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Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between radiation (electromagnetic radiation, or light, as well as particle radiation) and matter.
Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers have identified a new mechanism that the tumor suppressor protein p53 uses to trigger cell death via apoptosis and have shown how the process could be harnessed to kill cancer cells. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the scientific journal Molecular Cell. [More]
New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

Diseases like Alzheimer's are caused when proteins aggregate and clump together. In a world first, EPFL scientists have successfully distinguished between the disease-causing aggregation forms of proteins. [More]

Expectations shape babies' brains

Infants can use their expectations about the world to rapidly shape their developing brains, researchers have found. [More]
TTP’s elastography imaging technology provides vital diagnostic information during surgery

TTP’s elastography imaging technology provides vital diagnostic information during surgery

The Technology Partnership plc, a leading UK-based research and product development company, has made major advances in the use of elastography, a medical imaging technique that maps the elastic properties of soft tissue to provide vital diagnostic information during surgery. [More]
ULB integrates Arrayjet’s microarray technology to enhance biomolecular analysis using infrared imaging

ULB integrates Arrayjet’s microarray technology to enhance biomolecular analysis using infrared imaging

The Center for Structural Biology and Bioinformatics at the Free University of Brussels has developed an outstanding expertise in the analysis of biological molecules using infrared spectroscopy. [More]
NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

Christopher Colbert, assistant professor of biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $348,000 grant award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on structure-function relationships of iron transport and transcriptional regulation in Gram-negative bacteria. [More]
Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Silver is often used as a coating on medical equipment used for chemotherapy. The problem is that this silver coating can break down drugs. Now, researchers have found a graphene coating that will help boost chemotherapy's effects. [More]
University of Adelaide researchers develop laser system for onsite breath analysis

University of Adelaide researchers develop laser system for onsite breath analysis

University of Adelaide researchers are developing a laser system for fast, non-invasive, onsite breath analysis for disease, potentially enabling screening for a range of diseases including diabetes, infections and various cancers in the future. [More]
Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

The results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that Cognizin citicoline (Jarrow Formulas) was effective at reducing cocaine use, based on urine drug screens, in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence. The study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in Advance, included a total of 130 outpatients with bipolar I disorder and cocaine dependence, who received either Cognizin citicoline or placebo add-on therapy for 12 weeks. [More]

New findings can help scientists generate tailor-made proteins optimized for use in optogenetics

Optogenetics techniques, which allow scientists to map and control nerve cells using light stimulation, are being used to study neural circuits in the brain with unprecedented precision. This revolutionary technology relies on light-sensitive proteins such as channelrhodopsins, and researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now determined the molecular mechanism involved in the light-induced activation of one of these proteins. [More]
Transitioning infrared imaging into clinical use: an interview with Dr Matthew Baker

Transitioning infrared imaging into clinical use: an interview with Dr Matthew Baker

The CLIRSPEC network is a UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC – EP/L012952/1) funded network in clinical infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy can identify the hallmarks of disease and distinguish between diseased and non-diseased samples based upon inherent chemistry. [More]
Bacterial ‘fight club’ approach effective for finding new drugs from natural sources

Bacterial ‘fight club’ approach effective for finding new drugs from natural sources

Creating bacterial "fight clubs" is an effective way to find new drugs from natural sources. That is the conclusion of a team of Vanderbilt chemists who have been exploring ways to get bacteria to produce biologically active chemicals that they normally hold in reserve. These compounds are called secondary metabolites. [More]
MedDay announces additional positive results from MD1003 Phase III trial in patients with progressive MS

MedDay announces additional positive results from MD1003 Phase III trial in patients with progressive MS

MedDay, a biotechnology company focused on the treatment of nervous system disorders, reports additional positive data from its pivotal Phase III clinical trial, MS-SPI, with MD1003, a highly-concentrated pharmaceutical grade biotin, in patients with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. [More]
New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

Today the new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging (MOLIMA) was opened at the University Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at MedUni Vienna. Its aim is to bring about a significant improvement in the prognosis or course of a disease. The research institute, which is funded by the Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, develops high-resolution, quantitative imaging techniques to allow disease to be identified at an even earlier stage. [More]
Researchers find easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that can carry drugs to targeted tissues

Researchers find easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that can carry drugs to targeted tissues

Researchers have found an easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that are small enough to evade the body's immune system, reflect light in the near-infrared range for easy detection, and carry payloads of pharmaceutical drugs to targeted tissues. [More]
NIBIB-funded researcher develops new technique for tissue analysis

NIBIB-funded researcher develops new technique for tissue analysis

An NIBIB-funded researcher has developed a new technique that creates digital pictures of a tissue's chemical composition using light and a computer. The technique replaces the need for dyes or stains, which can be costly and require significant time and effort to apply. [More]
Discovery could help scientists reduce global vitamin A deficiency

Discovery could help scientists reduce global vitamin A deficiency

A research team's discovery of new information about how plants synthesize carotenoids, precursors for vitamin A that are essential for plant development and survival, and human health, could help scientists increase the levels of provitamin A in food crops and reduce global vitamin A deficiency. [More]
New microfluidic chip could save millions of euros in drug development costs

New microfluidic chip could save millions of euros in drug development costs

Scientists in an EU-supported project have developed a microfluidic chip that simultaneously analyses the reactions of several human organ tissues when they come into contact with candidates for new drugs. [More]
Diagnosing brain lesions in children can be challenging, report Loyola physicians

Diagnosing brain lesions in children can be challenging, report Loyola physicians

Brain lesions in children can be especially challenging to diagnose, according to a report in the journal Frontiers in Neurology by a multidisciplinary team of Loyola University Medical Center physicians.' [More]

Princeton researchers develop cobalt-catalyzed reaction that may give unprecedented access to cyclobutanes

Researchers at Princeton have developed a cobalt-catalyzed [2π+2π] reaction that may give unprecedented access to cyclobutanes, four-membered ring-containing molecules. [More]
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