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High fructose consumption can lead to uncontrolled growth of cardiomyocytes, heart attack

High fructose consumption can lead to uncontrolled growth of cardiomyocytes, heart attack

'Walk through any supermarket and take a look at the labels on food products, and you'll see that many of them contain fructose, often in the form of sucrose (table sugar)' -- that's how Wilhelm Krek, professor for cell biology at ETH Zurich's Institute for Molecular Health Sciences, summarises the problem with today's nutrition. [More]
AstraZeneca, Inserm to investigate new therapeutic approaches to type 2 diabetes, CKD

AstraZeneca, Inserm to investigate new therapeutic approaches to type 2 diabetes, CKD

AstraZeneca today announced a three-year research collaboration with the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) to investigate new therapeutic approaches totype 2 diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease. [More]
New article shows taxonomic classification of rare genetic bone disorders based on metabolic phenotypes

New article shows taxonomic classification of rare genetic bone disorders based on metabolic phenotypes

An International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group on Skeletal Rare Diseases has published a new classification of rare genetic metabolic bone disorders (RGMBDs) according to their metabolic pathogenesis. [More]
Australian researchers discover gene involved in muscular dystrophy

Australian researchers discover gene involved in muscular dystrophy

Australian researchers have made a critical discovery about a gene involved in muscular dystrophy that could lead to future therapies for the currently untreatable disease. [More]
New tissue 'scaffold' technology could one day help produce large organs

New tissue 'scaffold' technology could one day help produce large organs

Scientists have developed a new tissue 'scaffold' technology that could one day enable the engineering of large organs. Research led by the Universities of Bristol and Liverpool has shown that it is possible to combine cells with a special scaffold to produce living tissue in the laboratory. It is hoped this can then be implanted into patients as a way of replacing diseased parts of the body. [More]
Allergan agrees to acquire KYTHERA Biopharmaceuticals for $2.1 billion

Allergan agrees to acquire KYTHERA Biopharmaceuticals for $2.1 billion

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, and KYTHERA Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of novel prescription products for the aesthetic medicine market, today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Allergan has agreed to acquire KYTHERA in a cash and equity transaction valued at $75 per KYTHERA share, or approximately $2.1 billion. [More]
Women with significant depressive symptoms have lower levels of klotho hormone

Women with significant depressive symptoms have lower levels of klotho hormone

Women under chronic stress have significantly lower levels of klotho, a hormone that regulates aging and enhances cognition, researchers at UC San Francisco have found in a study comparing mothers of children on the autism spectrum to low-stress controls. [More]
CyMedica Orthopedics closes $11.5 million Series A financing

CyMedica Orthopedics closes $11.5 million Series A financing

CyMedica Orthopedics, Inc. announced today that it has closed an extension to its Series A financing. The Series A financing was led by investors Research Corporation Technologies, Inc., a Tucson-based venture capital firm, and California Technology Ventures, LLC, a Pasadena-based venture capital fund. The financing also included participation from existing investor Aphelion Capital (Mill Valley, CA) and the founding group of investors. [More]
Taiho, Servier sign exclusive license agreement to develop and commercialize TAS-102 drug

Taiho, Servier sign exclusive license agreement to develop and commercialize TAS-102 drug

Taiho Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.(Japan) and Servier (France) announced on June 15 that they have entered into an exclusive license agreement on June 12, 2015 for the development and commercialization of TAS-102 (nonproprietary names: trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride) in Europe and other countries. [More]
People with rheumatoid arthritis less likely to benefit from hepatitis B vaccine

People with rheumatoid arthritis less likely to benefit from hepatitis B vaccine

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) Press Conference showed that people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less likely to be protected by hepatitis B vaccination than the general population. [More]
Experimental drug improves failing heart's function

Experimental drug improves failing heart's function

An experimental drug improves the ability of heart muscle cells damaged by heart failure to pump blood, according to the results of a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers and published online today in Nature Communications. [More]
New noninvasive brain stimulator may help tamp down Parkinson's symptoms at home

New noninvasive brain stimulator may help tamp down Parkinson's symptoms at home

Parkinson's disease patients whose symptoms such as tremor, muscle stiffness and slowed movement make it tough to hold an eating utensil steady have few options for relief outside of a hospital or clinic. Medication can help, but over time it tends to become less effective. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on ISIS-SMN Rx Phase 2 clinical study in infants with Type I SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on ISIS-SMN Rx Phase 2 clinical study in infants with Type I SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today provided an update on its ongoing open-label Phase 2 clinical study of ISIS-SMN Rx in infants with Type I spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). [More]
Study reveals surgical consequences of severe obesity

Study reveals surgical consequences of severe obesity

Research from the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is revealing the heavy surgical consequences of severe obesity. [More]
INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

The International Neuromodulation Society (INS) announced winners today of its inaugural best abstract competition at the 12th World Congress in Montreal. [More]
Rapid cooling procedures prior to catheterization reduce extent of myocardial infarction

Rapid cooling procedures prior to catheterization reduce extent of myocardial infarction

After an acute myocardial infarction, patients treated with rapid lowering of body temperature by combined cold saline infusion and endovascular cooling had less heart muscle damage and reduced incidence of heart failure. Therapeutic hypothermia was especially protective against heart muscle damage in patients with a large area of myocardium at risk according to an analysis of two clinical trials published in Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Children undergoing deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia experience better outcomes

Children undergoing deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia experience better outcomes

Children and adolescents who received deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia maintained significant symptom relief for up to eight years, according to a study presented today at the 12th World Congress of the International Neuromodulation Society. [More]
New microfluidic chip could save millions of euros in drug development costs

New microfluidic chip could save millions of euros in drug development costs

Scientists in an EU-supported project have developed a microfluidic chip that simultaneously analyses the reactions of several human organ tissues when they come into contact with candidates for new drugs. [More]
Star-shaped brain cells control cerebral blood flow and blood pressure

Star-shaped brain cells control cerebral blood flow and blood pressure

A star-shaped brain cell called an astrocyte appears to help keep blood pressure and blood flow inside the brain on a healthy, even keel, scientists report. [More]

Control systems have potential to improve function of powered leg prostheses

A control system that incorporated electrical signals generated during muscle contractions and gait information resulted in improved real-time control of a powered prosthetic leg for different modes of walking (such as on level ground or descending stairs), according to a study in the June 9 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on the Americans with Disabilities Act. [More]
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