Spectroscopy News and Research RSS Feed - Spectroscopy News and Research

Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between radiation (electromagnetic radiation, or light, as well as particle radiation) and matter.
Advances in NIRS technologies offer reduced health-care costs, better patient comfort

Advances in NIRS technologies offer reduced health-care costs, better patient comfort

The latest advances in near-infrared spectroscopy technologies are enabling development of new capabilities in diagnosis and treatment of disease, offering reduced health-care costs, portability, increased sensitivity, higher patient comfort, and better quality of life. [More]
Researchers show porous silicon nanoparticles could be harmless to diagnose and treat cancer

Researchers show porous silicon nanoparticles could be harmless to diagnose and treat cancer

The Lomonosov Moscow State University researchers in collaboration with their German colleagues have succeeded in proving that silicon nanoparticles can be applied to diagnose and cure cancer. [More]
Study examines link between craving and glutamate levels in the brain of patients with AUDs

Study examines link between craving and glutamate levels in the brain of patients with AUDs

Craving consists of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral elements related to a desire to drink alcohol, and can be experienced during intoxication, withdrawal, and/or prior to relapse. [More]
Studying blood stored in plastic blood bags with Renishaw’s inVia™ Raman microscopy

Studying blood stored in plastic blood bags with Renishaw’s inVia™ Raman microscopy

The Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia, Canada, is leading the way in the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for monitoring biochemical changes and inter-donor variability in stored red blood cell (RBC) units. [More]
UCI researchers use new imaging method to measure fat metabolism

UCI researchers use new imaging method to measure fat metabolism

A team from the University of California, Irvine and supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has used a new imaging technique to measure how people break down dietary fat into products the cells of their bodies can use. [More]
Using NMR to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Dr Isabella Felli

Using NMR to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Dr Isabella Felli

“IDPs” is now a widely used acronym that stands for “intrinsically disordered proteins.” It is the term generally used by the scientific community to refer to a wide variety of proteins that do not have a stable 3D structure and are instead characterized by a high extent of local mobility, disorder and many conformers that are accessible at room temperature. [More]
New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technologies that facilitate a look inside the human body using light -- and without cutting into the tissue -- promise to enable both compact, wearable devices for point-of-care diagnostics as well as powerful new systems that provide even more information and from even deeper under the skin. [More]
Study links brain chemistry and fluid intelligence in living humans

Study links brain chemistry and fluid intelligence in living humans

A new study begins to clarify how brain structure and chemistry give rise to specific aspects of "fluid intelligence," the ability to adapt to new situations and solve problems one has never encountered before. [More]
Scientists aim to explore how gestational diabetes can put babies at lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease

Scientists aim to explore how gestational diabetes can put babies at lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease

Gestational diabetes can put babies at a lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease, and scientists want to better understand how. [More]
Researchers seek to develop inexpensive electronic nose for breath analysis

Researchers seek to develop inexpensive electronic nose for breath analysis

Researchers at the Texas Analog Center of Excellence (TxACE) at UT Dallas are working to develop an affordable electronic nose that can be used in breath analysis for a wide range of health diagnosis. [More]
New device may enable painless, effective diagnosis of Helicobacter in exhaled air

New device may enable painless, effective diagnosis of Helicobacter in exhaled air

In the future, several illnesses can be quickly and painlessly diagnosed by the optical analysis of isotopes contained in exhaled air. VTT developed its first prototype for this purpose. [More]
Using spectral imaging to study brain tumors in 3D: an interview Dr Cyril Petibois

Using spectral imaging to study brain tumors in 3D: an interview Dr Cyril Petibois

I’m a biophysicist at the University of Bordeaux and I mainly work on bio-imaging methods in the cancer laboratory research facility, mostly for brain cancers. [More]
New qPAINT technology helps develop more precise, less expensive microscopes

New qPAINT technology helps develop more precise, less expensive microscopes

Knowing the exact number of molecules located at specific junctures in cells can be a critical measure of health as well as disease. For example, abnormally high numbers of growth factor receptors on cells can be an indication of cancerous and precancerous states; specific proteins located at the junction where neurons connect in the brain may affect brain function as they accumulate or disperse. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

We started from theoretical inorganic to bioinorganic chemistry, so looking at metals in proteins, enzymes and so on. About 30% of all the proteins that we have are metalloproteins, so it’s a huge contribution that inorganic chemistry is providing for life. [More]
Study establishes copper’s role in fat metabolism

Study establishes copper’s role in fat metabolism

A new study is further burnishing copper's reputation as an essential nutrient for human physiology. A research team led by a scientist at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the University of California, Berkeley, has found that copper plays a key role in metabolizing fat. [More]
New study finds alternative approaches to target proteins sustaining cancer, Alzheimer's disease

New study finds alternative approaches to target proteins sustaining cancer, Alzheimer's disease

Drugs to treat cancer and Alzheimer's disease usually target the active sites of specific protein molecules sustaining the disease. Traditional drug design views proteins as rigid 3-D objects with active sites consisting of surface-accessible "pockets" with a specific, well-defined structure. [More]
New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils could lead to shorter scan time periods

New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils could lead to shorter scan time periods

New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils may be able to reduce the amount of time it takes to get an MRI scan. [More]
Raman spectroscopic technique helps detect unique cellular changes that occur following radiation

Raman spectroscopic technique helps detect unique cellular changes that occur following radiation

The Irving K Barber School of Arts and Sciences at the University of British Columbia, Canada, hosts a multidisciplinary group of physics, engineering and radiation oncology scientists. [More]
Novel VIPA-based spectroscopy allows researchers to obtain entire Brillouin spectrum in a single shot

Novel VIPA-based spectroscopy allows researchers to obtain entire Brillouin spectrum in a single shot

At a microscopic level, every material contains spontaneous sound waves -- acoustic phonons -- that have properties dependent on the material's mechanical properties. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement