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Hot flashes, depression and anxiety affect thinking skills of midlife women with HIV

Hot flashes, depression and anxiety affect thinking skills of midlife women with HIV

Hot flashes, depression, and most of all, anxiety, affect the thinking skills of midlife women with HIV, so screening for and treating their anxiety may be especially important in helping them function, according to a study just published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Reports indicate rural women more likely to have depressive mood and anxiety symptoms

Reports indicate rural women more likely to have depressive mood and anxiety symptoms

Women living in rural communities are less likely than urban-dwelling women to receive sufficient mental health care, in large part due to limited access to services and societal stigma, according to medicine and public health researchers. [More]
Randomized trial shows injecting anesthetic near nerve bundle reduces troublesome hot flashes

Randomized trial shows injecting anesthetic near nerve bundle reduces troublesome hot flashes

​Injecting a little anesthetic near a nerve bundle in the neck cut troublesome hot flashes significantly, shows a new randomized, controlled trial published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]

Study: Spanking linked to short- and long-term child behavior problems

Parents who spank their children believe it's an effective form of discipline. But decades of research studies have found that spanking is linked to short- and long-term child behavior problems. [More]
UTSA and Health Science Center receive grant to prevent substance abuse, HIV/AIDS transmission among young adults

UTSA and Health Science Center receive grant to prevent substance abuse, HIV/AIDS transmission among young adults

The UTSA Institute for Health Disparities Research in the College of Liberal and Fine Arts and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Division of Community Pediatrics have been awarded $900,000 in funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) for a collaborative project between a Minority-Serving Institution and Community-Based Organization(s) to prevent and reduce Substance Abuse (SA) and HIV/AIDS transmission among young adults. [More]
Development of physical aggression in toddlers strongly linked with genetic factors

Development of physical aggression in toddlers strongly linked with genetic factors

The development of physical aggression in toddlers is strongly associated genetic factors and to a lesser degree with the environment, according to a new study led by Eric Lacourse of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital. Lacourse's worked with the parents of identical and non-identical twins to evaluate and compare their behaviour, environment and genetics. [More]

Study: Even "minimally buzzed" drivers are more often to blame for fatal car crashes

Even "minimally buzzed" drivers are more often to blame for fatal car crashes than the sober drivers they collide with, reports a University of California, San Diego study of accidents in the United States. [More]
New research unit at JGU examines extreme experiences in human life using biomedical explanations

New research unit at JGU examines extreme experiences in human life using biomedical explanations

The German Research Foundation (DFG) is establishing a new research unit at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The interdisciplinary group will examine how new biomedical capabilities can lead to extreme experiences in human life. [More]

Marriage does not lower poverty rates among poor, single mothers

As the United States marks the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty this month, a new report suggests one recent weapon in the battle has been a disappointing failure. [More]

Restraint, seclusion in schools are used more frequently on students with disability

The restraint and seclusion of students in U.S. public schools in response to student behavior problems are used much more frequently on students with a disability than on students without a disability, and especially in affluent school districts, according to new research at the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire. [More]
Children's movies offer discordant presentation about food, exercise and weight status

Children's movies offer discordant presentation about food, exercise and weight status

In a world where animals often take the place of humans, sugar-sweetened beverages, exaggerated portion sizes and unhealthy snacks are common. So is TV watching, computer use and video games. [More]
New studies offer hope to women who want to get sexual mojo back

New studies offer hope to women who want to get sexual mojo back

For women, passing midlife can deal a blow to their sex drive. But two new studies just published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society, offer hope to women who want to get their sexual mojo back. [More]

Study: Social ties more important than biological development as predictors of teen sleep behaviors

Medical researchers point to developmental factors, specifically the decline of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin, as an explanation for why children get less sleep as they become teenagers. [More]

Despite routine work and less autonomous jobs, blacks report more positive emotions than whites

Despite working in more routine and less autonomous jobs, having fewer close friends at work, and feeling less supported by their coworkers, blacks report significantly more positive emotions in the workplace than whites, according to a new study in the December issue of Social Psychology Quarterly. [More]
Viewpoints: Local political fallout from Obama insurance pledge; 'debunking' sob story; is single payer still a possibility?

Viewpoints: Local political fallout from Obama insurance pledge; 'debunking' sob story; is single payer still a possibility?

Democratic state leaders have been some of ObamaCare's strongest advocates. To show his gratitude, President Obama is sticking them with political responsibility for the millions of insurance policies that are being cancelled because they don't comply with the law's minimum-benefits mandates. ... Renewing lapsed policies could weaken the state exchanges as healthy young people will want to keep their discontinued, lower-cost plans ... there are other political considerations. Namely, the criticism they'll face from both the right and left if they don't back the president's directive to allow policy renewals (Allysia Finley, 11/25). [More]
University students who were spanked as children more likely to engage in criminal behavior

University students who were spanked as children more likely to engage in criminal behavior

No matter where they live in the world, university students who were spanked as children are more likely to engage in criminal behavior, according to new research by Murray Straus, co-director of University of New Hampshire Family Research Lab. [More]
Good quality care for young people with type-1 diabetes unevenly distributed in Ireland

Good quality care for young people with type-1 diabetes unevenly distributed in Ireland

New research launched today to coincide with World Diabetes Day which takes place tomorrow, 14th November 2013 revealed that good quality care for young people with type-1 diabetes is unevenly distributed throughout Ireland. [More]

Spirituality in teens linked with increased positive social behaviors, reduced narcissism

If the spirit is truly willing, perhaps the flesh is not so weak, after all. Increased spirituality in teens undergoing substance abuse treatment is associated with greater likelihood of abstinence (as measured by toxicology screens), increased positive social behaviors, and reduced narcissism, according to a study by researchers from The University of Akron, Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and Baylor University. [More]

Hormone therapy does not help menopausal women who do not have hot flashes

Hormones at menopause can help with sleep, memory, and more, but only when a woman also has hot flashes, find researchers at Helsinki University in Finland. Their study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Parent's use of digital photography shown as effective tool in diagnosis of retinoblastoma

Parent's use of digital photography shown as effective tool in diagnosis of retinoblastoma

Can parents use digital cameras and smart phones to potentially screen their children for the most common form of pediatric eye cancer? Baylor University and Harvard Medical School researchers believe so. [More]