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New UF study shows that multi-tasking may improve cognitive performance

New UF study shows that multi-tasking may improve cognitive performance

A new University of Florida study challenges the notion that multi-tasking causes one or both activities to suffer. In a study of older adults who completed cognitive tasks while cycling on a stationary bike, UF researchers found that participants' cycling speed improved while multi-tasking with no cost to their cognitive performance. [More]
Fennec presents positive interim results from phase III trial of sodium thiosulphate at ASCO 2015

Fennec presents positive interim results from phase III trial of sodium thiosulphate at ASCO 2015

Fennec Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced the presentation of positive interim results from a poster presented today entitled, "Anti-tumor efficacy in SIOPEL6: A multi-centre open label randomised phase III trial of the efficacy of sodium thiosulphate (STS) in reducing ototoxicity in patients receiving cisplatin (Cis) monotherapy for standard risk hepatoblastoma (SR-HB)." [More]
Genesis Rehab Services forms groundbreaking partnership with Zhejiang Bang-Er Medical Group

Genesis Rehab Services forms groundbreaking partnership with Zhejiang Bang-Er Medical Group

Genesis Rehab Services, a division of Genesis HealthCare, one of the nation's largest providers of post-acute care, today announced a groundbreaking partnership with Zhejiang Bang-Er Medical Group, an orthopedic hospital system in China. [More]
Upsher-Smith announces FDA approval of sNDA for Qudexy XR extended-release capsules

Upsher-Smith announces FDA approval of sNDA for Qudexy XR extended-release capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. announced that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules for use as initial monotherapy in patients two years of age and older who are experiencing partial-onset seizures (POS) or primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. [More]
Modified poliovirus therapy for glioblastoma works best at a low dosage

Modified poliovirus therapy for glioblastoma works best at a low dosage

A modified poliovirus therapy that is showing promising results for patients with glioblastoma brain tumors works best at a low dosage, according to the research team at Duke's Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center where the investigational therapy is being pioneered. [More]
CHOP Global Health Center performs first rigorous study of CP outcomes in Africa

CHOP Global Health Center performs first rigorous study of CP outcomes in Africa

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of childhood disability in the world, affecting between 1 and 2 infants per thousand. But the neurological condition tends to be understudied, especially in developing countries. [More]
Autism and apraxia often go hand-in-hand

Autism and apraxia often go hand-in-hand

Some children with autism should undergo ongoing screenings for apraxia, a rare neurological speech disorder, because the two conditions often go hand-in-hand, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen to present clinical data on multiple blood cancer treatments at EHA 2015

Amgen today announced that it will present data from multiple Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection, BLINCYTO (blinatumomab), oprozomib and Nplate (romiplostim)‎ studies at the 20th Congress of the European Hematology Association taking place in Vienna, June 11 - 14, 2015. [More]
UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

The Huntington's Disease Clinical Research Center at UC San Diego Health System has been designated a Center of Excellence by the Huntington's Disease Society of America. UC San Diego was one of only 29 centers nationwide to receive this prestigious designation, which recognizes centers for their elite multidisciplinary approach to Huntington's disease care and research. [More]

Racial stereotypes can impact the way we communicate, understand others

Racial stereotypes and expectations can impact the way we communicate and understand others, according to UBC research. The new study, published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, highlights how non-verbal "social cues" - such as photographs of Chinese Canadians - can affect how we comprehend speech. [More]
New investments may enable two Canadian organizations to improve life for people with hearing loss

New investments may enable two Canadian organizations to improve life for people with hearing loss

New investments from public and private sources in Canada and the USA, including Grand Challenges Canada and Google.org, will enable two Canadian organizations to contribute to a better life for people with hearing loss in developing countries. [More]
Essential fatty acids play crucial role in human brain growth and function

Essential fatty acids play crucial role in human brain growth and function

New research conducted in a rural community in Pakistan highlights the crucial role that essential fatty acids play in human brain growth and function. [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Existing anti-stroke drug can be effective in treating middle-ear infections

Existing anti-stroke drug can be effective in treating middle-ear infections

An existing anti-stroke drug is an effective treatment for middle-ear infections, showing the ability to suppress mucus overproduction, improve bacterial clearance and reduce hearing loss, according to researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Rochester. [More]
First-of-its-kind DNA bank aims at advancing research into genetics of stuttering

First-of-its-kind DNA bank aims at advancing research into genetics of stuttering

Scientists at the University of Alberta's Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research want Albertans to give a spit -- five millilitres to be precise -- to help find the cause and a cure for stuttering. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

A study of older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease found that those who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids did better than their peers on tests of cognitive flexibility -- the ability to efficiently switch between tasks -- and had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region known to contribute to cognitive flexibility. [More]
Duke and MIT scientists discover brain area sensitive to the timing of speech

Duke and MIT scientists discover brain area sensitive to the timing of speech

Duke and MIT scientists have discovered an area of the brain that is sensitive to the timing of speech, a crucial element of spoken language. [More]
UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

Mike Jezdimir knows firsthand how hard it is to get appropriate medical treatment for his condition, a disease of the spinal cord called transverse myelitis. He has had it for 48 years, since he was 17. TM is fairly uncommon, and many physicians rarely encounter it. Treatment options are limited. [More]
Catatonia may cause regression in Down syndrome patients

Catatonia may cause regression in Down syndrome patients

Down syndrome, the most common chromosomal disorder in America, can be complicated by significant deterioration in movement, speech and functioning in some adolescents and young adults. Physicians previously attributed this regression to depression or early-onset Alzheimer's, and it has not responded to treatments. [More]
SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

Each year, around 55,000 more women than men will have a stroke. Longer lifespans, pregnancies and hormones all contribute to the disparity, as do illnesses that tend to strike women more frequently. Crunch the numbers and the math adds up to more strokes for women, making it important for women monitor their risk. [More]
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