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Being obese at age 25 places individuals at risk of severe level of obesity later in life

Being obese at age 25 places individuals at risk of severe level of obesity later in life

Exposure to long-term obesity has become more common with increases in obesity at younger ages. Researchers examined the relationship between BMI at age 25, obesity later in life, and biological indicators of health. [More]
India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with most debt-ridden farmers

India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with most debt-ridden farmers

A new study has found that India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with the most debt-ridden farmers who are clinging to tiny smallholdings - less than one hectare - and trying to grow 'cash crops', such as cotton and coffee, that are highly susceptible to global price fluctuations. [More]
Adolescent girls having romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined

Adolescent girls having romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined

A new study reveals that for adolescent girls, having a romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined it would has negative implications for their mental health. [More]
WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

A new study from the Women's Health Initiative shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Researchers examine mental health toll exacted on civilians who work with military in war zones

Researchers examine mental health toll exacted on civilians who work with military in war zones

The punishing psychological toll endured by military personnel in war zones has been extensively documented for years by researchers, perhaps more than ever in the wake of recent military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan. [More]
Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on genes of African American children

Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on genes of African American children

Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on the genes of children as young as age 9, according to a study led by Princeton University and Pennsylvania State University researchers. Such chronic stress during youth leads to physiological weathering similar to aging. [More]
Taking care of grandkids one day a week helps keep grandmothers mentally sharp, shows study

Taking care of grandkids one day a week helps keep grandmothers mentally sharp, shows study

Taking care of grandkids one day a week helps keep grandmothers mentally sharp, finds a study from the Women's Healthy Aging Project study in Australia, published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Studies underestimate mortality risks linked with excess weight

Studies underestimate mortality risks linked with excess weight

New research by Andrew Stokes, a doctoral student in demography and sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, suggests that many obesity studies substantially underestimate the mortality risks associated with excess weight in the United States. His study, "Using Maximum Weight to Redefine Body Mass Index Categories in Studies of The Mortality Risks of Obesity," was published in the March issue of the open-access journal Population Health Metrics. [More]
New analysis finds less research attention is given to diseases of developing world

New analysis finds less research attention is given to diseases of developing world

Death is not distributed equally around the world. In high-income countries, people typically die in old age of chronic diseases such as cancer or cardiovascular problems. In low-income countries, death comes primarily from infectious and perinatal diseases, and strikes at a young age. [More]
Adolescents with higher social status face increased risk of being bullied

Adolescents with higher social status face increased risk of being bullied

A new study suggests that for most x, becoming more popular both increases their risk of getting bullied and worsens the negative consequences of being victimized. [More]

New report provides link between poor health and multiple forms of discrimination

Racial and sexual minorities, women, and obese people may face more health risks because of their disproportionate exposure to discrimination, according to a new report in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. [More]
Social pressures rather than physical dangers may restrict e-cigarette use, says university professor

Social pressures rather than physical dangers may restrict e-cigarette use, says university professor

As part of the Psychology Invited Speakers Seminar Series at the University of Leicester, Professor Jason Hughes from the University's Department of Sociology will today argue that e-cigarettes, which are currently unregulated throughout the United Kingdom, will soon face legislation that will restrict and ban them - and that concerns about social dangers, more than physical dangers to health, will be the cause of it. [More]
Husband's agreeable personality and good health prevent conflict among older couples

Husband's agreeable personality and good health prevent conflict among older couples

A husband's agreeable personality and good health appear crucial to preventing conflict among older couples who have been together a long time, according to a study from University of Chicago researchers. [More]
Pioneer in nursing education receives GE Healthcare-AACN Pioneering Spirit Award

Pioneer in nursing education receives GE Healthcare-AACN Pioneering Spirit Award

Carrie B. Lenburg, RN, EdD, FAAN, ANEF, a pioneer in nursing education, will receive the GE Healthcare-AACN Pioneering Spirit Award in recognition of her career-long focus on innovative educational models, with an emphasis on competency performance and program evaluation. [More]
Research paper takes broader snapshot of returning soldiers' mental state

Research paper takes broader snapshot of returning soldiers' mental state

Much of the research on post-combat mental health of veterans focuses on problems like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression. A paper co-authored by R. Tyson Smith, visiting assistant professor of sociology, takes an even broader snapshot of returning soldiers' mental state by focusing instead on the identity conflict many face when transitioning from soldier to civilian life and how that conflict manifests as mental distress. [More]

Adolescents, young adults who fall victim to IPV more likely to experience depressive symptoms

Described by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as "physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse," intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious public health issue affecting millions of people in the United States. New research from sociologists at Bowling Green State University shows that adolescents and young adults who perpetrate or fall victim to IPV are more likely to experience an increase in symptoms of depression. [More]
Calcium and vitamin D supplements can improve cholesterol profiles in postmenopausal women

Calcium and vitamin D supplements can improve cholesterol profiles in postmenopausal women

Calcium and vitamin D supplements after menopause can improve women's cholesterol profiles. And much of that effect is tied to raising vitamin D levels, finds a new study from the Women's Health Initiative just published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Study investigates how biology, social factors interact within marriage to affect heart health

Study investigates how biology, social factors interact within marriage to affect heart health

Does the stress of marriage contribute to heart disease, which accounts for one of every four deaths in the United States? [More]

Greater childhood adversity may explain relationship and health disadvantage for black men

Greater childhood adversity helps to explain why black men are less healthy than white men, and some of this effect appears to operate through childhood adversity's enduring influence on the relationships black men have as adults, according to a new study in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. [More]

Reasons for self-employment vary across gender and culture, say researchers

Self-employment can allow older workers to stay in the labor market longer and earn additional income, yet little research has addressed if reasons for self-employment vary across gender and culture. [More]