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Salmonella is actually a group of bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria. Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States. Salmonella germs have been known to cause illness for over 100 years. They were discovered by an American scientist named Salmon, for whom they are named.
Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health, in partnership with vaccine manufacturer PaxVax, Inc. is participating in a clinical study to test the effects of the oral typhoid vaccination, Vivotif (Typhoid Vaccine Live Oral Ty21a). The study will look at the side effects that could occur when taking Vivotif across the range of approved potencies. [More]
Study reveals potential health risks associated with burning of incense in indoor environments

Study reveals potential health risks associated with burning of incense in indoor environments

The burning of incense might need to come with a health warning. This follows the first study evaluating the health risks associated with its indoor use. The effects of incense and cigarette smoke were also compared, and made for some surprising results. The research was led by Rong Zhou of the South China University of Technology and the China Tobacco Guangdong Industrial Company in China, and is published in Springer's journal Environmental Chemistry Letters. [More]
Trojan horse strategy may elucidate why antibiotics ineffective in some patients

Trojan horse strategy may elucidate why antibiotics ineffective in some patients

Bacteria are pretty wily creatures. Take for example, an organism such as Salmonella, which which are killed by antibiotics in lab tests, but can become highly resistant in the body. [More]
Analysis of toilet waste from international aircraft may lead to global surveillance of infectious diseases

Analysis of toilet waste from international aircraft may lead to global surveillance of infectious diseases

Current international disease surveillance systems are mainly based on reports made by doctors after treatment of infected patients. As a consequence, disease-causing microorganisms and resistance bacteria have time to spread and make large population groups sick before they are detected. [More]
UBC scientists reveal new weapon to combat malnutrition

UBC scientists reveal new weapon to combat malnutrition

UBC scientists have opened the doors to new research into malnutrition by creating an animal model that replicates the imbalance of gut bacteria associated with the difficult-to-treat disease. [More]
Prokarium receives funding to complete pre-clinical development of new Chlamydia vaccine

Prokarium receives funding to complete pre-clinical development of new Chlamydia vaccine

Prokarium Ltd, a biotechnology company developing transformational oral vaccines, today announced new funding from SynbiCITE, the UK’s Innovation and Knowledge Centre for Synthetic Biology. [More]
Scientists chemically synthesize ECA-derived oligosaccharides relevant for immunotherapy

Scientists chemically synthesize ECA-derived oligosaccharides relevant for immunotherapy

Immunotherapy using monoclonal antibodies is a promising treatment strategy, and it might now be within reach: American scientists have successfully prepared an oligosaccharide enterobacterial antigen for which a monoclonal antibody has been developed. The study is published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [More]
German life sciences entrepreneurs granted option to develop Aeterna Zentaris’ oral allogenic tumor vaccine technology

German life sciences entrepreneurs granted option to develop Aeterna Zentaris’ oral allogenic tumor vaccine technology

Aeterna Zentaris Inc. today announced that it has granted to German life sciences entrepreneurs with a proven track-record of funding the development and commercialization of biotechnology, an option to license the Company's live recombinant oral allogenic tumor vaccine technology, including AEZS-120, the most advanced product candidate for prostate cancer which is ready to enter a Phase 1 clinical trial. [More]
DigiPath Labs, Romer Labs to validate kit-based assays for food-borne pathogen, mycotoxin testing for cannabis

DigiPath Labs, Romer Labs to validate kit-based assays for food-borne pathogen, mycotoxin testing for cannabis

DigiPath Labs, the cannabis testing subsidiary of DigiPath, Inc., is combining efforts with True North Laboratory of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Romer Labs, a leading global supplier of diagnostic solutions for food-borne pathogens, to investigate the applicability of utilizing Romer Labs' rapid diagnostic test kits to screen for food-borne pathogens and quantify mycotoxins present in cannabis. [More]
Study provides new insights into mechanism that controls differences in gut's ability to fight infections

Study provides new insights into mechanism that controls differences in gut's ability to fight infections

Considering how many microorganisms we ingest each day, our gut has an extensive and well-developed immune system. This defense is involved in acute and chronic gut diseases, but it varies dramatically among people. A persistent question is how our genetic make-up affects our gut's ability to fight infections. EPFL scientists have found that gut immunity is not affected by single genes but by entire groups of genes. [More]
Retail meat harbors disease-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae, shows new study

Retail meat harbors disease-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae, shows new study

Chicken, turkey and pork sold in grocery stores harbors disease-causing bacteria known as Klebsiella pneumoniae, according to a new study. The research, which was published online today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, shows that contaminated meat may be an important source of human exposure to Klebsiella. [More]
NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

Christopher Colbert, assistant professor of biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $348,000 grant award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on structure-function relationships of iron transport and transcriptional regulation in Gram-negative bacteria. [More]
Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling levels of iron in the body also play an important role in combatting infection, according to a study published today in Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
Various freshwater sources in Georgia pose possible risk for salmonella infections

Various freshwater sources in Georgia pose possible risk for salmonella infections

Researchers from the University of Georgia have determined that various freshwater sources in Georgia, such as rivers and lakes, could feature levels of salmonella that pose a risk to humans. [More]
Light-based technologies help improve food shelf life, guard against food contaminants

Light-based technologies help improve food shelf life, guard against food contaminants

Light-based technologies are emerging as tools to enhance food shelf life and guard against food contaminants but more research needs to be done, warn food scientists at a July 13 panel discussion at IFT15: Where Science Feeds Innovation hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists in Chicago. [More]
Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

A study published in PLOS ONE has found that burn patients experience dramatic changes in the 100 trillion bacteria inside the gastrointestinal tract. [More]
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]
Extreme heat and precipitation events linked to increased risk of Salmonella infections

Extreme heat and precipitation events linked to increased risk of Salmonella infections

Extreme heat and precipitation events, which are expected to increase in frequency and intensity due to climate change, are associated with increased risk of Salmonella infections, according to a study led by researchers from the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]
Ron Simon & Associates files salmonella lawsuit against restaurant located in North Carolina

Ron Simon & Associates files salmonella lawsuit against restaurant located in North Carolina

Today the national food safety law firm of Ron Simon & Associates, along with local counsel Janet, Jenner & Suggs, filed a lawsuit stemming from salmonella-contaminated food served by the Tarheel Q located in North Carolina on U.S. 64 West in Lexington. [More]
RPCI-led research team to share clinical results of entolimod drug at ASCO 2015

RPCI-led research team to share clinical results of entolimod drug at ASCO 2015

A collaborative team of researchers led by Alex A. Adjei, MD, PhD, FACP, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) will share results from the first clinical study of the anticancer effects of the novel agent entolimod at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 51st Annual Meeting in Chicago. [More]
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