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Multi-center study compares clinical performance of AAA procedures in virtual environment

Multi-center study compares clinical performance of AAA procedures in virtual environment

University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center and Simbionix recently launched a multi-center, randomized study comparing the clinical performance of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) procedures with and without prior rehearsal in a virtual environment for physicians. [More]
New UCLA study reveals why people with autism experience neural stem cell overgrowth after birth

New UCLA study reveals why people with autism experience neural stem cell overgrowth after birth

People with autism spectrum disorder often experience a period of accelerated brain growth after birth. No one knows why, or whether the change is linked to any specific behavioral changes. [More]
BIDMC scientists uncover new class of molecules that protects against diabetes

BIDMC scientists uncover new class of molecules that protects against diabetes

Scientists at the Salk Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston have discovered a new class of molecules—produced in human and mouse fat—that protects against diabetes. [More]
USC to become a hub for exploring the human brain

USC to become a hub for exploring the human brain

In a rare distinction for one university, neuroimaging world leaders and USC Professors Arthur Toga and Paul Thompson will receive two major research center awards to advance their exploration of the human brain. [More]
New research reveals innovative way to classify severity of stroke

New research reveals innovative way to classify severity of stroke

New research conducted at the Florida State University-based National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has revealed a new, innovative way to classify the severity of a stroke, aid in diagnosis and evaluate potential treatments. [More]
Researchers use light to erase specific memories in mice

Researchers use light to erase specific memories in mice

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together to retrieve episodic memories. [More]
New findings link obesity and dietary factors to late-life dementias

New findings link obesity and dietary factors to late-life dementias

Difficulties learning, remembering, and concentrating. An inability to resist environmental temptations to eat. A lifetime of progressive deterioration in the brain. [More]
Study shows rats, mice perform similarly in cognitive tests; offers implications for cognition research

Study shows rats, mice perform similarly in cognitive tests; offers implications for cognition research

It's one of those ideas that seems to make perfect sense: the bigger the brain, the more intelligent the creature. [More]
Neuroscientists solve mystery of ‘chemo brain’

Neuroscientists solve mystery of ‘chemo brain’

It is estimated that as many as half of patients taking cancer drugs experience a decrease in mental sharpness. [More]
Shire receives FDA guidance on regulatory path for investigational compound SHP 465

Shire receives FDA guidance on regulatory path for investigational compound SHP 465

Shire plc today announced that it has received further guidance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on the regulatory path for SHP 465 (triple-bead mixed amphetamine salts MAS), an investigational oral stimulant medication being evaluated as a potential treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in adults. [More]
Stretch sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by external forces

Stretch sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by external forces

Stretch sensors in our muscles participate in reflexes that serve the subconscious control of posture and movement. According to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, these sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by one's voluntary action, and most strongly to stretch that is imposed by external forces. The ability to reflect causality in this manner can facilitate appropriate reflex control and accurate self-perception. [More]
Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with a healthy diet and lifestyle may be less likely to have a stroke by more than half, according to a study published in the October 8, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Specific perceptual learning deficit associated with Fragile X Syndrome

Specific perceptual learning deficit associated with Fragile X Syndrome

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have described for the first time a specific perceptual learning deficit in mice with a mutation of the same gene as found in children with Fragile X Syndrome (FXS). [More]
USC researchers develop new methods to advance study of human brains, epilepsy

USC researchers develop new methods to advance study of human brains, epilepsy

USC biomedical engineers, neurologists and neurosurgeons develop new methods to advance the study of human brains and epilepsy. Studying the human brain is logistically complicated. Living samples of the complex and sensitive organ are limited and difficult to preserve, which means that research on them must be conducted quickly before they expire. [More]
Two UCSD professors of psychiatry honored for schizophrenia research

Two UCSD professors of psychiatry honored for schizophrenia research

Two professors of psychiatry at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have been honored by the New York City-based Brain & Behavior Research Foundation for their work studying the genetics, dysfunction and treatment of schizophrenia, a chronic and severe brain disorder affecting roughly 1 percent of the general population or approximately 3 million people. [More]
Researchers develop potential fast-acting "vaccine" for myasthenia gravis

Researchers develop potential fast-acting "vaccine" for myasthenia gravis

Nearly 60,000 Americans suffer from myasthenia gravis (MG), a non-inherited autoimmune form of muscle weakness. The disease has no cure, and the primary treatments are nonspecific immunosuppressants and inhibitors of the enzyme cholinesterase. [More]

Clot-buster shows promise in treating less severe forms of traumatic brain injury

The only drug currently approved for treatment of stroke's crippling effects shows promise, when administered as a nasal spray, to help heal similar damage in less severe forms of traumatic brain injury. [More]

New Aalborg University center to study link between maladaptive central nervous system, chronic pain

A new research center at Aalborg University in Denmark will investigate how a maladaptive central nervous system can be responsible for the enduring or chronic pain that affects one in five adult Danes. If this major ambition is fulfilled, it may turn the understanding of the pain system on its head and improve treatment. [More]
Groundbreaking study tracks precise path of rabies to the central nervous system

Groundbreaking study tracks precise path of rabies to the central nervous system

Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body's internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year. [More]
U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

Deep in the brains of the million Americans with Parkinson's disease, changes to their brain cells put them at high risk of dangerous falls -- a problem that resists even the most modern treatments. [More]