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Innovative noise reduction technology SEDA helps tackle babble signals from cochlear implants

Innovative noise reduction technology SEDA helps tackle babble signals from cochlear implants

Wearers of cochlear implants and hearing aids often have difficulty teasing out what someone is saying over "babble" -- the cacophony of other talkers -- and other ambient sounds. New York University researchers have devised a novel solution: an algorithmic approach that, like making drinkable water from pond water, distills the talker's voice from a turbid wash of noise. [More]
Autistic children score almost exactly same as neurotypical kids in tests of learning new words

Autistic children score almost exactly same as neurotypical kids in tests of learning new words

A new study has found that children with autism are capable of learning new words the same way any child would—by following someone's gaze as they name an object. They just take longer to pick up the skill. [More]
Novel spoken-language intervention could benefit children, adolescents with developmental disabilities

Novel spoken-language intervention could benefit children, adolescents with developmental disabilities

Sean Sawicki, who has fragile X syndrome, can be hard to understand and doesn't always have the attention span to carry on a sustained conversation. But a novel intervention developed by UC Davis MIND Institute researchers seems to be making a difference. [More]
First small molecule targeted therapy holds promise for Usher syndrome

First small molecule targeted therapy holds promise for Usher syndrome

Usher syndrome (USH) is characterized by hearing loss or deafness at birth and progressive vision loss, and is the most common cause of inherited dual sensory deficit. No treatment is currently available to stop or slow the progression of vision or hearing loss in USH3, one of three clinical classifications for USH that are further divided into subtypes and all associated with different genes. [More]
Hearing socially meaningful sounds can modify ear’s ability to pick up those signals

Hearing socially meaningful sounds can modify ear’s ability to pick up those signals

Hearing socially meaningful sounds can change the ear and enable it to better detect those sounds, according to researchers at Georgia State University who studied the phenomenon in green treefrogs. [More]
UK charity Action on Hearing Loss funds new project to develop medicines for hearing loss

UK charity Action on Hearing Loss funds new project to develop medicines for hearing loss

Today, UK charity Action on Hearing Loss announces a major investment to fund a new project to develop medicines to treat age-related hearing loss and noise-induced hearing loss at BioTrinity 2016 – Europe’s Leading Investment and Biopartnering Conference. [More]
Mouse model offers insight into molecular, neurological basis of stuttering

Mouse model offers insight into molecular, neurological basis of stuttering

Mice that vocalize in a repetitive, halting pattern similar to human stuttering may provide insight into a condition that has perplexed scientists for centuries, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Safe electrical stimulation of the brain can enhance creative thinking

Safe electrical stimulation of the brain can enhance creative thinking

Safe levels of electrical stimulation can enhance your capacity to think more creatively, according to a new study by Georgetown researchers. [More]
Kevin Hollinrake MP, ANTRUK CEO comment on Chancellor George Osborne's IMF speech on antibiotic resistance

Kevin Hollinrake MP, ANTRUK CEO comment on Chancellor George Osborne's IMF speech on antibiotic resistance

Chancellor George Osborne will today warn that resistance to antibiotics will become an “even greater threat to mankind than cancer” without global action. His comments will be presented in a speech at the International Monetary Fund (IMF) meeting in Washington today, 14th April 2016. [More]
Innate Immunotherapeutics announces clinical trial fully enrolled and receives strong interest from potential Pharma partners

Innate Immunotherapeutics announces clinical trial fully enrolled and receives strong interest from potential Pharma partners

Innate Immunotherapeutics Limited has closed enrolment into the Company's Phase 2B placebo controlled efficacy trial of MIS416 in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). The study has exceeded the original recruitment target of 90 subjects with the successful enrolment this week of the 93rd patient. [More]
Scientists detect FFR signals from previously unknown part of the brain

Scientists detect FFR signals from previously unknown part of the brain

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University have made an important discovery about the human auditory system and how to study it, findings that could lead to better testing and diagnosis of hearing-related disorders. [More]
Right brain predicts post-stroke speech recovery

Right brain predicts post-stroke speech recovery

White matter integrity in the right hemisphere may help to predict speech fluency recovery following a stroke, research indicates. [More]
Right side of the brain reorganizes itself after stroke to help recover speech-motor functions

Right side of the brain reorganizes itself after stroke to help recover speech-motor functions

New research suggests that looking at structures in the right side of the brain may help predict who will better recover from language problems after a stroke, according to a study published in Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Deep Learning in Healthcare Summit taking place in London

Deep Learning in Healthcare Summit taking place in London

As the fifth global RE•WORK conference focused on artificial intelligence, the Deep Learning in Healthcare Summit will bring together industry, academia and startups to explore revolutionary deep learning tools and techniques that are shaping the future of medicine, healthcare and diagnostics. [More]
Speech-controlled nutrition-logging system may help lose weight

Speech-controlled nutrition-logging system may help lose weight

For people struggling with obesity, logging calorie counts and other nutritional information at every meal is a proven way to lose weight. The technique does require consistency and accuracy, however, and when it fails, it's usually because people don't have the time to find and record all the information they need. [More]
Study shows preterm born individuals at risk of lower health-related quality of life

Study shows preterm born individuals at risk of lower health-related quality of life

Parents of very premature babies are more worried about their grown up children's lives than mothers and fathers whose babies were born full term. [More]
Lack of UBE3A gene causes Angelman syndrome

Lack of UBE3A gene causes Angelman syndrome

The gene UBE3A plays a critical role in early neurological development. If UBE3A is overexpressed - or if the enzymatic function of UBE3A protein is hyperactive - autism ensues. A lack of functional UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe developmental delay, motor deficits, absence of speech, and, in most cases, epilepsy. [More]
Scientists identify gene associated with cleft lip and palate

Scientists identify gene associated with cleft lip and palate

Leading scientists have identified an important gene that is associated with cleft lip and palate.Experts say the discovery is a step closer to understanding how this birth defect arises, and will help in the development of medical approaches to prevent the disfiguring condition. [More]
Children with autism spectrum disorder need continued support

Children with autism spectrum disorder need continued support

9 out of 10 preschool children with autism still have major difficulties within the autism field at school age, despite having received early intervention. A majority of the parents stated that the children do not receive sufficient support at school. [More]
Early diagnosis, effective treatments can benefit children with autism

Early diagnosis, effective treatments can benefit children with autism

April is Autism Awareness Month, an opportunity to promote autism awareness and acceptance for the tens of thousands who are facing an autism diagnosis. With one in 68 children living with autism in the U.S., the need for awareness and research is significant. [More]
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