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Researchers find links between Facebook connections and alcohol use among college-aged females

Researchers find links between Facebook connections and alcohol use among college-aged females

Researchers at the University of Georgia have found links between certain patterns of connections among Facebook friends and drug and alcohol use among college-aged females. [More]
Study finds young whites more optimistic about likelihood of living to 35 than minority peers

Study finds young whites more optimistic about likelihood of living to 35 than minority peers

A new study of young people finds that, with one exception, whites are more optimistic -- sometimes drastically so -- than their minority peers about their likelihood of living to 35. [More]
Landmark study demonstrates link between pupils' breakfast quality and educational attainment

Landmark study demonstrates link between pupils' breakfast quality and educational attainment

A direct and positive link between pupils' breakfast quality and consumption, and their educational attainment, has for the first time been demonstrated in a ground-breaking new study carried out by public health experts at Cardiff University. [More]
Estradiol fluctuation may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress during menopausal transition

Estradiol fluctuation may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress during menopausal transition

If you're feeling a little blue during the transition to menopause, there's good reason, according to a new study being reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). The study from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that the estradiol (a form of estrogen) fluctuation that is common during the menopausal transition may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress. [More]
Economically disadvantaged immigrants of non-English speaking Latinos exposed to harmful air pollution

Economically disadvantaged immigrants of non-English speaking Latinos exposed to harmful air pollution

New research finds that economically disadvantaged immigrant neighborhoods of non-English speaking Latinos are more likely to be exposed to cancer-causing air toxics than comparable communities of any other racial group in the United States. [More]

Race differentiates beliefs in physician trust, study finds

A new Emory University study could help provide a clearer understanding of why black and Latino patients are less likely to trust their physicians than white patients. [More]
New research shows that using e-cigarettes related to problematic drinking

New research shows that using e-cigarettes related to problematic drinking

Using e-cigarettes is related to problematic drinking, according to new research published in Addictive Behaviors. In a study involving around 1400 people, researchers also found that more women than men use e-cigarettes socially, opposite to patterns seen in regular cigarette smoking. [More]
UW researcher reveals how cancer diagnosis affects employment, income of individuals and families

UW researcher reveals how cancer diagnosis affects employment, income of individuals and families

A new analysis by University of Wyoming researcher Anna Zajacova indicates that when American adults are diagnosed with cancer, they experience significant decreases in the probability of working, in the number of hours they work and, correspondingly, in their incomes. [More]
New study shows value of educating OB/GYN residents to address menopause-related health issues

New study shows value of educating OB/GYN residents to address menopause-related health issues

Despite the fact that nearly two million women every year reach menopause (that's equivalent to 6,000 women each day), many experts agree that OB/GYN residents are not being properly prepared to address menopause-related health issues. [More]
Perimenopausal women at greater risk for developing insomnia

Perimenopausal women at greater risk for developing insomnia

Millions of women may likely be sleep-deprived. It's already a known fact that women are more predisposed to insomnia. Now a new study presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society earlier this month suggests that perimenopausal women have an even greater risk for developing insomnia. Considering that perimenopause will affect roughly 500 million women within the next decade, that's a lot of tired women. [More]
HDL not so good in protecting women against atherosclerosis, study shows

HDL not so good in protecting women against atherosclerosis, study shows

What has previously been known as good cholesterol--high density lipoprotein (HDL)--has now been shown to be not so good in protecting women against atherosclerosis while they are transitioning through menopause. That's according to a new study from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health that was presented last week at the annual meeting of The North American Menopause Society in Las Vegas. [More]
Survey: One-third of US women use compounded hormones at menopause

Survey: One-third of US women use compounded hormones at menopause

A third of US women who take hormones at menopause are using compounded hormones, shows a new national survey. These women commonly--and mistakenly--think these hormones are safer and offer more benefits than FDA-approved therapies. [More]
Discrimination leads to dangerous health consequences among transgender Americans

Discrimination leads to dangerous health consequences among transgender Americans

Despite a surge in public attention toward the transgender population, transgender adults continue to face both major and daily discrimination that often directly leads to dangerous health consequences. [More]
NAMS panel provides recommendations to help women manage menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms

NAMS panel provides recommendations to help women manage menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms

Some three-quarters of North American women have menopausal hot flashes, but many cannot use hormones for medical reasons or choose not to. Numerous products and techniques are promoted for hot flashes, but do they work, and are they safe? To answer these questions, a North American Menopause Society panel of experts weighed the evidence and made recommendations in a position statement, "Nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms," published online today in the Society's journal, Menopause. [More]
NAMS recognizes outstanding contributions to the field of women's health, menopause

NAMS recognizes outstanding contributions to the field of women's health, menopause

The North American Menopause Society is pleased to announce the recipients of the Society's 2015 awards that recognize outstanding contributions to the field of women's health and menopause. The recipients will be acknowledged during the NAMS 26th Annual Meeting, in Las Vegas, NV, from September 30 through October 3, 2015. [More]
Study explores relationship between mental health and parenting

Study explores relationship between mental health and parenting

The effects of parenthood on mental health are complex, but a new study published in Health Sociology Review reveals a different angle to the relationship: how a person's mental health at 16 influences whether or not he or she becomes a parent, as well as whether or not parenthood has an effect on that mental health going forward. [More]
Latest edition of ‘The Menopause Guidebook’ helps women looking for answers to common questions

Latest edition of ‘The Menopause Guidebook’ helps women looking for answers to common questions

There is much debate surrounding how a woman entering the stages of menopause, or in the throes of this life stage, can or should manage symptoms, and now there are more options than ever before, adding extra confusion to the mix. [More]
Children exposed to toxic air pollutants at home more likely to have lower GPAs

Children exposed to toxic air pollutants at home more likely to have lower GPAs

A University of Texas at El Paso study on children's health has found that fourth and fifth graders who are exposed to toxic air pollutants at home are more likely to have lower GPAs. [More]

Blind people categorize many fewer people by race compared to sighted people

Most people who meet a new acquaintance, or merely pass someone on the street, need only a glance to categorize that person as a particular race. But, sociologist Asia Friedman wondered, what can we learn about that automatic visual processing from people who are unable to see? Friedman, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Delaware, set out to explore that question by interviewing 25 individuals who are blind. She will present her findings in a study at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]

Women's sexuality may be more flexible, adaptive than men's, study reveals

Romantic opportunities appear to influence women's sexual identities -- but not men's, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]
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