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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Guidelines to limit tours of overseas duty reduce mental health problems in UK’s armed forces

Guidelines to limit tours of overseas duty reduce mental health problems in UK’s armed forces

Prolonged periods of deployment among the UK’s armed forces have fallen since the introduction of the “Harmony Guidelines” to limit tours of overseas duty—which might have led to a reduction in mental health problems, new research published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal suggests. [More]
Schizophrenia symptom severity predicts atypical antipsychotic benefit

Schizophrenia symptom severity predicts atypical antipsychotic benefit

Atypical antipsychotic drugs benefit patients with acute schizophrenia across the full spectrum of symptom severity, as well as highly symptomatic patients with predominantly negative symptoms, suggests a meta-analysis published in JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
Metabolic syndrome screening in bipolar disorder warranted

Metabolic syndrome screening in bipolar disorder warranted

The frequency of the metabolic syndrome in patients with bipolar disorder warrants systematic screening, say researchers, particularly among men, older patients and those receiving atypical antipsychotic treatment. [More]
Researchers identify key protein that can reduce severity of disease equivalent to MS in mice

Researchers identify key protein that can reduce severity of disease equivalent to MS in mice

In multiple sclerosis, the immune system goes rogue, improperly attacking the body's own central nervous system. Mobility problems and cognitive impairments may arise as the nerve cells become damaged. [More]
Experts review advances in understanding, treatment of bipolar disorder

Experts review advances in understanding, treatment of bipolar disorder

Several lines of research have opened exciting new frontiers in scientific understanding and clinical management of bipolar disorder. Recent advances in bipolar disease research are described in this month's special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. [More]
UCSD researchers implicate new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism

UCSD researchers implicate new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism

With the help of mouse models, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the "tooth fairy," researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have implicated a new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism. The gene is associated with Rett syndrome, a syndromic form of autism, suggesting that different types of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may share similar molecular pathways. [More]
New program aims to educate COPD patients on how to manage their disease

New program aims to educate COPD patients on how to manage their disease

The American Thoracic Society today announced a new program, produced with support from Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., to provide materials to educate patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) about this progressive lung disease and how it can be managed. [More]
Anxiety can accelerate conversion to Alzheimer's disease for people with mild cognitive impairment

Anxiety can accelerate conversion to Alzheimer's disease for people with mild cognitive impairment

People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at increased risk of converting to Alzheimer's disease within a few years, but a new study warns the risk increases significantly if they suffer from anxiety. [More]
Low subjective social status linked to mental disorder risk

Low subjective social status linked to mental disorder risk

Researchers report an inverse association between people’s subjective social status (SSS) and the likelihood of them having a psychiatric disorder. [More]
Medical illness common in bipolar disorder

Medical illness common in bipolar disorder

Patients with bipolar disorder have high rates of medical illness, which often exceeds the levels observed in patients with unipolar depression, show results of a UK-based study. [More]
Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

New research suggests that a high-fat maternal diet during pregnancy and while breastfeeding could have significant and lasting detrimental effects on the brain function and behavior of children. [More]
New studies offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain, swelling

New studies offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain, swelling

Two new studies from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain and swelling, and point to ways to enhance muscular strength and body image. [More]
New article provides overview of evidence-based tips to support individuals with ASD

New article provides overview of evidence-based tips to support individuals with ASD

A Clinical Perspectives article published in the November 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry proposes a tool to empower stakeholders, guide caregivers, and provide a rationale for advocates, when considering the systems of support offered to people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). [More]
Researchers identify genetic markers that play role in alcoholism recovery

Researchers identify genetic markers that play role in alcoholism recovery

In an international study, Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have identified genetic markers that may help in identifying individuals who could benefit from the alcoholism treatment drug acamprosate. The findings, published in the journal Translational Psychiatry, show that patients carrying these genetic variants have longer periods of abstinence during the first three months of acamprosate treatment. [More]
Douglas Mental Health University Institute researcher wins 2014 Wilder-Penfield prize

Douglas Mental Health University Institute researcher wins 2014 Wilder-Penfield prize

The Douglas Mental Health University Institute is proud to announce that its researcher and neurobiologist, Michael Meaney, C.M., Ph.D., C.Q., FRSC, is the 2014 laureate of the prestigious prix Wilder-Penfield. [More]
Transition Therapeutics presents Phase 2 study of ELND005 drug for bipolar disorder

Transition Therapeutics presents Phase 2 study of ELND005 drug for bipolar disorder

Transition Therapeutics Inc. ("Transition" or the "Company") today announced findings from a Phase 2 study of neuropsychiatric drug candidate, ELND005, as an adjunctive maintenance treatment for bipolar disorder type I patients (BPD). [More]
Researchers to develop new tests to evaluate cognitive growth in people with intellectual disability

Researchers to develop new tests to evaluate cognitive growth in people with intellectual disability

Leading researchers, funded through a new, five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, are collaborating to develop and evaluate tests designed to measure and track changes in the cognitive functioning of people who typically are difficult to assess accurately: those with an intellectual disability, formerly termed mental retardation. [More]
Accumulated environmental risks have substantial impact on schizophrenia

Accumulated environmental risks have substantial impact on schizophrenia

Accumulation of environmental risk factors has a “huge” effect on age at schizophrenia onset, German researchers report. [More]
Study identifies new targets for developing novel treatment for alcohol dependence

Study identifies new targets for developing novel treatment for alcohol dependence

Bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract fulfill many vital functions and are critical for digestion. Yet, these same bacteria can induce strong inflammatory responses by the immune system if they penetrate the gut and enter the bloodstream. [More]
Two major studies newly implicate dozens of genes in autism

Two major studies newly implicate dozens of genes in autism

Two major genetic studies of autism, led in part by UC San Francisco scientists and involving more than 50 laboratories worldwide, have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms that govern whether, when, and how genes are activated overall. [More]