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Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received a National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award that will forward revolutionary stem cell and neuro-science in medicine. [More]
Synthetic oil triheptanoin improves Rett syndrome, longevity

Synthetic oil triheptanoin improves Rett syndrome, longevity

When young mice with the rodent equivalent of a rare autism spectrum disorder (ASD), called Rett syndrome, were fed a diet supplemented with the synthetic oil triheptanoin, they lived longer than mice on regular diets. Importantly, their physical and behavioral symptoms were also less severe after being on the diet, according to results of new research from The Johns Hopkins University. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in children with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in children with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today provided an update on its ongoing open-label Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in infants and children with spinal muscular atrophy at the 19th International World Muscle Society (WMS) Congress in Berlin, Germany. [More]
CytRx begins Phase 1b trial of aldoxorubicin plus gemcitabine in patients with metastatic solid tumors

CytRx begins Phase 1b trial of aldoxorubicin plus gemcitabine in patients with metastatic solid tumors

CytRx Corporation, a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in oncology, today announced the initiation of enrollment in an open-label Phase 1b clinical trial designed to investigate the preliminary safety and activity of aldoxorubicin plus gemcitabine in subjects with metastatic solid tumors. [More]
Power grid failure inside injured cardiac cells triggers post-heart attack arrhythmias

Power grid failure inside injured cardiac cells triggers post-heart attack arrhythmias

Heart attack survivors often experience dangerous heart rhythm disturbances during treatment designed to restore blood flow to the injured heart muscle, a common and confounding complication of an otherwise lifesaving intervention. [More]
Stretch sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by external forces

Stretch sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by external forces

Stretch sensors in our muscles participate in reflexes that serve the subconscious control of posture and movement. According to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, these sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by one's voluntary action, and most strongly to stretch that is imposed by external forces. The ability to reflect causality in this manner can facilitate appropriate reflex control and accurate self-perception. [More]
Kansas State professor aims to develop vaccines to protect against tick-borne diseases

Kansas State professor aims to develop vaccines to protect against tick-borne diseases

A Kansas State University professor is researching ways to keep animals and humans safe from tick-borne diseases. [More]
Surgical treatment of strabismus can be carried out at any age

Surgical treatment of strabismus can be carried out at any age

Around four per cent of all newborn children have a squint. In about 50 per cent of cases, this can be corrected with appropriate glasses, however the other half require treatment for their squint and in some cases even squint surgery. [More]
C3BS inks preferred access agreement with Mayo Clinic

C3BS inks preferred access agreement with Mayo Clinic

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery, development and commercialization of regenerative, protective and reconstructive therapies, announces today the signing of a preferred access agreement with Mayo Clinic. [More]
Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

For the second consecutive year, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has landed one of the year's much-coveted Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health. Principal investigator Rong Xu, PhD, assistant professor of medical informatics, will receive $2,377,000 for five years, starting immediately, to initiate computational analysis of thousands of drugs and their effects. [More]
Researchers develop potential fast-acting "vaccine" for myasthenia gravis

Researchers develop potential fast-acting "vaccine" for myasthenia gravis

Nearly 60,000 Americans suffer from myasthenia gravis (MG), a non-inherited autoimmune form of muscle weakness. The disease has no cure, and the primary treatments are nonspecific immunosuppressants and inhibitors of the enzyme cholinesterase. [More]
First three recipients of inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships named

First three recipients of inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships named

Harry Winston, Inc. and the UCLA Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute have named the first three recipients of the inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships. [More]
Researchers identify new technique to find rare stem cells

Researchers identify new technique to find rare stem cells

Deep within the bone marrow resides a type of cells known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These immature cells can differentiate into cells that produce bone, cartilage, fat, or muscle — a trait that scientists have tried to exploit for tissue repair. [More]
Tongue fat, size linked to obstructive sleep apnea in obese adults

Tongue fat, size linked to obstructive sleep apnea in obese adults

Obesity is a risk factor for many health problems, but a new Penn Medicine study published this month in the journal Sleep suggests having a larger tongue with increased levels of fat may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in obese adults. [More]
Acacia Pharma reports positive results from APD421 Phase 3 studies for management of PONV

Acacia Pharma reports positive results from APD421 Phase 3 studies for management of PONV

Acacia Pharma announces positive Phase 3 results with APD421 for the management of post-operative nausea & vomiting (PONV). The data generated demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of PONV with APD421 compared to placebo in adult surgical patients at moderate to high risk of suffering PONV (PONV is defined as any episode of emesis or use of antiemetic rescue medication in the first 24 hours after surgery). [More]
CHLA reports first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in Los Angeles

CHLA reports first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in Los Angeles

In September, Children's Hospital Los Angeles physicians predicted it was a matter of when, and not if, Los Angeles children would become infected with Enterovirus EV-D68, commonly referred to as enterovirus D68. On Oct. 1, that day came. CHLA and public health officials announced that a young patient who had been hospitalized at CHLA with a respiratory illness and later experienced partial limb paralysis had tested positive for enterovirus D68. [More]
Kessler Foundation's Guang Yue to study impact of high-effort training on muscle weakness

Kessler Foundation's Guang Yue to study impact of high-effort training on muscle weakness

Guang Yue, PhD, of Kessler Foundation has been awarded an NIH grant for$1,962,767 to study the impact of high-effort training on the muscle weakness that impairs quality life among many individuals with cancer. [More]
Experiments show that 'unsung' cells are crucial to the process of bone loss caused by bone disorder

Experiments show that 'unsung' cells are crucial to the process of bone loss caused by bone disorder

Experiments in mice with a bone disorder similar to that in women after menopause show that a scientifically overlooked group of cells are likely crucial to the process of bone loss caused by the disorder, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. [More]
Researchers discover rare disease that affects heart rate, intestinal movements

Researchers discover rare disease that affects heart rate, intestinal movements

Physicians and researchers at CHU Sainte-Justine, Universit- de Montr-al, CHU de Qu-bec, Universit- Laval, and Hubrecht Institute have discovered a rare disease affecting both heart rate and intestinal movements. [More]
Modified form of niclosamide drug may hold key to battling type 2 diabetes

Modified form of niclosamide drug may hold key to battling type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes affects an estimated 28 million Americans according to the American Diabetes Association, but medications now available only treat symptoms, not the root cause of the disease. [More]