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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
Cancer fighter may also help patients survive pneumonia

Cancer fighter may also help patients survive pneumonia

The tip of an immune molecule known for its skill at fighting cancer may also help patients survive pneumonia, scientists report. [More]
Biologists identify signaling pathway that switches on calorie-burning process in brown fat cells

Biologists identify signaling pathway that switches on calorie-burning process in brown fat cells

Biologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a signaling pathway that switches on a powerful calorie-burning process in brown fat cells. [More]
New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

A new stem-cell discovery might one day lead to a more streamlined process for obtaining stem cells, which in turn could be used in the development of replacement tissue for failing body parts, according to UC San Francisco scientists who reported the findings in the current edition of Cell. [More]
Study suggests healthy diet, sleep and exercise can mitigate negative impacts of stress

Study suggests healthy diet, sleep and exercise can mitigate negative impacts of stress

A new study from UC San Francisco is the first to show that while the impact of life's stressors accumulate overtime and accelerate cellular aging, these negative effects may be reduced by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising and sleeping well. [More]
Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. [More]
GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

The link between autism and disrupted brain development is an essential part of the puzzle of the disease, and is largely unknown. However, thanks to funding from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, George Washington University researcher Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D. may be able to offer truly integrative and in-depth answers to these key questions in the field of autism research. [More]
XPro1595 drug can protect vulnerable neurons, reduce motor deficits in Parkinson's model

XPro1595 drug can protect vulnerable neurons, reduce motor deficits in Parkinson's model

An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have shown. [More]
New therapeutic interventions that target brain regions can prevent obesity

New therapeutic interventions that target brain regions can prevent obesity

Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of obesity and dementia reside in the brain, according to a paper from American University's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. [More]
Blood flow to the brain significantly affected by dehydration

Blood flow to the brain significantly affected by dehydration

It’s a lesson riders in the Tour de France know all too well – drinking water while cycling in extreme heat is vital if they are to remain at peak performance. [More]
Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune disorders may share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer, according to a new report by George Washington University researcher Linda Kusner, Ph.D., published in PLOS ONE on July 22. [More]
Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Support from a network of leading researchers across Europe specialised in a rare auto-immune disease with unmet medical needs could help test several novel treatments [More]
Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Cystoid macular edema (CME) is a common complication of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of retinal diseases in which patients typically lose night and side vision first and then develop impaired central vision. CME can also decrease central vision. [More]
Scientist uses samples of beating heart tissue to test effect of drugs

Scientist uses samples of beating heart tissue to test effect of drugs

A Coventry University scientist has developed a pioneering new way - using samples of beating heart tissue - to test the effect of drugs on the heart without using human or animal trials. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune-system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Biochemists find groups of tiny protein loops that help bacteria to establish infection

Biochemists find groups of tiny protein loops that help bacteria to establish infection

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Kansas State University biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells. [More]
Health concerns over arsenic in rice-especially for children

Health concerns over arsenic in rice-especially for children

Inorganic arsenic in rice and rice-based foods poses health concerns in infants and young children, and steps should be taken to minimize exposure, according to a commentary in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
New theory of how cancer works could lead to next generation of treatments of disease

New theory of how cancer works could lead to next generation of treatments of disease

A new theory of how cancer works could lead to the next generation of treatments of the disease. The theory suggests that cancer forms when recently evolved genes are damaged, and cells have to revert to using older, inappropriate genetic pathways. [More]
New way to protect crops from insect plagues in safe and environmentally responsible way

New way to protect crops from insect plagues in safe and environmentally responsible way

Using spider toxins to study the proteins that let nerve cells send out electrical signals, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have stumbled upon a biological tactic that may offer a new way to protect crops from insect plagues in a safe and environmentally responsible way. [More]