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New bio-signal measuring electrodes can be mounted on IoT devices for health diagnosis

New bio-signal measuring electrodes can be mounted on IoT devices for health diagnosis

DGIST announced that Professor Kyung-in Jang's research team from the Department of Robotics Engineering succeeded in developing bio-signal measuring electrodes that can be mounted on Internet of Things (IoT) devices through joint research with a research team led by professor John Rogers of the University of Illinois, USA. [More]
Dietary supplement extracted from Amaranthus can increase plasma nitrate, study shows

Dietary supplement extracted from Amaranthus can increase plasma nitrate, study shows

A new, clinical study confirms that dietary supplementation of nitrate from a natural extract of Amaranthus species nicknamed "red spinach," results in a significant increase in plasma nitrite that ultimately enhances nitric oxide. [More]
Research shows how paralyzed limbs can be controlled via implanted electrodes

Research shows how paralyzed limbs can be controlled via implanted electrodes

Patients with spinal cord injuries might one day regain use of paralyzed arms and legs thanks to research that demonstrates how limbs can be controlled via a tiny array of implanted electrodes. [More]
Pitt researcher finds way to regenerate heart tissues in mammals

Pitt researcher finds way to regenerate heart tissues in mammals

Many lower forms of life on earth exhibit an extraordinary ability to regenerate tissue, limbs, and even organs--a skill that is lost among humans and other mammals. [More]
FASEB announces winners of 2016 BioArt competition

FASEB announces winners of 2016 BioArt competition

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology is pleased to announce the winners of the fifth annual BioArt competition. [More]
Messenger substance may help in future treatment of anxiety disorders

Messenger substance may help in future treatment of anxiety disorders

The targeted control of biochemical processes and neuronal signalling pathways using the messenger substance neuropeptide Y could help in the future treatment of anxiety disorders. [More]
Titin gene mutations affect heart function in healthy individuals, study finds

Titin gene mutations affect heart function in healthy individuals, study finds

A multinational study by researchers from the UK, Singapore and Germany has discovered that gene mutations in a protein called titin affect heart function in healthy individuals. [More]
Women more susceptible to damaging effects of alcohol, says Houston Methodist expert

Women more susceptible to damaging effects of alcohol, says Houston Methodist expert

"One drink a day might be too much for a woman who has a genetic pre-disposition to cirrhosis of the liver," said Howard Monsour, M.D., chief of hepatology at Houston Methodist Hospital "One drink for a woman has about twice the effect as it does for the same amount consumed by a man." [More]
Adolescent obesity may lead to irreparable bone damage

Adolescent obesity may lead to irreparable bone damage

Teenagers who are obese may be doing irreparable damage to their bones, according to a new study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Elite Team GB cyclist launches 'Little Bleeders' to tackle inactivity in young haemophilia patients

Elite Team GB cyclist launches 'Little Bleeders' to tackle inactivity in young haemophilia patients

Young Ambassadors, healthcare professionals and some of the UK’s elite athletes have today joined together to launch Little Bleeders – a foundation tackling inactivity in boys and young men living with haemophilia, head-on across the UK. [More]
Study finds yoga to be safe, but older participants may have injury risk

Study finds yoga to be safe, but older participants may have injury risk

Participating in yoga is relatively safe, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham who conducted the first large-scale examination of yoga-related injuries. [More]
Scientists identify naturally occurring molecule that plays protective role in ALS

Scientists identify naturally occurring molecule that plays protective role in ALS

Researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have identified a naturally occurring molecule that has the potential for preserving sites of communication between nerves and muscles in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and over the course of aging -- as well as a molecule that interferes with this helpful process. [More]
BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

The inability of cells to eliminate damaged proteins and organelles following the blockage of a coronary artery and its subsequent re-opening with angioplasty or medications - a sequence known as ischemia/reperfusion - often results in irreparable damage to the heart muscle. [More]
Hepatitis C virus sabotages antiviral defenses of liver cells by blunting effect of immune proteins

Hepatitis C virus sabotages antiviral defenses of liver cells by blunting effect of immune proteins

The virus that causes hepatitis C protects itself by blocking signals that call up immune defenses in liver cells, according to University of Washington researchers and colleagues reporting Nov. 14 in Nature Medicine. [More]
Researchers create temporal and spatial atlas that plots development of mouse heart

Researchers create temporal and spatial atlas that plots development of mouse heart

It's not simple, making a heart. In the womb, the organ begins as a tube, sprouts bead-like lumps, folds in on itself and eventually morphs into the more familiar-looking four-chambered structure. [More]
UAB researchers show how aging and excess dietary fat lead to heart failure

UAB researchers show how aging and excess dietary fat lead to heart failure

In mouse experiments, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have shown how aging and excess dietary fat create signals that lead to heart failure after a heart attack. [More]
Novel discovery could provide diabetic patients with better and safer insulin injections

Novel discovery could provide diabetic patients with better and safer insulin injections

Insulin injection, if you've never done it, takes two hands. One hand holds the insulin injector. [More]
Research sheds new light on potential of anti-inflammatory cytokines in treating aging-related metabolic diseases

Research sheds new light on potential of anti-inflammatory cytokines in treating aging-related metabolic diseases

New research published online in The FASEB Journal suggests that the anti-inflammatory molecule IL-10 may do more than just reduce inflammation. [More]
How toxic is your stress?

How toxic is your stress?

The term “stress” originates not in our minds or bodies, but from physics. It is the internal forces generated in an object in response to an external load. In the 1950s, Hans Selye adopted the term to characterize how living organisms change... [More]
New 3D scene analysis could supplement usual methods for monitoring sleep disorders

New 3D scene analysis could supplement usual methods for monitoring sleep disorders

The usual method of recording periodic leg movements in sleep for people with sleep disorders is to use electromyography (EMG), an electrophysiological method used in neurological diagnosis that measures muscle activity. [More]
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