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New drug fails to prevent irreversible injury to the heart after angioplasty

New drug fails to prevent irreversible injury to the heart after angioplasty

Patients who received the new drug Bendavia before undergoing angioplasty or receiving a stent to clear blocked arteries after a heart attack showed no significant reduction in scarring as compared to patients given a placebo, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Study: Remote ischemic preconditioning not effective in improving heart bypass outcomes

Study: Remote ischemic preconditioning not effective in improving heart bypass outcomes

Patients who underwent a simple conditioning procedure involving the inflation and deflation of a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm before coronary artery bypass grafting, known as heart bypass surgery, had no better long-term health outcomes than bypass patients who did not receive the conditioning, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego. [More]
New risk-evaluation protocol can help emergency departments evaluate chest-pain patients

New risk-evaluation protocol can help emergency departments evaluate chest-pain patients

A recently developed risk-evaluation protocol can help hospital emergency department personnel more efficiently determine which patients with acute chest pain can be sent home safely, according to a randomized trial conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. [More]
Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

According to a meta-analysis published in BMC Family Practice, high dose zinc acetate lozenges shortened the duration of common-cold associated nasal discharge by 34%, nasal congestion by 37%, scratchy throat by 33%, and cough by 46%. [More]
Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

A flu vaccine given just under the surface of the skin that includes four strains of inactivated influenza could be more protective than a similar flu vaccine containing only three strains, Saint Louis University research found. [More]
Metabolic derangement may facilitate cell proliferation in PAH

Metabolic derangement may facilitate cell proliferation in PAH

An enzyme that facilitates modification of proteins via a glucose metabolism pathway may promote cell proliferation in the lung tissue of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, say researchers. [More]
Tablet use has implications for potential neck injury

Tablet use has implications for potential neck injury

Tablet use has rocketed. Last year in the US, for example, 42% of under 18's owned one and more than half of 35-49 year olds used them regularly. [More]
Study shows fatigue pathways are more sensitive in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Study shows fatigue pathways are more sensitive in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

The mechanism that causes high-performance athletes to "feel the burn" turns out to be the culprit in what makes people with chronic fatigue syndrome feel exhausted by the most common daily activities, new University of Florida Health research shows. [More]
Neuralstem reports top line data from NSI-566 Phase II trial for treatment of ALS

Neuralstem reports top line data from NSI-566 Phase II trial for treatment of ALS

Neuralstem, Inc. announced top line data from the Phase II trial of NSI-566 spinal cord-derived neural stem cells under development for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study met primary safety endpoints. The maximum tolerated dose of 16 million transplanted cells and the surgery was well tolerated. [More]
Organ-on-a-chip could replace use of animals to test drugs for safety and efficacy

Organ-on-a-chip could replace use of animals to test drugs for safety and efficacy

When University of California, Berkeley, bioengineers say they are holding their hearts in the palms of their hands, they are not talking about emotional vulnerability. [More]
European scientists identify gene linked with certain types of early-onset epilepsy

European scientists identify gene linked with certain types of early-onset epilepsy

Certain types of early-onset epilepsy are caused by previously unknown mutations of a potassium channel gene, KCNA2. The mutations disrupt the electrical balance in the brain in two ways. In some patients, the flow of potassium is greatly reduced; while in others, it is raised enormously. Both states can lead to hard-to-treat epileptic seizures. Mental and motor development can come to a stop, or even to regress. [More]
Early mobility therapy improves outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Early mobility therapy improves outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung condition that affects approximately 200,000 people a year in the United States and has a higher mortality rate than breast and prostate cancer combined. The condition most often occurs in people who are critically ill or who have significant injuries; those who do survive it often experience profound skeletal muscle weakness. [More]
Excess dietary sodium can adversely affect organs

Excess dietary sodium can adversely affect organs

You may think you're one of the lucky ones who can eat all the salty snacks and convenience foods you want and still register low numbers on the blood pressure cuff. But, new research suggests you may not be so lucky after all. [More]
Scientists develop mathematical model to digitally map communication between heart cells

Scientists develop mathematical model to digitally map communication between heart cells

A team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins cardiologist and biomedical engineer Hiroshi Ashikaga, M.D., Ph.D., has developed a mathematical model to measure and digitally map the beat-sustaining electrical flow between heart cells. [More]
Narcolepsy bears trademarks of classic autoimmune disorder

Narcolepsy bears trademarks of classic autoimmune disorder

Narcoleptics suffer from bouts of sleepiness and sleep attacks, which impair their ability to function in daily life. But the precise cause of narcolepsy has long eluded scientists, and the cure for the devastating neurological disorder afflicting an estimated three million people worldwide -- and one in 3,000 Americans -- remains at bay. [More]
Using IT devices may put your muscles and joints under particular strain

Using IT devices may put your muscles and joints under particular strain

Spending hours on a computer or sending lots of text messages on a mobile phone can result in a stiff neck and sometimes even a strained thumb. Computer scientists in Saarbr├╝cken have developed a procedure that simulates in a lifelike manner which muscles and joints are put under particular strain when using IT devices. It also demonstrates the speed and accuracy with which a user can operate a device. [More]
Testosterone, estrogen raise men's risk of heart disease

Testosterone, estrogen raise men's risk of heart disease

Why men have more heart disease than premenopausal women has been unclear, but a new study shows that the sex hormones testosterone and estrogen alter cardiovascular risk factors in a way that raises a man's risk of heart disease. [More]
New study shows positive effects of gastric bypass surgery on obese adolescents

New study shows positive effects of gastric bypass surgery on obese adolescents

The skeletons of obese adolescents are usually more dense than those of normal weight teens, but after gastric bypass surgery, most return to normal density within two years, a new study finds. [More]
Obese females with eating/behavioral characteristic have impaired metabolism

Obese females with eating/behavioral characteristic have impaired metabolism

In obese females, a close relationship may exist between their disinhibition (detrimental eating and behavioral characteristics) that limits successful weight loss, and impaired metabolism, new research shows. [More]
Researchers study safety, effectiveness of experimental Ebola vaccine following high-risk exposure

Researchers study safety, effectiveness of experimental Ebola vaccine following high-risk exposure

A physician who received an experimental Ebola vaccine after experiencing a needle stick while working in an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone did not develop Ebola virus infection, and there was strong Ebola-specific immune responses after the vaccination, although because of its limited use to date, the effectiveness and safety of the vaccine is not certain, according to a study appearing in JAMA. [More]
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