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Scientists provide specific recommendations to reduce health risks for beachgoers

Scientists provide specific recommendations to reduce health risks for beachgoers

Beach sand contains all kinds of microorganisms, including those that can harm human health. Yet current guidelines are focused exclusively on monitoring the levels of microbes in the water. [More]
Research: Mechanisms behind bacterial warfare could be harnessed to target pathogenic bacteria

Research: Mechanisms behind bacterial warfare could be harnessed to target pathogenic bacteria

Two UC Santa Barbara graduate students have demonstrated how certain microbes exploit proteins in nearby bacteria to deliver toxins and kill them. [More]
Researchers find that humans carry more antibiotic-resistant staphylococci than farm animals

Researchers find that humans carry more antibiotic-resistant staphylococci than farm animals

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a concern for the health and well-being of both humans and farm animals. One of the most common and costly diseases faced by the dairy industry is bovine mastitis, a potentially fatal bacterial inflammation of the mammary gland (IMI). Widespread use of antibiotics to treat the disease is often blamed for generating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. [More]
European chestnut leaves contain ingredients with power to disarm deadly staph bacteria

European chestnut leaves contain ingredients with power to disarm deadly staph bacteria

Leaves of the European chestnut tree contain ingredients with the power to disarm dangerous staph bacteria without boosting its drug resistance, scientists have found. [More]
Wyss Institute scientists develop improved blood-cleansing therapeutic device to treat sepsis

Wyss Institute scientists develop improved blood-cleansing therapeutic device to treat sepsis

Last year, a Wyss Institute team of scientists described the development of a new device to treat sepsis that works by mimicking our spleen. It cleanses pathogens and toxins from blood circulating through a dialysis-like circuit. Now, the Wyss Institute team has developed an improved device that synergizes with conventional antibiotic therapies and that has been streamlined to better position it for near-term translation to the clinic. [More]
Surprising mechanism behind antibiotic resistant bacteria uncovered by TSRI scientists

Surprising mechanism behind antibiotic resistant bacteria uncovered by TSRI scientists

Every year, more strains of bacteria develop resistance to the antibiotics we use to treat deadly infections. At The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) scientists have been working to develop new forms of these drugs, including an antibiotic called arylomycin—but tests have shown that it is possible for bacteria to become resistant to arylomycin, too. [More]
Researchers capture images of immune cell interactions rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus

Researchers capture images of immune cell interactions rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus

Doctor Scott Mueller and colleagues from the University of Melbourne's Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Doherty Institute used state-of-the-art microscopy to painstakingly capture images of the interactions of three crucial types of immune cells rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus. [More]
Major gaps found in existing evidence for best practices for cleaning hospital room surfaces to prevent HAIs

Major gaps found in existing evidence for best practices for cleaning hospital room surfaces to prevent HAIs

Tray tables, bed rails, light switches, and toilets: All are common vectors for swapping germs between patients and health care workers. While a new systematic overview in this week's Annals of Internal Medicine points to several promising cleaning tactics of these "high-touch surfaces," there's a lack of evidence as to which is the most effective at reducing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
Intrexon, Synthetic Biologics form ECC to develop and commercialize novel biotherapeutics for phenylketonuria

Intrexon, Synthetic Biologics form ECC to develop and commercialize novel biotherapeutics for phenylketonuria

Intrexon Corporation, a leader in synthetic biology, and Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on developing therapeutics to protect the microbiome while targeting pathogen-specific diseases, today announced an Exclusive Channel Collaboration (ECC) to pursue the development and commercialization of novel biotherapeutics for the treatment of patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), a serious and debilitating metabolic disorder. [More]
Vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles could be novel treatment option for RSV

Vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles could be novel treatment option for RSV

A vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles, or microscopic, genetically engineered particles, is an effective treatment for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

A study by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Duke University helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection despite robustly inducing anti-HIV antibodies: the vaccine stimulated antibodies that recognized HIV as well as microbes commonly found in the intestinal tract, part of the body's microbiome. [More]
IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

Health experts have warned for years that the overuse of antibiotics is creating "superbugs" able to resist drugs treating infection. [More]
Discovery could put individuals with relapsing UTIs on fast track for new therapeutic regimen

Discovery could put individuals with relapsing UTIs on fast track for new therapeutic regimen

It's one thing to grow bacteria in a test tube, perform a screen in the lab, and find a mutation in the pathogen's genes. It's a whole other thing, and much rarer, to find the exact same mutation in nature--in this case, in E. coli in urine samples from some 500 patients suffering from relapsing urinary tract infections. [More]
Researchers uncover groundbreaking evidence for developing vaccine to prevent middle ear infections

Researchers uncover groundbreaking evidence for developing vaccine to prevent middle ear infections

Researchers from Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics, together with the Nationwide Children's Hospital in Ohio, have uncovered groundbreaking evidence to help vaccine developers prevent middle ear infections. [More]
DigiPath Labs, Romer Labs to validate kit-based assays for food-borne pathogen, mycotoxin testing for cannabis

DigiPath Labs, Romer Labs to validate kit-based assays for food-borne pathogen, mycotoxin testing for cannabis

DigiPath Labs, the cannabis testing subsidiary of DigiPath, Inc., is combining efforts with True North Laboratory of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Romer Labs, a leading global supplier of diagnostic solutions for food-borne pathogens, to investigate the applicability of utilizing Romer Labs' rapid diagnostic test kits to screen for food-borne pathogens and quantify mycotoxins present in cannabis. [More]
New findings unlock clues to disease protection

New findings unlock clues to disease protection

When disease-resistant rice is invaded by disease-causing bacteria, a small protein produced by the bacteria betrays the invader. Upon recognizing that protein, the rice plants sense that a microbial attack is underway and are able to mount an immune response to fend off bacterial infection, reports a research team led by the University of California, Davis. [More]
Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Pathogenic bacteria develop killer machines that work very specifically and highly efficiently. Scientists from the University of Freiburg have solved the molecular mechanism of a fish toxin that could be used in the future as a medication to treat cancer. The scientists have now published their research in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Retail meat harbors disease-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae, shows new study

Retail meat harbors disease-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae, shows new study

Chicken, turkey and pork sold in grocery stores harbors disease-causing bacteria known as Klebsiella pneumoniae, according to a new study. The research, which was published online today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, shows that contaminated meat may be an important source of human exposure to Klebsiella. [More]
TGen, NAU to jointly develop quick, affordable and accurate test to diagnose Lyme disease

TGen, NAU to jointly develop quick, affordable and accurate test to diagnose Lyme disease

Focus On Lyme, an initiative sponsored by the Leadership Children's Foundation of Gilbert, Ariz., has donated $75,000 to the Translational Genomics Research Institute to support research into the development of a quick, affordable and accurate method of diagnosing Lyme disease. [More]
Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling levels of iron in the body also play an important role in combatting infection, according to a study published today in Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
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