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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Zeiger’s cognitive behavioral therapy program helps school-aged children deal with anxiety issues

Zeiger’s cognitive behavioral therapy program helps school-aged children deal with anxiety issues

Change can be hard for many people. For kids - who often thrive on routine and predictability - the transition from school year to summer and into a new academic year can bring uncertainty that can trigger anxiety and behavioral problems. [More]
Study evaluates rate of depression in mothers based on different onset times

Study evaluates rate of depression in mothers based on different onset times

Postpartum depression--a household term since actress Brooke Shields went public in 2005 about her struggle with it--is indeed serious. But depression that begins before or during pregnancy is often more severe because it lasts longer and usually goes undetected until the doctor screens for it after the birth of the baby, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

As young people reach adulthood, their preferences for sweet foods typically decline. But for people with obesity, new research suggests that the drop-off may not be as steep and that the brain's reward system operates differently in obese people than in thinner people, which may play a role in this phenomenon. [More]
Maternal SRI treatment may cause microscopic changes in fetal brain structure

Maternal SRI treatment may cause microscopic changes in fetal brain structure

A new Finnish study shows that fetal exposure to commonly used SRI drugs may affect brain activity in newborns. The researchers suggest that the effects of drugs on fetal brain function should be assessed more carefully. [More]
Individuals diagnosed with ADHD, obesity have reduced ability to delay gratification

Individuals diagnosed with ADHD, obesity have reduced ability to delay gratification

Two new studies led by researchers at McMaster University and St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton have found that individuals diagnosed with ADHD or obesity are more likely to choose smaller immediate rewards over larger future rewards. [More]
Child adversities linked to high rates of adult insomnia

Child adversities linked to high rates of adult insomnia

According to a new study, child adversities, which are known to play an important role in mental and physical health, are also associated with poor sleep. [More]

Study identifies circadian pattern of peak incidence of suicides in alcohol dependent individuals

A new study found that there is a circadian pattern of peak and nadir in the incidence of suicides committed in alcohol dependent individuals. [More]
Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI

Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI

New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that strategy-based reasoning training can improve the cognitive performance for those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a preclinical stage of those at risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's is a devastating and incurable disease marked by beta-amyloid and tau protein aggregations in the brain, yet the direct relationship between these proteins and neurodegeneration has remained a mystery. [More]
Natural tendency to self-restrict time in bed can protect against chronic insomnia

Natural tendency to self-restrict time in bed can protect against chronic insomnia

Twenty to 50 percent of Americans suffer from acute insomnia each year, defined as difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, three or more nights per week, for between two weeks and three months. [More]
Blue wavelength light exposure leads to subsequent increases in brain activity in prefrontal cortex

Blue wavelength light exposure leads to subsequent increases in brain activity in prefrontal cortex

A new study found that blue wavelength light exposure led to subsequent increases in brain activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when participants were engaging in a cognitive task after cessation of light exposure. [More]
Amino acid acetylcarnitine may help predict neurobehavioral performance during chronic sleep loss

Amino acid acetylcarnitine may help predict neurobehavioral performance during chronic sleep loss

The amino acid acetylcarnitine may help predict an individual's neurobehavioral performance during chronic sleep restriction, according to results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that will be presented at SLEEP 2016, the 30th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC. [More]
Study finds link between depression, disease activity and disability in adolescents with JIA

Study finds link between depression, disease activity and disability in adolescents with JIA

European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress confirmed a clear association between depression symptom severity and the level of disease activity and disability in adolescent patients with juvenile inflammatory arthritis. [More]
Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Using an advanced imaging technique, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System were able to predict which patients who'd recently suffered concussions were likely to fully recover. [More]
Tablet-based risk assessment tool shows promise in evaluation of suicide risk

Tablet-based risk assessment tool shows promise in evaluation of suicide risk

Climbing suicide rates over the past ten years have prompted three Joint Commission Sentinel Event Alerts -- the most recent in February 2016 - urging health care organizations to step up screening and detection of those individuals most at risk. But due to a shortage of both time and psychiatry staff, complying with this mandate presents a challenge. [More]
Glial cells may play crucial role in addiction-related behaviors

Glial cells may play crucial role in addiction-related behaviors

Addiction may be viewed as a disorder of reward learning. To date, addiction research has focused on the molecular adaptations through which memories of exposure to abused substances are encoded and maintained by nerve cells. [More]
Study finds positive support from all racial/ethnic groups for physician-assisted death

Study finds positive support from all racial/ethnic groups for physician-assisted death

Physician-assisted death was supported by a majority of California and Hawaii residents, regardless of their ethnicity, who responded to an online survey, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Childhood psychological trauma can increase likelihood of drug misuse in adolescence

Childhood psychological trauma can increase likelihood of drug misuse in adolescence

Latest research from a national sample of almost 10,000 U.S. adolescents found psychological trauma, especially abuse and domestic violence before age 11, can increase the likelihood of experimentation with drugs in adolescence, independent of a history of mental illness. [More]
U-M study compares early-use and longer-duration stimulant medication with nonstimulant therapy for ADHD

U-M study compares early-use and longer-duration stimulant medication with nonstimulant therapy for ADHD

Youth who take Ritalin, Adderall or other stimulant medications for ADHD over an extended period of time early in life are no more at risk for substance abuse in later adolescence than teens without ADHD, according to a University of Michigan study. [More]
New research offers hope for patients struggling with major depression

New research offers hope for patients struggling with major depression

A new study reports that approximately two in five adults (39%) who have experienced major depression are able to achieve complete mental health. Researchers consider complete mental health as occurring when people achieve almost daily happiness or life satisfaction, positive social and psychological well-being, and are also free of depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts and substance abuse for at least one full year. [More]
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