Spine News and Research RSS Feed - Spine News and Research

Study suggests final fusion surgery in children with early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated

Study suggests final fusion surgery in children with early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated

In a look-back study of medical records, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine concluded that a major operation to fuse the spines of children with a rare form of severe, early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated in many cases. [More]
Study to evaluate outcomes of different hip replacement techniques using mobile gait analysis system

Study to evaluate outcomes of different hip replacement techniques using mobile gait analysis system

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have launched a pilot study using a portable gait analysis mat to determine early outcomes of several different hip replacement techniques. [More]
Surgery after first-time shoulder dislocation reduces recurrent injury risk in young athletes

Surgery after first-time shoulder dislocation reduces recurrent injury risk in young athletes

Shoulder instability is most common in the young, athletic population, bringing a focus to how these injuries are best treated. Research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO, demonstrated that surgery after a first-time shoulder dislocation lowered the re-injury risks and need for follow-up surgery when compared to those who were initially treated non-operatively and experienced a repeat dislocation prior to surgery. [More]
AMPK protein activated during fasting regulates hunger neurons in the brain

AMPK protein activated during fasting regulates hunger neurons in the brain

Neurons in the brain that control hunger are regulated by AMPK, a protein activated during fasting, report researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School in Neuron on July 6, 2016. [More]
Study finds no substantial link between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism

Study finds no substantial link between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism

In a study appearing in the July 5 issue of JAMA, Blayne Welk, M.D., M.Sc., of Western University, London, Canada, and colleagues conducted a study to assess the association between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism, a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination. [More]
Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

The risk of blindness caused by spinal fusion, one of the most common surgeries performed in the U.S., has dropped almost three-fold since the late 1990s, according to the largest study of the topic to date. [More]
New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

Matthew Gdovin, an associate professor in the UTSA Department of Biology, has developed a newly patented method to kill cancer cells. [More]
Prognostic factor could help identify tumor recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer

Prognostic factor could help identify tumor recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer

Slightly more than 10% of all patients who undergo successful surgery for prostate cancer have an elevated risk of tumor recurrence afterwards - especially as metastases. [More]
Research finds significant increase in use of chiropractic services among veterans

Research finds significant increase in use of chiropractic services among veterans

The use of chiropractic services in the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system has seen a steep rise over more than a decade, according to research published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, the official scientific journal of the American Chiropractic Association. [More]
Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Although neurofibromatosis (NF) is not commonly discussed, it affects more than 2 million people worldwide. [More]
Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Researchers have developed an index to better predict which women may experience faster bone loss across the menopause transition, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

A simple model consisting of four risk factors can help surgeons to predict the risk of complications after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM)—a common condition causing compression of the spinal cord in the neck, reports a study in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Scientific paper supports concept of CarThera's intracranial ultrasound implant to disrupt blood-brain barrier

Scientific paper supports concept of CarThera's intracranial ultrasound implant to disrupt blood-brain barrier

CarThera, a French company based at the Brain and Spine Institute, that designs and develops innovative ultrasound-based medical devices to treat brain disorders, today announces the publication in Science Translational Medicine of a scientific paper on initial successes in disrupting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the use of ultrasound. [More]
Adequate maternal folate may protect children from future obesity risk

Adequate maternal folate may protect children from future obesity risk

Proper maternal folate levels during pregnancy may protect children from a future risk of obesity, especially those born to obese mothers, according to a study led by researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Study shows similarity between embryonic and reprogrammed stem cells

Study shows similarity between embryonic and reprogrammed stem cells

Stem cells are specialized undifferentiated cells that can divide and have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. [More]
Behavioural intervention could be effective way to improve health of RA patients

Behavioural intervention could be effective way to improve health of RA patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time that a combination of text messages and individual counselling sessions to motivate patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) to be more active resulted in improved patient-reported clinical outcomes. [More]
Defects in cerebrospinal fluid flow may contribute to scoliosis during adolescence

Defects in cerebrospinal fluid flow may contribute to scoliosis during adolescence

A new study in zebrafish suggests that irregular fluid flow through the spinal column brought on by gene mutations is linked to a type of scoliosis that can affect humans during adolescence. [More]
Study shows no higher cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with rhBMP

Study shows no higher cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with rhBMP

Adding to previous evidence, a study based on a statewide cancer database shows no increase in cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with the bone-promoting growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP). The study appears in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
GFE3 protein may help researchers modify brain activity, memory in targeted ways

GFE3 protein may help researchers modify brain activity, memory in targeted ways

Scientists at USC have developed a new tool to modify brain activity and memory in targeted ways, without the help of any drugs or chemicals. [More]
One-third of osteoporotic women taking oral bisphosphonates have elevated risk for bone fracture

One-third of osteoporotic women taking oral bisphosphonates have elevated risk for bone fracture

More than 53 million Americans age 50 and older, primarily women, have osteoporosis or are at high risk for the condition due to low bone density. A recent study of oral bisphosphonates, the most commonly prescribed osteoporosis treatment, found that approximately a third of women prescribed these drugs continue to be at elevated risk for bone fracture, an outcome that may have several origins. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement