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Scientists report first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs

Scientists reported today the first human recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs. A research team led by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine, describes in the Lancet long-term success in four teenage girls who received vaginal organs that were engineered with their own cells. [More]
Researchers develop novel assay to identify genes controlling pharynx regeneration in flatworms

Researchers develop novel assay to identify genes controlling pharynx regeneration in flatworms

As multicellular creatures go, planaria worms are hardly glamorous. To say they appear rudimentary is more like it. These tiny aquatic flatworms that troll ponds and standing water resemble brown tubes equipped with just the basics: a pair of beady light-sensing "eyespots" on their head and a feeding tube called the pharynx (which doubles as the excretory tract) that protrudes from a belly sac to suck up food. [More]
Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola offers patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner

Loyola University Medical Center is now offering patients the most advanced PET/CT scanner on the market. The state-of-the-art system is improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions. [More]

New discovery opens door to development of new treatments that stop progression of Parkinson's disease

A research led by the Research Institute Vall d'Hebron (VHIR), in which the University of Valencia participated, has shown that pathological forms of the α-synuclein protein present in deceased patients with Parkinson's disease are able to initiate and spread in mice and primates the neurodegenerative process that typifies this disease. [More]
IRB Barcelona scientists develop new drug target to prevent muscle deterioration in certain diseases

IRB Barcelona scientists develop new drug target to prevent muscle deterioration in certain diseases

​In the study published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI), one of the journals with highest impact in experimental medicine, the researchers associate the activity of the DOR protein with muscle atrophy and point to DOR as a plausible target against which to develop a drug to prevent muscle deterioration in certain diseases. [More]

Natural compound from green tomatoes protects against muscle atrophy

Using a screening method that previously identified a compound in apple peel as a muscle-boosting agent, a team of University of Iowa scientists has now discovered that tomatidine, a compound from green tomatoes, is even more potent for building muscle and protecting against muscle atrophy. [More]

New drug for treating Rett syndrome is on the horizon

A powerful new drug which could relieve the symptoms of devastating childhood disease Rett syndrome is on the horizon thanks to a funding injection of -180,000. [More]
Forest Laboratories, Almirall receive feedback from FDA regarding fixed dose combination of aclidinium/formoterol

Forest Laboratories, Almirall receive feedback from FDA regarding fixed dose combination of aclidinium/formoterol

Forest Laboratories, Inc. and Almirall, S.A. today announced that they have recently received feedback from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the fixed dose combination of aclidinium and formoterol. [More]
Antimicrobial agent in personal care products boosts colonization of bacteria inside human noses

Antimicrobial agent in personal care products boosts colonization of bacteria inside human noses

An antimicrobial agent found in common household soaps, shampoos and toothpastes may be finding its way inside human noses where it promotes the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and could predispose some people to infection. [More]

New injectable hydrogel repairs damaged cardiac tissue following heart attack

University of California, San Diego bioengineer Karen Christman's new injectable hydrogel, which is designed to repair damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack, has been licensed to San Diego-based startup Ventrix, Inc, which is planning the first human clinical trials of the technology. Christman is a co-founder of Ventrix. [More]
Research suggests that person can slow aging process by exercising regularly

Research suggests that person can slow aging process by exercising regularly

New research by Canadian sports medicine physician Mark Tarnopolsky, MD, PhD, suggests that a person can slow the speed at which they age by exercising regularly. Dr. Tarnopolsky presented his research titled, "Exercise as a Countermeasure for Aging: From Mice to Humans" today at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM). Dr. Tarnopolsky discussed how regular exercise not only improves the quality of life but can also extend a person's lifespan by up to five years. [More]

Study shows spinal stimulation therapy may have potential to change prognosis of people with paralysis

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. [More]

Researchers show that vitamin B3 can slow down progression of mitochondrial disease

The researchers of the University of Helsinki, Finland, and école Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland, have shown that vitamin B3 form nicotinamide riboside can slow down the progression of mitochondrial disease, suggesting its potential as a novel therapy approach to adult-onset mitochondrial muscle diseases. [More]
Meta-analysis shows calcium supplementation does not raise coronary heart disease in elderly women

Meta-analysis shows calcium supplementation does not raise coronary heart disease in elderly women

The results of a study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases do not support the hypothesis that calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D, increases coronary heart disease or all-cause mortality risk in elderly women. [More]

President of Ukrainian Osteoporosis Association wins CNS Medal for contribution to cause of osteoporosis prevention

​Today, Dr Vladyslav Povoroznyuk, President of the Ukrainian Osteoporosis Association, was awarded the first Committee of National Societies (CNS) Medal. The CNS Medal recognizes an individual CNS representative who has made an important contribution to the cause of osteoporosis prevention through active participation in CNS activities and by expanding IOF's messages and outreach in his/her country. [More]

Experts provides guidance to ensure safe, effective physical activity for osteoporosis patients

​Today, experts from the Too Fit to Fracture Initiative presented the results of an international consensus process to establish exercise recommendations for people with osteoporosis, with or without spine fractures. [More]
UCL scientists find new way to artificially control paralyzed muscles using light

UCL scientists find new way to artificially control paralyzed muscles using light

​A new way to artificially control muscles using light, with the potential to restore function to muscles paralysed by conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury, has been developed by scientists at UCL and King's College London. [More]
Study examines link between higher screen time and bone mineral density in adolescents

Study examines link between higher screen time and bone mineral density in adolescents

Results of a study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases, showed that in boys, higher screen time was adversely associated to bone mineral density (BMD) at all sites even when adjusted for specific lifestyle factors. [More]

Study investigates link between bone microstructure in postmenopausal women and prevalent ankle fracture

A study by researchers at the University of Geneva concludes that prevalent ankle fractures should be considered as osteoporotic fractures and taken into account in fracture-risk assessment. [More]

Vitamin D insufficiency contributes to increased 10-year fracture risk in elderly women

A study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases shows that long-term low levels of vitamin D intake are associated with higher 10-year fracture risk in elderly women. [More]