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Johns Hopkins researchers capture images of protein complex that keeps hearts beating

Johns Hopkins researchers capture images of protein complex that keeps hearts beating

For years, a multidisciplinary team of Johns Hopkins researchers has tracked an elusive creature, a complex of proteins thought to be at fault in some cases of sudden cardiac death. As they report Nov. 5 in the online edition of Nature Communications, they have finally captured images of the complex. [More]
Eight organizations to receive IHF grants to improve care for military veterans

Eight organizations to receive IHF grants to improve care for military veterans

Infinite Hero Foundation today announced that eight organizations will receive charitable grants to fund therapies that address the most critical mental and physical challenges facing returning military veterans and their families. [More]
Latest findings on Chiari malformation to be presented at Akron conference

Latest findings on Chiari malformation to be presented at Akron conference

Researchers from around the country will gather Friday and Saturday at The University of Akron to share the latest findings on Chiari malformation, a neurological disorder at the bottom of the brain that causes at least 300,000 Americans to endure head and neck pain, loss of fine motor control and many other symptoms. [More]
Cardio3 BioSciences announces acquisition of CorQuest Medical

Cardio3 BioSciences announces acquisition of CorQuest Medical

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery and development of regenerative, protective and reconstructive therapies, announces today that it has acquired U.S.-based CorQuest Medical Inc. CorQuest Medical specializes in the development of innovative devices and technologies for cardiac surgery. [More]
Study suggests possible link between body fat and risk of immunotherapy toxicity

Study suggests possible link between body fat and risk of immunotherapy toxicity

Immunotherapy that can be effective against tumors in young, thin mice can be lethal to obese ones, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found. [More]
Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors

Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) appear to have a lot in common. They share risk factors such as obesity and they often occur together. If they also share the same genetic underpinings, then doctors could devise a way to treat them together too. [More]
Cellular-level changes in nerve structure and function may contribute to migraine headaches

Cellular-level changes in nerve structure and function may contribute to migraine headaches

A new study shows cellular-level changes in nerve structure and function that may contribute to the development of migraine headaches, reports the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Rigel Pharmaceuticals reports net loss of $20.9 million for third quarter of 2014

Rigel Pharmaceuticals reports net loss of $20.9 million for third quarter of 2014

Rigel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the third quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2014. [More]
CytRx provides overview of clinical development programs, reports 2014 Q3 financial results

CytRx provides overview of clinical development programs, reports 2014 Q3 financial results

CytRx Corporation (CYTR), a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in oncology, today reported financial results for the three months ended September 30, 2014, and also provided an overview of recent accomplishments by and upcoming milestones for its clinical development programs. [More]
UC Davis researchers link increased body fat and lethal drug reactions in mice

UC Davis researchers link increased body fat and lethal drug reactions in mice

Immunotherapy that can be effective against tumors in young, thin mice can be lethal to obese ones, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found. The findings, published online today in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggest a possible link between body fat and the risk of toxicity from some types of immunotherapy. [More]
Wimpy antibody prevents more serious self-inflicted forms of kidney disease, researchers say

Wimpy antibody prevents more serious self-inflicted forms of kidney disease, researchers say

An antibody abundant in mice and previously thought to offer poor assistance in fighting against infection may actually play a key role in keeping immune responses in check and preventing more serious self-inflicted forms of kidney disease, researchers say. [More]
Angela W. Rowe honored with American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics' Award of Fellow

Angela W. Rowe honored with American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics' Award of Fellow

Angela W. Rowe, D.O., orthopedic surgeon at Blair Orthopedics, has received the American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics' Award of Fellow. [More]
Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and eventual paralysis of muscles throughout the body. Patients typically survive only three to five years after diagnosis. [More]
Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

A new technology that may assist in the treatment of brain cancer and other neurological diseases is the subject of an article in a recent issue of the journal Technology, published by World Scientific Publishing Company. [More]
UCSD researchers develop novel ultrasound technology to diagnose two heart conditions

UCSD researchers develop novel ultrasound technology to diagnose two heart conditions

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain. [More]
Sleep apnea may affect peoples' ability to form new spatial memories

Sleep apnea may affect peoples' ability to form new spatial memories

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research led by NYU Langone Medical Center sleep specialists suggests. [More]
Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

When heart symptoms strike, men and women go through similar stages of pain but women are more likely to delay seeking care and can put their health at risk, according to a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Robotically assisted CABG surgery reduces complications, cuts recovery times

Robotically assisted CABG surgery reduces complications, cuts recovery times

Robotically assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is a rapidly evolving technology that shortens hospital stays and reduces the need for blood products, while decreasing recovery times, making the procedure safer and less risky, says a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Interrupting blood supply to limb before cardiac surgery protects the heart during operation

Interrupting blood supply to limb before cardiac surgery protects the heart during operation

In a study just published in the International Journal of Cardiology, researchers from the K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine – Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG) at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the St. Olavs Hospital in Trondheim, Norway have shown that shutting off the blood supply to an arm or leg before cardiac surgery protects the heart during the operation. [More]
Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings—part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex—outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month. [More]