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Salmonella is actually a group of bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria. Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States. Salmonella germs have been known to cause illness for over 100 years. They were discovered by an American scientist named Salmon, for whom they are named.
Researchers show how bacterial colony protects itself against toxic substances

Researchers show how bacterial colony protects itself against toxic substances

Bacterial populations move over surfaces in coordinated way known as swarming, which allows them to spread further over organs and tissues and increases the virulence of the infection. This movement is driven by the action of the flagella and the chemoreceptors, the systems responsible for identifying chemical compounds in the environment and which are anchored at the poles of their cells, forming highly organised structures, of which the protein CheW forms part. [More]
Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

The immune system exercises constant vigilance to protect the body from external threats--including what we eat and drink. A careful balancing act plays out as digested food travels through the intestine. Immune cells must remain alert to protect against harmful pathogens like Salmonella, but their activity also needs to be tempered since an overreaction can lead to too much inflammation and permanent tissue damage. [More]
Agienic issued three key U.S. patents for novel copper-based antimicrobial materials

Agienic issued three key U.S. patents for novel copper-based antimicrobial materials

Agienic Inc., an Arizona-based innovator in antimicrobial technology, announced today the issuance of three key U.S. patents on their novel copper-based antimicrobial materials. [More]
Adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy effective against drug-resistant bacteria

Adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy effective against drug-resistant bacteria

In the ever-escalating evolutionary battle with drug-resistant bacteria, humans may soon have a leg up thanks to adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
Researcher seeks to identify probiotic mixes to treat Clostridium difficile infections

Researcher seeks to identify probiotic mixes to treat Clostridium difficile infections

Antibiotics that fight infection can adversely affect the digestive tract and give destructive bacteria a chance to flourish, said assistant professor of veterinary and biomedical sciences Joy Scaria of South Dakota State University. His research seeks to identify probiotic mixes to treat intestinal infections, such as Clostridium difficile. [More]
Nottingham researchers explore viruses that can destroy food poisoning bugs in the gut

Nottingham researchers explore viruses that can destroy food poisoning bugs in the gut

Viruses that can seek and destroy food poisoning bugs in the gut are being investigated by researchers at The University of Nottingham, thanks to a prestigious new grant. [More]

Study shows pathogens can survive in dry foods for long periods of time

Researchers at the University of Georgia found that pathogens, like salmonella, can survive for at least six months in cookies and crackers. [More]
Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

A phage is a virus that infects a bacterium. People often get very confused about what the difference is between a virus and a bacterium. A virus, like a bacterium, is also a microorganism, but unlike bacteria, it needs to have a host to be able to replicate and propagate. [More]
TGen receives 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education

TGen receives 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education

The Arizona Board of Regents presented the Translational Genomics Research Institute with its 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education, recognizing the extensive research TGen has conducted in association with Northern Arizona University. [More]
Last resort antibiotics may no longer work

Last resort antibiotics may no longer work

E.coli has become resistant to the last line of antibiotics we have left and untreatable bugs may already be circulating in Britain, warn scientists. [More]
Clinical study shows new Ebola vaccine stimulates strong immune responses in adults

Clinical study shows new Ebola vaccine stimulates strong immune responses in adults

A clinical trial of a new Ebola vaccine (ChAd3-EBO-Z) that resulted from an unprecedented global consortium assembled at the behest of the World Health Organization has found that it is well tolerated and stimulates strong immune responses in adults in Mali, West Africa and in the US, according to a study published in the latest issue of the journal Lancet Infectious Disease. [More]
Birmingham researchers identify how Salmonella infections can lead to life-threatening thrombosis

Birmingham researchers identify how Salmonella infections can lead to life-threatening thrombosis

Researchers from the University of Birmingham have, for the first time, identified how Salmonella infections that have spread to our blood and organs can lead to life-threatening thrombosis. [More]
FDA finalizes innovative food safety rules to prevent foodborne illness

FDA finalizes innovative food safety rules to prevent foodborne illness

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today took major steps to prevent foodborne illness by finalizing rules implementing the bipartisan Food Safety Modernization Act that, for the first time, establish enforceable safety standards for produce farms and make importers accountable for verifying that imported food meets U.S. safety standards. [More]
UGA to use $2.1 million grant to explore effects of feeding wildlife at public parks

UGA to use $2.1 million grant to explore effects of feeding wildlife at public parks

People feeding white ibises at public parks are turning the normally independent birds into beggars, and now researchers at the University of Georgia say it might also be helping spread disease. [More]
Research may offer new treatments for patients suffering from severe diarrhea

Research may offer new treatments for patients suffering from severe diarrhea

Everyone has suffered from it. It's ranged from mild to severe. It's a condition that's most-often described in a whisper. [More]
Researchers use genomic techniques to show why different strains of Salmonella infect particular animal species

Researchers use genomic techniques to show why different strains of Salmonella infect particular animal species

It's called bird flu for a reason. Particular characteristics about the influenza virus known as H5N1 allow it to primarily affect avifauna, though in some worrying cases the disease has been passed to humans. [More]
CDC publishes reports on infectious and noninfectious diseases

CDC publishes reports on infectious and noninfectious diseases

Beginning with the Oct. 23, 2015, Supplements to Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), CDC will publish the summaries of all notifiable conditions – infectious and noninfectious – at the same time. [More]
Takeda highlights safety, efficacy of vedolizumab for UC and CD at ACG Annual Scientific Meeting

Takeda highlights safety, efficacy of vedolizumab for UC and CD at ACG Annual Scientific Meeting

Takeda Pharmaceuticals, U.S.A., Inc., today announced that data highlighting the efficacy and safety of vedolizumab for the treatment of adults with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), will be presented during the 2015 American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii, held on October 16-21. [More]
Invasive Salmonella infections revealed as major cause of child illness and deaths in Africa

Invasive Salmonella infections revealed as major cause of child illness and deaths in Africa

Invasive Salmonella infections in sub-Saharan Africa are a major cause of child illness and deaths, a new body of research into this usually overlooked infectious disease has revealed. [More]
Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health, in partnership with vaccine manufacturer PaxVax, Inc. is participating in a clinical study to test the effects of the oral typhoid vaccination, Vivotif (Typhoid Vaccine Live Oral Ty21a). The study will look at the side effects that could occur when taking Vivotif across the range of approved potencies. [More]
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