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Experimental hepatitis C drug slows down development of Zika in mice

Experimental hepatitis C drug slows down development of Zika in mice

Virologists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that an experimental antiviral drug against hepatitis C slows down the development of Zika in mice. The research team was led by Professor Johan Neyts from the Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy. [More]
WHO/PAHO statement on Zika virus and the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games

WHO/PAHO statement on Zika virus and the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) recognize that athletes and visitors are seeking more information on the risks of Zika and ways to prevent infection while attending the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games (5 August to 18 September 2016). [More]
Research findings on K2M’s RAVINE® lateral access system to be presented at SpineWeek 2016

Research findings on K2M’s RAVINE® lateral access system to be presented at SpineWeek 2016

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine and minimally invasive spine technologies and techniques, today announced that research on K2M’s RAVINE® Lateral Access System will be presented at the SpineWeek 2016 Annual Meeting, occurring May 16–20 in Singapore. [More]
Pluristem completes enrollment in Phase II intermittent claudication trial

Pluristem completes enrollment in Phase II intermittent claudication trial

Pluristem Therapeutics Inc., a leading developer of placenta-based cell therapy products, today announced it has completed the planned enrollment of 150 patients in a global Phase II trial of its PLacental eXpanded (PLX)-PAD cells for the treatment of intermittent claudication (IC), a peripheral artery disease (PAD). The double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial enrolled 50 patients since October 2015 in the U.S., Germany, Israel, and South Korea. [More]
Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

The term dark proteome refers to proteins whose structural features and thus functions are not well understood. Many proteins within the dark proteome do not fold into stable three-dimensional structures. These proteins are called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and feature highly flexible, disordered confirmations. [More]
General anesthesia affects heart muscle proteins and causes depressed heart function, study shows

General anesthesia affects heart muscle proteins and causes depressed heart function, study shows

Anesthesia is used every day, but surprisingly little is known about one of its most dangerous side effects--depressed heart function. [More]
Stimulating stem cells to make special type of cartilage may potentially heal broken bones

Stimulating stem cells to make special type of cartilage may potentially heal broken bones

Stem cells could one day be stimulated to make a special type of cartilage to help repair large, hard-to-heal bone fractures - a potential boon for doctors treating big-money athletes, USC researchers say. [More]
Single breath-hold for more than five minutes could make targeted radiotherapy feasible

Single breath-hold for more than five minutes could make targeted radiotherapy feasible

Researchers at the University of Birmingham working with clinical teams at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust have successfully shown for the first time that breast cancer patients can be trained to achieve single prolonged breath holds of over five minutes, opening the door for targeted radiotherapy to be administered with just one dose in each daily session. [More]
Children with good early life movement more likely to have stronger bones later in life

Children with good early life movement more likely to have stronger bones later in life

Children who start to walk and jump earlier are more likely to have stronger bones later on in life, research shows. [More]
Griffith researchers closer to identifying cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Griffith researchers closer to identifying cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

New findings regarding the pathology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) are bringing Griffith University researchers closer to identifying the cause of this disabling illness. [More]
Sheffield Hallam University lecturer to discuss research into cause of fibromyalgia at parliamentary event

Sheffield Hallam University lecturer to discuss research into cause of fibromyalgia at parliamentary event

A Sheffield Hallam University lecturer will address the Health Secretary and other MPs tomorrow at a parliamentary event that aims to raise awareness of the incurable chronic pain condition, fibromyalgia. [More]
Scientists make breakthrough in understanding senses of touch and movement

Scientists make breakthrough in understanding senses of touch and movement

Scientists investigating the little-understood senses of touch and movement have made a breakthrough that could eventually benefit people with movement disorders, spinal injuries, high blood pressure and even improve the design of robotics and prosthetics. [More]
Innovative inflatable footbaths can help you nod off easily during hot sticky nights

Innovative inflatable footbaths can help you nod off easily during hot sticky nights

As temperatures continue to soar this week sleeping on these hot sticky nights can become an issue, so how do we best ensure a successful slumber? [More]
Study links lower concentration of heat-shock proteins to recurrence of thymic tumors

Study links lower concentration of heat-shock proteins to recurrence of thymic tumors

In most cases, tumors of the thymus gland are removed by surgical resection. However, they recur after a few years in up to one third of patients. A research team headed up by thoracic surgeon Bernhard Moser of the Thoracic Surgery Department at MedUni Vienna has successfully demonstrated that these tumors form heat-shock proteins. The lower the concentration of these proteins, the more quickly tumors recur. The study has been published in the leading journal Scientific Reports. [More]
Researchers identify new molecular targets for recovering motor function in men afflicted with SBMA

Researchers identify new molecular targets for recovering motor function in men afflicted with SBMA

Michigan State University researchers used an old-fashioned neurobiology technique to explore new avenues for treatments to reverse a late-onset neurodegenerative disease that robs men of the capacity to walk, run, chew and swallow. [More]
Controlling heart cells using a laser: an interview with Prof. Konstantin Agladze

Controlling heart cells using a laser: an interview with Prof. Konstantin Agladze

We control their electrical activity. Cardiac cells are capable of producing and transmitting electric signals through changes in a cell membrane potential. [More]
High levels of exercise from young age can benefit patients with cerebral palsy

High levels of exercise from young age can benefit patients with cerebral palsy

For highly trained Paralympic athletes with cerebral palsy (CP), bone mineral density and other measures of body composition are similar to those of able-bodied adults of similar age, reports a study in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. [More]
Wolff-Parkinson-White patients continue to have atrial fibrillation risk even after catheter ablation, study finds

Wolff-Parkinson-White patients continue to have atrial fibrillation risk even after catheter ablation, study finds

Patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome who receive catheter ablation to cure their abnormal heart rhythms are just as likely as non-ablated patients to develop atrial fibrillation no matter what age they receive ablation, according to a new study. [More]
Drinking tart Montmorency cherry juice can reduce early signs of hypertension

Drinking tart Montmorency cherry juice can reduce early signs of hypertension

Drinking tart Montmorency cherry juice significantly reduces high blood pressure at a level comparable to that achieved by medication, according to new research from Northumbria University, Newcastle. [More]
Gene-replacement therapy could be potential treatment option for SMARD1

Gene-replacement therapy could be potential treatment option for SMARD1

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a disease that causes progressive degeneration in the nerve cells that control muscles, thereby causing muscle weakness and eventually death. [More]
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