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Confidence in government may play key role in public's willingness to take swine flu vaccine

Confidence in government may play key role in public's willingness to take swine flu vaccine

A new study suggests that confidence in government may play a key role in the public's willingness to get at least some vaccine [More]
News study finds association between chronic fatigue syndrome and early menopause

News study finds association between chronic fatigue syndrome and early menopause

A newfound link between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and early menopause was reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Minority stress affects same-sex couples' stress levels, overall health

Minority stress affects same-sex couples' stress levels, overall health

New research by Allen LeBlanc, Health Equity Institute Professor of Sociology at San Francisco State University, studies how minority stress -- which results from being stigmatized and disadvantaged in society -- affects same-sex couples' stress levels and overall health. [More]
Flexible work hours may help curb sleep deficiency

Flexible work hours may help curb sleep deficiency

Giving employees more control over their work schedules may help curb sleep deficiency, according to health researchers. [More]
Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

The mortgage strain of American home ownership can lead to poor health but a new study finds that the inverse may also be true-- changes in health can serve as a predictor to mortgage distress. [More]
Lack of information increases depression risk in people recovering from stroke

Lack of information increases depression risk in people recovering from stroke

People recovering from a stroke and living at home have generally a higher risk of suffering from depression. According to researchers lack of information is often a major concern for patients and this frequently contributes to their depression. This is the result of a new study from health sociologists of the University of Luxembourg. [More]
People urged to seek healthy eating information from registered dietitian nutritionists

People urged to seek healthy eating information from registered dietitian nutritionists

For many people, the New Year is an opportunity for a fresh look at life - a time to resolve to return to or even begin a healthy lifestyle. [More]
New multidisciplinary publication presents current findings on healthy aging

New multidisciplinary publication presents current findings on healthy aging

The way people age is determined by many factors including lifestyle, health conditions, genetics but also socioeconomic position, social cohesion and even the current national economic situation. [More]
Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

The new recipients of Germany's most prestigious research funding prize have been announced. In Bonn today, the Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) decided to award the 2015 Leibniz Prize to eight researchers. [More]
Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Eliminating health disparities between races is a goal of many groups and organizations, but a team of sociologists suggests that finding the reasons for the differences in the timing of black and white deaths may be trickier than once thought. [More]
New report finds that American children are generally safer, better-educated

New report finds that American children are generally safer, better-educated

American children are generally safer and better-educated than they have been in 20 years, a new report from Duke University finds. [More]
Experts expose fundamental role of chaos and complexity in biological information processing

Experts expose fundamental role of chaos and complexity in biological information processing

The interdisciplinary approach to problems that till recently were addressed in the hermetic framework of distinct disciplines such as physics, informatics, biology or sociology constitutes today one of the most active and innovative areas of science, where fundamental issues meet problems of everyday concern. [More]
Surprise WHI finding points to age, not menopause, as a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

Surprise WHI finding points to age, not menopause, as a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

Removing ovaries at hysterectomy does not increase a woman's risk of pelvic organ prolapse after menopause. In fact, removing ovaries lowers the risk of prolapse. This surprising finding from a Women's Health Initiative study was published online this week in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Genom Austria project to explore impact of genome sequencing on science and society

Genom Austria project to explore impact of genome sequencing on science and society

In many countries, genome sequencing technology is now starting to become available in the clinic, where it helps to diagnose rare Mendelian diseases and contributes to personalized cancer therapy. The analysis of personal genomes also creates unprecedented opportunities for predictive health counseling, ancestry research, and many more applications that are just starting to emerge. [More]

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men, according to a new study from University of Texas at Austin sociologist Tetyana Pudrovska. [More]
Medical school applicants anxious about new MCAT

Medical school applicants anxious about new MCAT

One of the biggest hurdles that college students face if they want to go to medical school is the MCAT - the Medical College Admission Test. The one-day standardized multiple-choice exam, which takes more than five hours to complete, is required for admission to nearly all medical schools in the United States. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, more than 85,000 students take the MCAT each year. [More]
NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

The North American Menopause Society is set to launch a first-ever menopause mobile app designed for use by both clinicians and patients to help manage menopausal symptoms and assess risk factors. [More]
Bad sleep quality may trigger insomnia in older adults

Bad sleep quality may trigger insomnia in older adults

Reports of insomnia are common among the elderly, but a new study finds that sleep problems may stem from the quality of rest and other health concerns more than the overall amount of sleep that patients get. [More]
Researcher calls for concerted international effort to confront organ trafficking problem

Researcher calls for concerted international effort to confront organ trafficking problem

The author of new research into organ trafficking has called for a concerted international effort to confront the problem. [More]
Young girls in poor households more likely than their male counterparts to become obese in midlife

Young girls in poor households more likely than their male counterparts to become obese in midlife

Adolescent girls living in economically disadvantaged families are more likely than their male counterparts to become overweight or obese, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin. [More]
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