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Study reveals influence of mentors on trainees and their medical research efforts

Study reveals influence of mentors on trainees and their medical research efforts

By analyzing peer-reviewed scientific papers that examined the effectiveness of a surgical procedure, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine provide evidence suggesting that the conclusions of these studies appear to be influenced by the authors' mentors and medical training. [More]
Bond villain fails neuroanatomy, says St. Michael's Hospital neurosurgeon

Bond villain fails neuroanatomy, says St. Michael's Hospital neurosurgeon

James Bond's nemesis in the most recent film likely failed neuroanatomy, said real-life neurosurgeon and scientist Dr. Michael Cusimano of St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
Study reveals effects of plain packaging on tobacco products among Australian Indigenous people

Study reveals effects of plain packaging on tobacco products among Australian Indigenous people

Following the introduction of plain packaging on tobacco products in 2012, Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were 12 per cent less likely to think certain tobacco brands were less harmful than others, a new study found. [More]
Novel 'hypnosedation' technique offers new option for patients undergoing awake surgery for gliomas

Novel 'hypnosedation' technique offers new option for patients undergoing awake surgery for gliomas

Could hypnosis help to reduce the psychological trauma associated with "awake craniotomy" for brain cancers? A new "hypnosedation" technique offers a new alternative for patients undergoing awake surgery for gliomas, suggests a study in the January issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Encouraging results from cannabidiol trial for treatment-resistant epilepsy

Encouraging results from cannabidiol trial for treatment-resistant epilepsy

Cannabidiol (CBD), a medical marijuana derivative, was effective in reducing seizure frequency and well-tolerated and safe for most children and young adults enrolled in a year-long study led by epilepsy specialists at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Researchers awarded $16 million NIH/NINDS grant to create methods for detecting CTE during life

Researchers awarded $16 million NIH/NINDS grant to create methods for detecting CTE during life

Researchers from Boston University, the Cleveland Clinic, Banner Alzheimer's Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, have been awarded a $16 million grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. [More]
Scientists identify genes linked to human intelligence

Scientists identify genes linked to human intelligence

Scientists from Imperial College London have identified for the first time two clusters of genes linked to human intelligence. [More]
New nanotechnology approach could transform gliomas from death sentence into treatable condition

New nanotechnology approach could transform gliomas from death sentence into treatable condition

An MRI contrast agent that can pass through the blood-brain barrier will allow doctors to detect deadly brain tumors called gliomas earlier, say Penn State College of Medicine researchers. This ability opens the door to make this fatal cancer treatable. [More]
Central thalamus tunes the brain to different states of activity and arousal

Central thalamus tunes the brain to different states of activity and arousal

Scientists showed that they could alter brain activity of rats and either wake them up or put them in an unconscious state by changing the firing rates of neurons in the central thalamus, a region known to regulate arousal. [More]
Multiple small doses of targeted radiation therapy more effective at destroying pituitary gland tumors

Multiple small doses of targeted radiation therapy more effective at destroying pituitary gland tumors

A recent patient study at Houston Methodist Hospital proved that multiple small doses of highly focused radiation therapy is safer and more effective than a single larger dose of radiation at destroying pituitary gland tumors. [More]
UA developing brain-scanning technology that could improve diagnosis of many disorders

UA developing brain-scanning technology that could improve diagnosis of many disorders

Researchers at the University of Arizona are developing a noninvasive brain-scanning technology that could produce images far superior to those obtained with the most commonly used systems -- electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. [More]
New paper outlines strategies to address hepatitis C in incarcerated individuals

New paper outlines strategies to address hepatitis C in incarcerated individuals

More than one in nine people with hepatitis C in Canada spend time in a correctional facility each year and researchers said this presents a unique opportunity to focus hepatitis C prevention and control efforts in incarcerated populations. [More]
Researchers call for improved cause-of-death reporting to advance understanding of epilepsy

Researchers call for improved cause-of-death reporting to advance understanding of epilepsy

Recent studies conclude that people with epilepsy have a 27-fold greater risk of sudden death than people without the disorder. However, many of these deaths could be prevented through greater identification of epilepsy as a cause of death, and in educating the public more effectively about the disease's life-threatening dangers. [More]
Immigrant couples at lower risk of having preterm birth than Canadian-born couples

Immigrant couples at lower risk of having preterm birth than Canadian-born couples

Couples who immigrate to Canada are generally at lower risk of having a preterm birth than Canadian-born couples, new research has found. [More]
UC San Diego's Comprehensive Stroke Center receives Gold Plus Award

UC San Diego's Comprehensive Stroke Center receives Gold Plus Award

When someone experiences a major stroke, almost two million nerve cells in the brain die each minute, emphasizing the need for rapid treatment. Stroke patients who receive life-saving interventions more quickly have a higher chance of recovery. A recent data analysis showed the Comprehensive Stroke Center at UC San Diego Medical Center exceeded national average treatment times, and as a result, has received a "Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award" from The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. [More]
Specific deep-brain circuit's firing frequency can alter forebrain activity, alertness levels

Specific deep-brain circuit's firing frequency can alter forebrain activity, alertness levels

Adjusting a specific deep-brain circuit's firing frequency immediately and dramatically alters rats' forebrain activity and alertness levels, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have shown. [More]
Treatment with antiplatelet therapy does not reduce pain crises in children with sickle cell disease

Treatment with antiplatelet therapy does not reduce pain crises in children with sickle cell disease

Treatment with the antiplatelet agent prasugrel does not significantly reduce the rate of pain crises or severe lung complications in children with sickle cell disease, according to a report published in the New England Journal of Medicine describing one of the largest and most geographically diverse international clinical trials on sickle cell disease to date. [More]
Penn's Brian Litt recognized with AES Research Recognition Award for Clinical Science

Penn's Brian Litt recognized with AES Research Recognition Award for Clinical Science

The American Epilepsy Society announces that Brian Litt, M.D., professor of neurology, neurosurgery and bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania, is being honored with the AES Research Recognition Award for Clinical Science on December 7, 2015, at the Society's 69th annual meeting in Philadelphia. [More]
TGen, Barrow researchers identify genetic risk factors linked to stress-induced cardiomyopathy

TGen, Barrow researchers identify genetic risk factors linked to stress-induced cardiomyopathy

Researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Barrow Neurological Institute have for the first time identified genetic risk factors that are linked to stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC), a rare type of heart disease. [More]
Air evacuations may pose significant added risk to patients with traumatic brain injury

Air evacuations may pose significant added risk to patients with traumatic brain injury

Over the past 15 years, more than 330,000 U.S. soldiers have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is one of the leading causes of death and disability connected to the country's recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Many of these patients were evacuated by air from these countries to Europe and the U.S. for further treatment. In general, these patients were flown quickly to hospitals outside the battle zone, where more extensive treatment was available. [More]
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