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Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

A new study shows the death of newborn brain cells may be linked to a genetic risk factor for five major psychiatric diseases, and at the same time shows a compound currently being developed for use in humans may have therapeutic value for these diseases by preventing the cells from dying. [More]
OSMR gene plays key role in driving growth of glioblastoma tumors

OSMR gene plays key role in driving growth of glioblastoma tumors

Glioblastoma is the most aggressive type of brain tumor in adults. Unfortunately, there are no effective treatments for the disease. On average, patients succumb just 16 months after diagnosis. [More]
Newly published manuscripts enhance understanding of the immune system

Newly published manuscripts enhance understanding of the immune system

MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, today announced that it has achieved a significant scientific milestone by publishing three manuscripts in Nature Immunology that advance the understanding of the immune system and highlight underlying mechanisms in two little-understood disease areas -- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). [More]
Salk scientists reveal how cellular fuel gauge plays unexpected role in development

Salk scientists reveal how cellular fuel gauge plays unexpected role in development

Salk scientists have revealed how a cellular "fuel gauge" responsible for monitoring and managing cells' energy processes also has an unexpected role in development. This critical link could help researchers better understand cancer and diabetes pathways. [More]
Hearing socially meaningful sounds can modify ear’s ability to pick up those signals

Hearing socially meaningful sounds can modify ear’s ability to pick up those signals

Hearing socially meaningful sounds can change the ear and enable it to better detect those sounds, according to researchers at Georgia State University who studied the phenomenon in green treefrogs. [More]
Derriford Appearance Scale 24 helps identify quality-of-life issues for breast cancer patients

Derriford Appearance Scale 24 helps identify quality-of-life issues for breast cancer patients

A new study produced by an interdisciplinary team led by Prof. Antonio Giordano, director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine at Temple University, tracks the development process and efficacy of the Italian translation of the Derriford Appearance Scale 24, an important clinical tool in identifying quality-of-life issues for breast cancer patients, especially concerns regarding body shame, depression, anxiety, overall appearance and appearance identity. [More]
Single season of contact sports can cause measurable brain changes

Single season of contact sports can cause measurable brain changes

Repeated impacts to the heads of high school football players cause measurable changes in their brains, even when no concussion occurs, according to research from UT Southwestern Medical Center's Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute and Wake Forest University School of Medicine. [More]
Study sheds light on mechanism of empty memories in epileptic patients

Study sheds light on mechanism of empty memories in epileptic patients

Between seizures and continually, brain cells in epileptic patients send signals that make "empty memories," perhaps explaining the learning problems faced by up to 40 percent of patients. This is the finding of a study in rats and humans led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and published April 25 in Nature Medicine. [More]
Brain chemical dopamine plays key role in representing or encoding movement

Brain chemical dopamine plays key role in representing or encoding movement

Princeton University researchers have found that dopamine - a brain chemical involved in learning, motivation and many other functions - also has a direct role in representing or encoding movement. The finding could help researchers better understand dopamine's role in movement-related disorders such as Parkinson's disease. [More]
Lab-grown mini-brains shed light on health crisis posed by Zika virus in fetal brains

Lab-grown mini-brains shed light on health crisis posed by Zika virus in fetal brains

Studying a new type of pinhead-size, lab-grown brain made with technology first suggested by three high school students, Johns Hopkins researchers have confirmed a key way in which Zika virus causes microcephaly and other damage in fetal brains: by infecting specialized stem cells that build its outer layer, the cortex. [More]
Widowed women have lower frailty risk than married women, study finds

Widowed women have lower frailty risk than married women, study finds

The well-accepted association between marital status, health, and risk of functional impairment in older individuals is generally true, but a new study on frailty found unexpected, gender-specific differences. [More]
FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

Florida Atlantic University's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is spearheading the South Florida site for the first U.S. clinical trial for Lewy body dementia (LBD), the second-most common dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The HEADWAY-DLB is a phase 2b multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate an investigational medicine, RVT-101, for dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
Researchers identify traveling spike generator that produces brain waves

Researchers identify traveling spike generator that produces brain waves

Brain waves that spread through the hippocampus are initiated by a method not seen before--a possible step toward understanding and treating epilepsy, according to researchers at Case Western Reserve University. [More]
Bacteria-derived gut metabolites can affect brain’s myelin content and induce depression-like symptoms

Bacteria-derived gut metabolites can affect brain’s myelin content and induce depression-like symptoms

Specific combinations of gut bacteria produce substances that affect myelin content and cause social avoidance behaviors in mice, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the medical journal eLife. This research suggests that targeting intestinal bacteria, or their metabolites, could be one way to treat debilitating psychiatric disorders and demyelinating diseases, like multiple sclerosis. [More]
Study aims to determine how aches, pains before and after concussion play role in recovery

Study aims to determine how aches, pains before and after concussion play role in recovery

Athletes who have medical complaints, like aches and pains, that have no known physical cause may take longer to recover after a concussion, according to a study published in the April 20, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

For years, neuroscientists have puzzled over how two abnormal proteins, called amyloid and tau, accumulate in the brain and damage it to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). Which one is the driving force behind dementia? The answer: both of them, according to a new study by researchers at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. [More]
Non-invasive optogenetic therapy can help treat chronic pain

Non-invasive optogenetic therapy can help treat chronic pain

The potential of light as a non-invasive, highly-focused alternative to pain medication was made more apparent thanks to research conducted by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
New study shows visuomotor errors accumulate during memory delay

New study shows visuomotor errors accumulate during memory delay

Who will win the women's singles tennis title at the 2016 Rio Olympics this August? That's a question recent York U brain research can help answer. [More]
Scientists discover CD2AP protein that plays key role in nervous system

Scientists discover CD2AP protein that plays key role in nervous system

University of Louisville researchers have discovered that a protein previously known for its role in kidney function also plays a significant role in the nervous system. In an article featured in the April 13 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, they show that the adaptor protein CD2AP is a key player in a type of neural growth known as collateral sprouting. [More]
Researchers discover new, previously underappreciated role for immature dentate gyrus granule cells

Researchers discover new, previously underappreciated role for immature dentate gyrus granule cells

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have proposed a model that resolves a seeming paradox in one of the most intriguing areas of the brain -- the dentate gyrus. [More]
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