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Salmonella is actually a group of bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria. Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States. Salmonella germs have been known to cause illness for over 100 years. They were discovered by an American scientist named Salmon, for whom they are named.
Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Food safety awareness is key to understanding the food safety issues on the horizon, and clinicians at hospitals and doctors' offices play a key role in ensuring consumers are aware of the threats of foodborne illness, said the University of Georgia's Michael Doyle. [More]
Simple blood tests diagnose irritable bowel syndrome quickly and accurately

Simple blood tests diagnose irritable bowel syndrome quickly and accurately

Millions of people afflicted by irritable bowel syndrome can now be diagnosed quickly and accurately with two simple blood tests developed by a Cedars-Sinai gastroenterologist. [More]
WHO calls on experts, social media to follow best practices in naming new human infectious diseases

WHO calls on experts, social media to follow best practices in naming new human infectious diseases

WHO today called on scientists, national authorities and the media to follow best practices in naming new human infectious diseases to minimize unnecessary negative effects on nations, economies and people. [More]
Adelaide researchers identify target for developing new antibiotics against disease-causing bacteria

Adelaide researchers identify target for developing new antibiotics against disease-causing bacteria

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered a target for the development of completely new antibiotics against disease-causing bacteria. [More]
Researchers examine alternative antimicrobials to lower bacterial contamination in fresh produce

Researchers examine alternative antimicrobials to lower bacterial contamination in fresh produce

Nearly half of foodborne illnesses in the U.S. from 1998 through 2008 have been attributed to contaminated fresh produce. Prevention and control of bacterial contamination on fresh produce is critical to ensure food safety. The current strategy remains industrial washing of the product in water containing chlorine. However, due to sanitizer ineffectiveness there is an urgent need to identify alternative antimicrobials, particularly those of natural origin, for the produce industry. [More]
Genetically modified Salmonella can help kill cancer cells

Genetically modified Salmonella can help kill cancer cells

A new study has demonstrated that genetically modified Salmonella can be used to kill cancer cells. The study is published in this week's issue of mBio, an American Society for Microbiology online-only, open access journal. [More]
New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data on the harm caused by foodborne illnesses underscore the global threats posed by unsafe foods, and the need for coordinated, cross-border action across the entire food supply chain, according to WHO, which next week is dedicating its annual World Health Day to the issue of food safety. [More]
Researchers reveal risks of drinking raw milk

Researchers reveal risks of drinking raw milk

An analysis conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) found that the risks of drinking raw (unpasteurized) cow's milk are significant. Consumers are nearly 100 times more likely to get foodborne illness from drinking raw milk than they are from drinking pasteurized milk. [More]
Researchers take images of tiny molecular machine that bacteria use to infect host cells

Researchers take images of tiny molecular machine that bacteria use to infect host cells

Armed with a microscope capable of zooming in on organisms measured in billionths of a meter, scientists report they are the first to observe one of the tiny molecular machines that bacteria use to infect host cells. Findings appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Ready to reconstitute BPW adds convenient option to support high throughput Salmonella testing in chocolate production

Ready to reconstitute BPW adds convenient option to support high throughput Salmonella testing in chocolate production

The discovery of Salmonella in one batch of a particular chocolate product, which prompted a recent recall, is a reminder of the importance of this pathogen in confectionery products. [More]
Standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria pathogen, study shows

Standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria pathogen, study shows

Purdue University research shows that standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria monocytogenes bacteria, which can cause a potentially fatal disease in people with vulnerable immune systems. [More]

Most home chefs engage in risky food practices

If you're gearing up for a big Super Bowl bash, you might want to consult the best food-handling practices before preparing that feast. New research from Kansas State University finds that most home chefs drop the ball on food safety. [More]
INRS researchers to use new specialized equipment to study environmental equity, male infertility

INRS researchers to use new specialized equipment to study environmental equity, male infertility

With the acquisition of new specialized equipment, INRS researchers Philippe Apparicio, Géraldine Delbès, and Maritza Jaramillo and their teams will be able to advance knowledge and train highly qualified people in the fields of environmental equity, reproductive toxicology, and the treatment of infections. They received a total of over $1 million from the Quebec government and the John R. Evans Leaders Fund of the Canadian Foundation for Innovation. [More]
COMPARE project aims to speed up global response to infectious disease outbreaks

COMPARE project aims to speed up global response to infectious disease outbreaks

A large EU project intends to speed up the detection of and response to disease outbreaks among humans and animals worldwide through the use of new genome technology. The aim is to reduce the impact and cost of disease outbreaks. To that end 28 European partners, including the Technical University of Denmark, have received more than 20 million euro in funding from the EU. [More]
Third annual Food Labs Conference to be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015

Third annual Food Labs Conference to be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015

The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to announce the third annual Food Labs Conference, the only food conference focused on the food laboratory, will be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The co-location of the two conferences provides that the registration fee to attend the two-day Food Lab Conference, March. 9-10, will also include unlimited week long admission to the Pittcon exposition floor and technical program. [More]
First successful vaccination of deer against chronic wasting disease

First successful vaccination of deer against chronic wasting disease

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere say that a vaccination they have developed to fight a brain-based, wasting syndrome among deer and other animals may hold promise on two additional fronts: Protecting U.S. livestock from contracting the disease, and preventing similar brain infections in humans. [More]
Study offers insights into mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides

Study offers insights into mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides

Antimicrobial peptides are a distinctive class of potent, broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by the body's innate immune system--the first line of defense against disease-causing microbes. [More]
Scientists discover how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves, others from antibiotics

Scientists discover how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves, others from antibiotics

Scientists from the Institute of Food Research and the University of East Anglia have discovered how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves and others in the gut from antibiotics. [More]
Experiments to probe bacteria virulence in low gravity of space station

Experiments to probe bacteria virulence in low gravity of space station

The University of Colorado Boulder will fly state-of-the-art hardware on the commercial SpaceX Dragon spacecraft launching to the International Space Station Dec. 19 to support experiments designed to better understand why the virulence of some pathogens increases in the low gravity of space. [More]
Researchers test new nanopore DNA sequencing technology to detect cause of antibiotic resistance

Researchers test new nanopore DNA sequencing technology to detect cause of antibiotic resistance

New nanopore DNA sequencing technology on a device the size of a USB stick could be used to diagnose infection - according to new research from the University of East Anglia and Public Health England. [More]
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