Psychology News and Research RSS Feed - Psychology News and Research

Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Lower attention ability in early adolescence linked to increased genetic risk for four different anxiety symptoms

Lower attention ability in early adolescence linked to increased genetic risk for four different anxiety symptoms

University of Texas at Arlington researchers have found that low attention control in early adolescence is related to a genetic risk factor for four different anxiety disorders. Young teens who suffer from anxiety are also more vulnerable to additional problems like depression, drug dependence, suicidal behavior and educational underachievement. [More]
Investigators find ways to improve patient-practitioner communication in fertility clinics

Investigators find ways to improve patient-practitioner communication in fertility clinics

One in every eight couples struggles to conceive or maintain a pregnancy. In Charlotte, at least 4,000 people seek infertility treatment every year. As such, the city has become a hub of knowledge and resources for patients diagnosed with infertility. [More]
Exercise can help improve ADHD symptoms in adults

Exercise can help improve ADHD symptoms in adults

Exercise, even a small amount, can help alleviate symptoms of ADHD in adults, according to a new study by University of Georgia researchers. [More]
Research highlights significance of ultra-rapid brain responses to threat-related visual stimuli

Research highlights significance of ultra-rapid brain responses to threat-related visual stimuli

An international team lead by researchers from CTB-UPM shows that the amygdala in the human brain is able to detect possible threats in the visual environment at ultra-fast time scales. [More]
Maternal SRI treatment may cause microscopic changes in fetal brain structure

Maternal SRI treatment may cause microscopic changes in fetal brain structure

A new Finnish study shows that fetal exposure to commonly used SRI drugs may affect brain activity in newborns. The researchers suggest that the effects of drugs on fetal brain function should be assessed more carefully. [More]
Researchers develop new method to combat VR sickness

Researchers develop new method to combat VR sickness

Columbia Engineering Professor Steven K. Feiner and Ajoy Fernandes MS'16 have developed a method of combating virtual reality (VR) sickness that can be applied to consumer head-worn VR displays, such as the Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, Sony PlayStation VR, and Google Cardboard. [More]
Child adversities linked to high rates of adult insomnia

Child adversities linked to high rates of adult insomnia

According to a new study, child adversities, which are known to play an important role in mental and physical health, are also associated with poor sleep. [More]
Researcher traces origins of double-trauma amnesia cure belief

Researcher traces origins of double-trauma amnesia cure belief

Spiers, PhD, associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Psychology, traced the origins of the double-trauma amnesia cure belief in a paper for Neurology titled, "The Head Trauma Amnesia Cure: The Making of a Medical Myth." [More]
Autonomic nervous system plays role in promoting memory consolidation during sleep

Autonomic nervous system plays role in promoting memory consolidation during sleep

A team of sleep researchers at the University of California, Riverside, led by psychology professor Sara C. Mednick, has found that the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for control of bodily functions not consciously directed (such as breathing, heartbeat, and digestive processes) plays a role in promoting memory consolidation - the process of converting information from short-term to long-term memory - during sleep. [More]
Amino acid acetylcarnitine may help predict neurobehavioral performance during chronic sleep loss

Amino acid acetylcarnitine may help predict neurobehavioral performance during chronic sleep loss

The amino acid acetylcarnitine may help predict an individual's neurobehavioral performance during chronic sleep restriction, according to results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that will be presented at SLEEP 2016, the 30th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC. [More]
NHS Health Checks may not be best option for preventing CVD in England

NHS Health Checks may not be best option for preventing CVD in England

A University of Liverpool study published in the British Medical Journal has found the UK population's cardiovascular health is not being supported enough by the NHS Health Check programme. [More]

Social contact with older adults can reduce ageism among young people

Young people are less likely to be ageist when their friends have friendships with older adults, research led by psychologists at the University of Kent has shown. [More]
Study sheds new light on the brain’s decision-making processes

Study sheds new light on the brain’s decision-making processes

Netflix binge-watching versus a hike in the woods. A cheeseburger versus kale salad. Fentanyl versus Tylenol. New UC research from the University California, Berkeley, suggests our brain activity could be influenced to make the healthier choice. [More]
Maternal stress exposure can have major effect on child’s development and future health

Maternal stress exposure can have major effect on child’s development and future health

The environment the unborn child is exposed to inside the womb can have a major effect on her or his development and future health. Maternal stress during pregnancy can be transmitted biologically to the unborn child. [More]
Rice study takes deeper look at how inflammation bridges stress and diabetes

Rice study takes deeper look at how inflammation bridges stress and diabetes

A Rice University study has found a link between emotional stress and diabetes, with roots in the brain's ability to control anxiety. [More]
Study: Majority of food, beverage products endorsed by music celebrities are unhealthy

Study: Majority of food, beverage products endorsed by music celebrities are unhealthy

Recording artists are frequently the face of commercial products—and children and adolescents are frequently their target audience. Now, a new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center finds that the vast majority of the food and beverage products marketed by some of the most popular music stars are unhealthy. [More]
Children with ADHD experience difficulties in adapting behaviour to given situations

Children with ADHD experience difficulties in adapting behaviour to given situations

Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often display behaviours that are inappropriate for the situation in which they are in. They might move around in the classroom during a lesson, or talk non-stop and interrupt others' conversations. [More]

New understanding of established link between glucose and improved self-control

In the age of the 'sugar tax', good news about glucose is hard to come by. But an Australian scientist has just proposed a new understanding of the established link between the sweet stuff and improved self-control. [More]
Study reinforces significance of raising young children in stimulating environments

Study reinforces significance of raising young children in stimulating environments

A recent study shows that infants and toddlers take longer to notice new visual stimuli and are less accurate in their gaze than adults, but slowly improve as they age. The findings reinforce the importance of raising young children in stimulating environments, and set an important baseline as detection of developmental disorders increasingly rely on tracking eye movements. [More]
UBC study finds lower HIV testing rates among gay men living in small cities

UBC study finds lower HIV testing rates among gay men living in small cities

Men who live outside major Canadian cities and have sex with other men are less likely to get an HIV test than their metropolitan counterparts, a UBC study shows. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement