Neuron News and Research RSS Feed - Neuron News and Research

Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity. [More]
Neuroprotective compounds can limit damage to the brain during ischemic stroke

Neuroprotective compounds can limit damage to the brain during ischemic stroke

In the 1990s, neuroscientists identified a class of drugs that showed promise in the area of stroke. NMDA receptor antagonists could limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke. But one problem complicated testing the drugs in a clinical setting: the side effects included disorientation and hallucinations. [More]
Carnegie Mellon study identifies intermediary neuron system that acts as synaptic cloaking device

Carnegie Mellon study identifies intermediary neuron system that acts as synaptic cloaking device

Neuroscientists believe that the connectome, a map of each and every connection between the millions of neurons in the brain, will provide a blueprint that will allow them to link brain anatomy to brain function. But a new study from Carnegie Mellon University has found that a specific type of neuron might be thwarting their efforts at mapping the connectome by temporarily cloaking the synapses that link a wide field of neurons. [More]
Scientists map autism genetic pathway that regulates brain development

Scientists map autism genetic pathway that regulates brain development

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found that mutations that cause autism in children are connected to a pathway that regulates brain development. The research, led by Lilia Iakoucheva, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry, is published in the February 18 issue of Neuron. [More]
CAMH scientists discover potential new approach to treat multiple sclerosis

CAMH scientists discover potential new approach to treat multiple sclerosis

Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health have discovered a promising new approach to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). In a new study, they've identified a previously unknown change in the spinal cord related to MS, and a way to alter this change to reduce the nerve cell damage that occurs with the disease. [More]
Background noise in the brain shapes neuron growth

Background noise in the brain shapes neuron growth

A process previously thought to be mere background noise in the brain has been found to shape the growth of neurons as the brain develops, according to research from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology (MRC CDN), Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), published in Cell Reports. [More]
TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine have been awarded a $7.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to determine how cocaine and HIV-1 interact to cause brain impairment in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. [More]
Andor Zyla sCMOS Camera enables instantaneous imaging of neuronal activity across whole organism for the first time

Andor Zyla sCMOS Camera enables instantaneous imaging of neuronal activity across whole organism for the first time

The speed, resolution and sensitivity of the Andor Zyla sCMOS camera has allowed the Vaziri research group in Vienna, Austria, to simultaneously image neuronal activity across an entire organism for the first time. [More]
New research provides hope for treating stroke using HUCBCs

New research provides hope for treating stroke using HUCBCs

Researchers have known that transplanted human umbilical cord cells (HUCBCs) can have a restorative effect on the brain and brain function following a stroke. However, just how the cells exert their therapeutic effects has not been clear. Now, a research team from the University of South Florida using animal models of stroke has found that the HUCBCs are most beneficial in preventing neuron loss when the Akt signaling pathway is activated by secretions from the HUCBCs and that Akt activation subsequently impacts a specific gene involved in reducing inflammation. [More]
Scientists show pattern of connectivity in newly-generated hippocampal neurons

Scientists show pattern of connectivity in newly-generated hippocampal neurons

Research by a team of scientists from Cologne, Munich and Mainz has shown an unprecedented degree of connectivity reorganization in newly-generated hippocampal neurons in response to experience, suggesting their direct contribution to the processing of complex information in the adult brain. [More]
UVA researchers find biological trigger for protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury

UVA researchers find biological trigger for protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury

Hot on the heels of discovering a protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have pinpointed the biological trigger for that response - a vital step toward being able to harness the body's defenses to improve treatment for spine injuries, brain trauma, Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. [More]
New study shows that the body's immune system may be able to clear Alzheimer's-associated plaques

New study shows that the body's immune system may be able to clear Alzheimer's-associated plaques

New research from scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California shows that the body's immune system may be able to clear the brain of toxic plaque build-up that is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, reversing memory loss and brain cell damage. [More]
Research findings could lead to improved treatments for brain and spinal cord injuries

Research findings could lead to improved treatments for brain and spinal cord injuries

Hot on the heels of discovering a protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have pinpointed the biological trigger for that response - a vital step toward being able to harness the body's defenses to improve treatment for spine injuries, brain trauma, Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. [More]
SuperAgers have distinctly different looking brains

SuperAgers have distinctly different looking brains

SuperAgers, aged 80 and above, have distinctly different looking brains than those of normal older people, according to new Northwestern Medicine research that is beginning to reveal why the memories of these cognitively elite elders don't suffer the usual ravages of time. [More]
Research opens door to development of new therapies to block HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

Research opens door to development of new therapies to block HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

While antiretroviral therapies have significantly improved and extended the lives of many HIV patients, another insidious and little discussed threat looms for aging sufferers - HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The disorders, which strike more often in HIV patients over age 50, can result in cognitive impairment, mild to severe, making everyday tasks a challenge. [More]
Findings may lay foundation for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

Findings may lay foundation for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

This story starts in 1955, upon the death of Albert Einstein, when the pathologist charged with performing the famous scientist's autopsy stole his brain. [More]
New research on dopamine-containing neurons could pave way for treating neurological disorders

New research on dopamine-containing neurons could pave way for treating neurological disorders

Scientists studying hatchling fish have made a new advance in studying a chemical in the brain that impacts on movement. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism underlying cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons

Scientists reveal mechanism underlying cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons

For the first time, scientists have revealed a mechanism underlying the cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons, a small group of neurons in the brain recently shown to play a major role in ALS pathology. [More]
Study helps develop better understanding of how dopamine influences behaviour

Study helps develop better understanding of how dopamine influences behaviour

Scientists studying hatchling fish have made a new advance in studying a chemical in the brain that impacts on movement. [More]
Silencing neurons in the arcopallium

Silencing neurons in the arcopallium

New research published by the Neuronal Mechanism for Critical Period Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University has shown the effectiveness of chemogenetic inhibition used to suppress neuronal activity as well as interesting results on how vocalization is controlled through this techniques application in zebra finches. [More]