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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Comprehensive review of sex hormones' role in female reproductive tract

Comprehensive review of sex hormones' role in female reproductive tract

Charles R. Wira, PhD, and colleagues at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine have presented a comprehensive review of the role of sex hormones in the geography of the female reproductive tract and evidence supporting a "window of vulnerability" to HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). [More]
When you eat is just as important as what you eat

When you eat is just as important as what you eat

If you're looking to improve your heart health by changing your diet, when you eat may be just as important as what you eat. [More]
Excess dietary sodium can adversely affect organs

Excess dietary sodium can adversely affect organs

You may think you're one of the lucky ones who can eat all the salty snacks and convenience foods you want and still register low numbers on the blood pressure cuff. But, new research suggests you may not be so lucky after all. [More]
UC Irvine researchers discover inner mechanisms of jet lag

UC Irvine researchers discover inner mechanisms of jet lag

Long the stuff of science fiction, the disembodied "brain in a jar" is providing science fact for UC Irvine researchers, who by studying the whole brains of fruit flies are discovering the inner mechanisms of jet lag. [More]
The Brain Prize awarded to four scientists for development of two-photon microscopy

The Brain Prize awarded to four scientists for development of two-photon microscopy

The world's most valuable (€1m) neuroscience prize, The Brain Prize has been awarded, to four scientists, Winfried Denk and Arthur Konnerth (Germany), and Karel Svoboda and David Tank (USA), for the invention and development of two-photon microscopy, a transformative tool in brain research. [More]
Better understanding of stomach's response to infection could lead to therapies against gastric damage

Better understanding of stomach's response to infection could lead to therapies against gastric damage

A better understanding of the stomach's immune response to Helicobater pylori (H. pylori) infection could lead to new therapies targeting damage in the stomach, report researchers in the March issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Researchers present new findings about 'key players' involved in brain inflammation

Researchers present new findings about 'key players' involved in brain inflammation

Inflammatory processes occur in the brain in conjunction with stroke and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Researchers from Lund University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, in close cooperation with a group led by Professor José L. Venero at the University of Seville, have presented new findings about some of the 'key players' in inflammation. [More]
Plant molecule helps female mice combat weight gain

Plant molecule helps female mice combat weight gain

A molecule found in some plants can combat weight gain induced by a high-fat diet, but only in female mice, not males. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) is thought to mimic the effects of a growth factor induced by exercise. [More]
Salt may help control infection

Salt may help control infection

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and in Germany have found that sodium - salt - accumulates in the skin and tissue in humans and mice to help control infection. [More]
UCLA life scientists develop new method to find genetic markers for many diseases

UCLA life scientists develop new method to find genetic markers for many diseases

UCLA life scientists have created an accurate new method to identify genetic markers for many diseases -- a significant step toward a new era of personalized medicine, tailored to each person's DNA and RNA. [More]
Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

In an advance that may potentially lead to new treatments for parasitic hookworms, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Cornell University have sequenced the genome of the hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum. [More]
Early intervention with GLP-1 analogues may delay onset of type 2 diabetes

Early intervention with GLP-1 analogues may delay onset of type 2 diabetes

GLP-1 is a hormone that regulates glucose levels in the body by stimulating the secretion of insulin, and GLP-1 also inhibits appetite. "We have found that GLP-1 is reduced by up to 25% among people with pre-diabetes and up to 20% among obese people compared to normal weight people. [More]
Drosophila Research Conference to highlight recent advances in genetics research

Drosophila Research Conference to highlight recent advances in genetics research

Over 1,500 scientists from 30 countries and 46 states will attend next week's 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference organized by the Genetics Society of America, March 4–8 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Researchers reveal that mosquitoes’ sexual biology may key to malaria transmission

Researchers reveal that mosquitoes’ sexual biology may key to malaria transmission

Sexual biology may be the key to uncovering why Anopheles mosquitoes are unique in their ability to transmit malaria to humans, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and University of Perugia, Italy. [More]

New study shows how anterior cingulate cortex can be stimulated to control pain

A new study by a University of Texas at Arlington physics team in collaboration with bioengineering and psychology researchers shows for the first time how a small area of the brain can be optically stimulated to control pain. [More]

Investigators caution parents, health care providers about use of general anesthetics in children

A group of anesthesiologists and toxicologists today issued a caution to parents and health care professionals about the use of general anesthetics in children. [More]
Intrinsically disordered proteins have ability to alter their configuration

Intrinsically disordered proteins have ability to alter their configuration

Like the shape-shifting robots of "Transformers" fame, a unique class of proteins in the human body also has the ability to alter their configuration. These so-named intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack a fixed or ordered three-dimensional structure, which can be influenced by exposure to various chemicals and cellular modifications. [More]
Researchers warn doctors, parents not to give melatonin drug to control sleep problems in children

Researchers warn doctors, parents not to give melatonin drug to control sleep problems in children

Sleep researchers at the University of Adelaide are warning doctors and parents not to provide the drug melatonin to children to help control their sleep problems. [More]
NYU Langone's Michael M. Halassa selected as winner of 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship

NYU Langone's Michael M. Halassa selected as winner of 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship

Michael M. Halassa, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Medical Center's Neuroscience Institute, has been selected as a winner of the 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship. [More]
Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix, which breaks up blood clots during heart attacks and other arterial diseases. [More]
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