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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Resistance exercise can improve episodic memory, shows study

Resistance exercise can improve episodic memory, shows study

Here's another reason why it's a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults. [More]
Genetic susceptibility to psychosocial stress can increase risk of cardiovascular disease

Genetic susceptibility to psychosocial stress can increase risk of cardiovascular disease

A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease. [More]
West Virginia University receives NIH award as part of BRAIN initiative

West Virginia University receives NIH award as part of BRAIN initiative

In its first wave of funding awards, a new presidential project aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain has pledged its support to a group of researchers led by West Virginia University faculty working to change the future of brain imaging. [More]
TSRI study points way to potential therapies for hereditary spastic paraplegia

TSRI study points way to potential therapies for hereditary spastic paraplegia

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that a gene mutation linked to hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disabling neurological disorder, interferes with the normal breakdown of triglyceride fat molecules in the brain. The TSRI researchers found large droplets of triglycerides within the neurons of mice modeling the disease. [More]
More reliable cardiorespiratory fitness data can be obtained using lean mass proportional measures

More reliable cardiorespiratory fitness data can be obtained using lean mass proportional measures

A recent study by the University of Eastern Finland shows that scaling maximal oxygen uptake and maximal workload by body weight confounds measures of cardiorespiratory fitness. It has been a common practice in exercise testing to scale the results by body weight and, according to researchers, this practice should be abandoned. More reliable data on cardiorespiratory fitness can be observed by using lean mass proportional measures. [More]
Pitt researchers awarded new $5.8 million NIH grant to develop microfluidic 3D liver model system

Pitt researchers awarded new $5.8 million NIH grant to develop microfluidic 3D liver model system

With a new $5.8 million, three-year award from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will further develop a state-of-the-art, microfluidic 3D model system that mimics structure and function of the liver to better predict organ physiology, assess drug toxicity and build disease models. [More]
Dynamical glucometry may uncover new ways of understanding diabetes

Dynamical glucometry may uncover new ways of understanding diabetes

For millions of people in the United States living with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, measuring the daily rise and fall of blood glucose (sugar) is a way of life. [More]
NIH awards $10.1 million in supplemental funding to study effects of sex in preclinical, clinical studies

NIH awards $10.1 million in supplemental funding to study effects of sex in preclinical, clinical studies

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $10.1 million in supplemental funding to bolster the research of 82 grantees to explore the effects of sex in preclinical and clinical studies. [More]
Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Study after study has proven it true: exercise is good for you. But new research from University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that exercise may have an added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. [More]
Reproductive cell division has mechanical safeguard against chromosome sorting errors

Reproductive cell division has mechanical safeguard against chromosome sorting errors

Reproductive cell division has evolved a simple, mechanical solution to avoid chromosome sorting errors, researchers report in the Sept. 11 Science Express. [More]
Dairy products contribute to overall metabolic health

Dairy products contribute to overall metabolic health

Dairy is considered part of a healthy diet and dietary guidelines recommend the daily consumption of 2-4 portions of milk-based products such as milk, yogurt, cheese, cream and butter. [More]
Scientists develop new method to get clearer picture of how drug abuse affects the brain

Scientists develop new method to get clearer picture of how drug abuse affects the brain

One thing leads to another, especially in research. When Stony Brook University School of Medicine scientists developed a new method to measure how cocaine disrupts blood flow in the brains of mice, doctors and researchers got a way to form a clearer picture of how drug abuse affects the brain. [More]
New research illustrates how fear arises in the brain

New research illustrates how fear arises in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. [More]
Brain stimulation increases cravings for high-calorie foods, shows study

Brain stimulation increases cravings for high-calorie foods, shows study

Magnetic stimulation of a brain area involved in "executive function" affects cravings for and consumption of calorie-dense snack foods, reports a study in the September issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
High levels of physical activity are associated with better reading and arithmetic skills in boys

High levels of physical activity are associated with better reading and arithmetic skills in boys

A recent Finnish study shows that higher levels of physical activity are related to better academic achievement during the first three school years particularly in boys. [More]

Study shows how stress can impact men’s health

Older men who lead high-stress lives, either from chronic everyday hassles or because of a series of significant life events, are likely to die earlier than the average for their peers, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
People can become addicted to eating but not to consuming foods high in sugar or fat

People can become addicted to eating but not to consuming foods high in sugar or fat

People can become addicted to eating for its own sake but not to consuming specific foods such as those high in sugar or fat, research suggests. [More]
5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries from prolonged sitting

5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries from prolonged sitting

An Indiana University study has found that three easy -- one could even say slow -- 5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries during three hours of prolonged sitting. [More]
AMPK gene can slow aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems

AMPK gene can slow aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems

UCLA biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems. [More]
Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

The understanding of how long-duration space flight affects the human body has come on quite considerably in recent years, and in large part, we owe that to programs of research that have taken place aboard the International Space Station and the Mir Space Station. [More]