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Kalorama Information: NGS diagnostics can detect any number of genetic variants

Kalorama Information: NGS diagnostics can detect any number of genetic variants

Next generation sequencing may be able to bypass some of the downside of molecular testing and in doing so earn its place in clinical testing, according to Kalorama Information. [More]
SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development has received a $2.9 million award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a new tuberculosis vaccine. [More]
Synthetic Biologics announces initiation of SYN-010 Phase 2 clinical trial for treatment of IBS-C

Synthetic Biologics announces initiation of SYN-010 Phase 2 clinical trial for treatment of IBS-C

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on developing therapeutics to protect the microbiome while targeting pathogen-specific diseases, reported the initiation of a Phase 2 clinical trial of its proprietary SYN-010 for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C). [More]
Basilea announces UK launch of broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera for first-line treatment of pneumonia

Basilea announces UK launch of broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera for first-line treatment of pneumonia

Basilea Pharmaceutica AG today announces the UK launch of its broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera (Ceftobiprole medocaril) for the first-line treatment of serious bacterial pneumonia. [More]
Researchers develop protective vaccine against chlamydia infections

Researchers develop protective vaccine against chlamydia infections

Chlamydiae are the most common, sexually transmitted, bacterial pathogens in the world. Every year around 100 million people contract Chlamydia infections, which are one of the main causes of female infertility and ectopic pregnancies and can also lead to blindness - especially in developing countries. [More]
Discovery provides basis for new pertussis treatments

Discovery provides basis for new pertussis treatments

The worldwide spreading of the whooping cough, also known as pertussis, has substantially increased since 2010. Researchers from the Biozentrum, University of Basel, have investigated structure and function of an important membrane protein of the bacterium causing pertussis. They discovered that the protein structure differs from a previously postulated model. [More]
UW microbiologist receives 2015 Shaw Prize in life science and medicine

UW microbiologist receives 2015 Shaw Prize in life science and medicine

UW microbiologist Peter Greenberg has long been fascinated with how bacteria in cells communicate for cooperative activities, including the spread of infection. He started exploring the subject in 1977, thinking the implications could be far-reaching. [More]
Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Just as militaries need to have trained, experienced soldiers ready for future wars, making sure that the immune system has enough battle-ready T cells on hand is important for fast-acting, more effective vaccines, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
Researchers reveal that Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to gastric cancer

Researchers reveal that Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to gastric cancer

Around half of the global population is chronically infected with the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori, almost 1 percent of whom go on to develop gastric adenocarcinoma, one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Usually it takes many decades for the cancer to develop, making it difficult to pinpoint exactly how it is linked to an infection. [More]
Researchers uncover how Gram-negative bacteria can trigger immune system reaction

Researchers uncover how Gram-negative bacteria can trigger immune system reaction

Researchers at the University of Toronto have uncovered how Gram-negative bacteria -- a broad class of bugs that cause diseases ranging from gonorrhea to diarrhea and pneumonia -- can trigger a reaction from our immune system. This discovery could lead to new therapies and treatments that use the immune system to fight infections instead of antibiotics. [More]

OSU microbiologists discover new type of dairy or food thickener with probiotic characteristics

Microbiologists at Oregon State University have discovered and helped patent and commercialize a new type of dairy or food thickener, which may add probiotic characteristics to the products in which it's used. [More]
Enhancing body's gut defense system can reverse bloodstream infections

Enhancing body's gut defense system can reverse bloodstream infections

An upset in the body's natural balance of gut bacteria that may lead to life-threatening bloodstream infections can be reversed by enhancing a specific immune defense response, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found. [More]
Scientists identify new agent to combat tuberculosis

Scientists identify new agent to combat tuberculosis

According to figures of the World Health Organization, some 8.7 million people contracted tuberculosis in 2012 and this disease is fatal for approximately 1.3 million people throughout the world each year. One of the main problems is that the tuberculosis pathogens have become resistant to the antibiotics used to fight them. [More]
Simple pre-surgical intervention can reduce S aureus surgical site infections

Simple pre-surgical intervention can reduce S aureus surgical site infections

Implementation of a pre-surgical intervention that included screening for the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, treating patients who were positive for this bacteria, and the administration of antibiotics based on these culture results was associated with a modest reduction in S aureus surgical site infections, according to a study in the June 2 issue of JAMA. [More]
New finding may lead to development of immunity-based therapies for tuberculosis

New finding may lead to development of immunity-based therapies for tuberculosis

A study by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center has identified how an enzyme involved in protecting the body from pathogens senses Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial pathogen that infects millions of people worldwide and causes about 1.5 million deaths annually. [More]
Northeastern University researchers report two approaches to eradicate Lyme disease

Northeastern University researchers report two approaches to eradicate Lyme disease

North­eastern Uni­ver­sity researchers have found that the bac­terium that causes Lyme dis­ease forms dor­mant per­sister cells, which are known to evade antibi­otics. This sig­nif­i­cant finding, they said, could help explain why it's so dif­fi­cult to treat the infec­tion in some patients. [More]
NYU researchers identify root cause of eye infections among contact lens wearers

NYU researchers identify root cause of eye infections among contact lens wearers

Using high-precision genetic tests to differentiate the thousands of bacteria that make up the human microbiome, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center suggest that they have found a possible — and potentially surprising — root cause of the increased frequency of certain eye infections among contact lens wearers. [More]
Scientists study active substance against dreaded hospital pathogen Staphylococcus aureus

Scientists study active substance against dreaded hospital pathogen Staphylococcus aureus

In the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), scientists from the universities of Tübingen, Münster and Munich join forces and prepare together with the company Hyglos clinical studies on an active substance against the dreaded hospital pathogen Staphylococcus aureus: A highly effective protein from bacteria-specific viruses, so-called bacteriophages, shall rapidly kill the bacteria, which frequently occur in the nose. [More]
Verax Biomedical obtains FDA clearance to expand use of Verax Platelet PGD test

Verax Biomedical obtains FDA clearance to expand use of Verax Platelet PGD test

Verax Biomedical today announced that the company has gained FDA clearance to expand the use of its Verax Platelet PGD test—a rapid test for the detection of bacterial contamination in platelets intended for transfusion. The new FDA clearance makes the Verax Platelet PGD test the only rapid test on the market cleared by the FDA to check every commonly distributed platelet type in the United States. [More]
Researchers create new vaccine development method for H5N1, H7N9 strains of avian influenza

Researchers create new vaccine development method for H5N1, H7N9 strains of avian influenza

A recent study with Kansas State University researchers details vaccine development for two new strains of avian influenza that can be transmitted from poultry to humans. The strains have led to the culling of millions of commercial chickens and turkeys as well as the death of hundreds of people. [More]
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