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Salk scientists discover key to amplification of ‘invader’ signals

Salk scientists discover key to amplification of ‘invader’ signals

When a receptor on the surface of a T cell -- a sentry of the human immune system -- senses a single particle from a harmful intruder, it immediately kicks the cell into action, launching a larger immune response. But exactly how the signal from a single receptor, among thousands on each T cell, can be amplified to affect a whole cell has puzzled immunologists for decades. [More]
Scientists identify naturally occurring molecule that plays protective role in ALS

Scientists identify naturally occurring molecule that plays protective role in ALS

Researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have identified a naturally occurring molecule that has the potential for preserving sites of communication between nerves and muscles in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and over the course of aging -- as well as a molecule that interferes with this helpful process. [More]
Study finds way to detect early signs of AD by looking at retina of patients' eyes

Study finds way to detect early signs of AD by looking at retina of patients' eyes

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston offers important insight into how Alzheimer's disease begins within the brain. [More]
Face preferences change depending on environment, study finds

Face preferences change depending on environment, study finds

When their environments are tough, men prefer heavier women, according to new research by the University of St Andrews. [More]
BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

The inability of cells to eliminate damaged proteins and organelles following the blockage of a coronary artery and its subsequent re-opening with angioplasty or medications - a sequence known as ischemia/reperfusion - often results in irreparable damage to the heart muscle. [More]
NYU Langone-led study to examine longer-term use of suppressive antiviral medication to reduce shingles

NYU Langone-led study to examine longer-term use of suppressive antiviral medication to reduce shingles

NYU Langone Medical Center will lead a five-year, 60-center clinical trial to evaluate new treatment protocols for herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO), a form of shingles that can seriously and permanently affect the eye. [More]
Exposure to allergens during pregnancy alters the brain makeup of fetuses and newborn rats

Exposure to allergens during pregnancy alters the brain makeup of fetuses and newborn rats

A new study in rats could begin to explain why allergies during pregnancy are linked to higher risks for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism in children. [More]
Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy

Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy

A new study shows a link between mothers with rheumatoid arthritis and children with epilepsy. [More]
Young adults with ADHD may display unique physiological signs that could lead to accurate diagnosis

Young adults with ADHD may display unique physiological signs that could lead to accurate diagnosis

Young adults diagnosed with ADHD may display subtle physiological signs that could lead to a more precise diagnosis, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
How toxic is your stress?

How toxic is your stress?

The term “stress” originates not in our minds or bodies, but from physics. It is the internal forces generated in an object in response to an external load. In the 1950s, Hans Selye adopted the term to characterize how living organisms change... [More]
New discovery may lead to targeted therapy for migraines

New discovery may lead to targeted therapy for migraines

A PhD student at Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University in Suzhou, China is carrying out work that could have a significant impact on drugs developed to prevent and treat migraines. [More]
arivis AG launches new InViewR software for 3D and 4D visualization of microscope data

arivis AG launches new InViewR software for 3D and 4D visualization of microscope data

arivis AG will be hosting a special event for VIP guests to journey inside biological structures during an immersive virtual reality experience with the newest version of InViewR software. [More]
Eminent physician Kenneth Walker receives Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award

Eminent physician Kenneth Walker receives Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award

Grady Health System Assistant Chief of Internal Medicine and Emory University School of Medicine Professor H. Kenneth Walker, M.D., was awarded the prestigious Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award at the Georgia Hospital Association's (GHA) Annual Meeting on Nov. 11. [More]
Research shows CRAC channel inhibitors decrease lesion size, brain hemorrhage, and neurological deficits in TBI model

Research shows CRAC channel inhibitors decrease lesion size, brain hemorrhage, and neurological deficits in TBI model

Researchers from the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and UCSF, and CalciMedica, Inc., are presenting a poster at the 46th annual Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego describing the use of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Every night while you sleep, electrical waves of brain activity circle around each side of your brain, tracing a pattern that, were it on the surface of your head, might look like the twin hair buns of Star Wars' Princess Leia. [More]
Neuroscientists find morphological differences between active and inactive cells in the brain

Neuroscientists find morphological differences between active and inactive cells in the brain

For the first time, Tübingen neuroscientists were able to differentiate between active and inactive cells in the brain morphologically, i.e. based on the cells' structure. [More]
Cancer researchers identify important driver of tumor cell invasion in glioblastoma

Cancer researchers identify important driver of tumor cell invasion in glioblastoma

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers have identified an essential driver of tumor cell invasion in glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer that can occur at any age. [More]
Research shows FOXP2 protein affects vocal production of all mammals, not just humans

Research shows FOXP2 protein affects vocal production of all mammals, not just humans

Our current understanding is that mice have either no -- or extremely limited -- neural circuitry and genes similar to those that regulate human speech. According to a recent study published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, this understanding may be incorrect. [More]
Brain implant enables ALS patient to operate speech computer with the mind

Brain implant enables ALS patient to operate speech computer with the mind

In the UMC Utrecht a brain implant has been placed in a patient enabling her to operate a speech computer with her mind. [More]
Bruker launches Ultima NeuraLight 3D imaging platform for neuroscience applications

Bruker launches Ultima NeuraLight 3D imaging platform for neuroscience applications

At the 46th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, Bruker today announced the release of the Ultima NeuraLight 3D simultaneous, all-optical stimulation and imaging platform for neuroscience applications. [More]
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