Metabolism News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolism News and Research

Metabolism is the means by which the body derives energy and synthesizes the other molecules it needs from the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat as food, by enzymatic reactions helped by minerals and vitamins.
Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D highly prevalent among children with type 1 diabetes

Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D highly prevalent among children with type 1 diabetes

During the past two decades, vitamin D status, defined as serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, has emerged as a predictor of key clinical outcomes including bone health, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, immune health and survival. [More]
Scientists evaluate phage-based therapy to battle antibiotic-resistant bacterial superbug infections

Scientists evaluate phage-based therapy to battle antibiotic-resistant bacterial superbug infections

Flinders University scientists are looking to bacteriophages – highly specific viruses - as the as the best way to attack antibiotic-resistant bacterial superbug infections. [More]
New clinical study to evaluate inexpensive drug to prevent type 1 diabetes

New clinical study to evaluate inexpensive drug to prevent type 1 diabetes

A clinical study evaluating a new hypothesis that an inexpensive drug with a simple treatment regimen can prevent type 1 diabetes will be launched in Dundee tomorrow. [More]
DKFZ researchers develop new methods to study disease-relevant changes in production of oxidants

DKFZ researchers develop new methods to study disease-relevant changes in production of oxidants

There are many false beliefs and myths about the role of oxidants and antioxidants in the human body. Traditionally, oxidants are presented as harmful and antioxidants as health-promoting. However, scientists have known for many years that endogenous oxidants are essential chemical messengers that help keep up the functions of the organism. [More]
Low doses of bisphenol A can affect development of metabolism, reproductive and nervous systems

Low doses of bisphenol A can affect development of metabolism, reproductive and nervous systems

If rats are exposed to bisphenol A in low doses during early development it can lead to reduced sperm count, obesity and changes to breast development and behaviour. These are some of the findings of a new study from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. The results support previous animal studies, which have shown that low doses of bisphenol A can affect development of the metabolism as well as the reproductive and nervous systems. [More]
Scientists discover new diagnostic marker for liver cancer

Scientists discover new diagnostic marker for liver cancer

Scientists may have discovered a significant new diagnostic marker for liver cancer, according to a paper published in the April 18 online issue of Nature Cell Biology. [More]
Fujitsu develops portable breath sensor that can quickly measure concentration of gas components in people's breath

Fujitsu develops portable breath sensor that can quickly measure concentration of gas components in people's breath

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. today announced that it has developed a portable breath sensor that can extract and quickly measure the concentration of only specified gas components, such as ammonia, that are included at low concentrations in people's breath and are suggested to be correlated with lifestyle diseases. [More]
Researchers determine mutations in RERE gene can cause many features linked with 1p36 deletions

Researchers determine mutations in RERE gene can cause many features linked with 1p36 deletions

One in 5,000 babies is born missing a small amount of genetic material from the tip of chromosome 1, a region called 1p36. Missing genes in the 1p36 region is a relatively common cause of intellectual disability. [More]
Intestinal bacteria can be used to reduce cancer risk, reveals UCLA study

Intestinal bacteria can be used to reduce cancer risk, reveals UCLA study

Researchers have shown that various types of intestinal bacteria might be factors in both causing and preventing obesity, and in other conditions and diseases. Now, a UCLA study suggests that it could also potentially be used to reduce the risk for some types of cancer. [More]
FOXO proteins affect dozens of genes common to worms, flies, mice and humans

FOXO proteins affect dozens of genes common to worms, flies, mice and humans

Whether a creature is a worm, a fly, a mouse, or a human, death inevitably awaits. And not only do these organisms share a common fate, but also, according to a new study, they may share some of the specific mechanisms of mortality. The researchers found that in all four species, there are 46 genes regulated by the same family of "FOXO" proteins known to be central in aging and longevity. [More]
Adolescent obesity linked to elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality in midlife

Adolescent obesity linked to elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality in midlife

A nationwide study of 2.3 million Israeli adolescents, examined from 1967 through 2010, finds an association between elevated body-mass index in late adolescence, and subsequent cardiovascular mortality in midlife. [More]
Improving body clock could protect against metabolic syndrome

Improving body clock could protect against metabolic syndrome

Essential biological processes are managed by an internal timer or body clock. When the body clock gets out of whack, conditions such as metabolic syndrome can occur. [More]
High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

Research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the protein COMP, which mainly exists in cartilage, can also be found in breast cancer tumours in patients with a poor prognosis. Studies on mice also showed that COMP contributed to the development and metastasis of the breast cancer. [More]
Depression combined with behavioral, metabolic symptoms increases risk of type 2 diabetes

Depression combined with behavioral, metabolic symptoms increases risk of type 2 diabetes

Depression may compound the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with such early warning signs of metabolic disease as obesity, high blood pressure and unhealthy cholesterol levels, according to researchers from McGill University, l'Université de Montréal, the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal and the University of Calgary. [More]
Six newly identified proteins may help potentially unlock new insights into aging-related diseases

Six newly identified proteins may help potentially unlock new insights into aging-related diseases

A group of six newly discovered proteins may help to divulge secrets of how we age, potentially unlocking new insights into diabetes, Alzheimer's, cancer, and other aging-related diseases. [More]
New sensitive detection method could help measure subfractions of HDL

New sensitive detection method could help measure subfractions of HDL

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is often referred to as good cholesterol: high levels of HDL are associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease. But many clinical outcome trials for drugs that raise HDL levels have failed to show significant benefits for trial participants. [More]
BMPR2 mutations affect outcomes of PAH patients

BMPR2 mutations affect outcomes of PAH patients

Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II gene affect not only the risk of developing pulmonary arterial hypertension but also the severity and outcomes of the disease, shows a meta-analysis of individual patient data. [More]
HIIT workout with integral electro-stimulation better than conventional aerobic exercise

HIIT workout with integral electro-stimulation better than conventional aerobic exercise

Practicing High Intensity Interval Training, or HIIT, together with integral electro-stimulation generates an up to 30% higher consumption of calories than conventional aerobic exercise. [More]
Mouse-based study shows exercise decreases cancer incidence, slows tumor growth

Mouse-based study shows exercise decreases cancer incidence, slows tumor growth

When you're pounding along an icy pavement or sweating through a gym workout, you try to remind yourself of the many health benefits of exercise. Between gasps, you can say that a healthy, fit lifestyle helps prevents obesity, a worldwide problem of increasing magnitude that has been linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. [More]
Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Sepsis represents a serious complication of infection and is one of the leading causes of death and critical illness worldwide due in part to the lack of effective therapies. A report in the American Journal of Pathology provides evidence from both mouse and human studies that SHARPIN, a protein involved in regulating inflammation, has anti-septic effects. These findings may spur development of novel sepsis treatments. [More]
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