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Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

New research has found that one of the world's most prolific bacteria manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism -- a sense of touch. This unique ability helps make the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa ubiquitous, but it also might leave these antibiotic-resistant organisms vulnerable to a new form of treatment. [More]
Infections due to Staphylococcus aureus bacterium aggravate neurodermatitis

Infections due to Staphylococcus aureus bacterium aggravate neurodermatitis

Because the skin and its function as a barrier are severely compromised in neurodermatitis patients, a large number of bacterial species are able to multiply - including the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. [More]
Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Mycoplasma gallisepticum causes chronic respiratory disease in birds. The illness particularly affects domestic chicken and turkey flocks. The bacteria are especially life-threatening for the animals when they occur in combination with other infections. In order to control the spread of the disease, poultry farms in the EU must be proven free from Mycoplasma gallisepticum or face being closed. [More]
Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company, today announced it has submitted its Group B Strep assay to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for 510(k) clearance. [More]
'Spillover' of henipaviruses into humans underway, study finds

'Spillover' of henipaviruses into humans underway, study finds

Another family of viruses, deadly in some cases, may have already jumped from fruit bats into humans in Africa, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Communications. The study provides the first, preliminary scientific evidence that "spillover" of henipaviruses into human populations is underway. [More]
Strategy to stem infections in livestock, endangered species

Strategy to stem infections in livestock, endangered species

When a viral infection spread through five genetically identical mice in a row, the virus replicated faster and became more virulent or severe. But when the infection spread one-by-one through five genetically diverse mice, the virus had trouble adapting and became less virulent. [More]
LSU Health New Orleans professor awarded $1.8 million grant to target intra-abdominal infections

LSU Health New Orleans professor awarded $1.8 million grant to target intra-abdominal infections

Mairi Noverr, PhD, Associate Professor of Prosthodontics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Dentistry's Center of Excellence in Oral Biology, has been awarded a $1.8 million grant by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Study reveals the origin of world's AIDS pandemic

Study reveals the origin of world's AIDS pandemic

A study published in Science magazine reveals for the first time where, when and how the world's AIDS pandemic originated. Thanks to a statistical analysis of all the genetic data available on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), an international research team has just confirmed that the scourge broke out in 1920 in Kinshasa, the capital of what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Identifying infections rapidly: an interview with Dr. David J. Ecker

Identifying infections rapidly: an interview with Dr. David J. Ecker

Current methods for diagnosing infectious diseases are based on the 150-year-old culture method, where physicians collect a sample of a patient’s tissue, such as blood, mucus or urine, and transfer it onto media bottle to allow the pathogens to grow. [More]
Study outlines how unique pathogen uses the release of ROS as signal to infect healthy people

Study outlines how unique pathogen uses the release of ROS as signal to infect healthy people

New research into a rare pathogen has shown how a unique evolutionary trait allows it to infect even the healthiest of hosts through a smart solution to the body's immune response against it. [More]
Scientists develop promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV infection

Scientists develop promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV infection

Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe respiratory tract infections and worldwide claims the lives of 160,000 children each year. Scientists at VIB and Ghent University have succeeded in developing a promising vaccination strategy to counteract this common virus infection. [More]
IU Bloomington biologists to receive funding from NSF’s Dimensions of Biodiversity Program

IU Bloomington biologists to receive funding from NSF’s Dimensions of Biodiversity Program

Indiana University Bloomington biologists who specialize in the ecology and evolution of microbes have been named one of 12 teams in the nation to receive funding from the National Science Foundation's Dimensions of Biodiversity Program. [More]
Statement on Ebola epidemic

Statement on Ebola epidemic

The Ebola virus is spreading rapidly and to an unexpected extent. The outbreak does not follow the patterns experienced in the past and the virus shows a new disease dynamic in regions, where it has never been recorded before. For this reason, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, acatech – the German Academy of Science and Engineering, and the Union of the German Academies of Sciences and Humanities have presented a statement on the Ebola epidemic today. [More]
Promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV

Promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV

Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe respiratory tract infections and worldwide claims the lives of 160,000 children each year. Scientists at VIB and Ghent University have succeeded in developing a promising vaccination strategy to counteract this common virus infection. [More]
Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) and methicillin-resistant staph aureus (MRSA) continue to be among the most common pathogens that overwhelm the immune system, causing serious skin, soft tissue and life-threatening blood-borne infections. [More]
Researchers are developing compounds to combat causative agents of periodontitis

Researchers are developing compounds to combat causative agents of periodontitis

A total 12 million Germans suffer from periodontitis. If the inflammation remains untreated, this could lead to tooth loss. However, it is also suspected of triggering many other diseases, like cardiopulmonary diseases. Researchers are studying the interactions, and developing compounds to combat the causative agents. [More]
Kansas State professor aims to develop vaccines to protect against tick-borne diseases

Kansas State professor aims to develop vaccines to protect against tick-borne diseases

A Kansas State University professor is researching ways to keep animals and humans safe from tick-borne diseases. [More]
TGen, NAU awarded patent for genomics-based test to detect H1N1 pandemic flu strain

TGen, NAU awarded patent for genomics-based test to detect H1N1 pandemic flu strain

The federal government has awarded a patent to the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University for a test that can detect — and assist in the treatment of — the H1N1 pandemic flu strain. [More]
MicroRNA molecule plays crucial role in managing cell survival and growth

MicroRNA molecule plays crucial role in managing cell survival and growth

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a microRNA molecule as a surprisingly crucial player in managing cell survival and growth. [More]