Metastasis News and Research RSS Feed - Metastasis News and Research

Metastasis is the spread of cancer from one part of the body to another. A tumor formed by cells that have spread is called a “metastatic tumor” or a “metastasis.” The metastatic tumor contains cells that are like those in the original (primary) tumor. The plural form of metastasis is metastases
Study gives a roadmap for future brain cancer vaccines

Study gives a roadmap for future brain cancer vaccines

Glioblastoma is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor, and despite advances in standard treatment, the median survival is about 15 months (compared to 4 months without treatment). [More]
Mayo Clinic study finds that chromosomal rearrangements can help trace lineage of lung cancer

Mayo Clinic study finds that chromosomal rearrangements can help trace lineage of lung cancer

A diagnostic test based on chromosomal rearrangements can trace the lineage of lung cancer to determine whether two separate lung cancers in the same patient are independent tumors or a tumor that has spread to another region of the lung, a Mayo Clinic study has found. For patients with multiple tumors, that distinction could mean the difference between early stage cancer that may be cured by surgery and incurable late-stage disease. [More]
Breakthrough study shows novel molecular imaging drug to detect early prostate cancer

Breakthrough study shows novel molecular imaging drug to detect early prostate cancer

A novel study demonstrates the potential of a novel molecular imaging drug to detect and visualize early prostate cancer in soft tissue, lymph nodes and bone. The research, published in the November issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, compares the biodistribution and tumor uptake kinetics of two Tc-99m labeled ligands, MIP-1404 and MIP-1405, used with SPECT and planar imaging. [More]
New vaccination approach can reduce tumor burden, suppress formation of lung metastases

New vaccination approach can reduce tumor burden, suppress formation of lung metastases

In a new study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget researchers from Uppsala University show that a therapeutic vaccine directed against tumor vessels can reduce tumor burden and suppress formation of spontaneous lung metastases in a mouse model for metastatic breast cancer. [More]
Clinical study data of Advaxis' Lm-LLO immunotherapies to be presented at SITC Annual Meeting

Clinical study data of Advaxis' Lm-LLO immunotherapies to be presented at SITC Annual Meeting

Advaxis, Inc., a cancer immunotherapy company, today announced the abstracts of three preclinical and clinical studies highlighting the survival outcomes and anti-tumor effects of its proprietary Lm-LLO cancer immunotherapy technology at the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) 29th Annual Meeting, November 6-9, 2014 at the Gaylord National Hotel and Convention Center in National Harbor, Maryland. [More]
Eribulin drug could extend life of women with advanced triple negative breast cancer

Eribulin drug could extend life of women with advanced triple negative breast cancer

THE cancer drug eribulin, originally developed from sea sponges, could give women with advanced triple negative breast cancer an average of five extra months of life, according to research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool today (Monday). [More]
Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

In the first study of its kind, Rice University researchers have mapped how information flows through the genetic circuits that cause cancer cells to become metastatic. The research reveals a common pattern in the decision-making that allows cancer cells to both migrate and form new tumors. Researchers say the commonality may open the door to new drugs that interfere with the genetic switches that cancer must flip to form both cancer stem cells and circulating tumor cells -- two of the main players in cancer metastasis. [More]

Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a lab device to give cancer researchers an unprecedented microscopic look at metastasis, the complex way that tumor cells spread through the body, causing more than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. By shedding light on precisely how tumor cells travel, the device could uncover new ways to keep cancer in check. [More]
TNF-α key player in RCC progression

TNF-α key player in RCC progression

Tumour necrosis factor - α appears to play a key role in the promotion of invasion and metastasis in clear cell renal cell carcinomas, Japanese study findings indicate. [More]
Adjuvant cisplatin for NSCLC raises non-cancer mortality risk

Adjuvant cisplatin for NSCLC raises non-cancer mortality risk

Re-analysis of data from the International Adjuvant Lung Cancer Trial indicates that cisplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy increases the long-term risk of non-cancer mortality in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. [More]
Study on papillary thyroid carcinoma to be presented at 84th Annual Meeting of the ATA

Study on papillary thyroid carcinoma to be presented at 84th Annual Meeting of the ATA

The prevalence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer, is increasing rapidly. New research to determine the impact of radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy on survival in PTC, describing a novel blood test able to detect circulating BRAFV600E-positive tumor DNA, and identifying a long non-coding RNA specifically associated with the thyroid that is down-regulated in PTC compared to normal thyroid tissue in patient-derived clinical specimens and cell cultures will be featured in oral presentations delivered at the 84th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association, October 29-November 2, 2014, in Coronado, California. [More]
KU researchers find potential therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

KU researchers find potential therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

A team at the University of Kansas School of Medicine has identified a potential target for treating breast cancer, including a particularly deadly form of the disease. [More]
International Aspirin Foundation introduces two biennial awards

International Aspirin Foundation introduces two biennial awards

In celebration of the 40th anniversary of the formation of The International Aspirin Foundation, we are delighted to announce the introduction of two biennial awards; a Senior Science Award and a Young Investigator Award. [More]
Game theory and the cancer ecosystem: an interview with Professor Pienta, Johns Hopkins

Game theory and the cancer ecosystem: an interview with Professor Pienta, Johns Hopkins

The classic description of game theory was described by the prisoner's dilemma, which is a situation in which two players have two options where the outcome depends on the simultaneous choice made by the other. [More]
Ludwig researchers discover key mechanism that control plasticity of epithelial cells

Ludwig researchers discover key mechanism that control plasticity of epithelial cells

Ludwig Oxford researchers have discovered a key mechanism that governs how cells of the epithelia, the soft lining of inner body cavities, shift between a rigid, highly structured and immobile state and a flexible and motile form. [More]
Tiny nano-sized particles may play major role in detecting, tracking breast cancer

Tiny nano-sized particles may play major role in detecting, tracking breast cancer

Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA (miRNA) molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer. New research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center suggests Dicer may also serve as a biomarker for breast cancer and possibly open up new avenues for diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Anti-cancer nanomedicines with smaller sizes exhibit enhanced performance in vivo, show studies

Anti-cancer nanomedicines with smaller sizes exhibit enhanced performance in vivo, show studies

Nanomedicines consisting of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to specific tissues and cells offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
Inflammation in tissue creates a niche for cancer cells

Inflammation in tissue creates a niche for cancer cells

In order to invade healthy tissue, tumor cells must leave the actual tumor and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system. For this purpose, they use certain enzymes, proteases that break down the tissue surrounding the tumor, thus opening the way for tumor cells to reach blood or lymphatic vessels. To keep the proteases in check, the body produces inhibitors such as the protein TIMP-1, which thwart the proteases in their work. [More]
Blocking STAT3 in immune system cells increases anti-tumour immunity

Blocking STAT3 in immune system cells increases anti-tumour immunity

The STAT transcription factors are involved in the development of many forms of cancer. STAT3 is frequently activated in tumour cells, so drugs targeting STAT3 could be used in cancer therapy. However, STAT3 is also important in the development of the immune system. Dagmar Gotthardt and colleagues at the Vetmeduni Vienna now show that blocking STAT3 in cells of the immune system actually leads to increased anti-tumour immunity. Anti-STAT3 therapy may thus be highly promising. [More]
BCRF announces $58.6 million commitment to breast cancer research

BCRF announces $58.6 million commitment to breast cancer research

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, announced its dedication of $58.6 million to breast cancer research today at its annual Symposium & Awards Luncheon. Totaling $47 million, the 2014-2015 annual grants, awarded to more than 220 physicians and scientists on six continents, continue to fuel BCRF's mission of advancing the world's most innovative research. [More]