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Salmonella is actually a group of bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria. Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States. Salmonella germs have been known to cause illness for over 100 years. They were discovered by an American scientist named Salmon, for whom they are named.
Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

In the United States, approximately 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year, and most of those cases are entirely preventable, a researcher from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston concluded in a New England Journal of Medicine review article. [More]
Sandia develops credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge to small business makes

Sandia develops credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge to small business makes

A credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge developed at Sandia National Laboratories and recently licensed to a small business makes testing safer, easier, faster and cheaper. [More]
Hospital kitchens remain source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria

Hospital kitchens remain source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria

After handling raw poultry, hands of food preparers and cutting boards remain a source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria, such as E. coli that produce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). [More]
ASU scientist selected as 2014 recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award

ASU scientist selected as 2014 recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award

Roy Curtiss III, a scientist at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, has been selected as the 2014 recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Findings suggest that IBS is linked to detectable gut microbiota alterations

Findings suggest that IBS is linked to detectable gut microbiota alterations

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) belongs to the most widespread diseases in Western countries, causing up to sixty per cent of the workload of gastrointestinal physicians. One of the most frequent symptoms of IBS is bloating, which reduces quality of life considerably as patients perceive it as particularly bothersome. [More]
New PhoneSoap Charger is most effective way to kill bacteria growing on cell phones

New PhoneSoap Charger is most effective way to kill bacteria growing on cell phones

Cell phones have become our constant companions, and as a result, they are exposed to many bacteria and viruses. When we open a door, shake hands, use an ATM or dozens of other daily tasks, our hands come in contact with germs, and numerous studies have shown that a significant number of bacteria, such as the flu virus, staph, strep, E. coli, and salmonella, are transferred from our hands to our cell phones every time we pick them up. [More]
Studies indicate that harvested rainwater frequently harbors pathogens

Studies indicate that harvested rainwater frequently harbors pathogens

South Africa has been financing domestic rainwater harvesting tanks in informal low-income settlements and rural areas in five of that nation's nine provinces. But pathogens inhabit such harvested rainwater, potentially posing a public health hazard, especially for children and immunocompromised individuals, according to a team from the University of Stellenbosch. [More]

Scientists propose improved method of screening salmonella vaccines in small animal studies

An innovative vaccine technology makes use of reengineered salmonella to deliver protective immunity. If such recombinant attenuated salmonella vaccines or RASVs can be perfected, they hold the promise of safe, lost-cost, orally administered defenses against viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections. [More]

Zoetis reports revenue of $1.25 billion for Q4 2013

Zoetis Inc. today reported its financial results for the fourth quarter and full year 2013. The company reported revenue of $1.25 billion for the fourth quarter of 2013, an increase of 7% from the fourth quarter of 2012. Revenue reflected an operational increase of 9%, with foreign currency having a negative impact of 2 percentage points. [More]
Researchers develop antibiotic "smart bomb" that can identify specific strains of bacteria

Researchers develop antibiotic "smart bomb" that can identify specific strains of bacteria

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a de facto antibiotic "smart bomb" that can identify specific strains of bacteria and sever their DNA, eliminating the infection. The technique offers a potential approach to treat infections by multi-drug resistant bacteria. [More]

Scientists to develop faster method for pathogen screening in food products

The regular appearance of food poisoning in the news, including a recent event that led to the recall of more than 33,000 pounds of chicken, drives home the need for better bacterial detection long before meats and produce make it to the dinner table. [More]

Salmonella infections can reduce incidence of asthma, say researchers

Researchers from Germany have identified the mechanism by which Salmonella infections can reduce the incidence of asthma in mice. The research, which appears ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity, opens up new avenues of research that could lead to treatments. [More]
Sexual selection enhances ability of offspring to cope with infection

Sexual selection enhances ability of offspring to cope with infection

To test whether female mate choice enhances the health and disease-resistance of offspring, either through immune resistance, tolerance to infection, or both, researchers led by Dustin Penn tested female house mice's preferences (Mus musculus) for particular males and then experimentally assigned each female to mate with either their preferred or their non-preferred male. [More]
Rice University-based research develops fast biosensor for pathogens in food

Rice University-based research develops fast biosensor for pathogens in food

An array of tiny diving boards can perform the Olympian feat of identifying many strains of salmonella at once. [More]
UT Southwestern' faculty receives Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award for contributions to understanding of autophagy

UT Southwestern' faculty receives Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award for contributions to understanding of autophagy

Dr. Beth Levine, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and Director of the Center for Autophagy Research at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has received the 2014 Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award from the American Society for Clinical Investigation. [More]
Researchers uncover how typhoid pathogen manages to evade host's immune system

Researchers uncover how typhoid pathogen manages to evade host's immune system

The life-threatening disease typhoid fever results from the ongoing battle between the bacterial pathogen Salmonella and the immune cells of the body. Prof. Dirk Bumann's research group at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has now uncovered how the typhoid pathogen repeatedly manages to evade the host's immune system. Their findings are published in the scientific journal "Cell Host & Microbe". [More]

Researchers find difficult to kill Salmonella biofilms with three types of disinfectant

Once Salmonella bacteria get into a food processing facility and have an opportunity to form a biofilm on surfaces, it is likely to be extraordinarily difficult, if not impossible, to kill it, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. [More]
Scientists show how a subset of bacterial cells escape being killed by many antibiotics

Scientists show how a subset of bacterial cells escape being killed by many antibiotics

Scientists have made an important advance in understanding how a subset of bacterial cells escape being killed by many antibiotics. [More]

Scientists progress towards understanding how some bacterial cells escape being killed by antibiotics

Scientists have made an important advance in understanding how a subset of bacterial cells escape being killed by many antibiotics. [More]
UMMS assistant professor recognized with Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

UMMS assistant professor recognized with Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

University of Massachusetts Medical School Assistant Professor Thomas G. Fazzio, PhD, was recognized as a rising scientific star by President Obama with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. [More]