Psychiatry News and Research RSS Feed - Psychiatry News and Research

Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Vitamin D supplementation improves autism symptoms, study shows

Vitamin D supplementation improves autism symptoms, study shows

Vitamin D supplementation improved symptoms of autism in a recent trial. [More]
eHealth technology may help foster patient-provider relationship in rehabilitation

eHealth technology may help foster patient-provider relationship in rehabilitation

New and developing eHealth technologies have the potential to improve the patient-provider connection and patient-centered health care. [More]
New study unravels why children with autism look less at other people's eyes

New study unravels why children with autism look less at other people's eyes

A new study conducted by researchers at Marcus Autism Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, and Emory University School of Medicine helps put to rest a longstanding controversy and question about children with autism spectrum disorder. [More]
Increased sensitivity to uncertain threat common to several anxiety disorders

Increased sensitivity to uncertain threat common to several anxiety disorders

Several anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobias, share a common underlying trait: increased sensitivity to uncertain threat, or fear of the unknown, report researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Connecticut law to temporarily seize guns prevented dozens of suicides, study reveals

Connecticut law to temporarily seize guns prevented dozens of suicides, study reveals

A Connecticut law enacted in 1999 to allow police to temporarily remove guns from potentially violent or suicidal people likely prevented dozens of suicides, according to a study by researchers at Duke and Yale universities and the University of Connecticut. [More]
Painless tDCS technique could improve life for people with major depression

Painless tDCS technique could improve life for people with major depression

Small amounts of electricity similar to the output of a common 9-volt battery could improve life for people living with major depression, the most common mood disorder. [More]
High-fat diet may have negative impact on maturation of the brain

High-fat diet may have negative impact on maturation of the brain

Junk food is a burgeoning problem for modern society: we literally have too much on our plate. Fatty and unhealthy foods are especially popular with young children and adolescents. They are often the cheapest and most convenient eating option. [More]
Excessive consumption of fatty foods could negatively affect cognitive functions in children

Excessive consumption of fatty foods could negatively affect cognitive functions in children

Chances are that children who eat excessive amounts of fatty foods will not only become obese, but will develop cognitive and psychiatric problems when they are older. [More]
Maternal depression may affect child's brain development at critical stages in life

Maternal depression may affect child's brain development at critical stages in life

Depressive symptoms in women during and after pregnancy are associated with reduced thickness of the cortex-the outer layer of the brain responsible for complex thought and behavior-in preschool-age kids, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry. [More]
Experts to examine impact of live music on health and morbidity in children with learning disabilities

Experts to examine impact of live music on health and morbidity in children with learning disabilities

Experts in the fields of music, education, neurology, psychiatry and psychology will gather at a conference at the Royal Society of Medicine in London on Monday 28 November to examine the current evidence for the value and impact of music interventions, especially live music, on health and morbidity in children with learning disabilities. [More]
Testing ability to recognize, remember odors may help identify people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Testing ability to recognize, remember odors may help identify people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A non-invasive protocol testing the ability to recognize, remember and distinguish between odors was able to identify older individuals who - according to genetic, imaging and more detailed memory tests - were at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Prenatal exposure to mother's stress causes microbial changes that persist into adulthood

Prenatal exposure to mother's stress causes microbial changes that persist into adulthood

Prenatal exposure to a mother's stress contributes to anxiety and cognitive problems that persist into adulthood, a phenomenon that could be explained by lasting - and potentially damaging - changes in the microbiome, according to new research in mice. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism of how circadian clocks in neurons encode daily rhythms of excitability

Researchers identify mechanism of how circadian clocks in neurons encode daily rhythms of excitability

Molecular clocks in cells throughout the body control many physiologic changes in a 24-hour day/night circadian rhythm -- among them the timing of sleep and wakefulness. [More]
Brain training could help improve memory and mood in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Brain training could help improve memory and mood in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Researchers at the University of Sydney have found that engaging in computer-based brain training can improve memory and mood in older adults with mild cognitive impairment - but training is no longer effective once a dementia diagnosis has been made. [More]
TSRI scientists discover sub-region in the brain that works to form contextual fear memory

TSRI scientists discover sub-region in the brain that works to form contextual fear memory

While the romantic poets' idea of memories being akin to spirits may have poetic merit, the scientists' perspective is that memories are concrete, physical entities that can be visualized within various regions of the brain. [More]
New study finds structural differences in the brains of adolescent boys and girls with PTSD

New study finds structural differences in the brains of adolescent boys and girls with PTSD

Traumatic stress affects the brains of adolescent boys and girls differently, according to a new brain-scanning study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Bullied children nearly twice as likely to be overweight as young adults

Bullied children nearly twice as likely to be overweight as young adults

Children who are bullied in primary and secondary school are nearly twice as likely to be overweight at the age of 18 than non-bullied children, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London. [More]
Arthritis drug increases effectiveness of antidepressants in bipolar patients

Arthritis drug increases effectiveness of antidepressants in bipolar patients

Giving severely depressed patients the arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex) dramatically boosted the effectiveness of their antidepressant medication, a Loyola study has found. [More]
Neuroimaging markers may help predict psychotherapy response in patients with depression, anxiety

Neuroimaging markers may help predict psychotherapy response in patients with depression, anxiety

Brain imaging scans may one day provide useful information on the response to psychotherapy in patients with depression or anxiety, according to a review of current research in the November/December issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Short sleepers likely to consume significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, study finds

Short sleepers likely to consume significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, study finds

People who sleep five or fewer hours a night are likely to also drink significantly more sugary caffeinated drinks, such as sodas and energy drinks, according to a new study of more than 18,000 adults led by UC San Francisco scientists. [More]
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