Spine News and Research RSS Feed - Spine News and Research

Treatments that involve neck manipulation may be linked with strokes

Treatments that involve neck manipulation may be linked with strokes

Treatments that involve neck manipulation may be associated with strokes, although this association is not proven, according to an American Heart Association Scientific Statement written by lead author Dr. Jose Biller of Loyola University Medical Center and other stroke experts. [More]
New tool could help reduce number of future potentially fatal hip fractures

New tool could help reduce number of future potentially fatal hip fractures

A new tool is being developed by experts in Manchester which automatically searches medical images for early signs of osteoporosis in the spine by identifying fractures there and could help reduce the number of future potentially fatal hip fractures. [More]
Clinical trial to investigate safety of neural stem cell transplantation in patients with spinal cord injuries

Clinical trial to investigate safety of neural stem cell transplantation in patients with spinal cord injuries

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have launched a clinical trial to investigate the safety of neural stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic spinal cord injuries. [More]
Research report on the U.S. spinal implant market

Research report on the U.S. spinal implant market

Decision Resources Group finds that the United States spinal implant market will expand modestly through 2022 to reach a value of nearly $7.1 billion. [More]
New spinal fixation technique: an interview with Dr. Ian Armstrong, Medical Director, Southern California Spine Institute

New spinal fixation technique: an interview with Dr. Ian Armstrong, Medical Director, Southern California Spine Institute

Traditionally, the most commonly used medical devices for spinal fusion procedures have been pedicle screws and rods, and interbody cages or spacers. Each are coupled with bone grafts and limit movement while the area being fused heals. [More]
New supplement covers current knowledge and methods for management of AAICH

New supplement covers current knowledge and methods for management of AAICH

The Journal of Neurosurgery is pleased to announce today's publication of a supplement to the August issue entitled "Race Against the Clock: Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Anticoagulant-Associated Intracerebral Hemorrhage. [More]
IOM study finds U.S. medical training may not be meeting needs for care

IOM study finds U.S. medical training may not be meeting needs for care

The comprehensive report calls for major changes in doctor training and points out that it is difficult to track how the $15 billion spent by the federal government is being used. [More]
New IOM report includes recommendations to overhaul current graduate medical education system

New IOM report includes recommendations to overhaul current graduate medical education system

The Institute of Medicine released a report, Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation's Health Needs, which encompasses recommendations to overhaul the current graduate medical education (GME) system. [More]
El Camino Hospital uses Leaf Patient Monitoring system to help prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers

El Camino Hospital uses Leaf Patient Monitoring system to help prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers

El Camino Hospital, a leader in the use of technology to improve patient care, is utilizing the Leaf Patient Monitoring system to help prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers by monitoring the position and movement of patients susceptible to bed sores. [More]
First Edition: July 30, 2014

First Edition: July 30, 2014

Today's headlines include a range of health policy headines, including news from Capitol Hill on the Senate confirmation of Robert McDonald to head the VA. [More]
Activity level predicts how well patients recover from injuries after treatment

Activity level predicts how well patients recover from injuries after treatment

According to a literature review in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, patients' activity level is a strong predictor for how well they will do with certain treatments and how well they recover from injuries after treatment. Patients are encouraged to ask their orthopaedic surgeon if activity level is an important factor in their treatment decision. [More]
RPCI redesignated as Blue Distinction Center for delivering quality transplant care

RPCI redesignated as Blue Distinction Center for delivering quality transplant care

BlueCross BlueShield of Western New York today has redesignated Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) as a Blue Distinction Center® for delivering quality transplant care as part of the Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty Care® program. [More]
Misonix’s workshop "Ultrasonic Bone Surgery"

Misonix’s workshop "Ultrasonic Bone Surgery"

Misonix, Inc., an international surgical device company that designs, manufactures and markets innovative therapeutic ultrasonic products for spine surgery, skull based surgery, neurosurgery, wound debridement, cosmetic surgery, laparoscopic surgery and other surgical applications, announced that it has hosted a hands-on workshop on ultrasonic bone surgery today, July 17, during the 21st International Meeting on Advanced Spine Technologies in Valencia, Spain, taking place from from July 16-18, 2014. [More]
Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Fifty-seven million Americans suffer from low bone density or osteoporosis, a disease which causes bones to become so weak and brittle that even a minor fall or other stresses may cause fractures. [More]
Anti-clotting treatment not needed for all kids who undergo spine operations

Anti-clotting treatment not needed for all kids who undergo spine operations

Blood clots occur so rarely in children undergoing spine operations that most patients require nothing more than vigilant monitoring after surgery and should be spared risky and costly anti-clotting medications, according to a new Johns Hopkins Children's Center study. [More]
Prostate cancer more likely to be aggressive in younger men

Prostate cancer more likely to be aggressive in younger men

The number of younger men diagnosed with prostate cancer has increased nearly 6-fold in the last 20 years, and the disease is more likely to be aggressive in these younger men, according to a new analysis from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
UH Case Medical Center named one of nation's top hospitals

UH Case Medical Center named one of nation's top hospitals

University Hospitals Case Medical Center has once again been named one of the nation's top hospitals, according to U.S. News & World Report's annual Best Hospitals rankings. UH Case Medical Center was ranked in all 12 methodology-ranked specialties for the third year in a row and in the Top 20 in four specialties - Cancer, Gastroenterology, Ear, Nose & Throat, and Orthopaedics. [More]
New study sheds light on role of RPM-1 protein in neuron development

New study sheds light on role of RPM-1 protein in neuron development

In a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shed new light on these complex processes, showing that a particular protein plays a far more sophisticated role in neuron development than previously thought. [More]
State highlights: N.Y. legalizes medical marijuana; La. Medicaid paid for ineligible inmate care; Md. checking Medicaid rolls for unqualified

State highlights: N.Y. legalizes medical marijuana; La. Medicaid paid for ineligible inmate care; Md. checking Medicaid rolls for unqualified

New York on Monday became the 23rd state to legalize certain forms of marijuana for medical reasons as Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation into law at an event in Manhattan. The measure, which passed both houses of the legislature during the final moments of the legislative session, in June, is significantly more restrictive than other medical-marijuana laws in the nation (Orden, 7/7). [More]
First Edition: July 8, 2014

First Edition: July 8, 2014

Today's headlines include reports that a federal judge in Wisconsin heard arguments in a health law challenge brought by a U.S. senator. [More]