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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Extract of Chinese herb thunder god vine suppresses pancreatic cancer cell

Extract of Chinese herb thunder god vine suppresses pancreatic cancer cell

A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer—the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the U.S.—can be devastating. Due in part to aggressive cell replication and tumor growth, pancreatic cancer progresses quickly and has a low five-year survival rate (less than 5 percent). [More]
LINX Reflux Management System safe for patients suffering from GERD, shows new data

LINX Reflux Management System safe for patients suffering from GERD, shows new data

Torax Medical today announced the release of new data from two leading U.S. medical centers that further establishes the LINX Reflux Management System as a safe and effective procedure for patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). [More]
Omega-3 PUFAs offer an affordable way to reduce effects of traumatic brain, spinal cord injuries

Omega-3 PUFAs offer an affordable way to reduce effects of traumatic brain, spinal cord injuries

The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) found in seafood and marine oils called EPA and DHA may offer a simple, affordable way to reduce the effects of traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries by decreasing inflammation and nerve cell damage. [More]
Synthetic Biologics supports SYN-004 C.difficile preventative program with formation of Clinical Advisory Board

Synthetic Biologics supports SYN-004 C.difficile preventative program with formation of Clinical Advisory Board

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of novel anti-infective biologic and drug candidates targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, announced today the formation of a Clinical Advisory Board (CAB) to support development of SYN-004, the Company's lead anti-infective product candidate for the prevention of the devastating effects of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) [More]
Modified classification system finds over one-third of knee replacements as inappropriate

Modified classification system finds over one-third of knee replacements as inappropriate

New research reports that more than one third of total knee replacements in the U.S. were classified as "inappropriate" using a patient classification system developed and validated in Spain. The study, published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), highlights the need for consensus on patient selection criteria among U.S. medical professionals treating those with the potential need of knee replacement surgery. [More]
Light-sensitive molecule enables noninvasive silencing of neurons

Light-sensitive molecule enables noninvasive silencing of neurons

Optogenetics, a technology that allows scientists to control brain activity by shining light on neurons, relies on light-sensitive proteins that can suppress or stimulate electrical signals within cells. This technique requires a light source to be implanted in the brain, where it can reach the cells to be controlled. [More]
Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

In work supported by The ALS Association, researchers have shown that increasing the clearance of misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival. The study was published today in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. [More]
Karolinska Institute Professor calls for innovative solutions for global healthcare

Karolinska Institute Professor calls for innovative solutions for global healthcare

Einstein once observed that "it is harder to crack prejudice than an atom". If he was right, then Hans Rosling is faced with a labour of Hercules. [More]
Targeting ASIC-related neurotransmission may lead to new therapies for treating drug addiction

Targeting ASIC-related neurotransmission may lead to new therapies for treating drug addiction

University of Iowa researchers have discovered a new form of neurotransmission that influences the long-lasting memory created by addictive drugs, like cocaine and opioids, and the subsequent craving for these drugs of abuse. Loss of this type of neurotransmission creates changes in brains cells that resemble the changes caused by drug addiction. [More]
Members of JUGGLE network collaborate to improve project coordination

Members of JUGGLE network collaborate to improve project coordination

The field of life sciences is at the crossroads of biology and medicine and is a key component of the research portfolio of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). [More]
Research provides new insight into effects of adding fructose to Western diet high in fat

Research provides new insight into effects of adding fructose to Western diet high in fat

A high-fructose, high-fat diet can cause harmful effects to the livers of adult rats, according to new research published in Experimental Physiology, providing new insight into the effects of adding fructose to a Western diet high in fat. [More]
Researchers find way to diagnose aggressiveness of oral cancer

Researchers find way to diagnose aggressiveness of oral cancer

Studying mouth cancer in mice, researchers have found a way to predict the aggressiveness of similar tumors in people, an early step toward a diagnostic test that could guide treatment, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Student's award winning research may help improve sportswear design

Student's award winning research may help improve sportswear design

A Loughborough University PhD student's award winning research into the body's sensitivity to skin wetness could influence the design of a major international retailer's sports clothing. [More]
Preventing antibiotic side effects: an interview with Florence Séjourné, CEO, Da Volterra

Preventing antibiotic side effects: an interview with Florence Séjourné, CEO, Da Volterra

Like all drugs, antibiotics can have side-effects when administered to people. The most common (and often benign) side effect people experience when taking antibiotics is “associated diarrhea”. This illustrates the fact that antibiotics have an impact on the intestine! [More]
Myosin binding protein C holds the key to new treatments for heart disease

Myosin binding protein C holds the key to new treatments for heart disease

Loyola University Chicago recently hosted a meeting of more than 60 of the world's leading researchers of a protein that could hold the key to new treatments for heart disease. [More]
Testosterone therapy may improve aerobic capacity in aging men

Testosterone therapy may improve aerobic capacity in aging men

Testosterone replacement therapy may help older men who have limited mobility and low testosterone improve their aerobic capacity and lessen its decline with age, new research finds. [More]
Study of SLC13 transporters unlocks their therapeutic potential

Study of SLC13 transporters unlocks their therapeutic potential

Researchers have provided the first functional analysis of a member of a family of transporter proteins implicated in diabetes, obesity, and lifespan. The study appears in the June issue of The Journal of General Physiology. [More]
Researchers explore shiatsu to help people with chronic pain fall asleep

Researchers explore shiatsu to help people with chronic pain fall asleep

There was a time, back in Nancy Cheyne's youth, when she combined the poise and grace of a ballerina with the daring and grit of a barrel racer. When she wasn't pursuing either of those pastimes, she bred sheepdogs, often spending hours on her feet grooming her furry friends at dog shows. [More]
GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics publish special collection on genetics of immunity

GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics publish special collection on genetics of immunity

Immunity is what stops you dying from a common cold or a tiny pinprick. Differences in resistance or tolerance to disease influence who catches the bug that's going around the office, or which species succumb to the deadly fungus devastating frogs around the world. [More]
Researchers identify muscle-building mechanism that could be important in addressing sarcopenia

Researchers identify muscle-building mechanism that could be important in addressing sarcopenia

Sarcopenia - the significant loss of muscle mass and function that can occur as we age - is associated with many chronic conditions such as diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity. [More]