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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
Expecting mothers may soon receive perinatal depression screenings using mHealth technology

Expecting mothers may soon receive perinatal depression screenings using mHealth technology

Pregnant women and new mothers at one central Illinois public health clinic will soon receive depression screenings using mobile health - also called mHealth - technology. [More]
Death risk is higher for dementia patients who take antipsychotic drugs, new study shows

Death risk is higher for dementia patients who take antipsychotic drugs, new study shows

Drugs aimed at quelling the behavior problems of dementia patients may also hasten their deaths more than previously realized, a new study finds. [More]
People with severe schizophrenia have major differences in brain networks

People with severe schizophrenia have major differences in brain networks

People with a severe form of schizophrenia have major differences in their brain networks compared to others with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy individuals, a new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health shows. [More]
OSU researchers find link between low levels of vitamin D and depression in young women

OSU researchers find link between low levels of vitamin D and depression in young women

A new study from Oregon State University suggests there is a relationship between low levels of vitamin D and depression in otherwise healthy young women. [More]
PVNF gifts $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern

PVNF gifts $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern

Presbyterian Village North Foundation has made two gifts totaling $1,250,000 to support Alzheimer's research at UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Increasing minimum age of legal access to tobacco products would reduce smoking, save lives

Increasing minimum age of legal access to tobacco products would reduce smoking, save lives

Increasing the minimum age of legal access (MLA) to tobacco products will prevent or delay initiation of tobacco use by adolescents and young adults, particularly those ages 15 to 17, and improve the health of Americans across the lifespan, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. [More]
Parental depression can put toddlers at risk of developing troubling behaviors

Parental depression can put toddlers at risk of developing troubling behaviors

A father's depression during the first years of parenting - as well as a mother's - can put their toddler at risk of developing troubling behaviors such as hitting, lying, anxiety and sadness during a critical time of development, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Cannabis abuse affects long-term memory, finds new Northwestern Medicine study

Cannabis abuse affects long-term memory, finds new Northwestern Medicine study

Teens who were heavy marijuana users - smoking it daily for about three years -- had an abnormally shaped hippocampus and performed poorly on long-term memory tasks, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Study finds that reformulated OxyContin forces some drug abusers to switch to heroin

Study finds that reformulated OxyContin forces some drug abusers to switch to heroin

A reformulation of OxyContin that makes it harder to abuse has curtailed the drug's illicit use. But some 25 percent of drug abusers entering rehab said they still abused the prescription painkiller despite package labeling that emphasizes its abuse-deterrent properties, new research indicates. [More]
Study finding suggests importance of individually-tailored treatment for depression

Study finding suggests importance of individually-tailored treatment for depression

The most commonly used treatment for the over 14 million Americans who suffer from Major Depressive Disorder is anti-depressant medication. While such medications bring relief to many, current research suggests that one size may not fit all when it comes to treating depression. [More]
Existing epilepsy drug reverses aMCI in elderly patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Existing epilepsy drug reverses aMCI in elderly patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A novel therapeutic approach for an existing drug reverses a condition in elderly patients who are at high risk for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins University found. [More]
Yoga could help reduce depression in pregnant women

Yoga could help reduce depression in pregnant women

In a small pilot study, researchers at Brown University, Butler Hospital, and Women & Infants' Hospital have found evidence suggesting that yoga could help pregnant women with significant depression reduce the severity of the mood disorder. [More]
Rat study reveals role of lead in schizophrenia

Rat study reveals role of lead in schizophrenia

A study of the brains of rats exposed to lead has uncovered striking similarities with what is known about the brains of human schizophrenia patients, adding compelling evidence that lead is a factor in the onset of schizophrenia. [More]
Recruitment completed for Phase III PROUD-PV trial of P1101 for treatment of polycythemia vera

Recruitment completed for Phase III PROUD-PV trial of P1101 for treatment of polycythemia vera

PharmaEssentia (Taipei, Taiwan) and AOP Orphan (Vienna, Austria) announce the completion of recruitment for the Phase III trial PROUD-PV to support global marketing of P1101 (Ropeginterferon alfa-2b), a novel, long-acting, mono-pegylated interferon for the first line treatment of polycythemia vera. [More]
Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in New York and the United Kingdom, have identified genetic markers, derived from blood samples that are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The markers are associated with gene networks that regulate innate immune function and interferon signaling. [More]
New evidence links autism risk genes to better cognitive function

New evidence links autism risk genes to better cognitive function

Genes linked with a greater risk of developing autism may also be associated with higher intelligence, a study suggests. [More]
Narcolepsy bears trademarks of classic autoimmune disorder

Narcolepsy bears trademarks of classic autoimmune disorder

Narcoleptics suffer from bouts of sleepiness and sleep attacks, which impair their ability to function in daily life. But the precise cause of narcolepsy has long eluded scientists, and the cure for the devastating neurological disorder afflicting an estimated three million people worldwide -- and one in 3,000 Americans -- remains at bay. [More]
Tourette syndrome patients may face second psychiatric disorder during their lifetimes

Tourette syndrome patients may face second psychiatric disorder during their lifetimes

A new study of Tourette syndrome (TS) led by researchers from UC San Francisco and Massachusetts General Hospital has found that nearly 86 percent of patients who seek treatment for TS will be diagnosed with a second psychiatric disorder during their lifetimes, and that nearly 58 percent will receive two or more such diagnoses. [More]
Use of psychedelic drugs linked to less psychological distress, fewer suicidal thoughts

Use of psychedelic drugs linked to less psychological distress, fewer suicidal thoughts

A history of psychedelic drug use is associated with less psychological distress and fewer suicidal thoughts, planning and attempts, according to new research from Johns Hopkins and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
Scientists find blood-based genomic biomarkers that could help identify young boys with ASD

Scientists find blood-based genomic biomarkers that could help identify young boys with ASD

In a study published in the current online issue of JAMA Psychiatry, an international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, report finding a highly accurate blood-based measure that could lead to development of a clinical test for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk in males as young as one to two years old. [More]
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