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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

New research suggests that a high-fat maternal diet during pregnancy and while breastfeeding could have significant and lasting detrimental effects on the brain function and behavior of children. [More]
New technology could revolutionise the way medical staff treat people with degenerative condition

New technology could revolutionise the way medical staff treat people with degenerative condition

A pioneering piece of technology will allow users to experience the world through the eyes of a person with Young-Onset Parkinson's disease- which could revolutionise the way carers and medical staff treat people with the degenerative condition. [More]
Dietary patterns of children vary according to socioeconomic backgrounds of mothers

Dietary patterns of children vary according to socioeconomic backgrounds of mothers

You have to be at least 2 years old to be covered by U.S. dietary guidelines. For younger babies, no official U.S. guidance exists other than the general recommendation by national and international organizations that mothers exclusively breastfeed for at least the first six months. [More]
Family-focused intervention program leads to fewer drop-out rates among Mexican American children

Family-focused intervention program leads to fewer drop-out rates among Mexican American children

New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use. [More]
Autism Speaks grants $1M to Children's Hospital Los Angeles to improve GI symptoms associated with ASD

Autism Speaks grants $1M to Children's Hospital Los Angeles to improve GI symptoms associated with ASD

Pat Levitt, PhD, Simms/Mann Chair in Developmental Neurogenetics at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has received a grant of nearly $1 million from Autism Speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization. [More]
Infant’s cry can indicate prenatal cocaine exposure

Infant’s cry can indicate prenatal cocaine exposure

A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development. [More]
Marital hostility, history of depression can increase obesity risk in adults

Marital hostility, history of depression can increase obesity risk in adults

The double-whammy of marital hostility and a history of depression can increase the risk for obesity in adults by altering how the body processes high-fat foods, according to new research. [More]
Higher level of vocabulary can help combat cognitive impairment

Higher level of vocabulary can help combat cognitive impairment

Some people suffer incipient dementia as they get older. To make up for this loss, the brain's cognitive reserve is put to the test. [More]
Study: Automated EEG biofeedback as effective as clinician-run system in addiction treatment

Study: Automated EEG biofeedback as effective as clinician-run system in addiction treatment

An automated EEG biofeedback system works just as well as a clinician-run system in helping reduce attention deficits in those with substance use disorders, according to an independent joint study from researchers at UCLA and UNC Wilmington. [More]
Researchers unravel separate biological responses of the eye to blue light

Researchers unravel separate biological responses of the eye to blue light

Blue light can both set the mood and set in motion important biological responses. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences have teased apart the separate biological responses of the human eye to blue light, revealing an unexpected contest for control. [More]
Internal calorie counter evaluates food based on its caloric density, shows neuroimaging study

Internal calorie counter evaluates food based on its caloric density, shows neuroimaging study

As you glance over a menu or peruse the shelves in a supermarket, you may be thinking about how each food will taste and whether it's nutritious, or you may be trying to decide what you're in the mood for. [More]

Study: People appreciate fairness in the same way as they appreciate money for themselves

Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer. According to a new Norwegian brain study, people appreciate fairness in much the same way as they appreciate money for themselves, and also that fairness is not necessarily that everybody gets the same income. [More]

Right kind of mental rest helps boost future learning.

A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning. [More]
Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies. Their research indicates that newborns of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy show lower levels of stress hormones, lowered stress response, and alterations in DNA for a gene that regulates passage of stress hormones from mother to fetus. [More]
Researchers receive NIH grant to study mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome

Researchers receive NIH grant to study mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder in humans that causes social impairments and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. [More]

Scandal-hit companies affect job prospects of even lower-ranking employees

There's more bad news for job seekers with a scandal-hit company like Lehman Brothers or Countrywide Mortgage on their résumés. [More]
Cadaver instruction better than computer-simulation instruction when learning human anatomy

Cadaver instruction better than computer-simulation instruction when learning human anatomy

Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications for health care. [More]
Parental understanding regarding daily experiences may affect adolescent health, well-being

Parental understanding regarding daily experiences may affect adolescent health, well-being

Adolescents whose parents better understand their daily experiences have better psychological adjustment, suggests a study in the October issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Medical school applicants anxious about new MCAT

Medical school applicants anxious about new MCAT

One of the biggest hurdles that college students face if they want to go to medical school is the MCAT - the Medical College Admission Test. The one-day standardized multiple-choice exam, which takes more than five hours to complete, is required for admission to nearly all medical schools in the United States. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, more than 85,000 students take the MCAT each year. [More]

ASU hosts 2014 Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience meeting for investigators

Across the country, billions of dollars and millions of hours are spent on studying the inner workings of the brain as scientists search for ways to treat debilitating diseases and injuries such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. Now, with the tremendous growth in basic knowledge driven by these efforts, researchers see a need to integrate their work across the broad scientific disciplines represented in modern neuroscience. [More]