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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Penn study sheds light on role of essential compound in maintaining optimal muscle function

Penn study sheds light on role of essential compound in maintaining optimal muscle function

Maintaining proper levels of an essential helper molecule is crucial for optimal muscle function, according to a study led by Joseph Baur, PhD, an assistant professor of Physiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Philips collaborates with Mayo Clinic to climb Mount Kilimanjaro on research expedition

Philips collaborates with Mayo Clinic to climb Mount Kilimanjaro on research expedition

Royal Philips today announced it will be among the leading organizations collaborating with the Mayo Clinic to climb Mount Kilimanjaro on a research expedition to understand how the body reacts to the rigors of high altitude and how those learnings can be applied to improving human health. [More]
Study finds reduced activity of ACMSD enzyme in people with suicidal behavior

Study finds reduced activity of ACMSD enzyme in people with suicidal behavior

It is known that people who have attempted suicide have ongoing inflammation in their blood and spinal fluid. Now, a collaborative study from research teams in the U.S., Sweden and Australia published in Translational Psychiatry shows that suicidal patients have a reduced activity of an enzyme that regulates inflammation and its byproducts. [More]
New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

The use of a newly-developed mosquito trap incorporating human odour has resulted in a 70% decline in the population of the most significant malaria mosquito on the Kenyan island of Rusinga. [More]
Pang receives NSF award to improve ICU management

Pang receives NSF award to improve ICU management

Guodong (Gordon) Pang has been awarded $150,000 by the National Science Foundation for research that aims to improve discharge predictions within intensive care units (ICUs) and a patient's subsequent flow through the hospital system. [More]
Playground zoning can help maximize physical activity of students during recess period

Playground zoning can help maximize physical activity of students during recess period

Most grade school students are likely to claim recess as their favorite period of the day; however, in many cases recess still can be sedentary with students not engaging in enough physical activity. [More]
Researchers discover olfactory receptors in human muscle cells of bronchi

Researchers discover olfactory receptors in human muscle cells of bronchi

Researchers identified two types of olfactory receptors in human muscle cells of bronchi. If those receptors are activated by binding an odorant, bronchi dilate and contract - a potential approach for asthma therapy. [More]
New study shows how the body’s biological clock suppresses inflammation during night-time sleep

New study shows how the body’s biological clock suppresses inflammation during night-time sleep

New research published online in The FASEB Journal, describes a protein created by the body's "biological clock" that actively represses inflammatory pathways within the affected limbs during the night. [More]
Study demonstrates significant reduction in severity of exercise-induced asthma following B-GOS consumption

Study demonstrates significant reduction in severity of exercise-induced asthma following B-GOS consumption

Clasado Biosciences Limited, the producers and suppliers of Bimuno(R) (B-GOS), a unique patented trans-galactooligosaccharide complex, today announces the publication of results for the latest clinical study using B-GOS. [More]
Novel dual molecular tuner offers easy way to perform in-depth analyses in mammalian cells

Novel dual molecular tuner offers easy way to perform in-depth analyses in mammalian cells

A research team headed by investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has developed a tool that allows scientists to quickly manipulate levels of two proteins in the same cell. [More]
Genome-wide study sheds light on evolution of pollen allergens

Genome-wide study sheds light on evolution of pollen allergens

A joint University of Adelaide-Shanghai Jiao Tong University study has provided the first broad picture of the evolution and possible functions in the plant of pollen allergens. [More]
Some WADA-banned substances may have potential medical applications

Some WADA-banned substances may have potential medical applications

As the world awaits the start of the 2016 Summer Olympics, doping in athletes remains a hot topic. [More]
Researchers identify crucial innate immunity role for gene linked to ARC syndrome in children

Researchers identify crucial innate immunity role for gene linked to ARC syndrome in children

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found an important innate immunity role for a gene linked to a rare, fatal syndrome in children. Their study has implications for a much more common disease: tuberculosis. [More]
Research findings elucidate how neurons process, represent touch in rat and the human brain

Research findings elucidate how neurons process, represent touch in rat and the human brain

When reaching into a pocket or purse, it is easy to use the sense of touch to distinguish keys from loose change. Our brains seamlessly integrate the tactile, sensory cues from our fingers with hand movements to perceive the different objects. [More]
Scientists use animal model to gain better understanding of cocaine addiction

Scientists use animal model to gain better understanding of cocaine addiction

Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center are one step closer to understanding what causes cocaine to be so addictive. The research findings are published in the current issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
Paternal over-nutrition may lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction

Paternal over-nutrition may lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction

Paternal intake of a high-fat diet (HFD) can cause genetic changes that lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction—including body weight and fat mass increases and changes in blood pressure, triglyceride levels and fat metabolism—in mice, according to Japanese researchers at Okayama University. [More]
Overcoming gene silencing barriers to target neurological conditions: an interview with Dr Errol de Souza

Overcoming gene silencing barriers to target neurological conditions: an interview with Dr Errol de Souza

Many gene mutations that cause neurological disorders have been identified. For example, in a rare neurological disorder such as Huntington’s disease, an autosomal dominant mutation through expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats in the gene coding for the Huntingtin protein results in abnormal protein production. [More]
Researchers identify reason why antidepressants take so long to work

Researchers identify reason why antidepressants take so long to work

An episode of major depression can be crippling, impairing the ability to sleep, work, or eat. In severe cases, the mood disorder can lead to suicide. But the drugs available to treat depression, which can affect one in six Americans in their lifetime, can take weeks or even months to start working. [More]
Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

As women enter menopause, their levels of physical activity decrease; for years scientists were unable to determine why. [More]
New research elucidates details about architecture of synaptic transmission

New research elucidates details about architecture of synaptic transmission

For more than a century, neuroscientists have known that nerve cells talk to one another across the small gaps between them, a process known as synaptic transmission. [More]
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