Muscle News and Research RSS Feed - Muscle News and Research

Researchers find striking differences between countries, age groups in access to proper care for DMD

Researchers find striking differences between countries, age groups in access to proper care for DMD

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive muscle disease affecting one in 3800-6300 live male births and leads to ambulatory loss, respiratory problems, cardiomyopathy, and early death of patients in their 20s or 30s. [More]
AMPK enzyme plays vital role in enhancing muscle insulin sensitivity after physical activity

AMPK enzyme plays vital role in enhancing muscle insulin sensitivity after physical activity

ampk Physical activity benefits diabetics and others with insulin resistance. One of the reasons is that a single bout of physical activity increases the effectiveness of insulin. [More]
Scripps physician first to treat heart attack patients with supersaturated oxygen therapy

Scripps physician first to treat heart attack patients with supersaturated oxygen therapy

A physician at Scripps Health's Prebys Cardiovascular Institute has become the first in the Western United States to treat heart attack patients with a new supersaturated oxygen (SSO2) system in an attempt to reduce permanent damage to their heart muscle. [More]
Systematic use of anatomically shaped implants is not justified, says plastic surgeon

Systematic use of anatomically shaped implants is not justified, says plastic surgeon

Looking at before-and-after photos, plastic surgeons and nurses can't tell whether breast augmentation surgery was done using conventional round implants or newer anatomically shaped implants, reports a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Scientists developing magnetic stem cells to fight cancer

Scientists developing magnetic stem cells to fight cancer

Scientists from the Tomsk Polytechnic University's Laboratory of Novel Dosage are developing a technology to control mesenchymal stem cells of patients. [More]
Bicycle exercise may benefit ICU patients, shows study

Bicycle exercise may benefit ICU patients, shows study

Early bicycle exercise during their stay in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU) may help some patients recover more quickly. [More]
New research points to lncRNA's key role in helping control cellular processes

New research points to lncRNA's key role in helping control cellular processes

Scientific research over the past decade has concentrated almost exclusively on the 2 percent of the genome's protein coding regions, virtually ignoring the other 98 percent, a vast universe of non-coding genetic material previously dismissed as nothing more than 'junk.' [More]
MMJ Labs to launch new wearable pain therapy device at runDisney Health and Fitness Expo

MMJ Labs to launch new wearable pain therapy device at runDisney Health and Fitness Expo

MMJ Labs, LLC, industry leaders in non-invasive pain relief, will debut their newest product, VibraCool® Massaging Ice Therapy, at the runDisney Health and Fitness Expo in Orlando, FL. [More]
Researchers develop synthetic cardiac stem cells that offer therapeutic benefits

Researchers develop synthetic cardiac stem cells that offer therapeutic benefits

Researchers from North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University have developed a synthetic version of a cardiac stem cell. [More]
New study shows efficacy of Ebola vaccine in offering protection against disease

New study shows efficacy of Ebola vaccine in offering protection against disease

An experimental Ebola vaccine was highly protective against the deadly virus in a major trial in Guinea, according to a new study that included researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. [More]
Ionis announces FDA approval of first SMA drug in the U.S for pediatric and adult patients

Ionis announces FDA approval of first SMA drug in the U.S for pediatric and adult patients

Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved SPINRAZATM (nusinersen) under Priority Review for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in pediatric and adult patients. [More]
Experimental Ebola vaccine offers high protection against deadly virus, reveals major trial

Experimental Ebola vaccine offers high protection against deadly virus, reveals major trial

An experimental Ebola vaccine was highly protective against the deadly virus in a major trial in Guinea, according to results published today in The Lancet. The vaccine is the first to prevent infection from one of the most lethal known pathogens, and the findings add weight to early trial results published last year. [More]
OTC medical device receives CE Mark approval to treat pain linked to fibromyalgia

OTC medical device receives CE Mark approval to treat pain linked to fibromyalgia

AVACEN Medical announced its AVACEN 100, Class-IIa, OTC medical device has received the CE Mark approval to treat widespread pain associated with fibromyalgia. [More]
MDA celebrates FDA approval of new spinal muscular atrophy drug

MDA celebrates FDA approval of new spinal muscular atrophy drug

The Muscular Dystrophy Association today celebrated news of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's decision to grant approval for nusinersen (brand name Spinraza), the first disease-modifying drug to treat the most common genetic cause of death in infants. [More]
FDA approves first drug to treat children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy

FDA approves first drug to treat children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Spinraza (nusinersen), the first drug approved to treat children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a rare and often fatal genetic disease affecting muscle strength and movement. [More]
Caltech scientists develop simple way to visualize gene expression with MRI

Caltech scientists develop simple way to visualize gene expression with MRI

Genes tell cells what to do -- for example, when to repair DNA mistakes or when to die--and can be turned on or off like a light switch. [More]
Making muscles burn more fat and less glucose could cause diabetes, say researchers

Making muscles burn more fat and less glucose could cause diabetes, say researchers

Making muscles burn more fat and less glucose can increase exercise endurance, but could simultaneously cause diabetes, says a team of scientists from Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions. [More]
New TSRI study shows how Piezo2 protein plays critical role in sensing lung expansion

New TSRI study shows how Piezo2 protein plays critical role in sensing lung expansion

The new study might help shed light on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in human babies, which is thought to be associated with dysfunctional airway sensory neurons. [More]
High-mileage runners show more neuromuscular changes than low-mileage counterparts

High-mileage runners show more neuromuscular changes than low-mileage counterparts

Runners who consistently log high mileage show more neuromuscular changes that improve running efficiency than their low-mileage counterparts, according to researchers from Liverpool John Moores University in the United Kingdom. [More]
New detection method could lead to noninvasive diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

New detection method could lead to noninvasive diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

The detection of prions in the blood of patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease could lead to a noninvasive diagnosis prior to symptoms and a way to identify prion contamination of the donated blood supply, according to researchers at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
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