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Vaccine against H. pylori infection is within reach

Researchers from the University of Rhode Island are championing a recent breakthrough in the laboratory with hopes it could lead to a vaccine against the pathogen responsible for stomach cancer and to therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. [More]
Pediatrician reviews co-pathogenesis of influenza viruses with bacteria in lung

Pediatrician reviews co-pathogenesis of influenza viruses with bacteria in lung

Le Bonheur Children's Hospital Pediatrician-in-Chief Jon McCullers, MD, was recently invited to submit a review in the April issue of Nature Reviews Microbiology, one of the world's foremost scientific publications. [More]

Researchers study evolution of harmful organisms from 1 bacterial family

For the first time, researchers have studied the Black Death bacterium's entire family tree to fully understand how some of the family members evolve to become harmful. [More]
Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

A team that includes scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Johns Hopkins University and St. Mary's University reported the structure of a protein that helps a common fungus to infect the body. [More]

Research: Novel antiviral drug may reduce spread, severity of measles without vaccination

A novel antiviral drug may reduce the spread and severity of measles without a vaccination. Dr. Richard Plemper from the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University and Dr. Michael Natchus of the Emory Institute for Drug Discovery (EIDD) will be available to answer questions from the media at a live virtual press conference at 1 PM EDT, Wednesday, April 16th. [More]

Scientists develop novel antiviral drug that may prevent spreading of measles

A novel antiviral drug may protect people infected with the measles from getting sick and prevent them from spreading the virus to others, an international team of researchers says. [More]
Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible for smuggling the toxin of the bacterium Clostridium perfringens into the cell. [More]
UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

The global experts who study the deadliest infectious diseases recognized the contributions of Frederick A. Murphy and Thomas G. Ksiazek, professors at the University of Texas Medical Branch, with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 6th annual International Symposium on Filoviruses. The filoviruses include Ebola and Marburg viruses that cause death in 50 to 90 percent of people infected. The current outbreak of Ebola virus raging in West Africa has caused more than 100 deaths so far. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism that explains reason for persistence of hepatitis C virus

Researchers identify mechanism that explains reason for persistence of hepatitis C virus

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a mechanism that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long. [More]
Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical, manufacturer and provider of innovative medical products, is pleased to announce its rollout of SKY 6Xi, disinfection technology for mobile devices. SKY 6Xi uses high intensity (254 nanometer wavelength) ultraviolet light in the "C" spectrum (UVC) at close proximity to thoroughly disinfect a mobile device. The unique power of SKY reduces the risk that Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are transmitted to patients while improving safety for healthcare workers. [More]

Too much of c-FLIPR protein can trigger autoimmune diseases

So-called c-FLIP proteins inhibit signaling cascades that can lead to apoptosis. This is important temporarily in the response to pathogens to ensure that lymphocytes, a type of immune cells, can proliferate sufficiently. [More]

Novel study uncovers way coughs and sneezes stay airborne for long distances

The next time you feel a sneeze coming on, raise your elbow to cover up that multiphase turbulent buoyant cloud you're about to expel. [More]
Humans appear to develop immunity against strain-specific Lyme disease that lasts for years

Humans appear to develop immunity against strain-specific Lyme disease that lasts for years

Lyme disease, if not treated promptly with antibiotics, can become a lingering problem for those infected. But a new study led by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania has some brighter news: Once infected with a particular strain of the disease-causing bacteria, humans appear to develop immunity against that strain that can last six to nine years. [More]

UM researchers awarded FDA contract to expand high-throughput sequencing database

Researchers at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have been awarded a research program contract from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to sequence, assemble, and annotate a population of bacterial pathogens using two high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies in support of the expansion of a vetted public reference database. [More]
Novel proteins may lead to new ways to combat venereal disease

Novel proteins may lead to new ways to combat venereal disease

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered novel proteins in, or on the surface of the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, which offer a promising new avenue of attack against a venereal disease that is showing increased resistance to the antibiotics used to treat it. [More]
S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant cause of community-acquired pneumonia among children in Belgium, with non-vaccine serotypes accounting for the majority of cases, a Belgian study shows. [More]
Experimental vaccine for HSV-2 infection reduces rate of viral shedding at 6 months

Experimental vaccine for HSV-2 infection reduces rate of viral shedding at 6 months

Updated Phase 1/2a results with GEN-003, a vaccine candidate under development by Genocea Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: GNCA) for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, showed the experimental vaccine to generate highly significant reductions in both the number of clinical lesion days and rate of viral shedding at six months after the final vaccine dose. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Infectious disease specialists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center have identified a protein that regulates the body's immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), a common pathogen that causes lifelong infections and can lead to devastating illness in newborns and those with weakened immune systems. [More]
Emergence of community-acquired infections due to ESBL-producing bacteria on the rise

Emergence of community-acquired infections due to ESBL-producing bacteria on the rise

The emergence of community-acquired infections, such as urinary tract infections (UTI), due to strains resistant to common antibiotics are on the rise, according to Rhode Island Hospital researchers. The study is published online in the journal Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control. [More]

Scientist receives $275,000 grant to study human papillomavirus that causes head and neck cancer

Basic scientists focus on understanding how things work, so most don't get the chance to directly impact other people's lives. That's why Michelle Ozbun, PhD, is very excited about her recent grant to study human papillomavirus. [More]