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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Researchers find less sexual activity among millennials

Researchers find less sexual activity among millennials

Since time immemorial, older generations have fretted over the sexual habits of young people. In today's world, however, elders might just be wondering why young people are having so little sex, according to a new study by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge. [More]
UTA researchers find how changing estrogen levels make women more vulnerable to cocaine addiction

UTA researchers find how changing estrogen levels make women more vulnerable to cocaine addiction

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are studying how fluctuating estrogen levels make females increasingly sensitive to the rewarding effects of cocaine and ultimately, vulnerable to cocaine addiction. [More]
Brief smartphone exercises can help uplift mood

Brief smartphone exercises can help uplift mood

Brief, directed smartphone exercises can help quickly improve our mood. This is the latest finding from psychologists at the University of Basel and their international colleagues, reported in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. [More]
New project examines use of mindfulness therapy in preventing drug abuse relapse among young adults

New project examines use of mindfulness therapy in preventing drug abuse relapse among young adults

A research project at the University of Illinois is examining the use of mindfulness therapy in preventing drug abuse relapse among marginalized young adults. [More]
Twitches during rapid eye movement sleep may be linked to sensorimotor development in newborns

Twitches during rapid eye movement sleep may be linked to sensorimotor development in newborns

When her daughter was born two-and-a-half years ago, Mary Goldsberry-Troyer eagerly watched for the typical developmental milestones in her firstborn. She noted when Vivi smiled, rolled over, and took her first step. [More]
Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Using data from the Women's Health Initiative, a new study has found that women with reproductive-period durations of less than 30 years had a 37% increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with women whose reproductive durations were somewhere in the middle (36 to 40 years). [More]
Researchers discover three new risk genes for ALS

Researchers discover three new risk genes for ALS

Published today in Nature Genetics, the study reveals three new risk genes for ALS and one of these - C21orf2 - increases an individual's risk of developing the dis-ease by 65 per cent. [More]
Simple, non-invasive test may help screen young children for hearing deficits linked to autism

Simple, non-invasive test may help screen young children for hearing deficits linked to autism

Researchers have identified an inner ear deficiency in children with Autism that may impact their ability to recognize speech. [More]
Children who experience inadequate sleep more likely to develop depression, anxiety later in life

Children who experience inadequate sleep more likely to develop depression, anxiety later in life

When asked how lack of sleep affects emotions, common responses are usually grumpy, foggy and short-tempered. [More]
Neuroimaging study identifies four mental stages during math problem solving

Neuroimaging study identifies four mental stages during math problem solving

A new Carnegie Mellon University neuroimaging study reveals the mental stages people go through as they are solving challenging math problems. [More]
Experts call to make parenting a national priority

Experts call to make parenting a national priority

Ask any mom or dad and they will tell you: parenting is hard work. For those parents and caregivers who struggle with the nature or the demands of child rearing, sometimes help is hard to find. [More]
Pitt researchers shed more light on neurobiology of reading

Pitt researchers shed more light on neurobiology of reading

Reading is a relatively modern and uniquely human skill. For this reason, visual word recognition has been a puzzle for neuroscientists because the neural systems responsible for reading could not have evolved for this purpose. [More]
Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Falling can have serious consequences for older adults, including a loss of function and increased risk of institutionalization. [More]
Researchers explore effectiveness of neurorehabilitation for individuals with brain injury or stroke

Researchers explore effectiveness of neurorehabilitation for individuals with brain injury or stroke

In the current issue of NeuroRehabilitation leading researchers explore the effectiveness of several neurorehabilitation treatments for individuals with brain injury or stroke. A number of published articles have covered the issue of efficacy of neurorehabilitation, but only a few have discussed the issue of effectiveness. [More]
Noninvasive brain stimulation may curb cravings for appetitive foods

Noninvasive brain stimulation may curb cravings for appetitive foods

Available research suggests that noninvasive stimulation of a specific brain area can reduce food cravings—particularly for high-calorie, "appetitive" foods, according to a review in the Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Study shows ordering food immediately before eating leads to overall increase in calorie content

Study shows ordering food immediately before eating leads to overall increase in calorie content

Want to cut calories and make healthier meal choices? Try avoiding unhealthy impulse purchases by ordering meals at least an hour before eating. [More]
Researchers aim to reduce decision-making errors due to sleep loss

Researchers aim to reduce decision-making errors due to sleep loss

Researchers from Washington State University's Sleep and Performance Research Center received a $1.7 million grant to develop and test cognitive flexibility training to combat the effects of sleep loss on decision-making under rapidly changing circumstances. [More]
In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

A national research collaboration funded by the National Institutes of Health has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding outcomes, according to a study published online this week in Pediatrics. [More]
All brain training protocols do not return equal benefits, study reveals

All brain training protocols do not return equal benefits, study reveals

Cognitive brain training improves executive function whereas aerobic activity improves memory, according to new Center for BrainHealth research at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award

JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award

The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease is pleased to announce that Mark W. Bondi, PhD, ABPP/CN, Professor of Psychiatry at UC San Diego and Director of the Neuropsychological Assessment Unit at the VA San Diego Healthcare System, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Alzheimer Award presented by the journal in recognition of his outstanding work on the development of a novel and promising method of staging preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on number of abnormal biomarkers that is predictive of progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. [More]
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