Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
Researchers see benefit from behavioral weight loss program designed to curb food addiction

Researchers see benefit from behavioral weight loss program designed to curb food addiction

It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research by scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and at Massachusetts General Hospital. [More]
BIOCRATES launches first-ever bile acids kit based on targeted metabolite quantitation

BIOCRATES launches first-ever bile acids kit based on targeted metabolite quantitation

Austrian BIOCRATES Life Sciences AG, internationally renowned developer and marketer of innovative targeted metabolomics solutions, further expands its range of metabolomics-based kits with the addition of its assay for the determination of endogenous bile acids, allowing a panel of up to 19 analytes to be simultaneously quantitated from a single 10 µL sample of human or mouse plasma. [More]
Bariatric surgery can provide valuable benefits to the brain

Bariatric surgery can provide valuable benefits to the brain

At bariatric facilities like Dr. Feiz and Associates, the life-changing benefits of bariatric surgery, including reduced risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and endocrine disorders are well established. [More]
Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

The failing in the work of nerve cells: An international team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Chris Meisinger from the Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Freiburg has discovered how Alzheimer's disease damages mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell. [More]
InnoPharma receives FDA approval for generic DACOGEN

InnoPharma receives FDA approval for generic DACOGEN

InnoPharma, Inc. today announced the approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for decitabine for injection, a generic version of Eisai Inc.'s DACOGEN. [More]
New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

A new method for measuring and imaging how quickly blood flows in the brain could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain, which may aid in improving brain-cancer surgery and tissue engineering, and lead to better treatment options for recovering drug addicts. [More]
Amgen seeks FDA approval for evolocumab to treat patients with high cholesterol

Amgen seeks FDA approval for evolocumab to treat patients with high cholesterol

Amgen today announced the submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for evolocumab seeking approval for the treatment of high cholesterol. [More]
Armetheon raises $7 million in first round of financing

Armetheon raises $7 million in first round of financing

Armetheon, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing novel mid- to late-stage cardiovascular drug candidates, today announced that it has raised $7.0 million in its first round of financing. [More]
Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc, a new study from Johns Hopkins suggests. The initial dosing studies, completed before the drug was licensed in 2007, included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body. [More]
Spanish scientists explore genetic basis of familial extreme longevity

Spanish scientists explore genetic basis of familial extreme longevity

In a recent report in Aging Cell, a multidisciplinary team of Spanish scientists, led by Tim Cash and Manuel Serrano at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, identify rare variants in the APOB gene in several families where exceptional longevity (>100 years of age) appears to cluster. [More]
Researchers show how interplay between nutrition, metabolism, immunity involved in ageing process

Researchers show how interplay between nutrition, metabolism, immunity involved in ageing process

Researchers from UCL (University College London) have demonstrated how an interplay between nutrition, metabolism and immunity is involved in the process of ageing. [More]
Reduce inflammatory reaction by losing weight, says researcher

Reduce inflammatory reaction by losing weight, says researcher

Researchers have found a possible molecular explanation for why overweight is harmful. This new knowledge may provide new drugs for heart attack, stroke, cancer and chronic intestinal inflammation. [More]
Aldea Pharmaceuticals announces closure of $24M Series B equity financing

Aldea Pharmaceuticals announces closure of $24M Series B equity financing

Aldea Pharmaceuticals, a company pioneering novel therapeutics to treat aldehyde metabolism disorders, today announced that it has closed a $24 million Series B equity financing. [More]
Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

African American women born at a low or very low birth weight may be at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The findings, which appear in Diabetes Care, may explain in part the higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes in African American populations, which has a high prevalence of low birth weight. [More]
Calcium buildup in coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients indicates heart disease risk

Calcium buildup in coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients indicates heart disease risk

Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients may be a strong indicator of heart disease risk, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). [More]
Blood test could help gauge psychosis risk

Blood test could help gauge psychosis risk

Researchers have developed a multiplex blood assay that may aid the identification of high-risk individuals who will progress to psychosis. [More]
Researchers examine parental availability and kids’ eating habits

Researchers examine parental availability and kids’ eating habits

The way parents balance their work schedules may affect their adolescent children's eating habits, according to Penn State researchers. Those schedules may be even more important than the number of hours the parents spend at work, said Molly Martin, associate professor of sociology and demography. [More]
Vitamin D deficiency affects fertility in women undergoing IVF

Vitamin D deficiency affects fertility in women undergoing IVF

Women with a vitamin D deficiency were nearly half as likely to conceive through in vitro fertilization (IVF) as women who had sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have discovered a new clue to understanding how the most important medication for tuberculosis (TB) works to attack dormant TB bacteria in order to shorten treatment. [More]
Findings may lead to better ways for preventing gum disease, diabetes and Crohn's disease

Findings may lead to better ways for preventing gum disease, diabetes and Crohn's disease

Bacteria inside your mouth drastically change how they act when you're diseased, according to research using supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. [More]