Neuroscience News and Research RSS Feed - Neuroscience News and Research

All brain training protocols do not return equal benefits, study reveals

All brain training protocols do not return equal benefits, study reveals

Cognitive brain training improves executive function whereas aerobic activity improves memory, according to new Center for BrainHealth research at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
Study produces most detailed picture to date of genetics underlying type 2 diabetes

Study produces most detailed picture to date of genetics underlying type 2 diabetes

The largest study of its kind into type 2 diabetes has produced the most detailed picture to date of the genetics underlying the condition. [More]
Immune system signaling can directly affect social behavior

Immune system signaling can directly affect social behavior

Using a systems-biology approach, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School made a startling discovery that immune system signaling can directly affect, and even change, social behavior in mice and other model animals. [More]
Salk scientists propose new molecular criteria for generating naïve stem cells

Salk scientists propose new molecular criteria for generating naïve stem cells

Salk scientists and colleagues have proposed new molecular criteria for judging just how close any line of laboratory-generated stem cells comes to mimicking embryonic cells seen in the very earliest stages of human development, known as naïve stem cells. [More]
Inability to turn off genes in the brain can affect learning and memory

Inability to turn off genes in the brain can affect learning and memory

Every time you play a game of basketball, make a cup of coffee or flick on a light switch, you are turning on genes in your brain. These same genes typically are turned off when the activity ceases - but when that doesn't happen, damaging consequences can occur. [More]
Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Fear memory encoding, the process responsible for persistent reactions to trauma-associated cues, is influenced by a sparse but potent population of inhibitory cells called parvalbumin-interneurons (PV-INs) in the amygdala, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online July 14 in the journal Neuron. [More]
Researchers find immune system directly affects, controls social behavior

Researchers find immune system directly affects, controls social behavior

In a startling discovery that raises fundamental questions about human behavior, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the immune system directly affects - and even controls - creatures' social behavior, such as their desire to interact with others. [More]
Genes linked to Alzheimer's disease may show effects on the brain from childhood

Genes linked to Alzheimer's disease may show effects on the brain from childhood

A gene associated with Alzheimer's disease and recovery after brain injury may show its effects on the brain and thinking skills as early as childhood, according to a study published in the July 13, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Scientists identify timing of major metabolic shift in developing neurons

Scientists identify timing of major metabolic shift in developing neurons

Our brains can survive only for a few minutes without oxygen. Salk Institute researchers have now identified the timing of a dramatic metabolic shift in developing neurons, which makes them become dependent on oxygen as a source of energy. [More]
Researcher receives $1.9 million grant to study development of memory networks in children

Researcher receives $1.9 million grant to study development of memory networks in children

Noa Ofen, Ph.D., a Wayne State University researcher in lifespan cognitive neuroscience, received a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health to study the development of memory networks in children. [More]
Study shows stress relief after eating highly palatable foods may vary between sexes

Study shows stress relief after eating highly palatable foods may vary between sexes

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found that the brain networks that mediate stress relief after eating highly palatable foods may vary between males and females, and may also depend on the stage of the estrous cycle. [More]
Neuroscience studies provide evidence of positive impact of social interaction

Neuroscience studies provide evidence of positive impact of social interaction

Animals prefer contact with other animals rather than drug consumption. – This has been shown by neuroscience studies providing first-time evidence of the positive impact of social interaction and opening up new therapeutic avenues. [More]
Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire plc announces that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Xiidra (lifitegrast ophthalmic solution) 5%, a twice-daily eye drop solution indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease in adult patients. [More]
Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

A patch made from cryopreserved human umbilical cord may be a novel method for treating spina bifida in utero, according to researchers at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Leukemia drug increases brain dopamine, lowers toxic proteins linked to Parkinson's or dementia

Leukemia drug increases brain dopamine, lowers toxic proteins linked to Parkinson's or dementia

A small phase I study provides molecular evidence that an FDA-approved drug for leukemia significantly increased brain dopamine and reduced toxic proteins linked to disease progression in patients with Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
Scientists succeed in restoring multiple key aspects of vision in mice

Scientists succeed in restoring multiple key aspects of vision in mice

Experiments conducted under the leadership of a Stanford University School of Medicine investigator have succeeded, for the first time, in restoring multiple key aspects of vision in mammals. [More]
New home-based intervention aims to improve health outcomes of children of South Asian immigrants

New home-based intervention aims to improve health outcomes of children of South Asian immigrants

More than one-third of Bronx residents are born outside of the United States. Often separated from family, challenged by language barriers, unfamiliar with health resources, and burdened by poverty, they are at high risk for health problems. And these risks extend to their young children. [More]
Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Loss or impairment of the ability to speak is one of the most feared complications of stroke--one faced by about 20% of stroke patients. Language, as one of the most complex functions of the brain, is not seated in a single brain region but involves connections between many regions. [More]
Non-drug solutions for postpartum depression: an interview with Dr David Brock & Christopher Thatcher

Non-drug solutions for postpartum depression: an interview with Dr David Brock & Christopher Thatcher

Postpartum depression (PPD) is reported to occur in 10-15% of delivering women with an estimated 400,000 women affected annually in the US. It is the most common complication of childbirth and is a significant public health concern. [More]
UH cardiologists implant first Abbott Absorb stent on patient with coronary artery disease

UH cardiologists implant first Abbott Absorb stent on patient with coronary artery disease

University Hospitals Case Medical Center is among the first in the country - and the first in Ohio - to offer and deploy the Abbott Absorb stent, a completely bioresorbable stent. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement