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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.

New Georgia Institute of Technology study finds that music may not help people remember things

Music may help some people relax when they're trying to concentrate. But it doesn't help them remember what they're focusing on, especially as they get older. [More]
Health campaigns should focus on benefits of abstaining, says study

Health campaigns should focus on benefits of abstaining, says study

Campaigns to get young people to drink less should focus on the benefits of not drinking and how it can be achieved, a new study suggests. [More]
UH professor wins Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award

UH professor wins Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award

University of Houston developmental psychology professor Arturo Hernandez is among this year's recipients of the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award. The award honors his work in mapping how the brain processes language. This research has implication on how language - including a second language - is taught and learned. [More]
Children exposed to air pollution are at increased risk for brain inflammation, neurodegenerative changes

Children exposed to air pollution are at increased risk for brain inflammation, neurodegenerative changes

City smog lowers children's IQ. This is among findings from a recent University of Montana study that found children living in cities with significant air pollution are at an increased risk for detrimental impacts to the brain, including short-term memory loss and lower IQ. [More]
Positive relations between youth and parents can prevent adolescent suicide attempts

Positive relations between youth and parents can prevent adolescent suicide attempts

Positive relations between youth and their parents can be key to preventing adolescent suicide attempts, according to the University of British Columbia research. [More]
Sanford Health wins LocumTenens.com's Best Places to Practice Locum Tenens contest

Sanford Health wins LocumTenens.com's Best Places to Practice Locum Tenens contest

Sanford Health, the nation's largest rural, not-for-profit healthcare system, has been named the winner of LocumTenens.com's Best Places to Practice Locum Tenens contest. [More]
Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation offers tips to help caregivers cope with challenges

Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation offers tips to help caregivers cope with challenges

Husbands and wives, parents and children, siblings and others are taking on the role of caregiver for family members who are unable to care for themselves due to disabilities, chronic health conditions or the challenges related to aging. In fact, more than 90 million caregivers – two out of five adults – are now providing that daily care, an increase of 30% since 2010. [More]
Latino teens who experience discrimination-related stress more likely to experience mental health issues

Latino teens who experience discrimination-related stress more likely to experience mental health issues

Latino adolescents who experience discrimination-related stress are more likely to experience anxiety, depression, and issues with sleep, according to research led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. These mental health outcomes were more pronounced among Latino teens born in the U.S. to immigrant parents, as opposed to foreign-born teens. [More]

Researchers reveal how the brain makes sense of data from fingers

Northwestern University and Carnegie Mellon University researchers now report a fascinating discovery that provides insight into how the brain makes sense of data from fingers. [More]

Powerful people draw inspiration from themselves rather than others, say researchers

We all know the type - people who can talk on and on about their latest adventures, seemingly unaware that those around them may not be interested. [More]
Study highlights the need for more research on trauma and other body-mind therapies

Study highlights the need for more research on trauma and other body-mind therapies

In a Theory and Hypothesis paper titled "Somatic Experiencing: Using Interoception and Proprioception as Core Elements of Trauma Therapy," published today in Frontiers in Psychology, Dartmouth investigators Peter Payne, SEP, and Mardi Crane-Godreau, PhD, note the lack of hypothesized scientific models for the mechanisms of action responsible for outcomes in Somatic Experiencing® (SE) trauma therapy and other body-mind therapies. [More]
Meditation appears to help preserve the brain's gray matter

Meditation appears to help preserve the brain's gray matter

Since 1970, life expectancy around the world has risen dramatically, with people living more than 10 years longer. That's the good news. [More]
New research shows that time-based intervention can improve self-control

New research shows that time-based intervention can improve self-control

A study conducted by researchers at Kansas State University is the first to demonstrate increases in both self-control and timing precision as a result of a time-based intervention. This new research may be an important clue for developing behavioral approaches to treat disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, substance abuse and obesity. [More]
Study could lead to potential drug treatment for fighting addiction

Study could lead to potential drug treatment for fighting addiction

A research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder has discovered a mechanism in the brain that is key to making cocaine seem pleasurable, a finding that could lead to a drug treatment for fighting addiction. [More]
Johns Hopkins student wins NCRC's 2015 Grand Prize

Johns Hopkins student wins NCRC's 2015 Grand Prize

The National Collegiate Research Conference sponsored by the Harvard College Undergraduate Research Association awarded its 2015 Grand Prize to Mahima Sukumar, an undergraduate student at The Johns Hopkins University, working in the lab of Keri Martinowich, Ph.D., at the Lieber Institute for Brain Development. [More]
Brain scans can predict therapeutic responses to talk therapy

Brain scans can predict therapeutic responses to talk therapy

UNC School of Medicine researchers have shown that brain scans can predict which patients with clinical depression are most likely to benefit from a specific kind of talk therapy. [More]
Researchers identify a common pattern across different psychiatric disorders

Researchers identify a common pattern across different psychiatric disorders

In a study analyzing whole-brain images from nearly 16,000 people, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine identified a common pattern across a spectrum of psychiatric disorders that are widely perceived to be quite distinct. [More]
News study finds association between chronic fatigue syndrome and early menopause

News study finds association between chronic fatigue syndrome and early menopause

A newfound link between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and early menopause was reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]

Transgender children live in alignment with their gender identity

A visible and growing number of transgender children in North America live in alignment with their gender identity rather than their natal sex, yet scientific research has largely ignored them. No longer, says Nicholas Eaton, PhD, an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stony Brook University. Dr. Eaton and his colleagues at the TransYouth Project have started the first large-scale, national study of socially-supported transgender kids. [More]
Study: Simple strategies can lead to significant improvements in one-year-olds at risk for ASD

Study: Simple strategies can lead to significant improvements in one-year-olds at risk for ASD

A new study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers finds that a collection of simple strategies used by parents can lead to significant improvements in one-year-olds at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). [More]