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Study shows how people's attitudes differ based on sexual orientation

Study shows how people's attitudes differ based on sexual orientation

An Indiana University study found that how "in love" a romantic couple appears to be is interpreted differently based on the couple's sexual orientation, affecting what formal and informal rights people think that couple deserves. [More]
Efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among adults need to consider peers, not peer pressure

Efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among adults need to consider peers, not peer pressure

Current efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among young adults need to consider peers - but not peer pressure - according to a Purdue University study. [More]

Federal law enacted to combat use of "club drugs" fails to reduce drugs' popularity

A federal law enacted to combat the use of "club drugs" such as Ecstasy - and today's variation known as Molly - has failed to reduce the drugs' popularity and, instead, has further endangered users by hampering the use of measures to protect them. [More]
Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Feeling that conventional doctors did not take their suffering seriously, women instead sought out hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians, according to a Case Western Reserve University study that investigated the appeal of anti-aging medicine. [More]
Researchers examine mental health conditions of "super mom" and "super dad“

Researchers examine mental health conditions of "super mom" and "super dad“

Mental health experts in the past three decades have emphasized the dangers of post-partum depression for mothers, but a University of Kansas researcher says expanding awareness of several other perinatal mental health conditions is important for all new parents, including fathers. [More]
Middle-aged women seek extra-marital affairs, not divorce

Middle-aged women seek extra-marital affairs, not divorce

When middle-aged women seek extra-marital affairs, they are looking for more romantic passion, which includes sex - and don't want to divorce their husbands, suggests new research to be presented at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]
Risky situations increase anxiety for women but not for men

Risky situations increase anxiety for women but not for men

Risky situations increase anxiety for women but not for men, leading women to perform worse under these circumstances, finds a study to be presented at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]
Parental incarceration can be more detrimental to child's well-being than divorce or death of a parent

Parental incarceration can be more detrimental to child's well-being than divorce or death of a parent

With more than 2 million people behind bars, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. This mass incarceration has serious implications for not only the inmates, but their children, finds a new University of California-Irvine study. [More]
Some working parents experience more psychological strain than others

Some working parents experience more psychological strain than others

Some working parents are carrying more psychological baggage than others - and the reason has nothing to do with demands on their time and energy. [More]

Prayer to ease symptoms of anxiety-related disorders does not have same effect for everybody

Whether the problem is health, enemies, poverty or difficulty with aging, "Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there," suggested the late gospel musician Charles A. Tindley. But when it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer doesn't have the same effect for everybody, according to a Baylor University researcher. [More]

Scientists receive £500,000 to investigate global food fraud

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have received £500,000 to investigate global food fraud and help prevent criminal activity within the industry. [More]
Children of immigrants are 3 times as likely to have lower levels of physical activity

Children of immigrants are 3 times as likely to have lower levels of physical activity

Immigrant children from all racial and ethnic backgrounds are more likely to be sedentary than U.S.-born white children, according to a new study by sociologists at Rice University. [More]
Diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters

Diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters

A diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters, finds a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically

Study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically

If you consider your friends family, you may be on to something. A study from the University of California, San Diego, and Yale University finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically. [More]
Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

In the 2,500+ years that have passed since acupuncture was first used by the ancient Chinese, it has been used to treat a number of physical, mental and emotional conditions including nausea and vomiting, stroke rehabilitation, headaches, menstrual cramps, asthma, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, to name just a few. [More]

Resarchers offer insight into how low-wage jobs affect public health, economy in Syracuse, N.Y.

As low-wage jobs continue to show strong gains since the recession, findings from the Low-Wage Workers' Health Project led by Upstate Medical University is offering insight into how these jobs affect public health and the economy in Syracuse, N.Y., and reflect national trends in issues related to low-wage workers. [More]
Study: Behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes

Study: Behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes

Now women have yet one more incentive to lose weight as a new study has shown evidence that behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes. [More]
Sociologists to discuss economic inequality at ASA's Annual Meeting in San Francisco

Sociologists to discuss economic inequality at ASA's Annual Meeting in San Francisco

More than 5,000 sociologists will convene in San Francisco this August to explore ideas and scientific research relating to economic inequality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association's 109th Annual Meeting. This year's theme, "Hard Times: The Impact of Economic Inequality on Families and Individuals," draws attention to the many ways in which inequality reverberates throughout American society and the world. [More]

Researchers apply infection-modeling to tackle mass incarceration rates

The incarceration rate has nearly quadrupled since the U.S. declared a war on drugs, researchers say. Along with that, racial disparities abound. Incarceration rates for black Americans are more than six times higher than those for white Americans, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. [More]
Study confirms association between older maternal age at birth of last child and exceptional longevity

Study confirms association between older maternal age at birth of last child and exceptional longevity

Women who had their children later in life will be happy to learn that a new study suggests an association between older maternal age at birth of the last child and greater odds for surviving to an unusually old age. [More]