Metastasis News and Research RSS Feed - Metastasis News and Research

Metastasis is the spread of cancer from one part of the body to another. A tumor formed by cells that have spread is called a “metastatic tumor” or a “metastasis.” The metastatic tumor contains cells that are like those in the original (primary) tumor. The plural form of metastasis is metastases
Researchers quantify growth and composition of breast tumours in living animal

Researchers quantify growth and composition of breast tumours in living animal

The ability to visualize and characterize the composition of a tumour in detail during its development can provide valuable insights in order to target appropriate therapeutics. [More]
Protein imbalances within cells can cause ovarian cancer

Protein imbalances within cells can cause ovarian cancer

Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found. The discovery is a major breakthrough because, until now, genetic aberrations have been seen as the main cause of almost all cancer. [More]
Study: Omega-3 fatty acids may help improve treatment response, quality of life for patients with cancer

Study: Omega-3 fatty acids may help improve treatment response, quality of life for patients with cancer

Adding omega-3 fatty acids to anti-tumor medications may improve treatment response and quality of life for cancer patients according to a new study by researchers at the University Hospitals of Leicester in the United Kingdom. [More]
Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Pathogenic bacteria develop killer machines that work very specifically and highly efficiently. Scientists from the University of Freiburg have solved the molecular mechanism of a fish toxin that could be used in the future as a medication to treat cancer. The scientists have now published their research in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Recent advances in the understanding of cancer have led to more personalized therapies, such as drugs that target particular proteins and tests that analyze gene expression patterns in tumors to predict a patient's response to therapy. [More]
Gene responsible for cancer growth plays unexpected role in prostate cancer

Gene responsible for cancer growth plays unexpected role in prostate cancer

A gene that is responsible for cancer growth plays a totally unexpected role in prostate cancer. The gene Stat3 is controlled by the immune modulator interleukin 6 and normally supports the growth of cancer cells. The international research team led by Prof. Lukas Kenner from the Medical University of Vienna, the Veterinary University of Vienna, and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institiute for Cancer Research (LBI-CR) discovered a missing link for an essential role of Stat3 and IL-6 signalling in prostate cancer progression. [More]
Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

A diet that starves triple-negative breast cancer cells of an essential nutrient primes the cancer cells to be more easily killed by a targeted antibody treatment, UW Carbone Cancer Center scientists report in a recent publication. [More]
Single molecule appears to be central regulator driving cancer metastasis

Single molecule appears to be central regulator driving cancer metastasis

Cancer is a disease of cell growth, but most tumors only become lethal once they metastasize or spread from their first location to sites throughout the body. For the first time, researchers at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia report a single molecule that appears to be the central regulator driving metastasis in prostate cancer. [More]
Researchers identify genetic abnormalities that lead to skin SCC

Researchers identify genetic abnormalities that lead to skin SCC

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is one of the most frequent cancers in humans affecting more than half million new persons every year in the world. The transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell is caused by an accumulation of genetic abnormalities in the progeny of single cells. The spectrum of genetic anomalies found in a variety of human cancers have been described. [More]
Researchers identify five recurrent fusion genes involved in acute gastritis and cancer

Researchers identify five recurrent fusion genes involved in acute gastritis and cancer

Studying the gastric cancers of 15 Southeast Asian patients, researchers at The Jackson Laboratory, the Genome Institute of Singapore and other institutions identified five recurrent fusion genes, one of which appears to lead to cellular changes involved in acute gastritis and cancer. [More]
Elsevier, NCI implement two-way linking between research articles on ScienceDirect and datasets in caNanoLab

Elsevier, NCI implement two-way linking between research articles on ScienceDirect and datasets in caNanoLab

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the US National Cancer Institute, a world-leading institute for cancer research, today announced that they have implemented two-way linking between research articles on ScienceDirect and datasets stored in NCI's cancer Nanotechnology Laboratory (caNanoLab) data portal. [More]
Findings shed light on how symmetrical, round cells become polarized and directional

Findings shed light on how symmetrical, round cells become polarized and directional

When Greek mythology and cell biology meet, you get the protein Callipygian, recently discovered and named by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University for its role in determining which area of a cell becomes the back as it begins to move. [More]
IRB Barcelona scientists provide molecular details about Seckel Syndrome

IRB Barcelona scientists provide molecular details about Seckel Syndrome

Today in Nature Communications, scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) provide molecular details about Seckel Syndrome, a rare disease that causes microcephaly, or small brain, and growth delays. [More]
Study uncovers complicated role of simple protein in spread of osteosarcoma

Study uncovers complicated role of simple protein in spread of osteosarcoma

The investigation of a simple protein has uncovered its uniquely complicated role in the spread of the childhood cancer, osteosarcoma. It turns out the protein, called ezrin, acts like an air traffic controller, coordinating multiple functions within a cancer cell and allowing it to endure stress conditions encountered during metastasis. [More]
New therapeutic alternative found for children suffering from Ewing's sarcoma

New therapeutic alternative found for children suffering from Ewing's sarcoma

A research consortium made up of the Virgen del Rocio hospital in Seville, Sant Joan de Deu and the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute in Barcelona, has found a new therapeutic alternative for children who suffer from a malignant pediatric tumor bone and soft tissue called Ewing's sarcoma. [More]
Researchers unravel mechanisms that enable accumulation of tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells

Researchers unravel mechanisms that enable accumulation of tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells

A mechanism beyond the level of gene regulation, which is often the underlying reason for changes in protein levels, does enable the strong accumulation of a tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells. The group of BIOSS researcher Prof. Dr. Thomas Reinheckel teamed up with BIOSS investigator Prof. Dr. Sabine Rospert and their colleagues from the University Medical Center Freiburg, Prof. Dr. Elmar Stickeler and Dr. Peter Bronsert, in order to unravel mechanisms by which stress-resistant production of cancer promoting proteins occurs. [More]
Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists from the University of Leeds and The Institute of Cancer Research, London, have discovered a new protein which triggers the growth of blood vessels in breast cancer tumours which have spread to the brain, a common location which breast cancer can spread to. [More]
Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Recent Weizmann Institute studies are revealing a complex picture of cancer progression in which certain genes that drive tumor growth in the earlier stages get suppressed in later stages - taking a step back to move forward. [More]
Breast tumors have something in common with embryos, say MD Anderson researchers

Breast tumors have something in common with embryos, say MD Anderson researchers

It may seem incredulous, but breast tumors may have something in common with embryos ... at least in mice, say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]

UCSD researchers discover cell signaling pathway that controls initiation, progression of colorectal cancer

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a cell signaling pathway that appears to exert some control over initiation and progression of colorectal cancer, the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. A key protein in the pathway also appears to be predictive of cancer survival rates. [More]
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