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Psychology is the study of human mental functions, behavior and processes.
Bad sleep quality may trigger insomnia in older adults

Bad sleep quality may trigger insomnia in older adults

Reports of insomnia are common among the elderly, but a new study finds that sleep problems may stem from the quality of rest and other health concerns more than the overall amount of sleep that patients get. [More]
Weight-normative approach could be harmful to patients, shows study

Weight-normative approach could be harmful to patients, shows study

A new review of the way health care professionals emphasise weight to define health and wellbeing suggests the approach could be harmful to patients. [More]

Hands-free, voice-controlled automobile infotainment systems can distract drivers, show studies

Two new AAA-University of Utah studies show that despite public belief to the contrary, hands-free, voice-controlled automobile infotainment systems can distract drivers, although it is possible to design them to be safer. [More]
Childhood eating disorders could have underlying psychological issues, researchers warn

Childhood eating disorders could have underlying psychological issues, researchers warn

Researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital are warning parents that difficult eaters could have underlying psychological issues, as they have found that restrictive behaviours can appear before puberty. [More]
Researchers demonstrate involvement of ClpB protein in eating disorders

Researchers demonstrate involvement of ClpB protein in eating disorders

Eating disorders (ED) such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and binge eating disorder affect approximately 5-10% of the general population, but the biological mechanisms involved are unknown. Researchers at Inserm Unit 1073, "Nutrition, inflammation and dysfunction of the gut-brain axis" (Inserm/University of Rouen) have demonstrated the involvement of a protein produced by some intestinal bacteria that may be the source of these disorders. [More]
Most people agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children

Most people agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children

Majorities of media researchers, parents and pediatricians agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children, according to a new national study. [More]

University of Michigan study identifies different types of early child problems

A toddler who doesn't feel guilty after misbehaving or who is less affectionate or less responsive to affection from others might not raise a red flag to parents, but these behaviors may result in later behavior problems in 1st grade. [More]
U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

Deep in the brains of the million Americans with Parkinson's disease, changes to their brain cells put them at high risk of dangerous falls -- a problem that resists even the most modern treatments. [More]
Suicide prevention: an interview with Dr Shekhar Saxena, World Health Organization

Suicide prevention: an interview with Dr Shekhar Saxena, World Health Organization

Suicide is a serious public health problem. More than 800,000 people die from suicide every year – that’s one person every 40 seconds. [More]

People may eat larger portions of unhealthy foods when eating with overweight person

Have you ever ordered more food at a restaurant than you intended? There are elements of dining rooms that actually prime you to eat more food. [More]
Adolescents with strong working memory better equipped to escape problematic drug use

Adolescents with strong working memory better equipped to escape problematic drug use

Adolescents with strong working memory are better equipped to escape early drug experimentation without progressing into substance abuse issues, says a University of Oregon researcher. [More]
Resistance exercise can improve episodic memory, shows study

Resistance exercise can improve episodic memory, shows study

Here's another reason why it's a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults. [More]

Virginia Tech scientists plan to use social media to develop new approach to addiction recovery

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists plan to use social media to develop a new approach to addiction recovery, one that takes advantage of people's instinct for social connectedness. [More]
Women who accept their imperfections may experience more positive body image

Women who accept their imperfections may experience more positive body image

Women who accept and tolerate their imperfections appear to have a more positive body image despite their body mass index (BMI) and are better able to handle personal disappointments and setbacks in their daily lives. [More]

Findings indicate that our bodies are used as perceptual "ruler" to measure the world around us

People tend to perceive their dominant hand as staying relatively the same size even when it's magnified, lending support to the idea that we use our hand as a constant perceptual "ruler" to measure the world around us. [More]
UI study finds sleep twitches activate the brain in a unique way

UI study finds sleep twitches activate the brain in a unique way

A University of Iowa study has found twitches made during sleep activate the brains of mammals differently than movements made while awake. [More]
Perfectionists may be at increased risk of suicide, says York University psychology professor

Perfectionists may be at increased risk of suicide, says York University psychology professor

Perfectionism is a bigger risk factor in suicide than we may think, says York University Psychology Professor Gordon Flett, calling for closer attention to its potential destructiveness, adding that clinical guidelines should include perfectionism as a separate factor for suicide risk assessment and intervention. [More]
Understanding how neurons encode information

Understanding how neurons encode information

Nathan Urban, interim provost and the Dr. Frederick A. Schwertz Distinguished Professor of Life Sciences, and Robert Kass, professor of statistics and machine learning, have received a $930,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to apply biological and statistical neuroscience approaches in order to create a better overall understanding of how neurons encode information. [More]
Dr. Nancy Chiaravalloti of Kessler Foundation receives Alumni Achievement in Science award

Dr. Nancy Chiaravalloti of Kessler Foundation receives Alumni Achievement in Science award

Nancy (Donofrio) Chiaravalloti, PhD, of Kessler Foundation received the Alumni Achievement in Science award from her alma mater, Muhlenberg College at the Alumni Association luncheon on September 13th. [More]

Research shows gender differences in age preferences regarding sexual partners

New evolutionary psychology research shows gender differences in age preferences regarding sexual partners. [More]