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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Study describes how opioid receptors participate in spermatozoa production

Study describes how opioid receptors participate in spermatozoa production

The study conducted at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country describes for the first time how these receptors participate in spermatogenesis. [More]
Rice study takes deeper look at how inflammation bridges stress and diabetes

Rice study takes deeper look at how inflammation bridges stress and diabetes

A Rice University study has found a link between emotional stress and diabetes, with roots in the brain's ability to control anxiety. [More]
Drinking soft drinks to rehydrate worsens dehydration-related kidney injury

Drinking soft drinks to rehydrate worsens dehydration-related kidney injury

Repeated heat-related dehydration has been associated with increased risk of chronic kidney damage in mice. A new study in rats published in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology reports that drinking soft drinks to rehydrate worsened dehydration and kidney injury. [More]
Study establishes copper’s role in fat metabolism

Study establishes copper’s role in fat metabolism

A new study is further burnishing copper's reputation as an essential nutrient for human physiology. A research team led by a scientist at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the University of California, Berkeley, has found that copper plays a key role in metabolizing fat. [More]
Loughborough research reveals most effective way of boosting muscle strength

Loughborough research reveals most effective way of boosting muscle strength

Engaging in short, explosive leg contractions is the most effective way of strengthening muscles, Loughborough research reveals. [More]
Research shows IFITM3 protein can block Zika virus from infecting human, mouse cells

Research shows IFITM3 protein can block Zika virus from infecting human, mouse cells

Eight weeks after receiving their first samples of Zika virus, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have shown that a very small protein we all have in our bodies, interferon-induced protein 3 (IFITM3), can dramatically reduce the ability of Zika virus to infect human and mouse cells. [More]
Clinical study finds two topical skin creams as effective noninvasive treatments for low-risk superficial BCC

Clinical study finds two topical skin creams as effective noninvasive treatments for low-risk superficial BCC

Basal cell carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and its incidence is increasing worldwide, putting a significant burden on health services. Topical treatments are available for superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC) but there has a lack of long-term follow-up data to guide treatment decisions. [More]
Researchers developing more accessible way to monitor brain health

Researchers developing more accessible way to monitor brain health

Simon Fraser University researchers hope that a brain vital-sign test becomes as routine during a doctor's check-up as taking a blood pressure or heart rate measurement. [More]
New online training module provides opportunity for HCPs to support patients with scarring

New online training module provides opportunity for HCPs to support patients with scarring

An online training module has launched in the UK this week offering primary care healthcare professionals the opportunity to develop their knowledge and access resources to support patients with scarring. [More]
Excess phosphates in foods may lead to abnormally high blood pressure

Excess phosphates in foods may lead to abnormally high blood pressure

Excess consumption of phosphate over-activates nerves that raise blood pressure, leading to abnormally high blood pressure, a new study in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology reports. [More]
UA researcher aims to identify imaging biomarkers for effective screening of ovarian cancer

UA researcher aims to identify imaging biomarkers for effective screening of ovarian cancer

University of Arizona researcher Jennifer Barton is leading a two-year, $1 million project funded by the National Cancer Institute to identify imaging biomarkers of ovarian cancer, the most deadly gynecological cancer in the United States. [More]
Researchers shed more light on how brain rhythms organize memories across time

Researchers shed more light on how brain rhythms organize memories across time

Just as members of an orchestra need a conductor to stay on tempo, neurons in the brain need well-timed waves of activity to organize memories across time. In the hippocampus--the brain's memory center--temporal ordering of the neural code is important for building a mental map of where you've been, where you are, and where you are going. [More]
Study finds that TPC2 protein regulates melanin production

Study finds that TPC2 protein regulates melanin production

A year and a half ago, researchers at Brown University found a molecular gas pedal for melanin production. Now they've found a brake. For scientists, the finding deepens not only the basic understanding of how eyes, skin and hair gain color, but also what perhaps can be done in disorders, such as albinism, when that doesn't happen. [More]
Salk scientists discover REV-ERBα protein that controls strength of circadian rhythm

Salk scientists discover REV-ERBα protein that controls strength of circadian rhythm

At noon every day, levels of genes and proteins throughout your body are drastically different than they are at midnight. Disruptions to this 24-hour cycle of physiological activity are why jet lag or a bad night's sleep can alter your appetite and sleep patterns for days--and even contribute to conditions like heart disease, sleep disorders and cancers. [More]
Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Researchers at the Buck Institute have shown a new effect on aging via a small drug-like molecule that alters the perception of food in the nematode C. elegans. Publishing in Aging Cell, researchers "tricked" the worm's metabolism into a state of caloric restriction, extending the animal's lifespan by 50 percent. [More]
Early-life stress may lead to functional dyspepsia in adulthood

Early-life stress may lead to functional dyspepsia in adulthood

Traumatic events early in life can increase levels of norepinephrine—the primary hormone responsible for preparing the body to react to stressful situations—in the gut, increasing the risk of developing chronic indigestion and anxiety during adulthood, a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology reports. [More]
WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

Cell therapies for a range of serious conditions, including heart attacks, diabetes, and traumatic injuries, will be accelerated by research at Worcester Polytechnic Institute that yielded a newly patented method of converting human skin cells into engines of wound healing and tissue regeneration. [More]
Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Artificial sweeteners help individuals with obesity to cut calories and lose weight but may have negative health effects, according to researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. [More]
Georgia Tech engineers developing device to listen to and measure sounds inside the joint

Georgia Tech engineers developing device to listen to and measure sounds inside the joint

You've injured your knee. A doctor straps a listening device to it, and the noises you hear coming out of it are cringe-worthy. "Crackle! Krglkrglkrgl! Snap!" [More]
JBCPP journal publishes new evidence for clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy

JBCPP journal publishes new evidence for clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy

New evidence for the clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy is presented in the latest issue of the Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology, a De Gruyter publication. [More]
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