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Natural molecule NAC could benefit patients with Parkinson's disease

Natural molecule NAC could benefit patients with Parkinson's disease

The natural molecule, n-acetylcysteine (NAC), with strong antioxidant effects, shows potential benefit as part of the management for patients with Parkinson's disease, according to a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Research is finally beginning to shed light on some of the reasons that extra weight is difficult to shed permanently. Now, a new study has uncovered another method by which the gut senses how much food a person eats and relays that to the brain. [More]
Diet modification could help improve quality of life in women with ovarian cancer

Diet modification could help improve quality of life in women with ovarian cancer

New research conducted at the University of Alabama at Birmingham has shown that a particular type of diet could help women with ovarian cancer to lose weight and improve their quality of life and cancer-related measures. [More]
Creative art making can help reduce stress

Creative art making can help reduce stress

Whether you're Van Gogh or a stick-figure sketcher, a new Drexel University study found that making art can significantly reduce stress-related hormones in your body. [More]
FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. [More]
Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

In a large prospective study published online in the British Journal of Cancer, researchers looked at the association between nut consumption and prostate cancer risk and mortality among 47,299 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. [More]
CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

Significant improvements seen across multiple sociodemographic groups, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine [More]
Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Today leading experts on infectious disease and urinary tract infections (UTIs) will gather in London to discuss the alarming state of antibiotic resistance, and present findings from a landmark study that conclusively shows that cranberries can be a nutritional approach to reducing symptomatic UTIs, and as a result, may be a useful strategy to decrease worldwide use of antibiotics. [More]
Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Two classes of blood pressure medications, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are associated with a 16% lower risk of strokes, heart attacks and death in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a new study in the journal, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, reports. [More]
Poor physical fitness, passive hobbies may increase pain conditions in children

Poor physical fitness, passive hobbies may increase pain conditions in children

Poor physical fitness and sedentary behaviour are linked to increased pain conditions in children as young as 6-8 years old, according to the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children Study ongoing at the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in the Journal of Pain. [More]
Physical activity can counteract genetic risk linked to bone fragility in childhood

Physical activity can counteract genetic risk linked to bone fragility in childhood

Exercise, particularly high-impact activity, builds stronger bones in children, even for those who carry genetic variants that predispose them to bone weakness, according to new research. [More]
Adequate maternal folate may protect children from future obesity risk

Adequate maternal folate may protect children from future obesity risk

Proper maternal folate levels during pregnancy may protect children from a future risk of obesity, especially those born to obese mothers, according to a study led by researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Early-life peanut consumption feasible and nutritionally safe for children, study finds

Early-life peanut consumption feasible and nutritionally safe for children, study finds

Introducing peanut-containing foods during infancy as a peanut allergy prevention strategy does not compromise the duration of breastfeeding or affect children's growth and nutritional intakes, new findings show. [More]
ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

People with type 2 diabetes who intensively controlled their blood sugar level during the landmark Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Trial Eye Study were found to have cut their risk of diabetic retinopathy in half in a follow-up analysis conducted four years after stopping intensive therapy. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Minimal zinc deficiency can impede human and animal health

Minimal zinc deficiency can impede human and animal health

The trace element zinc has an impact on the essential metabolic functions of most living organisms. New research carried out by the Chair of Animal Nutrition at the Technical University of Munich has found that even minimal zinc deficiency impairs digestion, albeit without any typical symptoms such as skin problems or fatigue. [More]
LITE Program receives 'Beyond the Cure' educational survivorship conference grant from NCCS

LITE Program receives 'Beyond the Cure' educational survivorship conference grant from NCCS

An effort by Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey to educate pediatric cancer survivors is receiving a boost from The National Children's Cancer Society in the form of a 'Beyond the Cure' educational survivorship conference grant. [More]
Study: Mediterranean diet high in vegetable fats does not lead to weight gain compared to low-fat diet

Study: Mediterranean diet high in vegetable fats does not lead to weight gain compared to low-fat diet

Eating a non-calorie restricted Mediterranean diet high in vegetable fats such as olive oil or nuts does not lead to significant weight gain compared to a low-fat diet, according to a large randomised trial published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
Barley products lower levels of two types of bad cholesterol linked to cardiovascular risk

Barley products lower levels of two types of bad cholesterol linked to cardiovascular risk

Eating barley or foods containing barley significantly reduced levels of two types of "bad cholesterol" associated with cardiovascular risk, a St. Michael's Hospital research paper has found. [More]
Genetic variation may predispose certain Asian-Americans to food addiction

Genetic variation may predispose certain Asian-Americans to food addiction

Rice anyone? How about a bowl of ramen noodles? Researchers have found that some Asian-Americans are more likely to hunger for carbohydrates and unhealthy foods than other Asian-Americans -- and the reason appears to be genetic. [More]
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