Neurosurgery News and Research RSS Feed - Neurosurgery News and Research

Gothenburg study shows epilepsy surgery is a low-risk procedure

Gothenburg study shows epilepsy surgery is a low-risk procedure

A study at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, has found that epilepsy surgery is a safe, effective and low-risk procedure. Nevertheless, few Swedes have the operation, and those who are interested may have to wait a long time for presurgical counseling. [More]
Researchers say that nervous system may play vital role in infections, autoimmune diseases

Researchers say that nervous system may play vital role in infections, autoimmune diseases

The nervous system may play a bigger role in infections and autoimmune diseases than previously known. If researchers can learn more about that role, it could provide insight into diagnosing and treating everything from the stomach flu to rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
SNTF protein can predict severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes

SNTF protein can predict severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes

New Penn Medicine research has found that elevated levels in the blood of the brain-enriched protein calpain-cleaved αII-spectrin N-terminal fragment, known as SNTF, shortly after sports-related concussion can predict the severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes. [More]

STAR Analytical Services awarded NIH grant to develop system for hearing-impaired listeners

STAR Analytical Services announces the award of a 3-year $1,500,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop an assistive conversation system for hearing-impaired listeners, including many aging baby-boomers, who have difficulty understanding and participating in conversations in noisy environments. [More]
New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

A new, enhanced MRI diagnostic approach was, for the first time, able to identify significant damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of professional football players following "unreported" trauma or mild concussions. Published in the current issue of JAMA Neurology, this study could improve decision making on when an athlete should "return to play." [More]
Surgery simulator app: an interview with Jean Nehme

Surgery simulator app: an interview with Jean Nehme

Touch Surgery is a mobile surgical simulation app that allows surgeons to learn and rehearse surgical procedures. It provides a cognitive map for operations on a virtual patient. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
A new formal protocol for emergency treatment of patients with aneurysmal SAH

A new formal protocol for emergency treatment of patients with aneurysmal SAH

Neurosurgeons and neurointerventionalists at Kyungpook National University in the Republic of Korea have developed a formal protocol for delivering emergency treatment to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from ruptured aneurysms within the first few hours after bleeding occurs. [More]
RI-MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

RI-MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). [More]
Study offers unprecedented picture of how children frequently suffer head injuries

Study offers unprecedented picture of how children frequently suffer head injuries

A study in which more than 43,000 children were evaluated for head trauma offers an unprecedented picture of how children most frequently suffer head injuries, report physicians at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine. [More]
New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

Penn State College of Medicine and University of Wisconsin have been awarded a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund the study of a novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause of anemia in the United States. [More]
K2M receives FDA clearance to market CAPRI Corpectomy Cage System

K2M receives FDA clearance to market CAPRI Corpectomy Cage System

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine technologies, techniques and minimally invasive procedures, today announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market the CAPRI Corpectomy Cage System, an expandable vertebral body replacement device that provides structural stability following a corpectomy or vertebrectomy. [More]
Douglas Mental Health University Institute researcher wins 2014 Wilder-Penfield prize

Douglas Mental Health University Institute researcher wins 2014 Wilder-Penfield prize

The Douglas Mental Health University Institute is proud to announce that its researcher and neurobiologist, Michael Meaney, C.M., Ph.D., C.Q., FRSC, is the 2014 laureate of the prestigious prix Wilder-Penfield. [More]
Butler neuropsychologist studies OCD patients undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery

Butler neuropsychologist studies OCD patients undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery

Supported by a $750,000 K23 Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health, Butler Hospital neuropsychologist Nicole McLaughlin, PhD, is conducting a first-of-its-kind study of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery. [More]
Study finds lower mortality at hospitals that treat high volume of SAH cases

Study finds lower mortality at hospitals that treat high volume of SAH cases

For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of SAH cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
UH's Neurological Institute designated as Gold Center of Excellence

UH's Neurological Institute designated as Gold Center of Excellence

The Neurological Institute at University Hospitals has been designated as a Gold Center of Excellence (COE) and featured as a top performing center by NeuStrategy, Inc., a Chicago consulting firm providing strategic support to neuroscience, oncology and orthopaedic service providers. [More]

Codman Neuro releases SPETZLER MALIS Dual Irrigating Forceps for neurosurgery

Codman Neuro, a global leader in neurosurgery and part of DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson, announced the launch of SPETZLERTM MALIS Dual Irrigating Disposable Non-Stick Bipolar Forceps, the first disposable dual irrigating forceps for neurosurgery. [More]
NICO, Synaptive Medical join forces to integrate innovative technologies for brain surgery

NICO, Synaptive Medical join forces to integrate innovative technologies for brain surgery

Indianapolis interventional medical device maker NICO Corporation and Toronto-based 3D visualization leader Synaptive Medical announced today at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting that they have joined forces to integrate their innovative technologies for brain surgery. [More]
Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Two studies recently published in Cell Transplantation reveal that cell transplantation may be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), a major cause of disability and paralysis with no current restorative therapies. [More]
Caregivers more aware of SUDEP than patients

Caregivers more aware of SUDEP than patients

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is concerning and many—even those with seizure disorders—may not be aware of this condition. New research published in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), reports that 76% of caregivers are more likely to have heard of SUDEP compared with 65% of patients with epilepsy. [More]