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Aggression influences new nerve cell production in the brain

Aggression influences new nerve cell production in the brain

A group of neurobiologists from Russia and the USA, including Dmitry Smagin, Tatyana Michurina, and Grigori Enikolopov from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, have proven experimentally that aggression has an influence on the production of new nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Parental debt may have adverse effects on socioemotional well-being of children

Parental debt may have adverse effects on socioemotional well-being of children

Certain types of debt that parents take on may have adverse effects on children's socioemotional well-being according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and Dartmouth published by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Mexican immigrant children's diet different from their mothers'

Mexican immigrant children's diet different from their mothers'

The diet of Mexican immigrant children in the U.S. is different from what their mothers eat, according to Penn State sociologists, and that may mean kids are trading in the generally healthy diet of their moms for less nutritious American fare. [More]
Fitness DVDs could diminish user's hope and potentially cause psychological harm

Fitness DVDs could diminish user's hope and potentially cause psychological harm

Using fitness DVDs to work out at home may seem like a good way to get started on new exercise goals this year, but those DVDs may also include negative imagery and demotivating language. [More]
New phase III trial takes intravaginal DHEA a step closer to approval

New phase III trial takes intravaginal DHEA a step closer to approval

A new phase III trial with positive results is taking intravaginal DHEA a step closer to governmental approval. The formulation could provide women who cannot or do not wish to use intravaginal estrogen with an effective vaginal alternative for easing vaginal symptoms and pain with sex after menopause. [More]
Obesity studies underestimate effects of excess weight on mortality

Obesity studies underestimate effects of excess weight on mortality

Researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health and the University of Pennsylvania have found that prior studies of the link between obesity and mortality are flawed because they rely on one-time measures of body mass index (BMI) that obscure the health impacts of weight change over time. [More]
Growing number of North Americans traveling to Europe for low-cost in vitro fertilization treatments

Growing number of North Americans traveling to Europe for low-cost in vitro fertilization treatments

North Americans travel to Europe for many reasons, including business, vacation or trips to learn more about their family heritage. [More]
Smoking bans may stop casual smokers from becoming heavy smokers

Smoking bans may stop casual smokers from becoming heavy smokers

If governments want to discourage smoking among young people, both high taxes and smoking bans do the job - but bans may have one key advantage. [More]
Study highlights strong need for weight management before menopause

Study highlights strong need for weight management before menopause

At midlife, overweight and obesity, lack of exercise, less education, and low income put women at much higher risk of having metabolic syndrome, the cluster of conditions predisposes people to diabetes and heart disease, shows a large study published today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Timing of marriage and first childbirth affects women's health at midlife

Timing of marriage and first childbirth affects women's health at midlife

A new study finds some surprising ways in which women's health at midlife is connected to when they had their first child and to their marital history. [More]
Routledge publishes second edition of Food Wars: The Global Battle for Mouths, Minds and Markets

Routledge publishes second edition of Food Wars: The Global Battle for Mouths, Minds and Markets

This October Routledge published the second edition of Food Wars: The Global Battle for Mouths, Minds and Markets written by Tim Lang and Michael Heasman. In the years since the publication of the first edition of the book, much has happened in the world of food policy. [More]
Commercialization of health and beauty can lead to Angelina Jolie syndrome

Commercialization of health and beauty can lead to Angelina Jolie syndrome

The politicization and commercialization of health issues in today's Western culture have led to growing healthism -- a peremptory idea of self-preserving behaviour. This approach criticizes everything that fails to fit into the glamorous standards of a beautiful, young and slim body. [More]
More than half of women may have vulvovaginal symptoms after menopause

More than half of women may have vulvovaginal symptoms after menopause

After menopause, more than half of women may have vulvovaginal symptoms that have a big impact on their lifestyle, emotions, and sex life. What's more, the symptoms tend to travel with other pelvic troubles, such as prolapse and urinary and bowel problems. But many women aren't getting help, shows a study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]

Researchers find links between Facebook connections and alcohol use among college-aged females

Researchers at the University of Georgia have found links between certain patterns of connections among Facebook friends and drug and alcohol use among college-aged females. [More]
Study finds young whites more optimistic about likelihood of living to 35 than minority peers

Study finds young whites more optimistic about likelihood of living to 35 than minority peers

A new study of young people finds that, with one exception, whites are more optimistic -- sometimes drastically so -- than their minority peers about their likelihood of living to 35. [More]
Landmark study demonstrates link between pupils' breakfast quality and educational attainment

Landmark study demonstrates link between pupils' breakfast quality and educational attainment

A direct and positive link between pupils' breakfast quality and consumption, and their educational attainment, has for the first time been demonstrated in a ground-breaking new study carried out by public health experts at Cardiff University. [More]
Estradiol fluctuation may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress during menopausal transition

Estradiol fluctuation may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress during menopausal transition

If you're feeling a little blue during the transition to menopause, there's good reason, according to a new study being reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). The study from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that the estradiol (a form of estrogen) fluctuation that is common during the menopausal transition may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress. [More]
Economically disadvantaged immigrants of non-English speaking Latinos exposed to harmful air pollution

Economically disadvantaged immigrants of non-English speaking Latinos exposed to harmful air pollution

New research finds that economically disadvantaged immigrant neighborhoods of non-English speaking Latinos are more likely to be exposed to cancer-causing air toxics than comparable communities of any other racial group in the United States. [More]
Race differentiates beliefs in physician trust, study finds

Race differentiates beliefs in physician trust, study finds

A new Emory University study could help provide a clearer understanding of why black and Latino patients are less likely to trust their physicians than white patients. [More]
New research shows that using e-cigarettes related to problematic drinking

New research shows that using e-cigarettes related to problematic drinking

Using e-cigarettes is related to problematic drinking, according to new research published in Addictive Behaviors. In a study involving around 1400 people, researchers also found that more women than men use e-cigarettes socially, opposite to patterns seen in regular cigarette smoking. [More]
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