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Study examines impact of removing chocolate milk from Saskatoon elementary schools

Study examines impact of removing chocolate milk from Saskatoon elementary schools

Researchers from the College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan measured milk consumption (plain milk and flavoured milk) by children in a sample of Saskatoon elementary schools. This is the first study in a Canadian elementary school population to investigate the impact of removing chocolate milk from schools. [More]
Effective health messaging varies depending on target audience

Effective health messaging varies depending on target audience

Is it better to tell people about the harms of certain health decisions or about the benefits of positive health related decisions? Studies that delve into this very question have differing results, however, a new paper just published by Cornell Food & Brand Lab in Nutrition Reviews, finds that the type of health messaging that is most effective might vary depending on certain characteristics of the target audience. [More]
High vitamin D levels boost survival for metastatic colorectal cancer patients

High vitamin D levels boost survival for metastatic colorectal cancer patients

According to a new study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, clinical trial patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had high levels of vitamin D in their bloodstream prior to treatment with chemotherapy and targeted drugs, survived longer, on average, than patients with lower levels of the vitamin. [More]
New project explores role of gut microbiota in preventing diet- and brain-related diseases

New project explores role of gut microbiota in preventing diet- and brain-related diseases

A new project comprising thirty organisations from fifteen countries has started working together to study the microorganisms in our intestines and the role they play in health, well-being, and how they can help prevent diet- and brain-related diseases. [More]
CHLA scientists grow tissue-engineered small intestine from human cells

CHLA scientists grow tissue-engineered small intestine from human cells

A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has shown that tissue-engineered small intestine grown from human cells replicates key aspects of a functioning human intestine. The tissue-engineered small intestine they developed contains important elements of the mucosal lining and support structures, including the ability to absorb sugars, and even tiny or ultra-structural components like cellular connections. [More]
One cup of blueberries per day could help reduce blood pressure, arterial stiffness

One cup of blueberries per day could help reduce blood pressure, arterial stiffness

Just one cup of blueberries per day could be the key to reducing blood pressure and arterial stiffness, both of which are associated with cardiovascular disease. [More]
Certain patients with type 2 diabetes, renal impairment discouraged from taking metformin

Certain patients with type 2 diabetes, renal impairment discouraged from taking metformin

Many patients with type 2 diabetes in the United States may be discouraged from taking metformin—a proven, oral diabetes medicine—because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration inappropriately labels the drug unsafe for some patients also suffering from kidney problems, researchers from Penn Medicine and Weill Cornel Medical College report this week in a research letter published in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Brazilian researchers find that nutrition education may help prevent reoccurrence of breast cancer

Brazilian researchers find that nutrition education may help prevent reoccurrence of breast cancer

Breast cancer is the most frequent cause of death among women worldwide, and five-year survival rates are just 58.4% in Brazil, lower than in many other regions. In a new study, however, researchers from Federal University of Santa Catarina provided Brazilian breast cancer patients with nutrition education and found it could benefit patients and may help prevent reoccurrence of the cancer. [More]
Low alcohol consumption, plant-based diet reduce risk of obesity-related cancers

Low alcohol consumption, plant-based diet reduce risk of obesity-related cancers

Low alcohol consumption and a plant-based diet, both healthy habits aligning with current cancer prevention guidelines, are associated with reducing the risk of obesity-related cancers, a New York University study shows. [More]
Vitamin B counteracts levels of DDT in women who are more likely to get, stay pregnant

Vitamin B counteracts levels of DDT in women who are more likely to get, stay pregnant

Women who have adequate levels of B vitamins in their bodies are more likely to get and stay pregnant even when they also have high levels of a common pesticide known to have detrimental reproductive effects, according to new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research. [More]
Healthy Nordic diet reduces expression of inflammation-associated genes in adipose tissue

Healthy Nordic diet reduces expression of inflammation-associated genes in adipose tissue

A Nordic study led by the Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition at the University of Eastern Finland discovered that the health-promoting Nordic diet reduces the expression of inflammation-associated genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue. In overweight persons, the expression of these genes reduced without weight loss. [More]
Study: Sugar molecule promotes spontaneous cancers in mice

Study: Sugar molecule promotes spontaneous cancers in mice

While people who eat a lot of red meat are known to be at higher risk for certain cancers, other carnivores are not, prompting researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine to investigate the possible tumor-forming role of a sugar called Neu5Gc, which is naturally found in most mammals but not in humans. [More]
Multiple micronutrients for pregnant women does not reduce infant mortality compared to iron-folic acid

Multiple micronutrients for pregnant women does not reduce infant mortality compared to iron-folic acid

In Bangladesh, daily maternal supplementation of multiple micronutrients compared to iron-folic acid before and after childbirth did not reduce all-cause infant mortality to age 6 months, but did result in significant reductions in preterm birth and low birth weight, according to a study in the December 24/31 issue of JAMA. [More]
Multiple micronutrient supplement during pregnancy reduces pre-term births, increases infant birth weight

Multiple micronutrient supplement during pregnancy reduces pre-term births, increases infant birth weight

A multivitamin given daily to pregnant women in rural Bangladesh reduced pre-term births, increased infant birth weight and resulted in healthier babies overall, according to the large randomized trial conducted by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers. [More]
CorMedix signs Neutrolin sales/distribution agreement with Arabian Trade House

CorMedix signs Neutrolin sales/distribution agreement with Arabian Trade House

CorMedix Inc., a pharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing therapeutic products for the prevention and treatment of cardiac, renal and infectious disease, announced today the first signed Middle East sales/distribution agreement for lead product Neutrolin with distributor Arabian Trade House in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. [More]
People urged to seek healthy eating information from registered dietitian nutritionists

People urged to seek healthy eating information from registered dietitian nutritionists

For many people, the New Year is an opportunity for a fresh look at life - a time to resolve to return to or even begin a healthy lifestyle. [More]
Study underscores the importance of appropriate testing, support and care for HCV patients

Study underscores the importance of appropriate testing, support and care for HCV patients

A new study shows that many patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are lost during different stages of health care to manage the disease. [More]
Eating habits and brain chemistry: an interview with Dr Kevin Hall

Eating habits and brain chemistry: an interview with Dr Kevin Hall

Several times every day, we choose when, where, what, with whom, and how much to eat. Many of these eating decisions have become automatic and don’t require cognitive effort. [More]
School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

Parents of children involved in an elementary school-based community intervention to prevent obesity appear to share in its health benefits. A new analysis of Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart Play Hard shows an association between being exposed to the intervention as a parent and a modest decrease in body mass index (BMI) compared to parents in two similar control communities. [More]
Aging: A risk factor for malnutrition

Aging: A risk factor for malnutrition

Health care systems and providers are not attuned to older adults' malnutrition risk, and ignoring malnutrition exacts a toll on hospitals, patients, and payers, according to the latest issue of the What's Hot newsletter from The Gerontological Society of America. [More]