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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Mild traumatic brain injury can affect quality of parent-child relationships

Mild traumatic brain injury can affect quality of parent-child relationships

A study published in the Journal of Neuropsychology, reveals the adverse effects of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) on the quality parent-child relationships. The young brain is particularly vulnerable to injury and one of the first visible signs of social difficulties in young children is a decline in their relationship with their parents. Parents should watch for emotional and behavioural changes in their children. [More]
Transcranial direct current stimulation can allow faster comprehension of meaningful word combinations

Transcranial direct current stimulation can allow faster comprehension of meaningful word combinations

How the human brain processes the words we hear and constructs complex concepts is still somewhat of a mystery to the neuroscience community. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can alter our language processing, allowing for faster comprehension of meaningful word combinations, according to new research from the department of Neurology the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The work is published in the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
Alzheimer's disease impairs visual face perception beyond causing memory problems

Alzheimer's disease impairs visual face perception beyond causing memory problems

A recent study has demonstrated that, beyond causing memory problems, Alzheimer's disease also impairs visual face perception. This finding may help families better understand their loved one's inevitable difficulties and lead to new avenues to postpone this painful aspect of the disease, such as the recognition of particular facial traits or voice recognition. [More]
Long-term medication use reduces risk of relapse and improves symptoms in BDD patients

Long-term medication use reduces risk of relapse and improves symptoms in BDD patients

People with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) fare better and are less likely to relapse when treated with medication on a long-term basis, according to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. [More]
Electrical stimulation of deep brain structures to ease chronic pain

Electrical stimulation of deep brain structures to ease chronic pain

Abuse of prescription opioid medicines used to treat chronic pain has reached epidemic proportions, so much that the White House has announced new efforts to combat addiction and prevent the thousands of overdose-related deaths reported in the U.S. each year. [More]
Study: Disparities in pain management may be partly attributed to bias

Study: Disparities in pain management may be partly attributed to bias

Research has documented that black Americans are systematically undertreated for pain relative to white Americans, likely due to both the over-prescription and over-use of pain medications among white patients and the under-prescription of pain medications for black patients. [More]
New UCLA study reveals how the brain combines sound and vision

New UCLA study reveals how the brain combines sound and vision

A new UCLA psychology study provides insights into how the brain combines sound and vision. The research suggests that there is not one sole mechanism in the brain that governs how much our senses work together to process information. [More]
School Breakfast Program in NYC boosts student participation

School Breakfast Program in NYC boosts student participation

Serving free breakfast in New York City's classrooms has boosted the number of students eating what some consider the most important meal of the day at school, according to research by New York University's Institute for Education and Social Policy and the Center for Policy Research at Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. [More]
Understanding neuronal feedback could provide new insight into visual perception

Understanding neuronal feedback could provide new insight into visual perception

Ever see something that isn't really there? Could your mind be playing tricks on you? The "tricks" might be your brain reacting to feedback between neurons in different parts of the visual system, according to a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Sandra J. Kuhlman and colleagues. [More]
Memory training with unpredictability more effective in enhancing episodic memory

Memory training with unpredictability more effective in enhancing episodic memory

Memory training with unpredictable components could be more effective in enhancing episodic memory than training with predictable elements, according to new findings from UT Dallas researchers published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. [More]
Partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism affects self-image of women

Partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism affects self-image of women

Women who perceive that their sexual partner is imposing perfectionist standards on them may suffer sexual dysfunction as a result, psychologists at the University of Kent have found. [More]
Study finds strong connection between pathological narcissism and sexual assault perpetration

Study finds strong connection between pathological narcissism and sexual assault perpetration

Almost 20 percent of college men have committed some kind of sexual assault, and 4 percent have committed rape, according to a study published by University of Georgia researchers who were examining the link between different kinds of narcissism and the perpetration of sexual assaults. [More]
Patients with multiple mild TBIs most likely to have saccadic eye movement impairment

Patients with multiple mild TBIs most likely to have saccadic eye movement impairment

Mild traumatic brain injuries (TBI) could be linked to eye movement impairment, even beyond the acute stage of injury, according to researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. [More]
Swedish population study helps answer lingering questions about hormone therapy safety

Swedish population study helps answer lingering questions about hormone therapy safety

A Swedish population study is helping answer lingering questions about hormone therapy safety. Published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society, the study shows that estrogen-only therapy carries a lower risk of blood clots than combined estrogen-progestogen therapy, but there is no significantly increased risk of clots with combination therapy when the estrogen is transdermal, and vaginal estrogen doesn't raise the risk at all. [More]
Fertility goes down when cost of achieving social status goes up

Fertility goes down when cost of achieving social status goes up

Competition for social status may be an important driver of lower fertility in the modern world, suggests a new study published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. [More]
MGH study finds that the brains of young marijuana users react differently to social exclusion

MGH study finds that the brains of young marijuana users react differently to social exclusion

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital researchers finds that the brains of young adult marijuana users react differently to social exclusion than do those of non-users. In a report published in the March issue of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, the team reports that activation of the insula, a region of the brain that is usually active during social rejection, was reduced in young marijuana users when they were being excluded from participation in virtual game of catch. [More]
Study demonstrates possibility of simultaneous improvement in all mental, physical functions

Study demonstrates possibility of simultaneous improvement in all mental, physical functions

Let's say you've decided to make some changes in your life. You're out of shape, your mind wanders, your self-esteem is wavering, and you have no idea what you just read. So you decide to focus on one thing -- losing weight, maybe -- and tackle the other issues later. You don't want to take on too much at once, right? [More]
Study shows preterm born individuals at risk of lower health-related quality of life

Study shows preterm born individuals at risk of lower health-related quality of life

Parents of very premature babies are more worried about their grown up children's lives than mothers and fathers whose babies were born full term. [More]

Tough men more likely to ignore medical problems

Men are less likely than women to go to the doctor, more likely to choose a male doctor when they do go, but less likely to be honest with that doctor about their symptoms, Rutgers psychologists have found. The researchers believe this may contribute to men's dying earlier than women. [More]
Researchers explore role of social media in promoting mental health, wellbeing in children

Researchers explore role of social media in promoting mental health, wellbeing in children

University of Leicester researchers to identify the benefits and challenges of promoting mental health through social media [More]
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