Proteomics News and Research RSS Feed - Proteomics News and Research

The term 'proteome' was first coined in 1994, and refers to all the proteins in a cell, tissue, or organism. Proteomics refers to the study of the proteome. Because proteins are involved in almost all biological activities, the proteome is a rich source of biological information.
Research with UWF imaging may change how diabetic eye disease is assessed and treated

Research with UWF imaging may change how diabetic eye disease is assessed and treated

For decades, clinicians have detected and monitored diabetic eye disease with standard retinal photographs that cover about a third of the retina. In recent years, an emerging class of ultrawide field (UWF) cameras has given a substantially larger view of the retina, providing new insight on the presentation and natural history of retinal disease. [More]
caprotec bioanalytics issued U.S. patent for CCMS proteome analysis technology

caprotec bioanalytics issued U.S. patent for CCMS proteome analysis technology

caprotec bioanalytics GmbH announced today that the United States Patent Office has issued patent No. US9,034,789 covering its revolutionary Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry (CCMS) technology. [More]
Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Case Western Reserve scientists may have uncovered a molecular mechanism that sets into motion dangerous infection in the feet and hands often occurring with uncontrolled diabetes. It appears that high blood sugar unleashes destructive molecules that interfere with the body's natural infection-control defenses. [More]
Findings by Joslin scientists may lead to early detection, treatment of complications in type 1 diabetes

Findings by Joslin scientists may lead to early detection, treatment of complications in type 1 diabetes

Joslin scientists have advanced understanding of how the cellular repair process is impaired in type 1 diabetes, which can cause cell death and lead to complications. The findings appear in the August issue of Cell Metabolism. [More]
RNA-binding protein ROQUIN regulates response to DNA damage

RNA-binding protein ROQUIN regulates response to DNA damage

Messenger (mRNA) molecules are a key component of protein biosynthesis. They are first transcribed as a "working copy" of the DNA and then translated into protein molecules. [More]
Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Impaired activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the presence of glucose has been demonstrated in pancreatic beta-cells from patients with type 2 diabetes. The cause of this dysfunction has been unknown. Publishing online in Endocrinology, Buck Institute assistant research professor Akos Gerencser, PhD, shows that in patients with type 2 diabetes the balance between supply and demand of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) is altered causing a decrease in the signaling that turns on insulin secretion. [More]
Wayne State leads landmark study that examines clinical use of polymyxin B to treat superbugs

Wayne State leads landmark study that examines clinical use of polymyxin B to treat superbugs

With the decline of the development of new antibiotics due to the complexity and expense of discovering them, there has been a rapid growth of antibiotic resistant pathogens that is one of the leading causes of death. With the help of a nearly $4.9 million, 5-year grant from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health, Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers are leading a landmark multi-center, international study that will provide essential information to clinicians for use of polymoxin B in critically ill patients where no other treatments will work. [More]
Landmark study to provide critical information for optimized use of polymyxin B in critically ill patients

Landmark study to provide critical information for optimized use of polymyxin B in critically ill patients

With the decline of the development of new antibiotics due to the complexity and expense of discovering them, there has been a rapid growth of antibiotic resistant pathogens that is one of the leading causes of death. [More]
Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium reduced involuntary motor movements - the troubling side effect of the medication most commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) - in a mouse model of the condition that is diagnosed in about 60,000 Americans each year. The third in a series of studies from the Andersen lab involving PD and low-dose lithium, the results add to mounting evidence that low-doses of the psychotropic drug could benefit patients suffering from the incurable, degenerative condition. [More]
MD Anderson named one of Genome Characterization Centers

MD Anderson named one of Genome Characterization Centers

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has been named a site for one of two new Genome Characterization Centers (GCC) funded through the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Immunologists from Emory University have identified a distinct set of long-lived antibody-producing cells in the human bone marrow that function as an immune archive. [More]
QIAGEN's therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit to guide use of IRESSA for in NSCLC treatment

QIAGEN's therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit to guide use of IRESSA for in NSCLC treatment

QIAGEN N.V. today received U.S. marketing (PMA) approval of its therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit (therascreen EGFR test) as a companion diagnostic to guide the use of AstraZeneca's IRESSA (gefitinib) in the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [More]
Laser microdissection microscope series with LED for transmitted light launched by Leica Microsystems

Laser microdissection microscope series with LED for transmitted light launched by Leica Microsystems

Leica Microsystems has launched two instruments of the laser microdissection microscope series, the Leica LMD6 and the LMD7, with LED illumination for transmitted light. Users can now choose between halogen and LED illumination. LEDs are an energy-efficient light source providing homogenous illumination and a constant color temperature. [More]
International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

Leukodystrophies are deadly neurodegenerative diseases that affect one in 7,000 children and remain incurable. These genetic diseases attack myelin or the "insulating rubber sheath" surrounding neurons, which leads to deteriorating health for affected children. [More]
Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Intermittent dosing with rapamycin selectively breaks the cascade of inflammatory events that follow cellular senescence, a phenomena in which cells cease to divide in response to DNA damaging agents, including many chemotherapies. [More]
Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea Biotechnologies Inc. announced today that it is partnering with Aelan Cell Technologies Inc. (San Francisco, California) for the development, validation and commercialization of novel biomarker tests and companion diagnostics using human STEM cells as models. [More]
New informatics technology could accelerate search for potential new drug targets on protein structures

New informatics technology could accelerate search for potential new drug targets on protein structures

Researchers have developed a new informatics technology that analyzes existing data repositories of protein modifications and 3D protein structures to help scientists identify and target research on "hotspots" most likely to be important for biological function. [More]
Sugar-gobbling enzyme helps restore normal function in heart muscles of diabetic rats

Sugar-gobbling enzyme helps restore normal function in heart muscles of diabetic rats

Working with heart muscle cells from diabetic rats, scientists at Johns Hopkins have located what they say is the epicenter of mischief wreaked by too much blood sugar and used a sugar-gobbling enzyme to restore normal function in the glucose-damaged cells of animal heart muscles. [More]
Stress during pregnancy affects babies' brain development

Stress during pregnancy affects babies' brain development

Stress during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the population of microbes living in a mother's vagina. Those changes are passed on to newborns during birth and are associated with differences in their gut microbiome as well as their brain development, according to a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers. [More]
Hitachi High-Technologies, QIAGEN form new strategic partnership to advance molecular testing

Hitachi High-Technologies, QIAGEN form new strategic partnership to advance molecular testing

Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation and QIAGEN N.V. have entered into a long-term strategic collaboration involving initiatives to deliver important advances in molecular testing. [More]
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