death before age 50

Although people live longer today than they did 50 years ago, people who were overweight and obese as teenagers aren't experiencing the same gains as other segments of the population, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). [More]