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Smith & Nephew to distribute Scopis TGS Target Guided Surgery system in the UK, Ireland and Belgium

Smith & Nephew to distribute Scopis TGS Target Guided Surgery system in the UK, Ireland and Belgium

Smith & Nephew plc, the global medical technology business, today announces a partnership with ScopisGmbH, the German developer and manufacturer of surgical navigation systems, as the exclusive distributor of Scopis TGS Target Guided Surgery system in the UK, Ireland and Belgium from 1 July. [More]
Three European medical centers planning upgrades to Elekta's stereotactic radiosurgery system for the brain

Three European medical centers planning upgrades to Elekta's stereotactic radiosurgery system for the brain

Three foremost medical centers in the United Kingdom and Germany have ordered and are now planning upgrades to Elekta's latest generation stereotactic radiosurgery system for the brain, Leksell Gamma Knife Icon, to provide the most advanced brain radiosurgery treatments for their patients. [More]
Cedars-Sinai scientists identify genes responsible for tumor growth in high grade brain tumors

Cedars-Sinai scientists identify genes responsible for tumor growth in high grade brain tumors

After generating new brain tumor models, Cedars-Sinai scientists in the Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute identified the role of a family of genes underlying tumor growth in a wide spectrum of high grade brain tumors. [More]
Revised work hour restrictions for resident physicians fail to improve surgical patient outcomes

Revised work hour restrictions for resident physicians fail to improve surgical patient outcomes

Work hour restrictions for resident physicians, revised nationally four years ago largely to protect patients against physician trainees' fatigue-related errors, have not had the desired effect of lowering postoperative complication rates in several common surgical specialties, according to new study results. [More]
International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

Leukodystrophies are deadly neurodegenerative diseases that affect one in 7,000 children and remain incurable. These genetic diseases attack myelin or the "insulating rubber sheath" surrounding neurons, which leads to deteriorating health for affected children. [More]

Smith & Nephew becomes exclusive distributor of Scopis TGS system in UK, Ireland and Belgium

Smith & Nephew plc, the global medical technology business, today announces a partnership with ScopisGmbH, the German developer and manufacturer of surgical navigation systems, as the exclusive distributor of Scopis TGS Target Guided Surgery system in the UK, Ireland and Belgium from 1 July. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researchers test new methods for preserving cognition in laboratory mice

Cedars-Sinai researchers test new methods for preserving cognition in laboratory mice

Cedars-Sinai researchers have successfully tested two new methods for preserving cognition in laboratory mice that exhibit features of Alzheimer's disease by using white blood cells from bone marrow and a drug for multiple sclerosis to control immune response in the brain. [More]
Researchers develop novel technique to generate activated T cells to tackle advanced melanoma

Researchers develop novel technique to generate activated T cells to tackle advanced melanoma

T cells from patients with melanoma can trigger a protective immune response against the disease according to a new study out of University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. [More]
Commercially available headphones unlikely to interfere with programmable shunt valve settings

Commercially available headphones unlikely to interfere with programmable shunt valve settings

Researchers at Brown University examined three magnetically programmable shunt valves to see if the magnetic field emissions of headphones can cause unintentional changes in shunt valve settings. Based on their findings, the researchers state that it is highly unlikely that commercially available headphones will interfere with programmable shunt valve settings. [More]
Mild head injury patients having lower serum S100B levels unlikely to have intracranial hemorrhage

Mild head injury patients having lower serum S100B levels unlikely to have intracranial hemorrhage

Researchers conducted a prospective observational study in elderly patients and adult patients receiving antiplatelet therapy who presented with mild head injury at two trauma hospitals in Vienna: the Trauma Hospital Meidling and the Donauspital. [More]
City of Hope researchers to use patients' own modified T cells to treat advanced brain tumors

City of Hope researchers to use patients' own modified T cells to treat advanced brain tumors

Already pioneers in the use of immunotherapy, City of Hope researchers are now testing the bold approach to cancer treatment against one of medicine's biggest challenges: brain cancer. This month, they will launch a clinical trial using patients' own modified T cells to fight advanced brain tumors. [More]
LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

Cancer's ability to grow unchecked is often attributed to cancer stem cells, a small fraction of cancer cells that have the capacity to grow and multiply indefinitely. How cancer stem cells retain this property while the bulk of a tumor's cells do not remains largely unknown. Using human tumor samples and mouse models, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that cancer stem cell properties are determined by epigenetic changes -- chemical modifications cells use to control which genes are turned on or off. [More]
Disproportionate number of older people hospitalized in Canada with TBI

Disproportionate number of older people hospitalized in Canada with TBI

A disproportionate number of people hospitalized in Canada with traumatic brain injuries are 65 years or older, a new study from St. Michael's Hospital has found. [More]
Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories

Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories

In the first study of its kind, UCLA and United Kingdom researchers found that neurons in a specific brain region play a key role in rapidly forming memories about every day events, a finding that may result in a better understanding of memory loss and new methods to fight it in Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases. [More]
Researchers make significant progress in improving survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas

Researchers make significant progress in improving survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas

Using clinical data collected over the past decade through a U.S. cancer registry, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine demonstrated that significant strides have been made in improving the survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas, a slow-growing yet deadly form of primary brain cancer. [More]
Penn State Health, CHI complete transfer of St. Joseph Regional Health Network ownership

Penn State Health, CHI complete transfer of St. Joseph Regional Health Network ownership

Penn State Health and Catholic Health Initiatives have completed the transfer of ownership of CHI's affiliate, St. Joseph Regional Health Network (St. Joseph) in Reading, Pa., to Penn State Health. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Two migraine surgery techniques equally effective in reducing severity of migraine headaches

Two migraine surgery techniques equally effective in reducing severity of migraine headaches

Two migraine surgery techniques targeting a specific "trigger site" are both highly effective in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine headaches, according to a randomized trial in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
New stroke treatment guidelines recommend use of stent retrievers as first-line treatment for eligible patients

New stroke treatment guidelines recommend use of stent retrievers as first-line treatment for eligible patients

Today, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association published new stroke treatment guidelines that recommend the use of stent retriever technology – such as Medtronic plc’s SolitaireTM stent retriever device – in conjunction with the current standard of care, IV-tPA, as a first-line treatment for eligible patients. [More]
Patients have nothing to fear from having physicians-in-training to assist in brain and spine surgeries

Patients have nothing to fear from having physicians-in-training to assist in brain and spine surgeries

An analysis of the results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries suggests patients have nothing to fear from having residents — physicians-in-training — assist in those operations. The contributions of residents, who work under the supervision and alongside senior physicians, do nothing to increase patients' risks of postoperative complications or of dying within 30 days of the surgery, the analysis showed. [More]
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