Neuroscience News and Research RSS Feed - Neuroscience News and Research

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. [More]
Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

MS relapses are typically reflective of new neurological symptoms. However, it can be a worsening of neurologic symptoms that begins after a patient has been stable (generally for about 30 days), but relapses are persistent and consistent changes in symptoms that occur for more than 24 to 48 hours. [More]
Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell? T [More]
Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Two years ago, Rachel Greenberg went out to run a few errands. While she was gone, her husband Glenn suffered a massive brain hemorrhage. He was immediately taken to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center where physicians explained he had suffered the worst kind of brain bleed. [More]
Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. [More]

Emotionally unstable people have different brain structure

We all vary in how often we become happy, sad or angry, and also in how strongly these emotions are expressed. This variability is a part of our personality and can be seen as a positive aspect that increases diversity in society. However, there are people that find it so difficult to regulate their emotions that it has a serious impact on their work, family and social life. These individuals may be given an emotional instability diagnosis such as borderline personality disorder or antisocial personality disorder. [More]

CU-Boulder study reveals how and when placebo effect works

You don't think you're hungry, then a friend mentions how hungry he is or you smell some freshly baked pizza and whoaaa, you suddenly feel really hungry. Or, you've had surgery and need a bit of morphine for pain. As soon as you hit that button you feel relief even though the medicine hasn't even hit your bloodstream. [More]
New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research suggests concussion may not significantly impair symptoms or cognitive skills for one gender over another, however, women may still experience greater symptoms and poorer cognitive performance at preseason testing. [More]
Study points to new treatment strategies for liver cancer

Study points to new treatment strategies for liver cancer

A new study by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, the National Cancer Institute, and the Chulabhorn Research Institute has found that blocking the activity of a key immune receptor, the lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LTβR), reduces the progression of liver cancer. [More]
Breakthrough reveals influence of schizophrenia’s 'Rosetta Stone' gene in brain development

Breakthrough reveals influence of schizophrenia’s 'Rosetta Stone' gene in brain development

Scientists have identified a critical function of what they believe to be schizophrenia's "Rosetta Stone" gene that could hold the key to decoding the function of all genes involved in the disease. [More]
Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

New research suggests older people who experience migraines may have an increased risk of stroke, but only if they are smokers. The study is published in the July 22, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Two UM researchers receive $500,000 to improve treatment for mild traumatic brain injury

Two UM researchers receive $500,000 to improve treatment for mild traumatic brain injury

Two University of Montana researchers were among six final winners nationally to receive $500,000 from the Head Health Challenge I, an up-to-$10 million program sponsored by General Electric Co. and the National Football League. [More]
Gladstone Institutes announces new business endeavor with Evotec and Dolby Family Ventures

Gladstone Institutes announces new business endeavor with Evotec and Dolby Family Ventures

The Gladstone Institutes announces the creation of Cure Network Ventures Inc. and Cure Network Dolby Acceleration Partners, LLC, a business endeavor with Dolby Family Ventures and Evotec AG, which will focus on Alzheimer's disease. Working through Cure Network Ventures, Inc., the new company will help expedite the translation of relevant scientific discoveries from the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease into the development of potential therapies. [More]
Body fat can send stress signals, say University of Florida Health researchers

Body fat can send stress signals, say University of Florida Health researchers

The brain's effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group that includes two University of Florida Health researchers has found that it's a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism. [More]
New assessment tool helps identify children and adolescents with bereavement disorder

New assessment tool helps identify children and adolescents with bereavement disorder

Everybody grieves the death of a loved one, and the process helps most mourners adjust to their loss. "Charlie Brown was right," said Christopher Layne, a psychologist and researcher at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. "There is good grief." But for some people, bereavement becomes a problem in itself, prolonging suffering and impairing functioning. For grieving children and adolescents persistent complex bereavement disorder can derail social and academic development at a time when children and adolescents need to master skills and form aspirations to succeed later in life. [More]

SAGE announces launch of open access journal: Educational Neuroscience

SAGE today announces the launch of Educational Neuroscience (EdN), an open access journal that explores developing brain-behavior relationships and their implications for the science of learning, academic skill acquisition, and education practice at multiple levels of the educational systems from early childhood to higher education. [More]
Phase 3 SUMIT study: Selumetinib fails to meet primary endpoint in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma

Phase 3 SUMIT study: Selumetinib fails to meet primary endpoint in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma

AstraZeneca today announced that the Phase 3 SUMIT study of selumetinib in combination with dacarbazine for the treatment of patients with metastatic uveal melanoma did not meet its primary endpoint of progression free survival. This combination therapy showed an adverse event profile generally consistent with current knowledge of the safety profiles of dacarbazine and selumetinib. [More]
Study reveals potential new therapeutic target for depression treatment

Study reveals potential new therapeutic target for depression treatment

Increasing the levels of a signaling molecule found in the brain can positively alter response to stress, revealing a potential new therapeutic target for treatment of depression, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers said. [More]
Alzheimer's Association recognizes Li Gan with Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research

Alzheimer's Association recognizes Li Gan with Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research

The Alzheimer's Association is recognizing Li Gan, Ph.D., for publishing influential research on the biology of Alzheimer's disease with the Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research. The Award was presented today during a plenary session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 in Washington, D.C. [More]
New genomic fingerprint may predict prostate cancer risk in African American men

New genomic fingerprint may predict prostate cancer risk in African American men

African American men are more likely to develop prostate cancer than European American men, and are also more than twice as likely to die from it. Although there are many reasons that contribute to this health disparity, new research shows that African American men may have a distinctly different type of prostate cancer than European American men, according to new genomic fingerprinting results. [More]
Advertisement