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Metabolites are the intermediates and products of metabolism. The term ''metabolite'' is usually restricted to small molecules.
UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

Tapping the potential of metabolomics, an emerging field focused on the chemical processes of metabolism, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new and pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease. [More]
Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism (energy production in cells) to a common and often fatal type of lymphoma. [More]
MGH-CEM researchers develop microfabricated device to analyze effects of pro-drugs on cancer cells

MGH-CEM researchers develop microfabricated device to analyze effects of pro-drugs on cancer cells

A team of researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine has developed a novel approach that dramatically simplifies the evaluation of the liver's drug-metabolizing activity and the potential toxic effects of the products of that activity on other organs. [More]
EPFL scientists identify lansoprazole as potential candidate against tuberculosis

EPFL scientists identify lansoprazole as potential candidate against tuberculosis

Testing thousands of approved drugs, EPFL scientists have identified an unlikely anti-tuberculosis drug: the over-the-counter antacid lansoprazole (Prevacid). [More]
Concert Pharmaceuticals’ precision deuteration platform can enhance metabolic properties of drugs

Concert Pharmaceuticals’ precision deuteration platform can enhance metabolic properties of drugs

Substituting deuterium for certain hydrogen atoms in molecules has been shown to enhance the metabolic properties of a number of drugs and provides a promising approach to the discovery and development of innovative drug products. [More]
TSRI scientists devise powerful set of chemical methods to explore protein biology

TSRI scientists devise powerful set of chemical methods to explore protein biology

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have devised a powerful set of chemical methods for exploring the biology of proteins. [More]
The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

Eli Lilly and Company announced that The Lancet Oncology has published results of the Phase III REACH trial that evaluated CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) as a second-line treatment for people with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), also known as liver cancer. While the REACH trial's primary endpoint of overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm, it was not statistically significant. [More]
MGH-CEM researchers develop novel approach to evaluate the liver's drug-metabolizing activity

MGH-CEM researchers develop novel approach to evaluate the liver's drug-metabolizing activity

A team of researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine (MGH-CEM) has developed a novel approach that dramatically simplifies the evaluation of the liver's drug-metabolizing activity and the potential toxic effects of the products of that activity on other organs. [More]
TSRI chemists invent scalable method for synthesizing brain-protecting compound

TSRI chemists invent scalable method for synthesizing brain-protecting compound

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute have invented the first practical, scalable method for synthesizing jiadifenolide, a plant-derived molecule that may have powerful brain-protecting properties. [More]
New microfluidic chip could save millions of euros in drug development costs

New microfluidic chip could save millions of euros in drug development costs

Scientists in an EU-supported project have developed a microfluidic chip that simultaneously analyses the reactions of several human organ tissues when they come into contact with candidates for new drugs. [More]
Researchers receive $10 million grant for citrus greening research project

Researchers receive $10 million grant for citrus greening research project

To help develop a therapeutic treatment for citrus greening disease, a bacterial infection that threatens the future of the U.S. citrus industry, the United States Department of Agriculture Specialty Crop Research Initiative has awarded a diverse group of researchers a $10 million grant. [More]
SNPs predict sunitinib outcome in mRCC

SNPs predict sunitinib outcome in mRCC

Research has confirmed that single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes related to the processing of sunitinib influence the outcome of treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. [More]
Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Researchers at Duke Medicine have determined that kidney function plays a critical role in the fate of patients being treated for sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection. [More]
New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), of the University of Luxembourg, have, under Dr. Manuel Buttini, successfully measured metabolic profiles, or the metabolomes, of different brain regions, and their findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has uncovered a big clue to how bacteria may promote some colon cancers. [More]
Pancreatic cancer rates higher in countries with less sunlight

Pancreatic cancer rates higher in countries with less sunlight

Writing in the April 30 online issue of the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report pancreatic cancer rates are highest in countries with the least amount of sunlight. Low sunlight levels were due to a combination of heavy cloud cover and high latitude. [More]
TAXIS Pharmaceuticals' TXA709 compound shows promise in combating antibiotic resistance

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals' TXA709 compound shows promise in combating antibiotic resistance

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals, a drug-discovery company focused on developing a new class of antibiotic agents to treat life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, today announced the presentation of data demonstrating the promise of its lead clinical candidate, TXA709, in combating antibiotic resistance. [More]
Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its fourth U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). CYRAMZA (ramucirumab injection 10 mg/mL solution) is now also indicated in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. [More]
Winners of GSA poster awards announced at Fungal Genetics Conference

Winners of GSA poster awards announced at Fungal Genetics Conference

The Genetics Society of America and the community of fungal geneticists are pleased to announce the winners of the GSA poster awards at the 28th Fungal Genetics Conference, which took place in Pacific Grove, CA, March 17-22, 2015. [More]
Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Rooted in malfunctions in the tiny power plants that energize our cells, mitochondrial disorders are notoriously complex and variable, with few effective treatments. Now, novel findings in microscopic worms may hold great promise for children and adults with mitochondrial disorders [More]
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