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Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

A non-invasive test to diagnose and monitor an inflammatory disease that injures the esophagus - called eosinophilic esophagitis or EoE - would replace the need for repeated endoscopy for a growing number of children and adults with this relatively new condition. [More]
Study discusses adequacy of fluid intake for replacing meaningful water losses

Study discusses adequacy of fluid intake for replacing meaningful water losses

A study from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition (JACN) discusses fluid intake adequacy in detail and a simple tool is reviewed that may help healthy, active, low-risk populations answer the question, "Am I drinking enough?" The article "Am I Drinking Enough? Yes, No, and Maybe" by Samuel N. Cheuvront PhD, RD and Robert W. Kenefick PhD is made available with Free Access in JACN Issue 35(2) 2016, the official publication of the American College of Nutrition. [More]
Daily dark chocolate consumption could help improve athletic performance

Daily dark chocolate consumption could help improve athletic performance

Dark chocolate has already been hailed for its positive effects on cardiovascular health - and now a study undertaken at London's Kingston University has found the tasty treat could help give sports enthusiasts an extra edge in their fitness training. [More]
Novel strategy for obesity prevention in young children

Novel strategy for obesity prevention in young children

A novel approach to preventing overweight/obesity in young children by replacing traditional, individual well-child care with a series of group visits that emphasize nutrition-focused interventions during the first 18 months of life was associated with a significantly reduced obesity rate at 2 years of age. [More]
Family interventions may help reduce children's genetic risks for obesity

Family interventions may help reduce children's genetic risks for obesity

Children's genetic risks for obesity may be reduced by interventions that strengthen family communication and help children manage their emotions and feelings of satiety, according to a new review of research on the problem. [More]
Griffith launches NNEDPro to help GPs provide effective nutrition advice to patients

Griffith launches NNEDPro to help GPs provide effective nutrition advice to patients

With a recent report released from the World Health Organisation on the almost four-fold increase in diabetes, Griffith University is stepping in with the launch of a program to help GPs provide effective nutrition advice to their patients. [More]
New research centre to tackle childhood obesity to be launched at University of Sydney’s CPC

New research centre to tackle childhood obesity to be launched at University of Sydney’s CPC

A world-first research centre exclusively focused on tackling the childhood obesity epidemic will launch this week at the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre (CPC). [More]
Professor outlines effects of sports-specific counseling on injury outcomes in youth athletes

Professor outlines effects of sports-specific counseling on injury outcomes in youth athletes

Neeru Jayanthi, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Emory University Sports Medicine Center in Atlanta, GA, presented "The Effects of Serial Sports Training Risk Assessment and Counseling in Kids (T.R.A.C.K.)" at the 25th Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine in Dallas, TX. [More]

Global inequities in health spending expected to intensify over next 25 years

Global inequities in health spending are expected to persist and intensify over the next 25 years, according to a new study that estimates total health financing in countries around the world. [More]
Daily dose of coffee could help reverse non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Daily dose of coffee could help reverse non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Adding coffee to the diet of people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) could help reverse the condition, according to a new study conducted in mice presented at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
WHO global diabetes report shows Australia must lift its game

WHO global diabetes report shows Australia must lift its game

Australia should do more to prevent diabetes and provide better care for those living with the disease, according to an author of the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) first ever global diabetes report. [More]
Combination of genetic, environmental risk factors can trigger fatal eating disorder in humans

Combination of genetic, environmental risk factors can trigger fatal eating disorder in humans

In a new study, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center described a new mouse model featuring a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors that can trigger the compulsive restriction of food intake seen in patients with anorexia nervosa. The findings may help to identify new prevention and treatment strategies for the eating disorder in humans. [More]
Maternal obesity, poor nutrition during pregnancy affect egg reserves of female child

Maternal obesity, poor nutrition during pregnancy affect egg reserves of female child

New research involving mice, published in the April 2016 issue of The FASEB Journal, suggests that maternal obesity and poor nutrition during pregnancy affects the egg reserves of female offspring. This discovery improves scientific understanding of the long-term, generational, effects of obesity and poor nutrition. This understanding is the first step toward devising interventions to protect the fertility of females who experienced very difficult womb environments. [More]
Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

By spending less than $5 per person on essential health care services such as contraception, medication for serious illnesses and nutritional supplements, millions of maternal and child lives could be saved every year, according to a new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Study shows WIC food package improves diet quality of roughly 4 million children

Study shows WIC food package improves diet quality of roughly 4 million children

In the U.S., where one of five children entering elementary school is overweight, a healthy diet is critical for preschool children, who are setting their eating patterns for the future. [More]
Study reports high prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes in Samoan Islands

Study reports high prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes in Samoan Islands

In two new papers in The Lancet that report dramatic worldwide increases in body-mass index (BMI) and type 2 diabetes, the U.S. territory of American Samoa and independent Samoa are mentioned for their especially high prevalence of both conditions. [More]
Adolescents like to share high-calorie, low-nutrient food items in social media

Adolescents like to share high-calorie, low-nutrient food items in social media

A new study from the University of Gothenburg show that adolescents like to present foods that are high in calories but low in nutrients in social media [More]
Person's age, mobility could be powerful predictors of survival than certain biomarkers

Person's age, mobility could be powerful predictors of survival than certain biomarkers

Advances in technology allow scientists to measure intricate details about the human body that greatly enhance understanding of health, disease and aging. [More]
Children of salmon-eating mothers less likely to develop asthma

Children of salmon-eating mothers less likely to develop asthma

Children born to mothers who eat salmon when pregnant may be less likely to have doctor diagnosed asthma compared to children whose mothers do not eat it, new research has shown. [More]
Study shows only 15% of children achieve 60 minutes of daily MVPA

Study shows only 15% of children achieve 60 minutes of daily MVPA

Children are far from meeting national guidelines for physical activity, and girls are at greatest risk of falling short of recommendations according to a study measuring the physical activity of 453 schoolchildren in Massachusetts during a one-week period. [More]
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