Nutrition News and Research RSS Feed - Nutrition News and Research

Frozen meals have better diet quality than QSR meals, shows research

Frozen meals have better diet quality than QSR meals, shows research

New data presented today indicate that consumers of frozen meals had higher daily intakes of dietary fiber, potassium, calcium and protein, and lower daily intakes of calories and saturated fat than consumers of quick service restaurant (QSR) meals. [More]
Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos. [More]
Twinlab Consolidated Holdings to expand contract manufacturing business

Twinlab Consolidated Holdings to expand contract manufacturing business

Twinlab Consolidated Holdings, Inc. ("TLCC" or the "Company") announced today that it expects to add more than 20 new American jobs to support its expanding contract manufacturing business. [More]
Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies. Their research indicates that newborns of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy show lower levels of stress hormones, lowered stress response, and alterations in DNA for a gene that regulates passage of stress hormones from mother to fetus. [More]
Animal study shows high-fat diet is more harmful to males than females

Animal study shows high-fat diet is more harmful to males than females

Male and female brains are not equal when it comes to the biological response to a high-fat diet. [More]
The Female Athlete Triad: A medical condition in active girls and women

The Female Athlete Triad: A medical condition in active girls and women

Sophie is a 15 year old cross country runner who has a history of a foot stress fracture and shin splints. Often she does not eat prior to her workouts. [More]
Anti-cancer nanomedicines with smaller sizes exhibit enhanced performance in vivo, show studies

Anti-cancer nanomedicines with smaller sizes exhibit enhanced performance in vivo, show studies

Nanomedicines consisting of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to specific tissues and cells offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
Practical indicators encourage habit changes more than calorific value

Practical indicators encourage habit changes more than calorific value

The Affordable Care Act includes laws to help the public know the nutritional value of the food they buy. Consequently, larger chain restaurants will be required to indicate the calories count next to items on their menus. However, a study published yesterday suggests that this may not be the best way to encourage healthier eating habits. [More]
Arsenic levels exceed in some rice-based foods, can affect celiac disease sufferers

Arsenic levels exceed in some rice-based foods, can affect celiac disease sufferers

Rice is one of the few cereal grains consumed by people with celiac disease, as it does not contain gluten. However, it can have high concentrations of a toxic substance – arsenic – as revealed by the analyses of flour, cakes, bread, pasta and other foods made with rice, conducted by researchers from the Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain. [More]
CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

For many months, the world has witnessed the Ebola virus spread and claim more than 4,400 lives in West African countries. On Oct. 8, the first confirmed adult Ebola patient identified in the United States died. The constant news coverage has heightened concern among parents who fear their children will become infected. Jill Hoffman, MD, a pediatric Infectious diseases specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, discusses the facts about Ebola, how parents can help their children prevent further outbreak by teaching them good hygiene, and how CHLA is prepared to identify and treat suspected Ebola patients. [More]
Potatoes can be part of a weight loss program, shows new study

Potatoes can be part of a weight loss program, shows new study

The study, a collaborative effort between the University of California at Davis and the Illinois Institute of Technology, sought to gain a better understanding of the role of calorie reduction and the glycemic index in weight loss when potatoes are included in the diet. [More]
Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center, a trusted NYC nursing home, urges senior citizens and their families to learn the basics of proper nutrition for senior citizens. The nursing facility's staff has created a short list of key tips for families and seniors looking to improve their mental and physical health through dietary changes. [More]
Eating high-protein breakfast reduces food cravings, overeating later on

Eating high-protein breakfast reduces food cravings, overeating later on

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, many teens skip breakfast, which increases their likelihood of overeating and eventual weight gain. Statistics show that the number of adolescents struggling with obesity, which elevates the risk for chronic health problems, has quadrupled in the past three decades. [More]
Cardiometabolic health intervention urged for schizophrenia patients

Cardiometabolic health intervention urged for schizophrenia patients

Research shows high cardiometabolic risk, particularly increased dyslipidaemia and smoking, but little related medical treatment in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. [More]
U.S. college students do better than U.K. counterparts in physical activity, healthy diet

U.S. college students do better than U.K. counterparts in physical activity, healthy diet

U.S. college students do better than their counterparts in the United Kingdom when it comes to physical activity, a healthy diet and less smoking, according to new research published in the latest issue of the journal Education and Health. [More]

SSEF protocol reduces incidence of NEC or death in infants with extremely low birth weight

A standardized slow enteral feeding (SSEF) protocol significantly reduces the incidence of necrotizing enterocoltis (NEC), or death of intestinal tissue, and death in infants with extremely low birth weight, according to a new study. [More]

A.S.P.E.N. to hold Clinical Nutrition Week 2015 in Long Beach, CA

On Saturday, February 14, 2015, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) kicks-off Clinical Nutrition Week 2015 (CNW) in Long Beach, CA, at the Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center. [More]
Preventing cancer: an interview with Dr Fiona Reddington

Preventing cancer: an interview with Dr Fiona Reddington

It’s estimated that more than four in 10 cancer cases could be prevented by lifestyle changes, such as not smoking, keeping a healthy body weight, cutting back on alcohol, eating a healthy diet, keeping active and staying safe in the sun. [More]
NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

The North American Menopause Society is set to launch a first-ever menopause mobile app designed for use by both clinicians and patients to help manage menopausal symptoms and assess risk factors. [More]
BIDMC scientists uncover new class of molecules that protects against diabetes

BIDMC scientists uncover new class of molecules that protects against diabetes

Scientists at the Salk Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston have discovered a new class of molecules—produced in human and mouse fat—that protects against diabetes. [More]