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Monash Vision Group moves a step closer to Bionic Eye clinical trials

Monash Vision Group moves a step closer to Bionic Eye clinical trials

The Monash Vision Groupmoves a step closer to clinical trials of its Bionic Eye, thanks to landmark donations from two respected business leaders. [More]
Real-time surgical guidance study to evaluate TriVersa NanoMate with LESA capability from Advion

Real-time surgical guidance study to evaluate TriVersa NanoMate with LESA capability from Advion

Advion, Inc. announces that is its TriVersa NanoMate with liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) capability will be evaluated as part of a study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. [More]
Alim Louis Benabid, Mahlon DeLong jointly win 2014 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award

Alim Louis Benabid, Mahlon DeLong jointly win 2014 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award

French neurosurgeon Alim Louis Benabid and American neurologist Mahlon DeLong were recently named winners of the 2014 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their roles in developing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson disease. [More]
'Safe entry zones' for neurosurgeons who perform brainstem surgery

'Safe entry zones' for neurosurgeons who perform brainstem surgery

A study using intricate fiber dissection techniques provides new insights into the deep anatomy of the human brainstem--and helps to define "safe entry zones" for neurosurgeons performing brainstem surgery, according to a special article published in Operative Neurosurgery, a quarterly supplement to Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]

IMRIS successfully completes human factors study for SYMBIS Surgical System

IMRIS Inc. today announced that the Company has successfully completed the human factors study for the SYMBIS Surgical System – the comprehensive validation used to support the product's 510(k) submission to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on November 26. [More]
Sanovas's endoscopic imaging platform recognized by Frost & Sullivan

Sanovas's endoscopic imaging platform recognized by Frost & Sullivan

Based on its recent analysis of the endoscopic imaging market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes Sanovas Inc. with the 2014 Global Frost & Sullivan Award for New Product Innovation Leadership. In a market where spiralling healthcare costs impact the entire spectrum of stakeholders, Sanovas's ground-breaking endoscopic platform, MicroCam, provides the functionality of a high-end, flexible endoscope without the accompanying cost and maintenance burden. [More]
PET/CT may improve differentiation of PTSD from MTBI

PET/CT may improve differentiation of PTSD from MTBI

Hybrid imaging with positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the pituitary region of the brain is a promising tool for differentiating military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from those with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). [More]
Good Samaritan Hospital receives $417,560 grant to implement telemedicine program

Good Samaritan Hospital receives $417,560 grant to implement telemedicine program

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development awards Good Samaritan Hospital, a prominent downtown Los Angeles hospital, a $417,560 grant to implement a telemedicine program that will connect members of the medical staff at Good Samaritan Hospital with public health and primary care providers and their patients at six Public Health sites on the island of Guam. [More]
GABA injections prevent and reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice

GABA injections prevent and reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice

A chemical produced in the pancreas that prevented and even reversed Type 1 diabetes in mice had the same effect on human beta cells transplanted into mice, new research has found. [More]

Gothenburg study shows epilepsy surgery is a low-risk procedure

A study at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, has found that epilepsy surgery is a safe, effective and low-risk procedure. Nevertheless, few Swedes have the operation, and those who are interested may have to wait a long time for presurgical counseling. [More]
Researchers say that nervous system may play vital role in infections, autoimmune diseases

Researchers say that nervous system may play vital role in infections, autoimmune diseases

The nervous system may play a bigger role in infections and autoimmune diseases than previously known. If researchers can learn more about that role, it could provide insight into diagnosing and treating everything from the stomach flu to rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
SNTF protein can predict severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes

SNTF protein can predict severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes

New Penn Medicine research has found that elevated levels in the blood of the brain-enriched protein calpain-cleaved αII-spectrin N-terminal fragment, known as SNTF, shortly after sports-related concussion can predict the severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes. [More]

STAR Analytical Services awarded NIH grant to develop system for hearing-impaired listeners

STAR Analytical Services announces the award of a 3-year $1,500,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop an assistive conversation system for hearing-impaired listeners, including many aging baby-boomers, who have difficulty understanding and participating in conversations in noisy environments. [More]
New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

A new, enhanced MRI diagnostic approach was, for the first time, able to identify significant damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of professional football players following "unreported" trauma or mild concussions. Published in the current issue of JAMA Neurology, this study could improve decision making on when an athlete should "return to play." [More]
Surgery simulator app: an interview with Jean Nehme

Surgery simulator app: an interview with Jean Nehme

Touch Surgery is a mobile surgical simulation app that allows surgeons to learn and rehearse surgical procedures. It provides a cognitive map for operations on a virtual patient. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
A new formal protocol for emergency treatment of patients with aneurysmal SAH

A new formal protocol for emergency treatment of patients with aneurysmal SAH

Neurosurgeons and neurointerventionalists at Kyungpook National University in the Republic of Korea have developed a formal protocol for delivering emergency treatment to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from ruptured aneurysms within the first few hours after bleeding occurs. [More]
RI-MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

RI-MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). [More]
Study offers unprecedented picture of how children frequently suffer head injuries

Study offers unprecedented picture of how children frequently suffer head injuries

A study in which more than 43,000 children were evaluated for head trauma offers an unprecedented picture of how children most frequently suffer head injuries, report physicians at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine. [More]
New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

Penn State College of Medicine and University of Wisconsin have been awarded a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund the study of a novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause of anemia in the United States. [More]