Speech News and Research RSS Feed - Speech News and Research

USF receives $9 million NIH grant to study unique treatment for age-related hearing loss

USF receives $9 million NIH grant to study unique treatment for age-related hearing loss

Researchers in the University of South Florida's Global Center for Hearing and Speech Research, recognized as the world's top research center for age-related hearing loss, have received a five-year, $9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study two unique ways to treat age-related hearing loss (ARHL). [More]
New study further supports link between Zika virus and microcephaly

New study further supports link between Zika virus and microcephaly

New research, based on data from the 2013-14 Zika outbreak in French Polynesia, further supports the association between Zika virus and microcephaly. [More]
Learning complex tactile tasks activates the visual cortex

Learning complex tactile tasks activates the visual cortex

Biology lessons teach us that the brain is divided into separate areas, each of which processes a specific sense. But findings to be published in eLife show we can supercharge it to be more flexible. [More]
Walking on two legs can be a challenging task even for young, healthy adults

Walking on two legs can be a challenging task even for young, healthy adults

"The most commonly cited statistic is that one in three older adults falls each year due to age-related changes in balance, and in this four-month study, more than half of the college students fell during daily activities," said Shirley Rietdyk, a professor of health and kinesiology, who only looked at young adults in this study. "The fall rate may be lower for older adults because they are more cautious due to the higher risk of serious, even fatal, injuries from falls. These findings also highlight that walking on two legs is a challenging task that is mechanically unstable, even for young, healthy adults." [More]
Leading dementia expert calls for greater public awareness of dementia risk factors

Leading dementia expert calls for greater public awareness of dementia risk factors

A leading dementia expert is calling for greater public awareness of the risk factors for dementia, following a new poll showing only a quarter of British adults think it is possible to reduce their risk of developing the condition. [More]
Researchers develop effective technique for studying high-arched palate using mouse model

Researchers develop effective technique for studying high-arched palate using mouse model

Researchers from the laboratory of Paul Trainor, Ph.D., at the Stowers Institute of Medical Research have developed an effective and reliable technique for studying high-arched palate using a mouse model. The methodology could expand research into the genetic aspects of this craniofacial abnormality. [More]
Kansas State University engineers developing technology to help children with special needs

Kansas State University engineers developing technology to help children with special needs

A Kansas State University engineering team is developing a technology collection that can make a big difference in the lives of children with developmental disabilities. [More]
Study: Magnesium therapy can alleviate muscular symptoms in patients with Motor Neurone Disease

Study: Magnesium therapy can alleviate muscular symptoms in patients with Motor Neurone Disease

Around 5,000 Motor Neurone Disease (MND) sufferers across the UK could find relief to their muscular symptoms thanks to transdermal (through the skin) magnesium therapy, say health pioneers BetterYou. [More]
Children with autism can develop speech, gestures by listening to different speech sounds

Children with autism can develop speech, gestures by listening to different speech sounds

Children with autism and other similar conditions often have difficulties in several areas of communication. A new doctoral thesis in linguistics from the University of Gothenburg shows that these children can develop speech, gestures and a sense of rhythm and melody by listening to various speech sounds. [More]
Damage to language network structural hubs can affect severity of aphasia following stroke

Damage to language network structural hubs can affect severity of aphasia following stroke

When brain regions that control speech and reading comprehension are destroyed due to blockage of blood flow, patients are often unable to speak or comprehend spoken or written language. These difficulties with language, or "aphasia," are a common symptom in the aftermath of stroke. However, in a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report that damage to the underlying connections among different areas of the brain can also affect the severity of aphasia. [More]
New method could help scientists better predict disease-causing mutations in people's genes

New method could help scientists better predict disease-causing mutations in people's genes

Two researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, have developed a method that could help clinicians and scientists better predict which mutations in people's genes could cause a disease and which would remain dormant. [More]
Current evidence insufficient to assess benefits and harms of screening for ASD

Current evidence insufficient to assess benefits and harms of screening for ASD

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has concluded that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children 18 to 30 months of age for whom no concerns of ASD have been raised by their parents or a clinician. [More]
Synthetic RNA and DNA could reverse protein deficiency that causes Friedreich's ataxia

Synthetic RNA and DNA could reverse protein deficiency that causes Friedreich's ataxia

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified synthetic RNA and DNA that reverses the protein deficiency causing Friedreich's ataxia, a neurological disease for which there is currently no cure. [More]
Survey: Some patients with multiple sclerosis not engaging with specialist services

Survey: Some patients with multiple sclerosis not engaging with specialist services

A new survey has highlighted that the lack of engagement with specialist services of some patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is a concern for MS-specialists. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers uncover clues to apraxia of speech

Mayo Clinic researchers uncover clues to apraxia of speech

It may start with a simple word you can't pronounce. Your tongue and lips stumble, and gibberish comes out. Misspeaking might draw a chuckle from family and friends. But, then, it keeps happening. Progressively, more and more speech is lost. Some patients eventually become mute from primary progressive apraxia of speech, a disorder related to degenerative neurologic disease. [More]
Bilingualism alters the brain networks

Bilingualism alters the brain networks

Bilinguals use and learn language in ways that change their minds and brains, which has consequences -- many positive, according to Judith F. Kroll, a Penn State cognitive scientist. [More]
New collaborative project to evaluate existing hearing loss treatment

New collaborative project to evaluate existing hearing loss treatment

A new collaborative project between universities, hearing aid manufacturers and other experts will evaluate existing hearing loss treatment. The goal is to improve quality - to the delight of both hearing aid users and society. [More]
CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans. [More]
Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

New analysis from a mental health care study shows that "coordinated specialty care" (CSC) for young people with first episode psychosis is more cost-effective than typical community care. Cost-effectiveness analysis in health care is a way to compare the costs and benefits of two or more treatment options. [More]
Researchers link symptoms of schizophrenia with the brain's anatomical characteristics

Researchers link symptoms of schizophrenia with the brain's anatomical characteristics

An international team, made up of researchers from the University of Granada, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of South Florida, has linked the symptoms of schizophrenia with the anatomical characteristics of the brain, by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement