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New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

The number of cases of childhood diarrhoea attributable to pathogens (bacteria, parasites, viruses or other infections) have been substantially underestimated and may be nearly twice as high as previous analysis suggests, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers identify novel compound that blocks growth of deadly fungus

Virginia Tech researchers identify novel compound that blocks growth of deadly fungus

Researchers with the Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery have identified a compound that blocks the growth of a fungus that causes deadly lung infections and allergic reactions in people with compromised immune systems. [More]
Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Over 100 million women are on hormonal contraceptives. All of them contain some form of progesterone, either alone or in combination with estrogen. [More]
MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

Streptococcus pneumoniae likely is not a term immediately recognizable by most individuals, even if they have had unpleasant run-ins with the common bacterium. However, experts at Mississippi State University are pioneering pathways to new treatment options. [More]
Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

My research lab studies several classes of systems. We are mostly interested in looking at large protein assemblies to understand their structure, dynamics and how their properties relate to their malfunction in disease. [More]
Scientists use computer model to explore geographical origins of influenza virus

Scientists use computer model to explore geographical origins of influenza virus

A computer model developed by scientists at the University of Chicago shows that small increases in transmission rates of the seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2) can lead to rapid evolution of new strains that spread globally through human populations. [More]
Using the immune system to fight cancer: an interview with Dr Charles Akle

Using the immune system to fight cancer: an interview with Dr Charles Akle

We all produce as many as 100,000 different types of cancer cells every day, which are recognized and eliminated by our extraordinarily efficient immune system. However, if something goes wrong with the immune system, and it no longer gets rid of these cells, then that’s when cancerous cells grow and become a problem. [More]
Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

A new analysis of 100 million Medicare records from U.S. adults aged 65 and older reveals rising healthcare costs for infections associated with opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens--disease-causing bacteria, such as Legionella--which can live inside drinking water distribution systems, including household and hospital water pipes. [More]
Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

A minor hiccup in the sequence of a human gene can have devastating impacts on health. Such flaws cause cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease affecting the lungs and other vital organs, often leading to death by the age of 30. [More]
Researchers discover how immune cells transition from silent to merciless killing machines

Researchers discover how immune cells transition from silent to merciless killing machines

Neutrophils are the superheroes of the body's immune system. Normally mild-mannered, they travel through the bloodstream until they reach an emergency situation, such as a cut or infection, where they switch into battle-mode to engulf and destroy foreign invaders. [More]
Tgen-NAU researchers produce anthrax genome sequence from victims of 1979 outbreak

Tgen-NAU researchers produce anthrax genome sequence from victims of 1979 outbreak

A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University used deep DNA sequencing methods to generate the anthrax genome sequence from the victims of the 1979 anthrax outbreak in Sverdlovsk, Russia, when it was part of the USSR. [More]
Fungal communities in chronic wounds can be linked to poor outcomes and slow healing

Fungal communities in chronic wounds can be linked to poor outcomes and slow healing

Researchers in Pennsylvania and Iowa have discovered that fungal communities found in chronic wounds can form mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms and can be associated with poor outcomes and longer healing times. [More]
New study details design and validation of accurate screening test for detecting deadly HAIs

New study details design and validation of accurate screening test for detecting deadly HAIs

A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute details the design and validation of a low-cost, rapid and highly accurate screening tool -- known as KlebSeq -- for potentially deadly healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs), such as Klebsiella pneumoniae. [More]
New mathematical model could help predict potential outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever

New mathematical model could help predict potential outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever

Potential outbreaks of diseases such as Ebola and Lassa fever may be more accurately predicted thanks to a new mathematical model developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge. [More]
Investigational biomarker surpasses current gold standard test for identifying brain shunt infections

Investigational biomarker surpasses current gold standard test for identifying brain shunt infections

In a study of children with brain shunts at Children's of Alabama, a University of Alabama at Birmingham investigational biomarker outperformed the current "gold standard" test for detecting bacterial infections in the shunts. [More]
The rise of disease ecology and its implications for parasitology

The rise of disease ecology and its implications for parasitology

The Journal of Parasitology – With a shared focus on host–pathogen relationships, parasitology and disease ecology seem to have a lot in common. But parasitology lacks the eye-catching—and wallet-opening—emphasis on known diseases. By working more closely with disease ecologists, could parasitologists gain more support for work crucial to predicting and controlling infectious diseases? [More]
Biostatisticians project nearly 400 non-travel Zika cases in Florida by end of summer

Biostatisticians project nearly 400 non-travel Zika cases in Florida by end of summer

Nearly 400 non travel-related Zika infections will occur in Florida before the end of the summer, according to new projections by biostatisticians at the University of Florida and other institutions. [More]
Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

As a further safety measure against the emerging Zika virus outbreak, today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a revised guidance recommending universal testing of donated Whole Blood and blood components for Zika virus in the U.S. and its territories. [More]
Scientists isolate new multicomponent virus from mosquitoes

Scientists isolate new multicomponent virus from mosquitoes

Scientists have identified a new "multicomponent" virus -- one containing different segments of genetic material in separate particles -- that can infect animals, according to research published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
New drug target could help prevent opioid tolerance and addiction

New drug target could help prevent opioid tolerance and addiction

Researchers have identified a brain mechanism that could be a drug target to help prevent tolerance and addiction to opioid pain medication, such as morphine, according to a study by Georgia State University and Emory University. [More]
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