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Research could help to reduce health care charges

Research could help to reduce health care charges

Recently published findings in Annals of Internal Medicine by Steven Lipshultz, M.D., Wayne State University professor and chair of pediatrics and pediatrician-in-chief at the Children's Hospital of Michigan, part of the Detroit Medical Center, and colleagues could help to reduce health care charges while also protecting childhood cancer survivors from heart ailments caused by drug therapy. [More]
Covenant and Sartori medical centers deploy TRU-D SmartUVC superbug-slaying robot

Covenant and Sartori medical centers deploy TRU-D SmartUVC superbug-slaying robot

Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare-Iowa is the latest to deploy TRU-D SmartUVC, a 5-foot-5 germ-killing ultraviolet robot equipped with the only infection prevention data collection and reporting software on the market. TRU-D is now in use at Covenant Medical Center in Waterloo and Sartori Medical Center in Cedar Falls, Iowa. [More]
Ethnic background of father can influence child's birthweight

Ethnic background of father can influence child's birthweight

A father's ethnic background can influence a child's birthweight, a new study has found. [More]
Targeting ASIC-related neurotransmission may lead to new therapies for treating drug addiction

Targeting ASIC-related neurotransmission may lead to new therapies for treating drug addiction

University of Iowa researchers have discovered a new form of neurotransmission that influences the long-lasting memory created by addictive drugs, like cocaine and opioids, and the subsequent craving for these drugs of abuse. Loss of this type of neurotransmission creates changes in brains cells that resemble the changes caused by drug addiction. [More]
Foreign medical graduates face difficulties in obtaining residency positions in US, Canada

Foreign medical graduates face difficulties in obtaining residency positions in US, Canada

Foreign-trained physicians feel there are not enough residency positions for them in countries such as Canada and the United States and this information was not communicated to them before they emigrated, a new study has found. [More]
Research: TB infection among people taking corticosteroid pills may be underestimated

Research: TB infection among people taking corticosteroid pills may be underestimated

Tuberculosis infection among people taking corticosteroid pills may be underestimated, new research suggests. [More]
Study questions whether health system, government policies can meet needs of people aging with HIV

Study questions whether health system, government policies can meet needs of people aging with HIV

As the first people with HIV grow old, a new study from St. Michael's Hospital questions whether the health care system and other government policies are prepared to meet their complex medical and social needs. [More]
Women are 10% more likely to use mental health services than men

Women are 10% more likely to use mental health services than men

Women with chronic physical illnesses are more likely to use mental health services than men with similar illnesses; they also seek out mental health services six months earlier than those same men, according to new study from St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). [More]
Key historical misconceptions hinder research and treatment for brain metastases

Key historical misconceptions hinder research and treatment for brain metastases

"Key historical misconceptions" are hindering progress in research and treatment for patients with cancer metastases to the brain, suggests a special article in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Good news for adults who suffer from insomnia

Good news for adults who suffer from insomnia

There's good news for the 30 per cent or more of adults who suffer from insomnia--difficulty falling asleep, waking up for prolonged periods during the night or unwanted early morning awakenings. [More]
Novel technology serves as "flight simulator" for neurosurgeons

Novel technology serves as "flight simulator" for neurosurgeons

NYU Langone Medical Center is now using a novel technology that serves as a "flight simulator" for neurosurgeons, allowing them to rehearse complicated brain surgeries before making an actual incision on a patient. [More]
Covidien launches Pipeline Flex embolization device at annual LINNC in Paris

Covidien launches Pipeline Flex embolization device at annual LINNC in Paris

Further strengthening its broad line of neurovascular products to treat unruptured brain aneurysms, Covidien plc announced the European launch of its Pipelineā„¢ Flex embolization device at the annual Live Interventional Neuroradiology & Neurosurgery Course (LINNC), held in Paris June 23-25. This next-generation flow diversion device received CE Mark earlier this year. [More]
Osteoarthritis may be treated with stem cell mobilization therapy

Osteoarthritis may be treated with stem cell mobilization therapy

Researchers in Taiwan have found that peripheral blood stem cells can be "mobilized" by injection of a special preparation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) into rats that modeled osteoarthritis (OA). [More]
Neurosurgeons implant new type of electrical stimulator to control seizures

Neurosurgeons implant new type of electrical stimulator to control seizures

On June 18, neurosurgeons at the University of Alabama at Birmingham implanted a new type of electrical stimulator to control seizures in patients with difficult-to-control epilepsy. [More]
New mobile app can measure respiratory rate in children 6 times faster than manual method

New mobile app can measure respiratory rate in children 6 times faster than manual method

A new mobile app developed by researchers at the Child & Family Research Institute (CFRI) at BC Children's Hospital and the University of British Columbia can measure respiratory rate in children roughly six times faster than the standard manual method. [More]
University Hospitals introduces surgical procedure for management of glaucoma in NE Ohio

University Hospitals introduces surgical procedure for management of glaucoma in NE Ohio

With the arrival of a leading expert in glaucoma, Douglas Rhee, MD, as its chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University Hospitals Case Medical Center is introducing a surgical procedure for the management of glaucoma that is new to Northeast Ohio. [More]
U-M researchers detail new discoveries about basic biology of dystonia

U-M researchers detail new discoveries about basic biology of dystonia

Twist and hold your neck to the left. Now down, and over to the right, until it hurts. Now imagine your neck - or arms or legs - randomly doing that on their own, without you controlling it. [More]
International researchers discover genetic component of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

International researchers discover genetic component of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

An international team of researchers has discovered a significant genetic component of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy (IGE), the most common form of epilepsy. [More]
Canola bread diet experiences reduction in blood glucose levels and LDL cholesterol

Canola bread diet experiences reduction in blood glucose levels and LDL cholesterol

Canola is Canada's oil and new research from St. Michael's Hospital suggests it should also be one of the oils of choice for people with Type 2 diabetes. [More]
Greenwood Genetic and Clemson receive first round of fund from SRHC

Greenwood Genetic and Clemson receive first round of fund from SRHC

Seven research projects from Greenwood Genetic Center and Clemson University faculty were selected to receive the first round of funding provided by Self Regional Healthcare (SRHC). [More]