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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Frederick Alt honored with 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

Frederick Alt honored with 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

Frederick Alt, PhD, director of the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital, has been honored with the 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research. [More]
ITIM-containing receptor crucial for development of acute myeloid leukemia

ITIM-containing receptor crucial for development of acute myeloid leukemia

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have discovered that a certain class of receptors that inhibit immune response are crucial for the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common acute leukemia affecting adults. [More]
Long-term survivors of esophageal cancer still face continued risks, study finds

Long-term survivors of esophageal cancer still face continued risks, study finds

Patients with esophageal cancer who survive 5 years after undergoing surgery might breathe a sigh of relief and become complacent about continued monitoring. In fact, there is little published information on the outcome of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC) who survive beyond the 5-year mark. [More]
Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Emphysema is a chronic, progressive, obstructive lung disease in which the small sacs of the lung (alveoli) are destroyed, leading to air pockets and severe breathing difficulties. In 2011, 4.7 million Americans reported being diagnosed with emphysema, and in 2013 more than 8200 patients died from emphysema. [More]
Dr. Philipp Scherer to receive prestigious Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement from ADA

Dr. Philipp Scherer to receive prestigious Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement from ADA

Dr. Philipp Scherer, Director of the Touchstone Center for Diabetes Research at UT Southwestern Medical Center, will receive the prestigious Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement, the highest honor bestowed by the American Diabetes Association. [More]
Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to reduce glucose spikes at breakfast and lunch

Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to reduce glucose spikes at breakfast and lunch

Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes have difficulty regulating their glucose -- or blood sugar -- levels, particularly after meals. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found that Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to help reduce glucose spikes at both breakfast and lunch. [More]
Adult survivors of preterm births at higher risk of developing COPD

Adult survivors of preterm births at higher risk of developing COPD

Adult survivors of preterm births may have a lung capacity that resembles the healthy elderly or casual smokers by the time they reach their early 20s, according to a University of Oregon study. [More]
McMaster researchers explore how surgeon's experience influences choice of surgery for patients

McMaster researchers explore how surgeon's experience influences choice of surgery for patients

Researchers at McMaster University (Hamilton, ON) explored whether a surgeon's expertise influences procedural choice. The results of a new study of more than 8000 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing surgical resection by 124 physicians showed that surgeons who perform more surgeries are less likely to perform high-risk pneumonectomies. Christian J. Finley, MD, MPH, will be presenting the results of this research at the 95th AATS Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA on April 28, 2015. [More]
Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Post-surgical hospital readmission after discharge and repeat emergency room (ER) visits are not unusual for patients who have undergone major thoracic surgery. Recognizing this problem, clinicians at McMaster University have implemented an innovative, active post-discharge intervention for thoracic surgery patients that is based on the principle of a "one team-one approach" that is initiated while the patient is still hospitalized. [More]
Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

New evidence suggests that lung cancer surgery patients are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), than previously thought, with elevated risks of complications or death. When thromboemboli occur, they may be asymptomatic or attributed to post-surgical pain or complications, and may reflect both the lung cancer itself as well as compromised lung function after surgery. [More]
Church-based education program improves diet, exercise habits among Latino adults with diabetes

Church-based education program improves diet, exercise habits among Latino adults with diabetes

Latino adults with diabetes who participated in a church-based education program reported eating less high-fat food and exercising more following a trial intervention program run by researchers from University of Chicago's Department of Medicine. [More]
Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

A retrospective review of 633 adults and children who underwent bioprosthetic pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) for congenital heart disease between 1996 and 2014 indicated that the risk of re-intervention was five times greater for children than adults, with the likelihood of re-intervention decreasing by 10% for each increasing year of age at surgery. [More]
Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully corrected the most common mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disorder. The study was published April 27 in Nature Communications. [More]
New study suggests that exercise type may be less important in fight against obesity

New study suggests that exercise type may be less important in fight against obesity

Medical experts widely recommended a combined program of diet and fitness to fight obesity. But when it comes to the type of exercise most effective a reducing weight and body mass—strength training, endurance exercise or a combination of both—opinions vary widely on which exercise regimen is best. [More]
Ultrasound settings can change beat frequency of cardiac cells

Ultrasound settings can change beat frequency of cardiac cells

Ultrasound—the technology used for sonograms and examining the heart—can increase the rate at which heart cells beat, researchers from Drexel University report. [More]
New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

An enzyme secreted by the body's fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body's fat tissue in controlling the brain's response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an optimal amount of body fat for maximizing health and longevity. [More]
Calorie restriction can improve muscle metabolism during middle age

Calorie restriction can improve muscle metabolism during middle age

Calorie restriction has long been studied as a way to extend lifespan in animals. It has been associated with the ability to reduce the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases and to improve overall health. [More]
ATA guidelines provide recommendations for managing thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in children

ATA guidelines provide recommendations for managing thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in children

Previous guidelines from the American Thyroid Association for evaluating and managing thyroid nodules and thyroid cancers targeted adults. Recognizing the potential differences in clinical presentation and long-term outcomes, and the potential risks of overly aggressive therapy in pediatric patients with thyroid cancer, an ATA Task Force developed management guidelines for children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which are published in Thyroid, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers and the official journal of the American Thyroid Association. [More]
Blocking Slit2 protein prevents blood vessel development that causes vasoproliferative ocular diseases

Blocking Slit2 protein prevents blood vessel development that causes vasoproliferative ocular diseases

Vasoproliferative ocular diseases are responsible for sight loss in millions of people in the industrialised countries. Many patients do not currently respond to the treatment offered, which targets a specific factor, VEGF. A team of Inserm researchers at the Vision Institute (Inserm/CNRS/Pierre and Marie Curie University), in association with a team from the Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, have demonstrated in an animal model that blocking another protein, Slit2, prevents the pathological blood vessel development that causes these diseases. [More]
Neuroscientists identify novel brain circuitry that increases anxiety during nicotine withdrawal

Neuroscientists identify novel brain circuitry that increases anxiety during nicotine withdrawal

In a promising breakthrough for smokers who are trying to quit, neuroscientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and The Scripps Research Institute have identified circuitry in the brain responsible for the increased anxiety commonly experienced during withdrawal from nicotine addiction. [More]
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