Proteomics News and Research RSS Feed - Proteomics News and Research

The term 'proteome' was first coined in 1994, and refers to all the proteins in a cell, tissue, or organism. Proteomics refers to the study of the proteome. Because proteins are involved in almost all biological activities, the proteome is a rich source of biological information.
New technology could help identify, characterize biologically active molecules produced by living cells

New technology could help identify, characterize biologically active molecules produced by living cells

Gene sequencing company Illumina recently made big waves by announcing a new spinoff, Grail, dedicated to building a test for cancer by sequencing tumor DNA fragments found in blood. The company also reported plans for a separate project to identify single cells and tag them for later analysis. [More]
Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

A first-in-class sphingosine kinase 2 inhibitor slowed the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, in part by inhibiting the enzyme dihydroceramide desaturase (DEGS), but did not kill them, according to the results of preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies published in the December 2015 issue of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and others. [More]
Multinational study suggests new way to classify gliomas

Multinational study suggests new way to classify gliomas

A comprehensive analysis of the molecular characteristics of gliomas—the most common malignant brain tumor—explains why some patients diagnosed with slow-growing (low-grade) tumors quickly succumb to the disease while others with more aggressive (high-grade) tumors survive for many years. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

Buck Institute faculty Judith Campisi, PhD, says age researchers need to stop thinking of cellular senescence, now accepted as an important driver of aging, as a single phenotype that stems from genotoxic stress. Research from her lab reveals that cellular senescence, a process whereby cells permanently lose the ability to divide, is also induced by signaling from dysfunctional mitochondria - and that the arrested cells secrete a distinctly different "stew" of biologically active factors in a process unrelated to the damaging free radicals that are created in mitochondria as part of oxygen metabolism. [More]
New strategy may reduce growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with KRAS gene mutation

New strategy may reduce growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with KRAS gene mutation

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have found a promising strategy that may limit the growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with a mutation in a gene called KRAS. [More]
Researchers identify new gene that helps maintain chromosome number in cells

Researchers identify new gene that helps maintain chromosome number in cells

Molecular biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a gene called NORAD that helps maintain the proper number of chromosomes in cells, and that when inactivated, causes the number of chromosomes in a cell to become unstable, a key feature of cancer cells. [More]
UCL Cancer Institute win $200,000 CytoFLEX Flow Cytometer from Beckman Coulter

UCL Cancer Institute win $200,000 CytoFLEX Flow Cytometer from Beckman Coulter

An internationally renowned gene therapy research team has won a $200,000 CytoFLEX Flow Cytometer from Beckman Coulter Life Sciences. The contest was designed to explore innovative research solutions involving flow cytometry. [More]
New test can help detect cancer and diabetes biomarkers in bloodstream

New test can help detect cancer and diabetes biomarkers in bloodstream

A new test for detecting biomarkers for cancer and diabetes is more than 1000x more detailed and 100% faster than existing methods, new research by the University of Warwick suggests. [More]
WaferGen Bio-systems signs collaboration agreement with Luxembourg Institute of Health

WaferGen Bio-systems signs collaboration agreement with Luxembourg Institute of Health

WaferGen Bio-systems announced today that the Company has signed a collaboration agreement with the Luxembourg Institute of Health, a leading public medical research center that specializes in oncology, infectious diseases, immunology, and population health. [More]
ASU-led researchers add new worldwide resource to explore genes' deep and hidden messages

ASU-led researchers add new worldwide resource to explore genes' deep and hidden messages

After a decade-long $3 billion international effort, scientists heralded the 2001 completion of the human genome as a moon landing achievement for biology and the key to finally solving intractable diseases like cancer. [More]
Sangamo presents Phase 2 data from two ongoing clinical trials of SB-728-T for treatment of HIV/AIDS

Sangamo presents Phase 2 data from two ongoing clinical trials of SB-728-T for treatment of HIV/AIDS

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., the leader in therapeutic genome editing, announced the presentation of Phase 2 data from two of the Company's ongoing clinical trials (SB-728-1101 Cohort 3* and SB-728-mR-1401) of SB-728-T, which is being developed for the functional control of HIV/AIDS. [More]
Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

A phage is a virus that infects a bacterium. People often get very confused about what the difference is between a virus and a bacterium. A virus, like a bacterium, is also a microorganism, but unlike bacteria, it needs to have a host to be able to replicate and propagate. [More]
Liver's cannabinoid receptors could be targeted to combat liver cancer in some patients

Liver's cannabinoid receptors could be targeted to combat liver cancer in some patients

A new study reveals that the liver's cannabinoid receptors could be targeted to fight liver cancer in some patients; and it offers a way to predict what treatments have the best chance of working. [More]
Mason researchers patent new breast cancer treatment

Mason researchers patent new breast cancer treatment

George Mason University researchers have patented a new breast cancer treatment that uses a common malaria drug to stop cancer in its beginning stages. [More]
ProMetic, ProThera form strategic partnership to develop and commercialize Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins

ProMetic, ProThera form strategic partnership to develop and commercialize Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins

ProMetic Life Sciences Inc. announced today that it has entered into a strategic partnership with ProThera Biologics Inc. for the development and commercialization of human plasma-derived Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins. [More]
March of Dimes scientists help fine-tune experiments to uncover unknown causes of preterm birth

March of Dimes scientists help fine-tune experiments to uncover unknown causes of preterm birth

A new, integrated online database of genes and other information related to pregnancy has been developed by March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center investigators to help fine-tune questions, theories, and experiments to uncover the unknown causes of preterm birth. [More]
Denator forms a new Scientific Advisory Board

Denator forms a new Scientific Advisory Board

Denator AB has announced that a new external expert advisory board has been formed. Karsten Fjärstedt, recently appointed as CEO comments, “It is a great honor for me to be entrusted to lead Denator forward in this new phase of development. With a pipeline of new exciting business opportunities and a strong Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) I am looking forward to realizing the full potential of the company technology”. [More]
Key protein controls stem cell properties that could make them useful in regenerative medicine

Key protein controls stem cell properties that could make them useful in regenerative medicine

A key protein controls stem cell properties that could make them more useful in regenerative medicine, according to a study led by Mount Sinai researchers and published online today in the journal Cell Stem Cell. [More]
SLU VTEU awarded $5.8 million NIH contract to support 'omics' research initiative

SLU VTEU awarded $5.8 million NIH contract to support 'omics' research initiative

Saint Louis University's Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit has received a five-year, $5.8 million contract from the National Institutes of Health to support an "omics" research initiative to study the safety and effectiveness of vaccines and other ways to fight infectious diseases. [More]
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