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UA developing brain-scanning technology that could improve diagnosis of many disorders

UA developing brain-scanning technology that could improve diagnosis of many disorders

Researchers at the University of Arizona are developing a noninvasive brain-scanning technology that could produce images far superior to those obtained with the most commonly used systems -- electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. [More]
Diseases that cause skin-related problems can also trigger serious neurological conditions

Diseases that cause skin-related problems can also trigger serious neurological conditions

Diseases such as lupus that cause rashes and other skin problems also can trigger migraine headaches, strokes and other serious neurological conditions, according to an article by Loyola University Medical Center physicians. [More]
New study reveals link between tinnitus severity and emotion processing in the brain

New study reveals link between tinnitus severity and emotion processing in the brain

Tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing in the ears, affects nearly one-third of adults over age 65. The condition can develop as part of age-related hearing loss or from a traumatic injury. In either case, the resulting persistent noise causes varying amounts of disruption to everyday life. [More]
Testing for developmental delay through an app? An interview with Dr. Clara Lajonchere

Testing for developmental delay through an app? An interview with Dr. Clara Lajonchere

Cognoa's app helps every parent find out if their child’s development is on track and, if not, get their child the right help as early as possible. [More]
Researchers discover unique muscle fibers of upper airways often present in sleep apnea patients

Researchers discover unique muscle fibers of upper airways often present in sleep apnea patients

Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden have discovered unique muscle fibers in the soft palate of the mouth in both infants and adults. The fibers seem to be present in greater number in snorers and sleep apnea patients. [More]
New model of arterial thrombus formation is similar to popular video game

New model of arterial thrombus formation is similar to popular video game

A group of biophysicists, including representatives from MIPT, has developed a mathematical model of arterial thrombus formation, which is the main cause of heart attacks and strokes. [More]
UNC study reveals how specific schizophrenia symptoms linked to distinct brain circuits

UNC study reveals how specific schizophrenia symptoms linked to distinct brain circuits

Schizophrenia, a severe mental disorder affecting about one in 100 people, is notoriously difficult to diagnose and treat, in large part because it manifests differently in different people. A new study published today in Molecular Neuropsychiatry helps explain why. [More]
Researchers find mechanism to repair communication between neurons

Researchers find mechanism to repair communication between neurons

A team of researchers led by professor Patrik Verstreken (VIB/KU Leuven) has exposed the fine details of a mechanism that provides more insight in the communication between neurons. The research has clarified how damaged synapses - the connection points between neurons - are repaired to keep communication between neurons at an optimal level. [More]
Dusseldorf will be the meeting point for MEDICA and COMPAMED this week

Dusseldorf will be the meeting point for MEDICA and COMPAMED this week

In the coming week, from 16 to 19 November 2015, Düsseldorf will again become the central meeting point of the international health business. Then, for the first time on the new set of dates from Monday to Thursday (previously: Wednesday to Saturday), the world’s largest medical trade fair, MEDICA, and the international leading supplier specialist trade fair, COMPAMED taking place at the same time, are going to start. [More]
Seven researchers win 2015 Early Career Researcher UK Awards

Seven researchers win 2015 Early Career Researcher UK Awards

The UK is a world-leader in breakthrough scientific discoveries, and seven of the early career researchers leading this field have been recognised for their contributions to areas including malaria elimination, securing water supplies for future generations and empowering patients in the management of their own health care. [More]
Computer algorithm may be useful in early diagnosis of schizophrenia

Computer algorithm may be useful in early diagnosis of schizophrenia

The opinion of a qualified professional is unlikely to be replaced by a computer algorithm for the diagnosis of schizophrenia. However, additional medical evidence based on such an algorithm might be useful in early diagnosis, according to work published in the International Journal of Intelligent Systems Technologies and Applications. [More]
Study shows post-stroke loss of speech can be recovered

Study shows post-stroke loss of speech can be recovered

After a debate that has lasted more than 130 years, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found that loss of speech from a stroke in the left hemisphere of the brain can be recovered on the back, right side of the brain. This contradicts recent notions that the right hemisphere interferes with recovery. [More]
APHA Law Section honors Lawrence Gostin for Lifetime Achievement in Public Health Law

APHA Law Section honors Lawrence Gostin for Lifetime Achievement in Public Health Law

Lawrence Gostin, JD, LLD (h.c.), Faculty Director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown Law, was honored today for his "Lifetime Achievement in Public Health Law" by the American Public Health Association (APHA) Law Section. The award was presented in Chicago. [More]
New generation of incretin-based medicines allows coordinated action against diabesity

New generation of incretin-based medicines allows coordinated action against diabesity

The new generation of incretin-based medicines will allow a coordinated action against the combination diabetes/obesity, also known as diabesity, in some cases with only a single weekly dose, and with the likelihood of additional beneficial effects on other health complications related to this condition, such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]

Babies remain calm twice as long when listening to song compared to speech

In a new study from the University of Montreal, infants remained calm twice as long when listening to a song, which they didn't even know, as they did when listening to speech. "Many studies have looked at how singing and speech affect infants' attention, but we wanted to know how they affect a baby's emotional self-control," explained Professor Isabelle Peretz, of the university's Center for Research on Brain, Music and Language. [More]
Frost & Sullivan honours recipients of 2015 Excellence in Best Practices Awards

Frost & Sullivan honours recipients of 2015 Excellence in Best Practices Awards

On Thursday, October 22, Frost & Sullivan honoured recipients of its 2015 Excellence in Best Practices Awards Banquet in Monaco. With a festive ambiance and exciting Awards, the event brought together top executives to celebrate their success. [More]

Cochlear implants improve outcomes in infants with profound hearing loss

'Dada' is a first word for many babies. Babbling sounds with consonant-vowel repetitions, such as 'dada,' are common among infants once they reach 8 months old; however, these sounds are not prevalent among infants who have profound hearing loss -- that is, until they receive cochlear implants. [More]
More research needed before recommending antidepressants, Alzheimer's disease drugs for stroke recovery: Study

More research needed before recommending antidepressants, Alzheimer's disease drugs for stroke recovery: Study

Evidence is mounting that drugs used to treat depression and Alzheimer's disease also can help patients recover from strokes. But there are conflicting findings from studies of these and other drugs given to recovering stroke patients. [More]
Scientists use new technology to create gene expression map of inner ear cell development

Scientists use new technology to create gene expression map of inner ear cell development

Using a sensitive new technology called single-cell RNA-seq on cells from mice, scientists have created the first high-resolution gene expression map of the newborn mouse inner ear. [More]
Researchers match certain schizophrenia symptoms to features of the brain's anatomy

Researchers match certain schizophrenia symptoms to features of the brain's anatomy

Using advanced brain imaging, researchers have matched certain behavioral symptoms of schizophrenia to features of the brain's anatomy. The findings, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, could be a step toward improving diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia. [More]
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