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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
New evidence may explain how gut microorganisms affect human physiology

New evidence may explain how gut microorganisms affect human physiology

Researchers have found evidence that could shed new light on the complex community of trillions of microorganisms living in all our guts, and how they interact with our bodies. [More]
Scientists identify sugar molecule that reduces inflammatory response and COPD progression

Scientists identify sugar molecule that reduces inflammatory response and COPD progression

Using a mouse model, scientists from the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology and a number of other institutes have identified a sugar molecule that reduced the inflammatory response and progress of emphysema, a common component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
Sight Sciences receives Health Canada approval for TRAB 360 Trabeculotomy System

Sight Sciences receives Health Canada approval for TRAB 360 Trabeculotomy System

Sight Sciences, Inc., a venture-backed, commercial-stage ophthalmic medical device company announced today that it has received Health Canada approval for the TRAB 360 Trabeculotomy System. [More]
Discrimination in daily life linked to high rates of sleep problems

Discrimination in daily life linked to high rates of sleep problems

People who perceive more discrimination in daily life have higher rates of sleep problems, based on both subjective and objective measures, reports a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
High-mileage runners show more neuromuscular changes than low-mileage counterparts

High-mileage runners show more neuromuscular changes than low-mileage counterparts

Runners who consistently log high mileage show more neuromuscular changes that improve running efficiency than their low-mileage counterparts, according to researchers from Liverpool John Moores University in the United Kingdom. [More]
Weight loss leads to improvements in psoriasis symptoms and quality of life

Weight loss leads to improvements in psoriasis symptoms and quality of life

Weight loss has a significant and prolonged positive impact on psoriasis symptoms and quality of life. [More]
Vitamin D supplementation improves metabolic syndrome in mice

Vitamin D supplementation improves metabolic syndrome in mice

It is well known that a diet high in fat can trigger a metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms that pose as risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. [More]
Scientists discover link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of subthalamic nucleus

Scientists discover link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of subthalamic nucleus

Northwestern Medicine scientists identified a link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of the subthalamic nucleus, a component of the basal ganglia, a group of brain structures critical for movement and impulse control. [More]
Music may regulate mood, emotional responses at behavioral and neuronal level

Music may regulate mood, emotional responses at behavioral and neuronal level

Sounds, such as music and noise, are capable of reliably affecting individuals' moods and emotions, possibly by regulating brain dopamine, a neurotransmitter strongly involved in emotional behavior and mood regulation. [More]
Danish researchers uncover bacteria’s secret code language

Danish researchers uncover bacteria’s secret code language

Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a growing global challenge. Danish researchers have now discovered that bacteria use a code language to avoid being controlled. [More]
Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

In a first-in-children randomized clinical study, medical researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). [More]
Hormone receptor could be potential biomarker for gastric cancer, research shows

Hormone receptor could be potential biomarker for gastric cancer, research shows

Scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Miami, and Shantou University Medical College in China, have shown that the hormone receptor GHRH-R could be a potential biomarker for gastric cancer, enabling earlier diagnoses and better staging. [More]
Research findings reveal new powerful role of sunlight on immunity

Research findings reveal new powerful role of sunlight on immunity

Sunlight allows us to make vitamin D, credited with healthier living, but a surprise research finding could reveal another powerful benefit of getting some sun. [More]
Noise sensitivity linked to how the brain processes variations in sound stream

Noise sensitivity linked to how the brain processes variations in sound stream

The degree to which one is disturbed by noises of everyday life may be related to how the brain processes variations in the sound stream, according to new findings published in Scientific Reports. [More]
NIH-funded scientists work with three ‘omes’ to understand human health

NIH-funded scientists work with three ‘omes’ to understand human health

Have you ever collected coins, cards, toy trains, stuffed animals? Did you feel the need to complete the set? If so, then you may be a completist. A completist will go to great lengths to acquire a complete set of something. [More]
Researchers use worms as model system to study how gut microbiome influences disease

Researchers use worms as model system to study how gut microbiome influences disease

The billions of microorganisms living within the human digestive tract appear to play a significant role in health and disease, notably metabolic syndrome, autoimmune disorders and diabetes - but how these organisms do so is not well understood. [More]
U-M awarded NIH grant to investigate molecular changes that occur during and after physical activity

U-M awarded NIH grant to investigate molecular changes that occur during and after physical activity

The University of Michigan was recently awarded $8.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the molecular changes that occur during and after physical activity. [More]
Good-tasting food does not lead to weight gain, new research suggests

Good-tasting food does not lead to weight gain, new research suggests

Does eating good-tasting food make you gain weight? Despite the common perception that good-tasting food is unhealthy and causes obesity, new research from the Monell Center using a mouse model suggests that desirable taste in and of itself does not lead to weight gain. [More]
Vitamin B3 may help treat preeclampsia-affected pregnant women

Vitamin B3 may help treat preeclampsia-affected pregnant women

Scientists in Japan and the US have found that vitamin B3 nicotinamide may help treat pregnant women who suffer from preeclampsia by preventing strokes and in some cases, even stimulating the growth of their fetus. [More]
Study improves molecular understanding of the brain in people with epilepsy

Study improves molecular understanding of the brain in people with epilepsy

Neural stem cells have been found in epileptic brain tissue—outside the regions of the brain where they normally reside. In a group of patients who underwent surgery for epilepsy, over half had stem cells where healthy individuals do not have them, according to a study from Sahlgrenska Academy. [More]
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