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Nephrology is a branch of internal medicine and pediatrics dealing with the study of the function and diseases of the kidney.
Smoking reduces lifespans and overall chances of kidney transplantation in dialysis patients

Smoking reduces lifespans and overall chances of kidney transplantation in dialysis patients

Dialysis patients who smoke are much less likely to receive a life-saving kidney transplant and much more likely to die sooner according to researchers from the Health Research Institute (HRI) at the University of Limerick and UL’s Graduate Entry Medical School. [More]
Specific urine proteins may be indicators of acute kidney injury in preterm infants

Specific urine proteins may be indicators of acute kidney injury in preterm infants

A new study indicates that several proteins are excreted differently in preterm infants with kidney injury compared with those with healthy kidneys. [More]
Researchers identify biomarkers to improve prognosis of CKD

Researchers identify biomarkers to improve prognosis of CKD

Currently, there is no effective method to predict the prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. [More]
Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Retained metabolites may contribute to impaired cognitive function in kidney failure patients

Retained metabolites may contribute to impaired cognitive function in kidney failure patients

Retention of certain metabolites in the blood may contribute to cognitive impairment in patients with kidney failure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Red meat intake may increase risk of developing end-stage renal disease

Red meat intake may increase risk of developing end-stage renal disease

A new study indicates that red meat intake may increase the risk of kidney failure in the general population, and substituting red meat with alternative sources of protein from time to time may significantly reduce this risk. [More]
Researchers discover strong genetic risk factor for IgA nephropathy

Researchers discover strong genetic risk factor for IgA nephropathy

An international research collaboration has discovered a strong genetic risk factor for IgA nephropathy (IgAN) - the most common inflammatory kidney disease worldwide - and related renal dysfunction. [More]
Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Columbia University Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine, in collaboration with NewYork-Presbyterian and NYC Health + Hospitals/Harlem, have been awarded a grant from the NIH for approximately $4 million in fiscal year 2016 to enroll participants in the Cohort Program of President Barack Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI)—a large-scale research effort to improve our ability to prevent and treat disease based on individual differences in lifestyle, environment and genetics. [More]
Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced new retrospective health economic data on H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection; RCI), which may be an option for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. [More]
Exposure to air pollution may increase risk of kidney disease

Exposure to air pollution may increase risk of kidney disease

While air pollution is known to cause respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, a new study indicates that it also likely causes damage to the kidneys. [More]
Diabetes, kidney disease may play role in increasing adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans

Diabetes, kidney disease may play role in increasing adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans

New research indicates that diabetes and kidney disease may increase African Americans' risk of stroke and coronary heart disease, as well as their risk of dying from cardiovascular causes. [More]
Kidney transplant recipients with inflammation prior to surgery more likely to develop diabetes

Kidney transplant recipients with inflammation prior to surgery more likely to develop diabetes

Up to 30 percent of people who receive organ transplants will develop diabetes, but researchers are unsure why. Although doctors typically blame immunosuppressive drugs that transplant recipients take to prevent organ rejection, it's unclear why some people develop the lifelong disorder, while others do not. [More]
Worsening renal function linked to increased cardiovascular risk in AF

Worsening renal function linked to increased cardiovascular risk in AF

Patients with atrial fibrillation and declining renal function are at increased risk of subsequent stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding and death, US researchers report. [More]
Surgical treatment more effective than medical therapy for treating severely obese adolescents

Surgical treatment more effective than medical therapy for treating severely obese adolescents

An analysis of the results of a study of bariatric surgery and a separate trial of medical therapy in treating type 2 diabetes in teenagers with severe obesity shows that after two years of treatment, body mass index (BMI) and HbA1c, a measure of blood sugar control, are both significantly better with surgery. [More]
Empagliflozin offers long-term renal protection in Type 2 diabetes

Empagliflozin offers long-term renal protection in Type 2 diabetes

The sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin slows renal progression and averts clinical events, shows further analysis of the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial. [More]
Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Two classes of blood pressure medications, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are associated with a 16% lower risk of strokes, heart attacks and death in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a new study in the journal, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, reports. [More]
GPCR-Gβγ inhibition therapy could prevent chronic and acute kidney damage in heart failure patients

GPCR-Gβγ inhibition therapy could prevent chronic and acute kidney damage in heart failure patients

A study in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology suggests a new therapeutic approach to treat the development of chronic kidney disease secondary to chronic heart failure, known as cardiorenal syndrome type 2. [More]
Many children, young adults with migraines appear to have mild vitamin deficiencies

Many children, young adults with migraines appear to have mild vitamin deficiencies

A high percentage of children, teens and young adults with migraines appear to have mild deficiencies in vitamin D, riboflavin and coenzyme Q10 -- a vitamin-like substance found in every cell of the body that is used to produce energy for cell growth and maintenance. [More]
Scientists identify gene linked to severe glaucoma in children

Scientists identify gene linked to severe glaucoma in children

Northwestern Medicine and University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have identified a gene that causes severe glaucoma in children. [More]
About 30% of iPSCs not safe for clinical use, report multi-institutional researchers

About 30% of iPSCs not safe for clinical use, report multi-institutional researchers

As the promise of using regenerative stem cell therapies draws closer, a consortium of biomedical scientists reports about 30 percent of induced pluripotent stem cells they analyzed from 10 research institutions were genetically unstable and not safe for clinical use. [More]
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