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New partnership aims to study underlying neurobiology and genetics of PTSD, TBI

New partnership aims to study underlying neurobiology and genetics of PTSD, TBI

Cohen Veterans Bioscience today announced two new collaborative partnership efforts that will provide critical research tools for understanding the underlying neurobiology and genetics of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the goal of accelerating the development of first generation diagnostics and treatments. [More]
Human brain uses several frequency channels for communication

Human brain uses several frequency channels for communication

In the brain, the visual cortex processes visual information and passes it from lower to higher areas of the brain. However, information also flows in the opposite direction, e.g. to direct attention to particular stimuli. But how does the brain know which path the information should take? Researchers at the Ernst Strüngmann Institute for Neuroscience in Frankfurt in Cooperation with Max Planck Society have now demonstrated that the visual cortex of human subjects uses different frequency channels depending on the direction in which information is being transported. [More]
Unobtrusive patch on the forehead provides relief from PTSD

Unobtrusive patch on the forehead provides relief from PTSD

An average of 30 years had passed since the traumatic events that had left them depressed, anxious, irritable, hypervigilant, unable to sleep well and prone to nightmares. [More]
Remicade co-developer funds new microscopy facility on Scripps Florida campus

Remicade co-developer funds new microscopy facility on Scripps Florida campus

The co-developer of Remicade, one of the three top-selling drugs in the world, has donated more than $500,000 to fund what will be known as the Iris and Junming Le Foundation Super-Resolution Microscopy Facility on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has solved a long-standing mystery in cell biology by showing essentially how a key "relief-valve" in cells does its job. [More]
Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Research at King's College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder. [More]
NJHA honors several individuals and organizations with Healthcare Leader Awards

NJHA honors several individuals and organizations with Healthcare Leader Awards

The New Jersey Hospital Association, the state's oldest and largest healthcare trade association, today held its annual awards program to honor several individuals and organizations for their commitment to the state's healthcare system and the patients and communities they serve. [More]
Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Halaven (eribulin mesylate) Injection (0.5 mg per mL) for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic liposarcoma who have received a prior anthracycline-containing regimen. [More]
Researchers develop new painkiller as strong as morphine but not addictive

Researchers develop new painkiller as strong as morphine but not addictive

Researchers at Tulane University and Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System have developed a painkiller that is as strong as morphine but isn't likely to be addictive and with fewer side effects, according to a new study in the journal Neuropharmacology. [More]
New SBP research may lead to novel approach to treat heart failure

New SBP research may lead to novel approach to treat heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
Researchers create new neuronal connections for the first time

Researchers create new neuronal connections for the first time

That very fine hair-line object that you see being pulled across the screen is actually a neuron being made. A research team led by McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Institute has managed to create new functional connections between neurons for the first time. Apart from the fact that these artificial neurons grow over 60 times faster than neurons naturally do, they are indistinguishable from ones that grow naturally in our bodies. [More]
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Older people with higher amounts of a key protein in their brains also had slower decline in their memory and thinking abilities than people with lower amounts of protein from the gene called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, according to a study published in the January 27, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New findings offer roadmap for development of novel therapies to target common brain disorders

New findings offer roadmap for development of novel therapies to target common brain disorders

Scientists have pinpointed the cells that are likely to trigger common brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Multiple Sclerosis and intellectual disabilities. [More]
Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
Synaptic plasticity alterations responsible for memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

Synaptic plasticity alterations responsible for memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

Neurons communicate with one another by synaptic connections, where information is exchanged from one neuron to its neighbor. These connections are not static, but are continuously modulated in response to the ongoing activity (or experience) of the neuron. This process, known as synaptic plasticity, is a fundamental mechanism for learning and memory in humans as in all animals. [More]
Early diagnosis, treatment of sleep apnea may reduce hospital readmissions for heart failure patients

Early diagnosis, treatment of sleep apnea may reduce hospital readmissions for heart failure patients

Early diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea may reduce six-month readmissions for patients hospitalized with heart failure, according to research recently published online by the American Journal of Cardiology. [More]
Preventing memory loss in Alzheimer's Disease, a new key mechanism

Preventing memory loss in Alzheimer's Disease, a new key mechanism

Neurons communicate with one another by synaptic connections, where information is exchanged from one neuron to its neighbor. These connections are not static, but are continuously modulated in response to the ongoing activity (or experience) of the neuron. [More]
Shire announces resubmission of lifitegrast NDA to FDA for treatment of dry eye disease in adults

Shire announces resubmission of lifitegrast NDA to FDA for treatment of dry eye disease in adults

Shire plc today announced it has resubmitted the New Drug Application (NDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its investigational candidate, lifitegrast, for the treatment of signs and symptoms of dry eye disease in adults. Shire resubmitted the NDA in response to the complete response letter (CRL) the company received from the FDA on October 16, 2015. [More]
Neurocutaneous disorders affect skin, nervous system

Neurocutaneous disorders affect skin, nervous system

One of the most common genetic disorders is a condition called neurofibromatosis, which causes brown spots on the skin and benign tumors on the brain, spinal cord and other parts of the nervous system. [More]
UAB study shows IL-37 protein suppresses inflammatory response after spinal cord injury

UAB study shows IL-37 protein suppresses inflammatory response after spinal cord injury

Spinal cord injuries cause severe functional disabilities in those who sustain them, including paraplegia or tetraplegia, depending on the scale of the injury. This is due to the degeneration of the spinal pathways that carry nerve signals from the brain to the different parts of the body and vice versa, resulting in loss of mobility and sensitivity underneath the injured area. [More]
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