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Salmonella is actually a group of bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria. Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States. Salmonella germs have been known to cause illness for over 100 years. They were discovered by an American scientist named Salmon, for whom they are named.
Study shows syringe-like device acts as traffic cop directing bacteria to carry out infection

Study shows syringe-like device acts as traffic cop directing bacteria to carry out infection

A study has found that a syringe-like device used to invade intestinal cells also acts as a traffic cop -- directing bacteria where to go and thereby enabling them to efficiently carry out infection. [More]
Antibiotic treatment may allow bad bugs to flourish

Antibiotic treatment may allow bad bugs to flourish

Antibiotics are essential for fighting bacterial infection, but, paradoxically, they can also make the body more prone to infection and diarrhea. [More]
Existing non-antibiotic therapeutic drugs could help combat antibiotic-resistant pathogens

Existing non-antibiotic therapeutic drugs could help combat antibiotic-resistant pathogens

The rise of antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens is an increasingly global threat to public health. In the United States alone antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens kill thousands every year. [More]
Simple, paper-based test could help detect foodborne pathogens

Simple, paper-based test could help detect foodborne pathogens

Food poisoning is a stomach-churning, miserable condition that sends thousands of Americans to hospital emergency rooms every year. Now scientists report in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry a simple, paper-based test that could help detect pathogens hitchhiking on food before they reach store shelves, restaurants and, most importantly, our stomachs. [More]
Oral Salmonella-based vaccine could prevent Type 1 diabetes

Oral Salmonella-based vaccine could prevent Type 1 diabetes

A combined vaccine therapy including live Salmonella is a safe and effective way to prevent diabetes in mice and may point to future human therapies, a new study finds. The results will be on Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
MGH researchers identify how Shigella injects proteins into target host cells

MGH researchers identify how Shigella injects proteins into target host cells

Researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases are investigating the mechanism by which several important pathogenic species of bacteria deliver proteins into the cells of the organisms they are infecting. [More]
Startling lack of resistance genes discovered in intensively-farmed beef

Startling lack of resistance genes discovered in intensively-farmed beef

In the first study to track antibiotic resistance in intensively-farmed beef, scientists discovered a "startling" lack of resistance genes in meat.Meanwhile, in soil and faeces samples from cattle pens they found genes resistant to a powerful "last resort" class of antibiotics called carpabemens that aren't used in the livestock industry. These genes may have jumped from humans or companion animals to livestock, or could even be present at low levels in the wider environment. [More]
Research could change the way people look at gene expression, immune response

Research could change the way people look at gene expression, immune response

Research from the Single-Cell Genomics Centre on the Wellcome Genome Campus could change the way we look at gene expression and immune response. Published in Nature Methods, the new method, TraCeR, provides a powerful tool for research into immune response, vaccination, cancer and autoimmunity. [More]
New UNC School of Medicine study shows how some bacteria can spread throughout the body

New UNC School of Medicine study shows how some bacteria can spread throughout the body

Bacteria have evolved thousands of clever tactics for invading our bodies while evading our natural defenses. Now, UNC School of Medicine scientists studying one of the world's most virulent pathogens and a separate very common bacterium have discovered a new way that some bacteria can spread rapidly throughout the body - by hitchhiking on our own immune cells. [More]
Critical discovery holds key to explaining how 'good' gut bacteria promote health

Critical discovery holds key to explaining how 'good' gut bacteria promote health

A critical discovery about how bacteria feed on an unusual sugar molecule found in leafy green vegetables could hold the key to explaining how 'good' bacteria protect our gut and promote health. [More]
UIC researchers discover molecular switch that allows salmonella bacteria to fight immune system

UIC researchers discover molecular switch that allows salmonella bacteria to fight immune system

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered a molecular regulator that allows salmonella bacteria to switch from actively causing disease to lurking in a chronic but asymptomatic state called a biofilm. [More]
Researchers show how bacterial colony protects itself against toxic substances

Researchers show how bacterial colony protects itself against toxic substances

Bacterial populations move over surfaces in coordinated way known as swarming, which allows them to spread further over organs and tissues and increases the virulence of the infection. This movement is driven by the action of the flagella and the chemoreceptors, the systems responsible for identifying chemical compounds in the environment and which are anchored at the poles of their cells, forming highly organised structures, of which the protein CheW forms part. [More]
Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

The immune system exercises constant vigilance to protect the body from external threats--including what we eat and drink. A careful balancing act plays out as digested food travels through the intestine. Immune cells must remain alert to protect against harmful pathogens like Salmonella, but their activity also needs to be tempered since an overreaction can lead to too much inflammation and permanent tissue damage. [More]
Agienic issued three key U.S. patents for novel copper-based antimicrobial materials

Agienic issued three key U.S. patents for novel copper-based antimicrobial materials

Agienic Inc., an Arizona-based innovator in antimicrobial technology, announced today the issuance of three key U.S. patents on their novel copper-based antimicrobial materials. [More]
Adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy effective against drug-resistant bacteria

Adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy effective against drug-resistant bacteria

In the ever-escalating evolutionary battle with drug-resistant bacteria, humans may soon have a leg up thanks to adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
Researcher seeks to identify probiotic mixes to treat Clostridium difficile infections

Researcher seeks to identify probiotic mixes to treat Clostridium difficile infections

Antibiotics that fight infection can adversely affect the digestive tract and give destructive bacteria a chance to flourish, said assistant professor of veterinary and biomedical sciences Joy Scaria of South Dakota State University. His research seeks to identify probiotic mixes to treat intestinal infections, such as Clostridium difficile. [More]
Nottingham researchers explore viruses that can destroy food poisoning bugs in the gut

Nottingham researchers explore viruses that can destroy food poisoning bugs in the gut

Viruses that can seek and destroy food poisoning bugs in the gut are being investigated by researchers at The University of Nottingham, thanks to a prestigious new grant. [More]

Study shows pathogens can survive in dry foods for long periods of time

Researchers at the University of Georgia found that pathogens, like salmonella, can survive for at least six months in cookies and crackers. [More]
Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

A phage is a virus that infects a bacterium. People often get very confused about what the difference is between a virus and a bacterium. A virus, like a bacterium, is also a microorganism, but unlike bacteria, it needs to have a host to be able to replicate and propagate. [More]
TGen receives 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education

TGen receives 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education

The Arizona Board of Regents presented the Translational Genomics Research Institute with its 2015 Regents' Award for Outstanding Service to Higher Education, recognizing the extensive research TGen has conducted in association with Northern Arizona University. [More]
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