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Salmonella is actually a group of bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria. Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States. Salmonella germs have been known to cause illness for over 100 years. They were discovered by an American scientist named Salmon, for whom they are named.
Denmark researchers calculate the real burden of foodborne infections

Denmark researchers calculate the real burden of foodborne infections

Campylobacter is the foodborne bacteria that contributes most to the burden of disease in Denmark. This is the finding of a study from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, which for the first time in Denmark ranks three foodborne bacteria according to the burden of disease they impose on society as a whole. [More]
Research opens new potential target against enterics

Research opens new potential target against enterics

In research published in Nature Chemical Biology, scientists from RIKEN in Japan have discovered a surprisingly simple mechanism through which enterics can adjust to the very different oxygen environments inside the human gut and outside. [More]
First study of promising Ebola vaccine commenced in West Africa

First study of promising Ebola vaccine commenced in West Africa

Professor Myron M. Levine, MD, Director of the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that the CVD, in conjunction with its sister institution, The Center for Vaccine Development of Mali and the Ministry of Health of Mali, have begun a clinical trial in health care workers (and other front-line workers) to evaluate a promising experimental Ebola vaccine. [More]
LLNL scientists issued patent for producing antimicrobial compounds to fight superbugs

LLNL scientists issued patent for producing antimicrobial compounds to fight superbugs

Superbugs, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, have been on the rise since antibiotics were first introduced 80 years ago. That's because these germ-fighting agents have lost their punch from being overprescribed and misused, allowing bacteria pathogens to develop immunities against them. [More]
Study compares breast and bottle fed infants

Study compares breast and bottle fed infants

Infant rhesus monkeys receiving different diets early in life develop distinct immune systems that persist months after weaning, a study by researchers from UC Davis, the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) at UC Davis and UC San Francisco have shown. [More]
Improving education about risky food handling behaviors may reduce foodborne illness

Improving education about risky food handling behaviors may reduce foodborne illness

Improving education about risky food handling behaviors would reduce the amount of foodborne illness and help improve food security around the world, according to Kansas State University research. [More]
Ames test successfully adapted for use with cigarette smoke and other complex aerosols

Ames test successfully adapted for use with cigarette smoke and other complex aerosols

The Ames test, a widely used method to determine whether a chemical has the potential to cause cancer, has been successfully adapted for use with cigarette smoke and other complex aerosols. [More]
Studies detect integrons that cause resistance to various antibiotics

Studies detect integrons that cause resistance to various antibiotics

In Mexico the sale of antibiotics for human consumption is controlled to prevent misuse, although in the veterinary sector failure in the implementation of the Official Mexican Standard NOM-064-ZOO-2000, "Guidelines for veterinarian products prescription", has prompted common bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp to become resistant to regular drugs such as streptomycin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, gentamicin, and tetracycline as a result of excess drug use. [More]
Researchers discover highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of pathogen in Ohio

Researchers discover highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of pathogen in Ohio

A team of clinician researchers has discovered a highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of the pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in patient samples in Ohio. [More]

New methods of dectecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing

Infections caused by foodborne microorganisms are an increasing public health burden. In a PhD project at the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, new methods of characterising and dectecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing and in bacteria in water, feed and food samples were studied. [More]
UC Riverside discovery could lead to future development of needle-free vaccines

UC Riverside discovery could lead to future development of needle-free vaccines

Ripping a page from the Star Trek script, specialized cells of the barrier that lines the inside of the intestines and airways of humans have invoked a biological version of Captain Kirk's famous command "shields up" as a first defense against invading microbes. [More]
Salmonella cases are not associated with Danish broiler meat, shows report

Salmonella cases are not associated with Danish broiler meat, shows report

The number of Danes who contracted a salmonella infection reached a historic low level in 2013. More than half of those infected became ill during a trip abroad. [More]
S. pneumoniae is major cause of severe pneumonia in Gambian children

S. pneumoniae is major cause of severe pneumonia in Gambian children

Researchers have published a detailed survey of children with pneumonia in the Gambia, which reveals that Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant aetiological agent and that multiple pathogens are present in at least half of cases. [More]
S. pneumoniae interacts with other nasopharyngeal bacteria

S. pneumoniae interacts with other nasopharyngeal bacteria

Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria are able to detect and respond to other bacterial species in the same host niche, researchers report in Open Biology. [More]
FDA-cleared BD MAX Enteric Bacterial Panel now available to detect bacterial pathogens

FDA-cleared BD MAX Enteric Bacterial Panel now available to detect bacterial pathogens

BD Diagnostics, a segment of leading global medical technology company BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), announced today the availability of the FDA-cleared BD MAX Enteric Bacterial Panel for use on the BD MAX System. [More]
Scientists identify benign bacterium that blocks Salmonella from colonizing raw tomatoes

Scientists identify benign bacterium that blocks Salmonella from colonizing raw tomatoes

Scientists from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have identified a benign bacterium that shows promise in blocking Salmonella from colonizing raw tomatoes. [More]

Denmark and China announce food safety partnership

On 25 April, a new memorandum of understanding between DTU and CFSA was signed by Martin Bends-e, DTU Senior Vice President and Dean, at a ceremony in Beijing witnessed by HRH Queen Margrethe II and Prince Henrik of Denmark. [More]
Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

In the United States, approximately 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year, and most of those cases are entirely preventable, a researcher from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston concluded in a New England Journal of Medicine review article. [More]
Sandia develops credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge to small business makes

Sandia develops credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge to small business makes

A credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge developed at Sandia National Laboratories and recently licensed to a small business makes testing safer, easier, faster and cheaper. [More]
Hospital kitchens remain source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria

Hospital kitchens remain source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria

After handling raw poultry, hands of food preparers and cutting boards remain a source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria, such as E. coli that produce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). [More]