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Transcranial magnetic stimulation could bring back abandoned memories

Transcranial magnetic stimulation could bring back abandoned memories

It's clear that your working memory -- which holds attention on small things of short-term importance -- works, or you wouldn't be able to remember a new phone number long enough to dial it. [More]
Research provides new insight into how diseases that disconnect brain and body occur

Research provides new insight into how diseases that disconnect brain and body occur

A huge colony of receptors must be optimally positioned and functioning on our muscle cells for our brains to talk with our bodies so we can walk and breathe. [More]
Experts come together to develop plan for managing and sharing neuroscience data

Experts come together to develop plan for managing and sharing neuroscience data

Three years ago the White House launched the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative to accelerate the development and application of novel technologies that will give us a better understanding about how brains work. [More]
Research identifies presence of neuron-producing stem cells in meninges

Research identifies presence of neuron-producing stem cells in meninges

A multidisciplinary research, conceived by Dr. Francesco Bifari, Department of Medical Biotechnology and Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Italy and Dr. Ilaria Decimo University of Verona, Italy, found that meninges - the protective membranes that enclose the brain - contain of a pool of neural stem cells. [More]
Neurons appear to retain partial communication despite serious structural aberrations, study finds

Neurons appear to retain partial communication despite serious structural aberrations, study finds

Neuroscientists have long known that brain cells communicate with each other through the release of tiny bubbles packed with neurotransmitters—a fleet of vessels docked along neuronal ends ready to launch when a trigger arrives. [More]
Noninvasive biomedical imaging technology uses light to map the brain

Noninvasive biomedical imaging technology uses light to map the brain

Scientific progress has provided a solid understanding of the anatomy of the brain. However, there is still no reliable way to examine neuron to neuron communication, as it happens--a key to understanding the correlation between brain structure and brain function. [More]
MEMOIR can help read history and ‘family trees’ of cells

MEMOIR can help read history and ‘family trees’ of cells

Researchers have developed a new method for reading the history and "family trees" of cells. [More]
Fetal limb movements can help neuron development, rat study shows

Fetal limb movements can help neuron development, rat study shows

A newborn rat's brain development stage is close to that of a human embryo in the second half of pregnancy, so this discovery allows to hypothesize that the same movement patterns can help neuron development in humans. [More]
Bitplane launches Imaris 8.4 solution that traces filaments in dense 3D neural networks

Bitplane launches Imaris 8.4 solution that traces filaments in dense 3D neural networks

Bitplane, an Oxford Instruments Company and world leader in 2-4D image visualization, analysis and interpretation, have announced the launch of Imaris 8.4 in advance of the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting in San Diego. [More]
Genetic mutation confers risk for development of Parkinson's disease earlier than usual

Genetic mutation confers risk for development of Parkinson's disease earlier than usual

A collaboration of 32 researchers in seven countries, led by scientists at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida, has found a genetic mutation they say confers a risk for development of Parkinson's disease earlier than usual. [More]
Scientists develop new model to provide predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity

Scientists develop new model to provide predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity

For as long as scientists have been listening in on the activity of the brain, they have been trying to understand the source of its noisy, apparently random, activity. [More]
Distinct structures of tau protein aggregates may help determine type of dementia, study shows

Distinct structures of tau protein aggregates may help determine type of dementia, study shows

The distinct structures of toxic protein aggregates that form in degenerating brains determine which type of dementia will occur, which regions of brain will be affected, and how quickly the disease will spread, according to a study from the Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute. [More]
Vanderbilt scientists develop new bioluminescent sensor that can light up brain cells in the dark

Vanderbilt scientists develop new bioluminescent sensor that can light up brain cells in the dark

A new kind of bioluminescent sensor causes individual brain cells to imitate fireflies and glow in the dark. [More]
Study reveals way to actively reverse anesthetic-induced unconsciousness

Study reveals way to actively reverse anesthetic-induced unconsciousness

The latest study from a Massachusetts General Hospital/Massachusetts Institute of Technology team investigating the mechanisms underlying general anesthesia finds that stimulating a specific group of neurons in mice produces signs of arousal -- including getting on their feet and walking -- even as the animals continue to receive the anesthetic drug isoflurane. [More]
Scientists identify commonly affected genes sets among people with three mental disorders

Scientists identify commonly affected genes sets among people with three mental disorders

Studying brain tissue from deceased donors, Johns Hopkins scientists have found common groups of genes disrupted among people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. [More]
Scientists suggest potential approach of lowering tau levels to thwart Alzheimer's disease

Scientists suggest potential approach of lowering tau levels to thwart Alzheimer's disease

Taking a pill that prevents the accumulation of toxic molecules in the brain might someday help prevent or delay Alzheimer's disease, according to scientists at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. [More]
MIT researchers develop imaging technique that provides unprecedented view of serotonin dynamics

MIT researchers develop imaging technique that provides unprecedented view of serotonin dynamics

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that's partly responsible for feelings of happiness and for mood regulation in humans. [More]
Cedars-Sinai receives FDA approval to examine safety of combination stem cell-gene therapy in ALS patients

Cedars-Sinai receives FDA approval to examine safety of combination stem cell-gene therapy in ALS patients

Cedars-Sinai regenerative medicine investigators have received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to test a combination stem cell-gene therapy they developed to stall the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a neurological disease that causes progressive paralysis and ultimately death. [More]
Study shows how damage to RNA-binding protein contributes to ALS

Study shows how damage to RNA-binding protein contributes to ALS

Although only 10 percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases are hereditary, a significant number of them are caused by mutations that affect proteins that bind RNA, a type of genetic material. [More]
Domain Therapeutics and Medicxi partner to launch Mavalon Therapeutics

Domain Therapeutics and Medicxi partner to launch Mavalon Therapeutics

Domain Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company that specializes in the discovery and development of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drugs, today announces the creation of Mavalon Therapeutics, a company focused on stopping the progression of Parkinson’s disease. [More]
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