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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
High-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage by 50%

High-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage by 50%

It's well known that over the long run, a high-fat diet increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Elsevier to publish ISN's flagship journals, Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements

Elsevier to publish ISN's flagship journals, Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the International Society of Nephrology (ISN), the global medical society devoted to advancing kidney care worldwide, announced today that Elsevier will publish ISN's flagship journals, Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements, as of January 1, 2016. [More]
Short-term, high-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage, shows study

Short-term, high-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage, shows study

It's well known that over the long run, a high-fat diet increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Pediatric cardiology researchers and clinicians from numerous centers from around the world are gathering at the Cardiology 2015: the 18th Annual Update on Pediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease conference, sponsored by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Phoenix Children's Hospital on Feb. 11 to Feb. 15 in Scottsdale, Ariz. [More]
Consortium formed to develop program to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients

Consortium formed to develop program to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients

Scripps Translational Science Institute will lead a consortium of four partners to develop a program through which wearable, wireless health sensors, a wireless vital signs monitoring platform and advanced analytics technology will be tested in a new "precision medicine" approach designed to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients, increase the safety of health care workers and reduce risk of spreading the virus to others. [More]
Retigabine drug shows promise in protecting the brain against effects of ischemic stroke

Retigabine drug shows promise in protecting the brain against effects of ischemic stroke

Retigabine, a drug approved to treat epilepsy, protected the brain against the effects of ischemic stroke in a study conducted at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. [More]
Expert panel makes new sleep-time recommendations

Expert panel makes new sleep-time recommendations

Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researcher Lydia DonCarlos, PhD, is a member of an expert panel that's making new recommendations on how much sleep people need. [More]

Space travel may contribute to temporary or permanent vision problems

An international partnership between Florida State University and a team from the Russian Academy of Sciences has found that space travel may severely impair the body's ability to regulate blood rushing to the brain, which could contribute to the temporary or permanent vision problems experienced by astronauts. [More]
Researchers develop novel approach to identify potential antimalarial drugs

Researchers develop novel approach to identify potential antimalarial drugs

Each year nearly 600,000 people--mostly children under age five and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa--die from malaria, caused by single-celled parasites that grow inside red blood cells. The most deadly malarial species--Plasmodium falciparum--has proven notoriously resistant to treatment efforts. [More]
IU School of Medicine launches Industry Collaboration Portal

IU School of Medicine launches Industry Collaboration Portal

The Indiana University School of Medicine has launched an initiative and accompanying web site to encourage more collaboration between private industry and researchers at the medical school. [More]
TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine have been awarded a $7.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to determine how cocaine and HIV-1 interact to cause brain impairment in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. [More]
Blood gas POCT seminar video published online by sphere medical - new clinical resources centre added to sphere medical’s website

Blood gas POCT seminar video published online by sphere medical - new clinical resources centre added to sphere medical’s website

Sphere Medical, innovator in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, has published online a video of an industry seminar on ‘True Point-of-Care Testing’ presented by Dr. Tom Clutton-Brock, Senior Lecturer Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Birmingham at the AAGBI 2014 Annual Congress. [More]
Combination of coconut oil and exercise training can reduce blood pressure

Combination of coconut oil and exercise training can reduce blood pressure

Coconut oil is one of the few foods that can be classified as a "superfood." Its unique combination of fatty acids can have profound positive effects on health, including fat loss, better brain function and many other remarkable benefits. [More]
New NIH grant to help restore function after spinal cord injury

New NIH grant to help restore function after spinal cord injury

Restoring function after spinal cord injury, which damages the connections that carry messages from the brain to the body and back, depends on forming new connections between the surviving nerve cells. While there are some delicate surgical techniques that reconnect the nerves, researchers are also looking at ways to restore the connections themselves at a cellular level. [More]
Psychedelic drug prevents allergic asthma in mouse model

Psychedelic drug prevents allergic asthma in mouse model

Research led by Charles Nichols, PhD, Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at the LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found that a psychedelic drug, (R)-DOI, prevents the development of allergic asthma in a mouse model. [More]
Drugs designed to target NHE9 protein could help fight glioblastoma

Drugs designed to target NHE9 protein could help fight glioblastoma

Applying lessons learned from autism to brain cancer, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have discovered why elevated levels of the protein NHE9 add to the lethality of the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, glioblastoma. Their discovery suggests that drugs designed to target NHE9 could help to successfully fight the deadly disease. [More]
IU researchers awarded NIH grant to develop new weapon to fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

IU researchers awarded NIH grant to develop new weapon to fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

The alarming increase of antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses health and economic threats worldwide, with more than 2 million Americans infected by the bacteria each year. Now, a team of Indiana University chemists and biologists has been awarded a major grant to develop and use a chemical tagging method to better understand how bacteria build their cell wall, which is still the best target for new antibiotics. [More]
Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers devise new method to activate genes with light

Duke University researchers have devised a method to activate genes in any specific location or pattern in a lab dish with the flip of a light switch by crossing a bacterium's viral defense system with a flower's response to sunlight. [More]
Physical, psychosocial factors can significantly increase risk of low back pain

Physical, psychosocial factors can significantly increase risk of low back pain

New research reveals the physical and psychosocial factors that significantly increase the risk of low back pain onset. In fact results published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, show that being engaged in manual tasks involving awkward positions will increase the risk of low back pain by eight times. Those who are distracted during activities or fatigued also significantly increase their risk of acute low back pain. [More]
Researchers conduct environmental scan to understand physical activity services offered by FHTs

Researchers conduct environmental scan to understand physical activity services offered by FHTs

To better understand the current use of physical activity as medicine among Family Health Teams (FHTs) in Ontario, researchers at the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Waterloo and the Centre for Family Medicine Family Health Team conducted an environmental scan of 102 FHTs. [More]