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Hands-free, voice-controlled automobile infotainment systems can distract drivers, show studies

Two new AAA-University of Utah studies show that despite public belief to the contrary, hands-free, voice-controlled automobile infotainment systems can distract drivers, although it is possible to design them to be safer. [More]
Physical therapy before joint replacement surgery reduces need for postoperative care by nearly 30%

Physical therapy before joint replacement surgery reduces need for postoperative care by nearly 30%

Physical therapy after total hip (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) surgery is standard care for all patients. A new study, appearing in the October 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery), also found that physical therapy before joint replacement surgery, or "prehabilitation," can diminish the need for postoperative care by nearly 30 percent, saving an average of $1,215 per patient in skilled nursing facility, home health agency or other postoperative care. [More]
Genesis Rehab Services, St. Catherine University to create online occupational therapy assistant program

Genesis Rehab Services, St. Catherine University to create online occupational therapy assistant program

Genesis Rehab Services and St. Catherine University (St. Paul-Minneapolis, Minn.) announced today their partnership to create the first online occupational therapy assistant program to address the rising need for professional occupational therapy assistants throughout the country. [More]
Children's oral language can be a good predictor of future writing difficulties

Children's oral language can be a good predictor of future writing difficulties

Children's future writing difficulties can be identified before they even learn how to begin writing, according to a new study by Professor Phaedra Royle and Postdoctoral fellow Alexandra Marquis of the University of Montreal's School of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology. [More]
Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

At the first sign of a stroke, time is of the essence. For every minute of delay in treatment, people typically lose almost two million brain cells. Yet a new study presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress reveals that those delays - in getting the right tests and the right drugs - can be longer when people experience a stroke in a hospital. [More]
Viewpoints: Another troubled website rollout; insurers fight consumer measures in Calif.

Viewpoints: Another troubled website rollout; insurers fight consumer measures in Calif.

If the federal government's new Open Payments website were a consumer product, it would be returned to the manufacturer for a full refund. Open Payments is the government's site for publishing payments made to doctors and teaching hospitals by drug and medical device manufacturers. It includes 4.4 million payments, worth $3.5 billion, to more than half a million doctors and almost 1,360 teaching hospitals (Charles Ornstein, 10/1). [More]

Researchers create speech-to-text software for Google Glass to help hard-of-hearing users

A team of Georgia Institute of Technology researchers has created speech-to-text software for Google Glass that helps hard-of-hearing users with everyday conversations. A hard-of-hearing person wears Glass while a second person speaks directly into a smartphone. [More]
Large number of Canadian stroke patients not getting help to get back to active life

Large number of Canadian stroke patients not getting help to get back to active life

Too many stroke patients in Canada are not getting the rehabilitation they need to return to a healthy, active life, according to a new study which will be presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress in Vancouver tomorrow. [More]

MSU to provide specialized health benefits to veterans

Mississippi State University will be the first higher learning institution in the nation to partner with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to provide timely, specialized health benefits to veterans. [More]
Parent coaching intervention benefits preschool-aged children with autism

Parent coaching intervention benefits preschool-aged children with autism

A parent coaching intervention brings meaningful benefits for preschool-aged children with autism-spectrum disorders (ASD), according to a clinical trial in the October Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. [More]

Precyse displays HFMA Peer Reviewed HIM Technology and Services Suite at AHIMA 2014

Precyse, an industry leader in Health Information Management (HIM) Performance Management services and technologies, invites AHIMA 2014 show attendees to visit booth #1617 and see how it is driving the power of information with the only HFMA Peer Reviewed HIM Technology and Services Suite. [More]
Pitt researchers awarded $11.8 million NIH grant to explore genetic roots of cleft lip, palate

Pitt researchers awarded $11.8 million NIH grant to explore genetic roots of cleft lip, palate

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine have been awarded a $11.8 million, five-year grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, to continue their exploration of the genetic roots of cleft lip and cleft palate and to expand the effort to include populations in Colombia, Nigeria, the Philippines and Pennsylvania. [More]
During first debate, Iowa Senate candidates Ernst and Braley clash on the health law

During first debate, Iowa Senate candidates Ernst and Braley clash on the health law

News outlets offer updates on how the Affordable Care Act is playing in Iowa, Arkansas and Minnesota races. [More]
Cancer specialist outlines 10 symptoms that should never be ignored

Cancer specialist outlines 10 symptoms that should never be ignored

Patients often ask, "Doc, is this something to worry about?" Patients fear the worst yet often choose to ignore potentially deadly warning signs. [More]
Innovative program aims to tackle health barriers for underprivileged children

Innovative program aims to tackle health barriers for underprivileged children

Many children in inner-city schools who have long faced economic hardships also struggle with chronic health conditions that further impair their ability to learn and break free from a cycle of poverty. To address this, the H&M Conscious Foundation announced today that it is investing $1.3 million to support an innovative school-based program in New York designed to tackle health barriers that get in the way of learning for underprivileged children. [More]
Innovative partnership provides effective intervention program for substance-exposed babies, toddlers

Innovative partnership provides effective intervention program for substance-exposed babies, toddlers

Two decades after its initiation, the University of Miami Linda Ray Intervention Program for substance-exposed babies and toddlers demonstrates long-term success. [More]

More insurers to offer health exchange insurance plans

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell announced that the number of insurers participating in the marketplaces this fall will increase 25 percent. [More]
MU study reinforces importance of early hearing interventions

MU study reinforces importance of early hearing interventions

Infants' vocalizations throughout the first year follow a set of predictable steps from crying and cooing to forming syllables and first words. However, previous research had not addressed how the amount of vocalizations may differ between hearing and deaf infants. [More]
Resting-state brainwaves altered in schizophrenia

Resting-state brainwaves altered in schizophrenia

Patients with schizophrenia have increased resting-state gamma-band connectivity in a distinct region of the brain, and the increases correlate with clinical symptoms, research shows. [More]

Research findings can help speech therapists, parents broaden toddlers' vocabularies

Research has shown that most 18-month-olds learn an average of two to five new words a day; however, little is known about how children process information to learn new words as they move through the preschool years. [More]