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Human physiology is the science of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of humans in good health, their organs, and the cells of which they are composed. The principal level of focus of physiology is at the level of organs and systems. Most aspects of human physiology are closely homologous to corresponding aspects of animal physiology, and animal experimentation has provided much of the foundation of physiological knowledge. Anatomy and physiology are closely related fields of study: anatomy, the study of form, and physiology, the study of function, are intrinsically tied and are studied in tandem as part of a medical curriculum.
UCLA scientists identify new method to deliver glucose to pancreatic and prostate cancer cells

UCLA scientists identify new method to deliver glucose to pancreatic and prostate cancer cells

UCLA scientists have for the first time identified a new sodium-dependent mechanism to deliver glucose—the body's main fuel that drives tumor growth—to pancreatic and prostate cancer cells, offering new hope in the fight against two of the deadliest forms of the disease. [More]
University Hospital recognized for providing high standard of care for heart attack patients

University Hospital recognized for providing high standard of care for heart attack patients

University of Missouri Health Care's University Hospital has received the American College of Cardiology's ACTION Registry-Get with the Guidelines (GWTG) Silver Performance Achievement Award for 2015. [More]
Virginia Tech scientist uses mathematical model to show how bacteria can control behavior of robots

Virginia Tech scientist uses mathematical model to show how bacteria can control behavior of robots

Forget the Vulcan mind-meld of the Star Trek generation -- as far as mind control techniques go, bacteria is the next frontier. In a paper published July 16 in Scientific Reports, which is part of the Nature Publishing Group, a Virginia Tech scientist used a mathematical model to demonstrate that bacteria can control the behavior of an inanimate device like a robot. [More]
Type 2 diabetes patients with specific genetic markers at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Type 2 diabetes patients with specific genetic markers at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Certain patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) may have specific genetic risk factors that put them at higher risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published recently in Molecular Aspects of Medicine. [More]
Alternative approach to treat fatal blood clots found to be more effective in patients

Alternative approach to treat fatal blood clots found to be more effective in patients

Potentially fatal blood clots account for thousands of emergency room visits each year and often those patients are admitted to the hospital, treated with an injectable anticoagulant and monitored for a few days. [More]
Changes in body temperature can cause sudden cardiac death, finds SFU research

Changes in body temperature can cause sudden cardiac death, finds SFU research

Scientists, including SFU professor Peter Ruben, have found that sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmia can be triggered by changes in body temperature. The study is published in the Journal of Physiology. [More]
SLU researcher awarded NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve pain-killer problem

SLU researcher awarded NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve pain-killer problem

SLU pain researcher Daniela Salvemini has been awarded the NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award (CEBRA) to solve an alarming problem: pain killers that are capable of quelling terrible pain also carry debilitating side effects and significant risk of addiction. [More]
Iowa researchers gain important insight into sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Iowa researchers gain important insight into sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is becoming increasingly recognized as a very real and devastating problem in which impaired breathing is thought to play a critical role. Researchers believe breathing may be impaired during and after seizures, without the patient's knowledge. [More]
New study shows high-fat diet can cause impairments in functioning of mesolimbic dopamine system

New study shows high-fat diet can cause impairments in functioning of mesolimbic dopamine system

High-fat feeding can cause impairments in the functioning of the mesolimbic dopamine system, says Stephanie Fulton of the University of Montreal and the CHUM Research Centre. This system is a critical brain pathway controlling motivation. Fulton's findings, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology, may have great health implications. [More]
UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers have identified a therapeutic target for the treatment of acute spinal cord injuries. According to this research, conducted on mice, the administration of a drug that prevents loss of myelin - the insulating sheath around nerve fibres that allows signals to be transmitted - increases the mobility of the mice after an injury. [More]
New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

A growing number of patient studies show that people who suffered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, including stroke and heart attack. A new review article in American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology examines the recent scientific literature to explain how the two are linked. [More]
Diabetes drug metformin can also treat portal hypertension

Diabetes drug metformin can also treat portal hypertension

The diabetes drug metformin continues to expand beyond its treatment for type 2 diabetes. In addition to its potential use in treating age-related health problems, metformin can treat portal hypertension—high blood pressure in the liver resulting from cirrhosis, according to a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. [More]
Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Chunying Li, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has secured his first R01 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the role and mechanism of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 in regulating new blood vessel formation, the so-called angiogenesis. [More]
New analysis explores importance of medical imaging in drug development, understanding pathological physiology

New analysis explores importance of medical imaging in drug development, understanding pathological physiology

The use of small animal models in basic and preclinical research is now an integral part of developing and testing new pharmaceutical drugs prior to commercialisation. [More]
New study identifies potential antidepressant medications with few side effects

New study identifies potential antidepressant medications with few side effects

A new study by researchers at University of Maryland School of Medicine has identified promising compounds that could successfully treat depression in less than 24 hours while minimizing side effects. Although they have not yet been tested in people, the compounds could offer significant advantages over current antidepressant medications. [More]
Activating bacterial receptors boosts macrophage response, limits damage to spinal cord following injury

Activating bacterial receptors boosts macrophage response, limits damage to spinal cord following injury

Macrophages are cellular sentinels in the body, assigned to identify "attacks" from viruses, bacteria, or fungi and sound the alarm when they are present. However, these cells are a "double edged sword" in spinal cord injury, providing both neural repair-promoting properties and pathological functions that destroy neuronal tissue [More]
UB researchers to study dangers that dehydration poses for U.S. Navy divers

UB researchers to study dangers that dehydration poses for U.S. Navy divers

Researchers at the University at Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions will study the dangers that dehydration presents for U.S. Navy divers, examining diver physiology both during and after underwater activities. [More]
Composition of fatty acids in human cell membranes changes throughout the day

Composition of fatty acids in human cell membranes changes throughout the day

Fatty acids are important components of cell membranes. They have signalling functions within the cells and play a role in controlling metabolic processes in the entire body. Thomas Ruf and Walter Arnold of the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, investigated these cyclic fluctuations in human cells. [More]
Retrosplenial cortex serves as 'conjunction junction' for brain's navigation function

Retrosplenial cortex serves as 'conjunction junction' for brain's navigation function

Ever wake at night needing a drink of water and then find your way to the kitchen in the dark without stubbing your toe? [More]
Researchers discover molecule that may favour production of induced pluripotent cells

Researchers discover molecule that may favour production of induced pluripotent cells

Since 2006, research has succeeded in generating, from specialised adult cells, induced pluripotent cells (iPS cells), with huge potential applications, particularly for regenerative medicine. However, the process has still not been completely mastered. Two teams of researchers from Inserm, CNRS, Centre Léon Bérard and Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University have discovered a molecule that may favour the production of these induced stem cells. [More]
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