Neuroscience News and Research RSS Feed - Neuroscience News and Research

Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Taking vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements may not reduce the risk of memory and thinking problems after all, according to a new study published in the November 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the largest to date to test long-term use of supplements and thinking and memory skills. [More]
Researchers find that yellow fever mosquitoes contain odor-detecting gene

Researchers find that yellow fever mosquitoes contain odor-detecting gene

One of the world's deadliest mosquitoes sustains its taste for human blood thanks in part to a genetic tweak that makes it more sensitive to human odor, according to new research. [More]
Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation today announced the award of NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants valued at $1.5 million to 15 scientists, who are full professors or the equivalent, conducting innovative projects in diverse areas of neurobiological and behavioral research. [More]
New study reveals promising path for rehabilitation of mild traumatic brain injury patients

New study reveals promising path for rehabilitation of mild traumatic brain injury patients

As football players are learning, a violent blow to the head has the potential to cause mild to severe traumatic brain injury -- physical damage to the brain that can be debilitating, even fatal. The long-term effects run the gamut of human functioning, from trouble communicating to extensive cognitive and behavioral deterioration. To date, there is no effective medical or cognitive treatment for patients with traumatic brain injuries. [More]
Effecting changes to FosB gene could help control addiction, depression

Effecting changes to FosB gene could help control addiction, depression

Regulation of a single, specific gene in a brain region related to drug addiction and depression is sufficient to reduce drug and stress responses, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 27 online in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
Scientists identify new therapeutic targets, screening test to uncover compounds for memory disorders

Scientists identify new therapeutic targets, screening test to uncover compounds for memory disorders

In a pair of related studies, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a number of new therapeutic targets for memory disorders and have developed a new screening test to uncover compounds that may one day work against those disorders. [More]
Study reveals significant reduction in smoking following olfactory conditioning during sleep

Study reveals significant reduction in smoking following olfactory conditioning during sleep

New Weizmann Institute research may bring the idea of sleep learning one step closer to reality. The research, which appeared today in The Journal of Neuroscience, suggests that certain kinds of conditioning applied during sleep could induce us to change our behavior. The researchers exposed smokers to pairs of smells - cigarettes together with that of rotten eggs or fish - as the subjects slept, and then asked them to record how many cigarettes they smoked in the following week. [More]
Experts review advances in understanding, treatment of bipolar disorder

Experts review advances in understanding, treatment of bipolar disorder

Several lines of research have opened exciting new frontiers in scientific understanding and clinical management of bipolar disorder. Recent advances in bipolar disease research are described in this month's special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. [More]
Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Synapses are the sites that connect neurons – sites where information is passed from one neuron to another. They are highly specialized structures and synaptic function is crucial for normal brain function. [More]
Leading causes of blindness can be detected by looking at how eyes respond to watching TV

Leading causes of blindness can be detected by looking at how eyes respond to watching TV

One of the leading causes of blindness worldwide could be detected by how our eyes respond to watching TV according to a new study from researchers at City University London. [More]
Mothers, teachers lack awareness about ADHD symptoms in tween girls

Mothers, teachers lack awareness about ADHD symptoms in tween girls

According to a new survey released today, nearly 50 percent of mothers of tween girls who have been diagnosed with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) reported that they had first attributed their daughters' behavior to "normal" adolescent struggles, and 59 percent reported that they initially hesitated to seek help from a doctor for their daughter. [More]
Mice may hold clues in development of ADHD, autism and bipolar disorder

Mice may hold clues in development of ADHD, autism and bipolar disorder

A darting mouse may hold an important clue in the development of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), autism and bipolar disorder, according to a study by a Vanderbilt University-led research team recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Olympus to host fifth annual neuroimaging symposium in conjunction with 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience

Olympus to host fifth annual neuroimaging symposium in conjunction with 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience

Olympus is hosting its fifth annual neuroimaging symposium in conjunction with the 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) on Monday, November 17 at 6:30pm in Washington DC. The Olympus Neuroimaging Symposium and reception will be held at the Marriott Marquis Washington, DC, 901 Massachusetts Avenue NW, in the Capitol and Congress ballrooms. It is open to all media and registered SfN attendees. [More]
Johnson & Johnson completes acquisition of Alios BioPharma

Johnson & Johnson completes acquisition of Alios BioPharma

Johnson & Johnson today announced the completion of the acquisition of Alios BioPharma, Inc., a privately held clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing therapies for viral diseases, for a total purchase price of approximately $1.75 billion in cash. [More]
Applying lessons learnt from failed Alzheimer's studies for future research

Applying lessons learnt from failed Alzheimer's studies for future research

Disappointing results in clinical Alzheimer's studies discourage doctors and scientists from continuing their research into ɣ-secretases and a possible treatment against Alzheimer's disease. In the prestigious journal Cell, the Alzheimer's expert Bart De Strooper (VIB-KU Leuven) argues that these studies are not pointless, but merely indicate what the next steps should be for the Alzheimer's research. [More]
Salk Institute researchers heal injured hearts of living mice

Salk Institute researchers heal injured hearts of living mice

Researchers at the Salk Institute have healed injured hearts of living mice by reactivating long dormant molecular machinery found in the animals' cells, a finding that could help pave the way to new therapies for heart disorders in humans. [More]
U-M researchers show how neurons perform multiple functions

U-M researchers show how neurons perform multiple functions

Researchers at the University of Michigan have shown how a single neuron can perform multiple functions in a model organism, illuminating for the first time this fundamental biological mechanism and shedding light on the human brain. [More]
Study looks at new diagnostic, treatment approaches to neurological conditions

Study looks at new diagnostic, treatment approaches to neurological conditions

Despite great advances in understanding how the human brain works, psychiatric conditions, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain injuries are on the rise. Progress in the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches appears to have stalled. In a special issue of the Cell Press journal Neuron, experts look at the challenges associated with "translational neuroscience," or efforts to bring advances in the lab to the patients who need them. [More]
Commonly prescribed drugs for arthritis and pain may increase risk of death from stroke

Commonly prescribed drugs for arthritis and pain may increase risk of death from stroke

Commonly prescribed, older drugs for arthritis and pain may increase the risk of death from stroke, according to a study published in the November 5, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]

UTSA professor selected to receive NSF grant to study complex brain processes

Fidel Santamaria, associate professor of biology in the UTSA College of Sciences, is one of 36 researchers in the nation selected to receive a two-year $300,00 National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER). The funding supports President Obama's BRAIN Initiative, a federal effort to support researchers to create new technology that will demystify complex brain processes. [More]