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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

Inflammatory diseases can occur simultaneously in distinct sites in the same patient, complicating treatment because a medication effective for one disorder may exacerbate the other. [More]
Acute episodes of low back pain not linked to weather conditions

Acute episodes of low back pain not linked to weather conditions

Australian researchers reveal that sudden, acute episodes of low back pain are not linked to weather conditions such as temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation. [More]
Rockefeller scientists identify protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize

Rockefeller scientists identify protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize

Using an innovative tool that captures heretofore hidden ways that cells are regulated, scientists at Rockefeller University have identified a protein that makes breast cancer cells more likely to metastasize. [More]
Study compares level of physical fitness of adolescents in south with centre and north of Europe

Study compares level of physical fitness of adolescents in south with centre and north of Europe

Adolescents in southern Europe are less fit in terms of cardiorespiratory capacity, strength and speed-agility than their central-northern European peers. Moreover, southern adolescents are more obese and present higher levels of total and abdominal fat than those from the centre-north of Europe. [More]
Scientists discover new role for pair of compounds which alter circadian rhythm

Scientists discover new role for pair of compounds which alter circadian rhythm

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a surprising new role for a pair of compounds—which have the potential to alter circadian rhythm, the complex physiological process that responds to a 24-hour cycle of light and dark and is present in most living things. [More]
Scientists discover new compounds that could alter circadian rhythm

Scientists discover new compounds that could alter circadian rhythm

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a surprising new role for a pair of compounds—which have the potential to alter circadian rhythm, the complex physiological process that responds to a 24-hour cycle of light and dark and is present in most living things. [More]
High level of adiponectin linked to decreased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease

High level of adiponectin linked to decreased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease

It has been known for its flavorful addition to soups and as a delicacy for dogs but bone marrow fat may also have untapped health benefits, new research finds. [More]
Researchers discover mechanical threshold that regulates angiogenesis

Researchers discover mechanical threshold that regulates angiogenesis

Angiogenesis, the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is essential to the body's development. As organs grow, vascular networks must grow with them to feed new cells and remove their waste. [More]
Clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis are within reach, say immunologists

Clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis are within reach, say immunologists

Leading immunologists expect to see some clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis, an infectious disease that is widespread the world over. Professor Stefan Kaufmann, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, echoed these sentiments at today's launch of the scientific programme for the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting at Lindau, Germany. [More]
Extract of Chinese herb thunder god vine suppresses pancreatic cancer cell

Extract of Chinese herb thunder god vine suppresses pancreatic cancer cell

A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer—the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the U.S.—can be devastating. Due in part to aggressive cell replication and tumor growth, pancreatic cancer progresses quickly and has a low five-year survival rate (less than 5 percent). [More]
LINX Reflux Management System safe for patients suffering from GERD, shows new data

LINX Reflux Management System safe for patients suffering from GERD, shows new data

Torax Medical today announced the release of new data from two leading U.S. medical centers that further establishes the LINX Reflux Management System as a safe and effective procedure for patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). [More]
Omega-3 PUFAs offer an affordable way to reduce effects of traumatic brain, spinal cord injuries

Omega-3 PUFAs offer an affordable way to reduce effects of traumatic brain, spinal cord injuries

The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) found in seafood and marine oils called EPA and DHA may offer a simple, affordable way to reduce the effects of traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries by decreasing inflammation and nerve cell damage. [More]
Synthetic Biologics supports SYN-004 C.difficile preventative program with formation of Clinical Advisory Board

Synthetic Biologics supports SYN-004 C.difficile preventative program with formation of Clinical Advisory Board

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of novel anti-infective biologic and drug candidates targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, announced today the formation of a Clinical Advisory Board (CAB) to support development of SYN-004, the Company's lead anti-infective product candidate for the prevention of the devastating effects of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) [More]
Modified classification system finds over one-third of knee replacements as inappropriate

Modified classification system finds over one-third of knee replacements as inappropriate

New research reports that more than one third of total knee replacements in the U.S. were classified as "inappropriate" using a patient classification system developed and validated in Spain. The study, published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), highlights the need for consensus on patient selection criteria among U.S. medical professionals treating those with the potential need of knee replacement surgery. [More]
Light-sensitive molecule enables noninvasive silencing of neurons

Light-sensitive molecule enables noninvasive silencing of neurons

Optogenetics, a technology that allows scientists to control brain activity by shining light on neurons, relies on light-sensitive proteins that can suppress or stimulate electrical signals within cells. This technique requires a light source to be implanted in the brain, where it can reach the cells to be controlled. [More]
Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

In work supported by The ALS Association, researchers have shown that increasing the clearance of misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival. The study was published today in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. [More]
Karolinska Institute Professor calls for innovative solutions for global healthcare

Karolinska Institute Professor calls for innovative solutions for global healthcare

Einstein once observed that "it is harder to crack prejudice than an atom". If he was right, then Hans Rosling is faced with a labour of Hercules. [More]
Targeting ASIC-related neurotransmission may lead to new therapies for treating drug addiction

Targeting ASIC-related neurotransmission may lead to new therapies for treating drug addiction

University of Iowa researchers have discovered a new form of neurotransmission that influences the long-lasting memory created by addictive drugs, like cocaine and opioids, and the subsequent craving for these drugs of abuse. Loss of this type of neurotransmission creates changes in brains cells that resemble the changes caused by drug addiction. [More]
Members of JUGGLE network collaborate to improve project coordination

Members of JUGGLE network collaborate to improve project coordination

The field of life sciences is at the crossroads of biology and medicine and is a key component of the research portfolio of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). [More]
Research provides new insight into effects of adding fructose to Western diet high in fat

Research provides new insight into effects of adding fructose to Western diet high in fat

A high-fructose, high-fat diet can cause harmful effects to the livers of adult rats, according to new research published in Experimental Physiology, providing new insight into the effects of adding fructose to a Western diet high in fat. [More]