Proteomics News and Research RSS Feed - Proteomics News and Research

The term 'proteome' was first coined in 1994, and refers to all the proteins in a cell, tissue, or organism. Proteomics refers to the study of the proteome. Because proteins are involved in almost all biological activities, the proteome is a rich source of biological information.
Simple urine test could guide clinicians to better treat bladder cancer patients

Simple urine test could guide clinicians to better treat bladder cancer patients

Researchers at the University of Birmingham believe that a simple urine test could help to guide clinicians in the treatment of bladder cancer patients. [More]
UT Arlington chemist receives NIH's Academic Research Enhancement Award for protein research

UT Arlington chemist receives NIH's Academic Research Enhancement Award for protein research

A University of Texas at Arlington bio-analytical chemist exploring proteins, their structures and functions by using cutting-edge analytical instrumentation called mass spectrometry has received an Academic Research Enhancement Award from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Saliva test holds promise to diagnose autism spectrum disorder in children

Saliva test holds promise to diagnose autism spectrum disorder in children

A spit test may one day be able to diagnose autism according to researchers at Clarkson University and the State University of New York at Plattsburgh. [More]
SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics designated as FAO Reference Centre for bioinformatics

SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics designated as FAO Reference Centre for bioinformatics

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has appointed SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics as the FAO Reference Centre for bioinformatics. [More]
PBI announces receipt of first purchase order for new Barozyme HT48 High-throughput System

PBI announces receipt of first purchase order for new Barozyme HT48 High-throughput System

Pressure BioSciences, Inc., a leader in the development and sale of broadly enabling sample preparation solutions using pressure cycling technology ("PCT")-based instruments and consumables to the worldwide life sciences industry, today announced the receipt of the first purchase order for its new Barozyme HT48 High-throughput System. [More]
Variants in fetus's DNA may trigger some early births

Variants in fetus's DNA may trigger some early births

Some babies seem to have a genetic predisposition to a higher risk of being born too soon, according to researchers in a study to be presented on Feb. 5 in an oral concurrent session at 8 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
Project Spark to advance neuroprotective drug for schizophrenia-associated cognitive impairment

Project Spark to advance neuroprotective drug for schizophrenia-associated cognitive impairment

A public-private consortium led by the biotech Iproteos -based at Parc Científic de Barcelona (PCB)-, and comprised by the biopharmaceutical company Ascil-Biopharma, the Institute for Biomedical Research (IRB Barcelona), the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) has launched a project to advance the development of a new neuroprotective drug for the treatment of the cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. [More]
Removing volatile organic solvents from your 96-well microplates in minutes

Removing volatile organic solvents from your 96-well microplates in minutes

The MiniVap™ blowdown evaporator from Porvair Sciences takes just minutes to remove volatile organic solvents from your 96-well microplates. The MiniVap™ is the perfect tool for labs where smaller numbers of individual plates need drying. [More]
First Major Analysis Of Human Protein Atlas Is Published In Science

First Major Analysis Of Human Protein Atlas Is Published In Science

A research article published today in Science presents the first major analysis based on the Human Protein Atlas, including a detailed picture of the proteins that are linked to cancer, the number of proteins present in the bloodstream, and the targets for all approved drugs on the market. [More]
Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Case Western Reserve scientists have taken a huge leap toward identifying root causes of psoriasis, an inflammatory skin condition affecting 125 million people around the world. Of the roughly 50,000 proteins in the human body, researchers have zeroed in on four that appear most likely to contribute this chronic disease. [More]
Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

The biological mesoscale range includes biological structures that range from 10 to 100 nanometers (billionths of a meter). Structures in this size range include viruses, cellular organelles, large molecular complexes, and any other internal cellular environments within that range. [More]
Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the aging process. [More]
UH Case Medical Center researchers find that coenzyme A plays key role in cell metabolism

UH Case Medical Center researchers find that coenzyme A plays key role in cell metabolism

Case Western Reserve and University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers and physicians have discovered that the molecule known as coenzyme A plays a key role in cell metabolism by regulating the actions of nitric oxide. Cell metabolism is the ongoing process of chemical transformations within the body's cells that sustains life, and alterations in metabolism are a common cause of human disease, including cancer and heart disease. [More]
HLI gains access to PGDx's cancer genomics solutions to expand cancer genome analysis

HLI gains access to PGDx's cancer genomics solutions to expand cancer genome analysis

Personal Genome Diagnostics, Inc., a provider of advanced cancer genome analysis and testing services, and Human Longevity, Inc., the human health information technology and health care company, today announced that HLI will have access to PGDx's cancer genomics solutions to expand its analysis of cancer genomes, including CancerSelect, PlasmaSelect, CancerXome, METDetect and CancerComplete. [More]
QIAGEN's circulating tumor DNA test CE-IVD marked to assess genomic mutation NSCLC patients

QIAGEN's circulating tumor DNA test CE-IVD marked to assess genomic mutation NSCLC patients

QIAGEN announced today the CE-IVD marking of its novel liquid biopsy-based companion diagnostic that analyzes circulating nucleic acids obtained from blood samples to assess an important genomic mutation in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common form of this cancer. [More]
Proteomics market expected to experience continual growth

Proteomics market expected to experience continual growth

The market for microarrays used to study the workings of proteins are in great demand, according to Kalorama Information. The healthcare market research publisher said "proteomics" instruments, reagents and testing are needed to discover new biomarkers and even new drugs, and that the market for them topped 5 billion dollars in 2013. [More]
Porvair Sciences releases 2015 catalogue of tissue culture plastics and epigenetic consumables

Porvair Sciences releases 2015 catalogue of tissue culture plastics and epigenetic consumables

Porvair Sciences has released a new 2015 catalogue that describes its popular range of high quality tissue culture treated plastics and consumable products for Epigenetics. [More]
Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

In a study published today by Nature, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center used a microscopic worm (C. elegans) to identify a new path that could lead to drugs to slow aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it--and might even lead to better cosmetics. [More]
Ceres to develop new method for detecting the presence of Ebola virus in saliva

Ceres to develop new method for detecting the presence of Ebola virus in saliva

Ceres Nanosciences Inc. today announced the commencement of a development program, funded by the Gates Foundation, to use Ceres' Nanotrap particle technology to develop a new method of detecting the presence of the Ebola virus in saliva. [More]
Researchers investigate role of mitochondria in expansion, survival of cancer stem cells

Researchers investigate role of mitochondria in expansion, survival of cancer stem cells

Cancer stem cells are particularly difficult to eradicate and are at the heart of why it is so hard to more effectively treat cancer patients, as the post-treatment survival of cancer stem cells drives tumour recurrence, the systemic spread of cancer and, ultimately, treatment failure. [More]