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Speech-controlled nutrition-logging system may help lose weight

Speech-controlled nutrition-logging system may help lose weight

For people struggling with obesity, logging calorie counts and other nutritional information at every meal is a proven way to lose weight. The technique does require consistency and accuracy, however, and when it fails, it's usually because people don't have the time to find and record all the information they need. [More]
Study shows preterm born individuals at risk of lower health-related quality of life

Study shows preterm born individuals at risk of lower health-related quality of life

Parents of very premature babies are more worried about their grown up children's lives than mothers and fathers whose babies were born full term. [More]
Lack of UBE3A gene causes Angelman syndrome

Lack of UBE3A gene causes Angelman syndrome

The gene UBE3A plays a critical role in early neurological development. If UBE3A is overexpressed - or if the enzymatic function of UBE3A protein is hyperactive - autism ensues. A lack of functional UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe developmental delay, motor deficits, absence of speech, and, in most cases, epilepsy. [More]
Scientists identify gene associated with cleft lip and palate

Scientists identify gene associated with cleft lip and palate

Leading scientists have identified an important gene that is associated with cleft lip and palate.Experts say the discovery is a step closer to understanding how this birth defect arises, and will help in the development of medical approaches to prevent the disfiguring condition. [More]
Children with autism spectrum disorder need continued support

Children with autism spectrum disorder need continued support

9 out of 10 preschool children with autism still have major difficulties within the autism field at school age, despite having received early intervention. A majority of the parents stated that the children do not receive sufficient support at school. [More]
Early diagnosis, effective treatments can benefit children with autism

Early diagnosis, effective treatments can benefit children with autism

April is Autism Awareness Month, an opportunity to promote autism awareness and acceptance for the tens of thousands who are facing an autism diagnosis. With one in 68 children living with autism in the U.S., the need for awareness and research is significant. [More]
USF receives $9 million NIH grant to study unique treatment for age-related hearing loss

USF receives $9 million NIH grant to study unique treatment for age-related hearing loss

Researchers in the University of South Florida's Global Center for Hearing and Speech Research, recognized as the world's top research center for age-related hearing loss, have received a five-year, $9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study two unique ways to treat age-related hearing loss (ARHL). [More]
New study further supports link between Zika virus and microcephaly

New study further supports link between Zika virus and microcephaly

New research, based on data from the 2013-14 Zika outbreak in French Polynesia, further supports the association between Zika virus and microcephaly. [More]
Learning complex tactile tasks activates the visual cortex

Learning complex tactile tasks activates the visual cortex

Biology lessons teach us that the brain is divided into separate areas, each of which processes a specific sense. But findings to be published in eLife show we can supercharge it to be more flexible. [More]
Walking on two legs can be a challenging task even for young, healthy adults

Walking on two legs can be a challenging task even for young, healthy adults

"The most commonly cited statistic is that one in three older adults falls each year due to age-related changes in balance, and in this four-month study, more than half of the college students fell during daily activities," said Shirley Rietdyk, a professor of health and kinesiology, who only looked at young adults in this study. "The fall rate may be lower for older adults because they are more cautious due to the higher risk of serious, even fatal, injuries from falls. These findings also highlight that walking on two legs is a challenging task that is mechanically unstable, even for young, healthy adults." [More]
Leading dementia expert calls for greater public awareness of dementia risk factors

Leading dementia expert calls for greater public awareness of dementia risk factors

A leading dementia expert is calling for greater public awareness of the risk factors for dementia, following a new poll showing only a quarter of British adults think it is possible to reduce their risk of developing the condition. [More]
Researchers develop effective technique for studying high-arched palate using mouse model

Researchers develop effective technique for studying high-arched palate using mouse model

Researchers from the laboratory of Paul Trainor, Ph.D., at the Stowers Institute of Medical Research have developed an effective and reliable technique for studying high-arched palate using a mouse model. The methodology could expand research into the genetic aspects of this craniofacial abnormality. [More]

Kansas State University engineers developing technology to help children with special needs

A Kansas State University engineering team is developing a technology collection that can make a big difference in the lives of children with developmental disabilities. [More]
Study: Magnesium therapy can alleviate muscular symptoms in patients with Motor Neurone Disease

Study: Magnesium therapy can alleviate muscular symptoms in patients with Motor Neurone Disease

Around 5,000 Motor Neurone Disease (MND) sufferers across the UK could find relief to their muscular symptoms thanks to transdermal (through the skin) magnesium therapy, say health pioneers BetterYou. [More]
Children with autism can develop speech, gestures by listening to different speech sounds

Children with autism can develop speech, gestures by listening to different speech sounds

Children with autism and other similar conditions often have difficulties in several areas of communication. A new doctoral thesis in linguistics from the University of Gothenburg shows that these children can develop speech, gestures and a sense of rhythm and melody by listening to various speech sounds. [More]
Damage to language network structural hubs can affect severity of aphasia following stroke

Damage to language network structural hubs can affect severity of aphasia following stroke

When brain regions that control speech and reading comprehension are destroyed due to blockage of blood flow, patients are often unable to speak or comprehend spoken or written language. These difficulties with language, or "aphasia," are a common symptom in the aftermath of stroke. However, in a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report that damage to the underlying connections among different areas of the brain can also affect the severity of aphasia. [More]
New method could help scientists better predict disease-causing mutations in people's genes

New method could help scientists better predict disease-causing mutations in people's genes

Two researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, have developed a method that could help clinicians and scientists better predict which mutations in people's genes could cause a disease and which would remain dormant. [More]
Current evidence insufficient to assess benefits and harms of screening for ASD

Current evidence insufficient to assess benefits and harms of screening for ASD

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has concluded that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children 18 to 30 months of age for whom no concerns of ASD have been raised by their parents or a clinician. [More]
Synthetic RNA and DNA could reverse protein deficiency that causes Friedreich's ataxia

Synthetic RNA and DNA could reverse protein deficiency that causes Friedreich's ataxia

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified synthetic RNA and DNA that reverses the protein deficiency causing Friedreich's ataxia, a neurological disease for which there is currently no cure. [More]
Survey: Some patients with multiple sclerosis not engaging with specialist services

Survey: Some patients with multiple sclerosis not engaging with specialist services

A new survey has highlighted that the lack of engagement with specialist services of some patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is a concern for MS-specialists. [More]
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