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Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Different regions of brain help to visually locate objects relative to one's own body

Different regions of brain help to visually locate objects relative to one's own body

Serena Williams won her third consecutive US Open title a few days ago, thanks to reasons including obvious ones like physical strength and endurance. But how much did her brain and its egocentric and allocentric functions help the American tennis star retain the cup? [More]
Sanofi contributes $2.5 million to CCNA for dementia research

Sanofi contributes $2.5 million to CCNA for dementia research

Sanofi announced today its $2.5 million contribution to co-fund the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging, a partnership officially launched in Montreal today in the presence of The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health. [More]
Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
New way to preserve flexibility and resilience of the brain

New way to preserve flexibility and resilience of the brain

As Alzheimer's disease progresses, it kills brain cells mainly in the hippocampus and cortex, leading to impairments in "neuroplasticity," the mechanism that affects learning, memory, and thinking. [More]
People can become addicted to eating but not to consuming foods high in sugar or fat

People can become addicted to eating but not to consuming foods high in sugar or fat

People can become addicted to eating for its own sake but not to consuming specific foods such as those high in sugar or fat, research suggests. [More]
Young people who have attempted suicide less likely to have successful professional career later

Young people who have attempted suicide less likely to have successful professional career later

People who have attempted suicide when young are less likely to have a successful professional career later in life. [More]
Researchers address major challenge in quest to build replacement kidneys in the lab

Researchers address major challenge in quest to build replacement kidneys in the lab

Regenerative medicine researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have addressed a major challenge in the quest to build replacement kidneys in the lab. [More]
Scientists identify how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body

Scientists identify how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body

In most of the tissues of the body, specialized immune cells are entrusted with the task of engulfing the billions of dead cells that are generated every day. [More]
Researchers develop novel technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles

Researchers develop novel technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) have developed a novel technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles. [More]
Research to help patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries

Research to help patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries

Many patients suffer from severe spinal cord injuries after being involved in traffic accidents or accidents at work. [More]
Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Sleep difficulties may be linked to faster rates of decline in brain volume, according to a study published in the September 3, 2014, online issue of Neurology-, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Neuroscientist discovers new mechanism that can reverse chronic pain

Neuroscientist discovers new mechanism that can reverse chronic pain

It's in the brain where we perceive the unpleasant sensations of pain, and researchers have long been examining how calcium channels in the brain and peripheral nervous system contribute to the development of chronic pain conditions. [More]
E-cigarettes may function as "gateway drug" to marijuana and cocaine

E-cigarettes may function as "gateway drug" to marijuana and cocaine

Like conventional cigarettes, electronic cigarettes (or e-cigarettes) may function as a "gateway drug"—a drug that lowers the threshold for addiction to other substances, such as marijuana and cocaine—according to the 120th Shattuck lecture, presented to the Massachusetts Medical Society by Columbia researchers Denise and Eric Kandel and published today in the online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Implementing guidelines can improve hospitals' communication during patient care transitions

Implementing guidelines can improve hospitals' communication during patient care transitions

What happens when you are hospitalized, but your outpatient doctor does not know? Or when you arrive at the office for follow-up care, but your doctor does not have the right information about your hospital stay? Missing or incomplete communication from hospitals to outpatient primary care physicians (PCPs) can contribute to poor experiences and lead to hospital readmissions. [More]
BioLegend acquires shares of Covance Antibody Services

BioLegend acquires shares of Covance Antibody Services

BioLegend, Inc. (BioLegend) acquired the shares of Covance Antibody Services Inc., a business unit of Covance, located in Dedham, Massachusetts, on August 29, 2014. [More]
Study for better understanding of neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory

Study for better understanding of neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory

A study just published in the prestigious Nature Neuroscience journal by, Sylvain Williams, PhD, and his team, of the Research Centre of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University, opens the door towards better understanding of the neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory as well of the role of an essential element of the hippocampus - a sub-region named the subiculum. [More]
MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. [More]
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
New study reveals psychosocial health benefits for older adults who volunteer

New study reveals psychosocial health benefits for older adults who volunteer

Older adults who stay active by volunteering are getting more out of it than just an altruistic feeling - they are receiving a health boost! [More]