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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Psychologists plan to enhance online health information on lung cancer

Psychologists plan to enhance online health information on lung cancer

Psychologists are to improve online health information on lung cancer after research showed that family members are more likely to search online to encourage loved ones to seek help. [More]
Health interventions to boost exercise in older people could be more successful with age differentiation

Health interventions to boost exercise in older people could be more successful with age differentiation

Health interventions to increase exercise in older people could be more successful if they differentiated between people aged 65 to 79 years old and those over 80 years old. [More]
NTNU researchers find link between sleep disorders and psychiatric problems in young children

NTNU researchers find link between sleep disorders and psychiatric problems in young children

Toddlers who take a long time to fall asleep or wake up many times during the night have put many a desperate mom and dad to the test. Tired parents are often told that night waking is part of toddlerhood, and that it will soon pass on its own, but this is not the case for everyone. [More]
Green tea compound, voluntary exercise slow Alzheimer's disease progression in mice

Green tea compound, voluntary exercise slow Alzheimer's disease progression in mice

According to the National Institutes of Health, Alzheimer's disease (AD) may affect as many as 5.5 million Americans. Scientists currently are seeking treatments and therapies found in common foods that will help stave off the disease or prevent it completely. [More]
New Cornell study analyzes healthy eating behaviors

New Cornell study analyzes healthy eating behaviors

If you want to know the secrets of healthier eating, think of the kitchen fruit bowl. A fruit bowl makes fruit more convenient, attractive, and normal to eat than if the same fruit were in the bottom of the refrigerator. [More]
Patients with traumatic brain injuries need effective cognitive neuroscience-based therapies

Patients with traumatic brain injuries need effective cognitive neuroscience-based therapies

Patients with traumatic brain injuries are not benefiting from recent advances in cognitive neuroscience research - and they should be, scientists report in a special issue of Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences. [More]

Eating healthy snacks primes shoppers to make healthier food choices

We have all been told not to grocery shop on an empty stomach, but what other tips can help us shop, and consequently eat, healthier? Cornell researchers Aner Tal, PhD and Brian Wansink, PhD (author of Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life) found that shoppers can be primed to buy more produce when they eat a healthy item before shopping. [More]
Children bullied by peers face worse long-term mental health problems than those who are maltreated

Children bullied by peers face worse long-term mental health problems than those who are maltreated

A new study published in The Lancet Psychiatry shows that children who have been bullied by peers suffer worse in the longer term than those who have been maltreated by adults. [More]
Discovery of molecular reset button for internal body clock could help treat different disorders

Discovery of molecular reset button for internal body clock could help treat different disorders

An international team of scientists has discovered what amounts to a molecular reset button for our internal body clock. Their findings reveal a potential target to treat a range of disorders, from sleep disturbances to other behavioral, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities, commonly associated with jet lag, shift work and exposure to light at night, as well as with neuropsychiatric conditions such as depression and autism. [More]
Research findings could offer new way to test for chemo brain in patients

Research findings could offer new way to test for chemo brain in patients

UBC research shows that chemotherapy can lead to excessive mind wandering and an inability to concentrate. Dubbed 'chemo-brain,' the negative cognitive effects of the cancer treatment have long been suspected, but the UBC study is the first to explain why patients have difficulty paying attention. [More]

TCSPP announces launch of Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis Program

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, a nonprofit university and one of the leading institutions devoted exclusively to the study of psychology, and related behavioral and health sciences, announces the launch of its Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Program at the Washington, D.C. Campus and online. [More]
Students with standing desks more attentive than seated counterparts, Texas A&M study finds

Students with standing desks more attentive than seated counterparts, Texas A&M study finds

A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks, which equates to an extra seven minutes per hour of engaged instruction time. [More]
New study reveals that psychiatric disorders don't predict future violent behavior

New study reveals that psychiatric disorders don't predict future violent behavior

Most psychiatric disorders - including depression -- do not predict future violent behavior, according to new Northwestern Medicine longitudinal study of delinquent youth. The only exception is substance abuse and dependence. [More]
UO researchers uncover how the brain encodes and translates sounds

UO researchers uncover how the brain encodes and translates sounds

When people hear the sound of footsteps or the drilling of a woodpecker, the rhythmic structure of the sounds is striking, says Michael Wehr, a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. [More]
Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Researchers have uncovered the first evidence of a genetic link between prodigy and autism. The scientists found that child prodigies in their sample share some of the same genetic variations with people who have autism. [More]
Two Louisville heart physicians to host symposium on cardiovascular disease in women

Two Louisville heart physicians to host symposium on cardiovascular disease in women

Two of Louisville's leading heart physicians will host a one-day symposium designed to provide the community, physicians, nurses and health professionals up-to-date information on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in women. [More]
Bionomics begins BNC210 Phase II clinical trial for treatment of anxiety, depression

Bionomics begins BNC210 Phase II clinical trial for treatment of anxiety, depression

Bionomics Limited, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of innovative therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and diseases of the central nervous system, today announced the initiation of a Phase II clinical study of BNC210, the Company's drug candidate in development for the treatment of anxiety and depression. [More]
New research shows that squirming helps ADHD children learn

New research shows that squirming helps ADHD children learn

For decades, frustrated parents and teachers have barked at fidgety children with ADHD to "Sit still and concentrate!" But new research shows that if you want ADHD kids to learn, you have to let them squirm. The foot-tapping, leg-swinging and chair-scooting movements of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks, according to a study published in an early online release of the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. [More]
New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

While a large number of women quit or reduce smoking upon pregnancy recognition, many resume smoking postpartum. Previous research has estimated that approximately 70% of women who quit smoking during pregnancy relapse within the first year after childbirth, and of those who relapse, 67% resume smoking by three months, and up to 90% by six months. [More]
Research indicates that even sweat can bring happiness

Research indicates that even sweat can bring happiness

Humans may be able to communicate positive emotions like happiness through the smell of our sweat, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that we produce chemical compounds, or chemosignals, when we experience happiness that are detectable by others who smell our sweat. [More]
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