Psychology News and Research RSS Feed - Psychology News and Research

Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
'Virtual-reality' therapy can reduce people's craving for alcohol, new study suggests

'Virtual-reality' therapy can reduce people's craving for alcohol, new study suggests

A form of 'virtual-reality' therapy may help people with alcohol dependence reduce their craving for alcohol, a new study suggests. The findings, published in the July issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, come from a small study of just 10 patients. [More]
Promoting healthy foods to children

Promoting healthy foods to children

If the packaging has an appealing design, primary school children also reach for healthy foods. This was revealed in a study in cooperation with the Research Institute for Child Nutrition in Dortmund under the direction of scientists from the University of Bonn. The results are being published in advance online in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. The final version will be published shortly. [More]
Study describes how stress-reduction program helps reduce anxiety among high school students

Study describes how stress-reduction program helps reduce anxiety among high school students

Amid reports that rank today's teens as the most stressed generation in the country, a new study offers hope for helping them effectively manage stress and build long-term resiliency. [More]
New study analyses how policy actions affect tobacco consumption among Spanish women

New study analyses how policy actions affect tobacco consumption among Spanish women

Cigarette prices and images on cigarette packets have an impact on women in terms of continuing to smoke or quitting. In fact, less educated women are more responsive to pictorial labels on cigarette packets, as revealed by a study that has analysed, for the first time, the generation differences among female smokers, a group which, despite policy measures, has not stopped growing. [More]

UC Berkeley study shows humans can navigate through their sense of smell

Like homing pigeons, humans have a nose for navigation because our brains are wired to convert smells into spatial information, new research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows. [More]

Understanding how humans and animals perceive the auditory world

Sit down with a friend in a quiet restaurant and begin talking, just before the dinner crowd's arrival. Business is slow at first, but picks up quickly, just like the sound level. Music plays, glasses clink, servers discuss specials. Discussions are everywhere, colliding and competing with the other noises. [More]
Simple strategy to lose weight: step on a scale each day and track your weight

Simple strategy to lose weight: step on a scale each day and track your weight

For those wishing to lose weight and keep it off, here's a simple strategy that works: step on a scale each day and track the results. [More]
New form of talking therapy shows promise for people suffering from chronic low back pain

New form of talking therapy shows promise for people suffering from chronic low back pain

New research from Royal Holloway, University of London has found that a new form of talking therapy is a credible and promising treatment for people with chronic low back pain who are also suffering from related psychological stress. [More]
Iowa's advanced driving simulator to help assess newly developed artificial lens for cataract patients

Iowa's advanced driving simulator to help assess newly developed artificial lens for cataract patients

A miniature version of the University of Iowa's advanced driving simulator will participate in a clinical trial later this year to assess a patient's driving ability after cataract surgery. [More]
Sleep deficiency affects face appearance

Sleep deficiency affects face appearance

To get enough sleep, and thereby look alert, can be beneficial both at a personal level and at work. This according to a new doctoral thesis in psychology at Stockholm University, examining sleep deficiency effects on appearance. [More]
Stress and worry of premature birth does not affect mother's parenting behaviour

Stress and worry of premature birth does not affect mother's parenting behaviour

The stress and worry of giving birth prematurely does not adversely affect a mother's parenting behaviour, according to researchers at the University of Warwick. [More]
Keele University academic calls for urgent review of cervical screening programmes

Keele University academic calls for urgent review of cervical screening programmes

As Cervical Screening Awareness Week begins, a Keele University academic is calling for cervical screening programmes and perceptions of cervical cancer to be reviewed urgently, to encourage more older women to get regularly screened. [More]
New TSRI study integrates neuroscience and psychological research to understand sleep, memory

New TSRI study integrates neuroscience and psychological research to understand sleep, memory

In Macbeth, Shakespeare describes sleep as "the death of each day's life," but he may have gotten it wrong. Sleep, as it turns out, may be the one thing that keeps our memories alive and intact. [More]
A third of people avoid social situations due to uncontrolled dandruff, reveals anonymous survey

A third of people avoid social situations due to uncontrolled dandruff, reveals anonymous survey

A third of people admitted to avoiding social situations as a result of emotional distress caused by their dandruff, according to new survey results released today by the British Skin Foundation(BSF) in conjunction with the world’s no. 1 anti-dandruff shampoo, Head & Shoulders (H&S). [More]
Stanford researchers explore true potential of fMRI machine in various applications

Stanford researchers explore true potential of fMRI machine in various applications

For the past several years, Anthony Wagner has been developing a computer program that can read a person's brain scan data and surmise, with a high degree of certainty, whether that person is experiencing a memory. [More]
New study finds growing use of CAM therapies among menopausal women

New study finds growing use of CAM therapies among menopausal women

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing for the treatment of menopausal symptoms but often without the guidance of a clinician. That's according to a new study reported online today in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society. [More]
CMU scientists identify how specific concrete objects are coded in the brain

CMU scientists identify how specific concrete objects are coded in the brain

Thanks to Carnegie Mellon University advances in brain imaging technology, we now know how specific concrete objects are coded in the brain, to the point where we can identify which object, such as a house or a banana, someone is thinking about from its brain activation signature. [More]
Reactions to stress may play key role in long-term health

Reactions to stress may play key role in long-term health

Reacting positively to stressful situations may play a key role in long-term health, according to researchers. [More]
Greater life satisfaction in older adults linked to reduced risk of mortality

Greater life satisfaction in older adults linked to reduced risk of mortality

In a study just published by researchers at Chapman University, findings showed that greater life satisfaction in adults older than 50 years of age is related to a reduced risk of mortality. [More]

Age-related memory loss lower than previously thought

The research, conducted by Wilma Koutstaal (University of Minnesota) and Alaitz Aizpurua (UPV/EHU), concludes that the memory of older adults is not as deficient as has been thought until now. Elderly people remember fewer specific details than younger people and, in general, both groups retain concrete information about events experienced better than abstract information. The main difference is to be found in the capacity to remember more distant facts: youngsters remember them better. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement