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Psychiatry is the treatment, study and prevention of mental disorders.
New monoclonal antibodies may provide blueprint for effective Alzheimer's disease treatments

New monoclonal antibodies may provide blueprint for effective Alzheimer's disease treatments

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center's Center for Cognitive Neurology have evidence that monoclonal antibodies they developed may provide the blueprint for effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. [More]
New findings point toward potential blood test to detect schizophrenia

New findings point toward potential blood test to detect schizophrenia

High blood levels of a growth factor known to enable new blood vessel development and brain cell protection correlate with a smaller size of brain areas key to complex thought, emotion and behavior in patients with schizophrenia, researchers report in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. [More]
UAB Department of Psychiatry to open new clinic to serve mental health needs of LGBTQ community

UAB Department of Psychiatry to open new clinic to serve mental health needs of LGBTQ community

The University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Psychiatry will open a mental health and wellness clinic specifically for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning individuals. The clinic will see patients beginning Monday, July 20. [More]
Children with psychiatric issues more likely to have serious problems as adults

Children with psychiatric issues more likely to have serious problems as adults

Children with even mild or passing bouts of depression, anxiety and/or behavioral issues were more inclined to have serious problems that complicated their ability to lead successful lives as adults, according to research from Duke Medicine. [More]
Iowa researchers gain important insight into sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Iowa researchers gain important insight into sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is becoming increasingly recognized as a very real and devastating problem in which impaired breathing is thought to play a critical role. Researchers believe breathing may be impaired during and after seizures, without the patient's knowledge. [More]
Key parts of the human brain network give power to control, redirect attention

Key parts of the human brain network give power to control, redirect attention

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have found that key parts of the human brain network that give us the power to control and redirect our attention--a core cognitive ability--may be unique to humans. [More]
Researchers identify gene that underlies thinking skills

Researchers identify gene that underlies thinking skills

An international team of researchers, including investigators from the University of Mississippi Medical Center, has identified a gene that underlies healthy information processing -- a first step on a complicated road to understand cognitive aging and age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

Why do some youngsters bounce back quickly from a traumatic brain injury, while others suffer devastating side effects for years? New UCLA/USC research suggests that damage to the fatty sheaths around the brain's nerve fibers--not injury severity-- may explain the difference. Published in the July 15 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience, the finding identifies possible biomarkers that physicians could use to predict higher-risk patients who require closer monitoring. [More]
Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

From 2004 to 2010 in Texas, mental illness was the most common reason for the hospitalization of children ages 10-14 while pregnancy/birth was the most common reason for the hospitalization of adolescents ages 15-17, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
Studies using MRI techniques can reveal brain connectivity differences in people with ASD

Studies using MRI techniques can reveal brain connectivity differences in people with ASD

Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are beginning to reveal differences in brain connectivity--the ways that different parts of the brain are connected to each other and work together--in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), reports a review in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. [More]
NAM report calls for strengthening psychosocial interventions for mental health, substance use disorders

NAM report calls for strengthening psychosocial interventions for mental health, substance use disorders

A plan to ensure that evidence-based psychosocial interventions are routinely used in clinical practice and made a part of clinical training for mental health professionals was released today by the National Academy of Medicine. [More]
People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in later childhood experience weaker brain connectivity in midlife

People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in later childhood experience weaker brain connectivity in midlife

People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in later childhood have weaker brain connectivity in midlife compared to those who were diagnosed at earlier ages according to a University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences study. [More]
Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and the School of Medicine have found that the three-dimensional shape of the cerebral cortex - the wrinkled outer layer of the brain controlling many functions of thinking and sensation - strongly correlates with ancestral background. [More]
Does smoking increase the risk of developing psychosis?

Does smoking increase the risk of developing psychosis?

Research conducted at King’s College London and reported in Lancet Psychiatry today indicates that smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing psychosis; a mental health disorder that disrupts normal processing by the brain causing delusion and hallucination. [More]
SUNY Downstate Medical Center researchers identify ALPIM syndrome as new spectrum disorder

SUNY Downstate Medical Center researchers identify ALPIM syndrome as new spectrum disorder

The relationship between mental and physical health is well established. But when mental and physical illnesses co-occur, patients' accounts of physical illness are sometimes arbitrarily discredited or dismissed by physicians. [More]
New UCLA study reveals genetic architecture of schizophrenia

New UCLA study reveals genetic architecture of schizophrenia

A new study by UCLA scientists adds to the understanding of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia. Past research has shown the impact of commonly occurring genetic variants on a person's risk of developing schizophrenia. This new study focused instead on rare coding mutations that affect protein function. It found that patients with schizophrenia have a higher-than-normal share of these mutations. [More]
Johns Hopkins, IOCB Prague sign drug discovery research agreement

Johns Hopkins, IOCB Prague sign drug discovery research agreement

The Johns Hopkins Drug Discovery (JHDD) program, created with the mission of identifying novel drug targets arising from Johns Hopkins faculty research and translating them into new therapeutics, and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague) have entered into a five-year drug discovery research agreement to develop small-molecule and peptide drugs for a range of therapeutic areas including neurological diseases, cancer and gastrointestinal disorders. [More]
Research examines reasons behind variation in prescription practices of antidepressants across Europe

Research examines reasons behind variation in prescription practices of antidepressants across Europe

Public attitudes towards mental illness and levels of healthcare spending may explain the huge variation in antidepressant use across Europe, according to a new study by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London. [More]
Georgia State University-led study identifies structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia patients

Georgia State University-led study identifies structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia patients

Structural brain abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia, providing insight into how the condition may develop and respond to treatment, have been identified in an internationally collaborative study led by a Georgia State University scientist. [More]
Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

The results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that Cognizin citicoline (Jarrow Formulas) was effective at reducing cocaine use, based on urine drug screens, in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence. The study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in Advance, included a total of 130 outpatients with bipolar I disorder and cocaine dependence, who received either Cognizin citicoline or placebo add-on therapy for 12 weeks. [More]
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