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Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between radiation (electromagnetic radiation, or light, as well as particle radiation) and matter.
SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

Last summer, SLU scientists made a breakthrough discovery about the way in which blood clots. Through X-ray crystallography, they solved the molecular structure of prothrombin, an important blood-clotting protein, revealing an unexpected, flexible role for a "linker" region that may be the key to developing better life-saving drugs. [More]
New way to understand how transcranial magnetic stimulation can give relief for severe depression

New way to understand how transcranial magnetic stimulation can give relief for severe depression

A group of UK scientists have found a way of understanding how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can give relief to severely depressed patients. TMS is used as an alternative to Electro-Convulsive Therapy (ECT), but it is not known how it achieves its therapeutic effect. Understanding how it works may open the door to better, more targeted treatment for depression and other conditions. [More]
Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation -- a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, heart disease, and certain forms of cancer. [More]
Researchers find way to screen blood samples to detect presence of precancerous polyps in the colon

Researchers find way to screen blood samples to detect presence of precancerous polyps in the colon

Canadian researchers have found a way to screen blood samples for molecular traces that indicate the presence of precancerous polyps in the colon, a key warning sign for colon cancer. Their results, published this week in the journal Biomedical Optics Express, from The Optical Society, may yield a cheaper and less invasive initial screening test for colon cancer that could complement colonoscopy, though further clinical trials will need to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of the blood test before it is routinely used. [More]
Tiny nanocrystals could be used in advanced medical imaging technologies to light up cancer cells

Tiny nanocrystals could be used in advanced medical imaging technologies to light up cancer cells

Researchers in China have developed tiny nanocrystals that could be used in the next generation of medical imaging technologies to light up cancer cells. [More]
Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island researchers awarded NSF grant to develop innovative brain imaging technologies

Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island researchers awarded NSF grant to develop innovative brain imaging technologies

The National Science Foundation has awarded $6 million to researchers in Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island to develop innovative and broadly accessible brain imaging technologies to provide insight into how the nervous system functions in health and disease. [More]
Pittcon will be exhibiting at Recent Advances in Microbiology Research:  A BioConference Live 2015 Virtual Event

Pittcon will be exhibiting at Recent Advances in Microbiology Research: A BioConference Live 2015 Virtual Event

The field of microbiology, the study of minute organisms such as bacteria, viruses, archaea, and eukaryotes, is yielding startling new findings about their effects on people and the environment. Keeping current with these advances while keeping up with a demanding workflow can be challenging. [More]
VTT develops miniature gas sensor for mobile devices to detect internal air problems

VTT develops miniature gas sensor for mobile devices to detect internal air problems

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a miniature gas sensor that can be connected to mobile devices. Gas measurements made with smartphones will make activities such as the detection of internal air problems easier. In addition, sleep quality will be measurable with greater precision, using mobile healthcare applications which gauge carbon dioxide quantities. [More]
Researchers describe new Lab-on-a-Disc device for fast and reliable diagnostics of urinary tract infections

Researchers describe new Lab-on-a-Disc device for fast and reliable diagnostics of urinary tract infections

Urinary tract infections can quickly move from being a merely miserable experience to a life-threatening condition. Untreated cases may trigger sepsis, which occurs when the immune system, in an attempt to fight off the infection, inadvertently activates body-wide inflammation that can cause blood clots and leaky blood vessels. [More]
New method helps determine titanium nanoparticles in sunscreen products

New method helps determine titanium nanoparticles in sunscreen products

Loads of cosmetics like sunscreen lotions contain titanium dioxide. These nanoparticles are contentious. Experts suspect they may have harmful effects on people and the environment. [More]
Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers have identified a new mechanism that the tumor suppressor protein p53 uses to trigger cell death via apoptosis and have shown how the process could be harnessed to kill cancer cells. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the scientific journal Molecular Cell. [More]
New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

Diseases like Alzheimer's are caused when proteins aggregate and clump together. In a world first, EPFL scientists have successfully distinguished between the disease-causing aggregation forms of proteins. [More]

Expectations shape babies' brains

Infants can use their expectations about the world to rapidly shape their developing brains, researchers have found. [More]
TTP’s elastography imaging technology provides vital diagnostic information during surgery

TTP’s elastography imaging technology provides vital diagnostic information during surgery

The Technology Partnership plc, a leading UK-based research and product development company, has made major advances in the use of elastography, a medical imaging technique that maps the elastic properties of soft tissue to provide vital diagnostic information during surgery. [More]
ULB integrates Arrayjet’s microarray technology to enhance biomolecular analysis using infrared imaging

ULB integrates Arrayjet’s microarray technology to enhance biomolecular analysis using infrared imaging

The Center for Structural Biology and Bioinformatics at the Free University of Brussels has developed an outstanding expertise in the analysis of biological molecules using infrared spectroscopy. [More]
NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

Christopher Colbert, assistant professor of biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $348,000 grant award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on structure-function relationships of iron transport and transcriptional regulation in Gram-negative bacteria. [More]
Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Silver is often used as a coating on medical equipment used for chemotherapy. The problem is that this silver coating can break down drugs. Now, researchers have found a graphene coating that will help boost chemotherapy's effects. [More]
University of Adelaide researchers develop laser system for onsite breath analysis

University of Adelaide researchers develop laser system for onsite breath analysis

University of Adelaide researchers are developing a laser system for fast, non-invasive, onsite breath analysis for disease, potentially enabling screening for a range of diseases including diabetes, infections and various cancers in the future. [More]
Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

The results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that Cognizin citicoline (Jarrow Formulas) was effective at reducing cocaine use, based on urine drug screens, in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence. The study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in Advance, included a total of 130 outpatients with bipolar I disorder and cocaine dependence, who received either Cognizin citicoline or placebo add-on therapy for 12 weeks. [More]

New findings can help scientists generate tailor-made proteins optimized for use in optogenetics

Optogenetics techniques, which allow scientists to map and control nerve cells using light stimulation, are being used to study neural circuits in the brain with unprecedented precision. This revolutionary technology relies on light-sensitive proteins such as channelrhodopsins, and researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now determined the molecular mechanism involved in the light-induced activation of one of these proteins. [More]
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