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Rush Health to provide orthopedic, spine surgeries at less cost to United Airline employees

Rush Health to provide orthopedic, spine surgeries at less cost to United Airline employees

Rush Health established a partnership to provide orthopedic and spine surgeries to United Airline employees. Under this arrangement, known as a direct employer contract, United employees and family members across the United States will be able to receive spinal fusion and hip and knee replacement surgeries at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, and in the future at other Rush Health facilities. [More]
Manipulation of signals in nervous system can enhance recovery after traumatic injury

Manipulation of signals in nervous system can enhance recovery after traumatic injury

Neurobiologists at UC San Diego have discovered how signals that orchestrate the construction of the nervous system also influence recovery after traumatic injury. They also found that manipulating these signals can enhance the return of function. [More]
Chemists design set of molecules that promote microscopic, anatomical changes in neurons

Chemists design set of molecules that promote microscopic, anatomical changes in neurons

Chemists at the University of California San Diego have designed a set of molecules that promote microscopic, anatomical changes in neurons associated with the formation and retention of memories. These drug candidates also prevent deterioration of the same neuronal structures in the presence of amyloid-beta, a protein fragment that accumulates in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Carbohydrate-binding protein controls inflammation in osteoarthritis patients

Carbohydrate-binding protein controls inflammation in osteoarthritis patients

More and more people, particularly older people, are suffering from osteoarthritis due to wear and tear on their joints. This primarily affects the knee and hip joints but also the spine. In earlier studies, scientists at MedUni Vienna Department of Orthopaedics showed that raised levels of certain proteins, so-called galectins, and their docking sites are found in patients with osteoarthritis. [More]
Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) for multiple indications. Inflectra is administered by intravenous infusion. This is the second biosimilar approved by the FDA. [More]
UChicago Medicine to open new orthopaedic center in Orland Park

UChicago Medicine to open new orthopaedic center in Orland Park

The University of Chicago Medicine will begin treating adult and pediatric patients at its new orthopaedic center in Orland Park on April 6. [More]
ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

Children and teenagers who take stimulant drugs to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have lower bone density than their peers who do not take these medications, a new study finds. [More]
Combining aromatase inhibitors with growth hormone may help short adolescent boys grow taller

Combining aromatase inhibitors with growth hormone may help short adolescent boys grow taller

Aromatase inhibitors, when used for up to three years in combination with growth hormone, may effectively and safely help very short adolescent boys grow taller, new research suggests. The study results will be presented Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston. [More]
Investigational drug abaloparatide-SC may help increase bone mineral density in postmenopausal women

Investigational drug abaloparatide-SC may help increase bone mineral density in postmenopausal women

The investigational drug abaloparatide-SC (subcutaneous) may help increase bone mineral density in postmenopausal women and reduce their risk of fracture, new industry-sponsored research suggests. The results of the subgroup analysis within the ACTIVE clinical trial will be presented Friday, April 1, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston. [More]
Wear and medical device testing seminars to be run by Lucideon and STC in China

Wear and medical device testing seminars to be run by Lucideon and STC in China

US and UK-based Lucideon, the materials technology company, and Hong Kong Standards and Testing Centre (STC), the testing, inspection and certification organization based in Hong Kong and China, are offering orthopaedic implant manufacturers in the Asia region, and their supply chain, a series of seminars on wear testing and medical devices testing. [More]
Lack of ARHGAP33 molecule causes neuropsychiatric disorders-related abnormal higher brain functions

Lack of ARHGAP33 molecule causes neuropsychiatric disorders-related abnormal higher brain functions

A research group led by Osaka University and the University of Tokyo found that the intracellular protein trafficking is important for higher brain functions such as learning and memory. The research group showed that a molecule, ARHGAP33 regulates synaptic functions and behaviors via intracellular protein trafficking and that the lack of ARHGAP33 causes neuropsychiatric disorder-related impaired higher brain functions. [More]
UAM implements family-centered care model to provide better patient outcomes

UAM implements family-centered care model to provide better patient outcomes

Family presence when a child is undergoing tracheal intubation in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can safely be implemented as part of a family-centered care model, reported a research team led by a University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences professor in the March 7 issue of JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Forensic experts establish science-based standards to identify human remains using X-rays

Forensic experts establish science-based standards to identify human remains using X-rays

Forensic researchers have for the first time established science-based standards for identifying human remains based on X-rays of an individual's spine, upper leg or the side of the skull. [More]
St. Luke’s surgeon first in world to implant Medtronic’s new, MRI-compatible neurostimulator system

St. Luke’s surgeon first in world to implant Medtronic’s new, MRI-compatible neurostimulator system

Steven Falowski, MD, Chief of Functional Neurosurgery at St. Luke’s University Health Network in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania today was the first surgeon in the world to implant Medtronic’s brand new, full-body, MRI-compatible paddle electrode leads for the Restore neurostimulator system. [More]
MEDICREA announces use of UNiD Lab Services in more than 500 surgeries worldwide

MEDICREA announces use of UNiD Lab Services in more than 500 surgeries worldwide

MEDICREA, the leading medical device company for developing patient-specific solutions for the treatment of spinal conditions) has announced the groundbreaking UNiD Lab Services have been used in more than 500 surgeries worldwide. [More]
Newly developed biodegradable polymer grafts can help repair the spine

Newly developed biodegradable polymer grafts can help repair the spine

Remember those colorful "grow capsules" that blossom into animal-shaped sponges in water? Using a similar idea, scientists have developed biodegradable polymer grafts that, when surgically placed in damaged vertebrae, should grow to be just the right size and shape to fix the spinal column. [More]
New study shows that structural changes within the spine alter vibration response

New study shows that structural changes within the spine alter vibration response

Magnetic resonance image isn't everything. A new University of Alberta study shows that vibrating the spine may reveal more when it comes to treating back pain. Teaming with the University of South Denmark to study the lumbar spine of twins, Greg Kawchuk and his team demonstrate that structural changes within the spine alter its vibration response significantly. [More]
Practicing movements at different speeds enhances certain nerve functions after stroke or spine injury

Practicing movements at different speeds enhances certain nerve functions after stroke or spine injury

Changes in one circuit of nerves, but not another, in the spinal cord depend on how quickly muscles must move to complete a task, according to results from the Human Motor Control Laboratory of Professor Kozo Funase, PhD, at Hiroshima University. The results could influence physical therapy routines for patients struggling to control their bodies after a stroke or spine injury. [More]
HIV-positive individuals in Africa with certain genetic variant have lower chance of developing TB

HIV-positive individuals in Africa with certain genetic variant have lower chance of developing TB

In the first known discovery of its kind, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine-led team has found that HIV patients in Africa with a certain genetic variant have a 63-percent lower chance of developing tuberculosis than HIV patients without the genetic variant. [More]
Reconstructive surgery using custom-made spinal rods may improve outcomes

Reconstructive surgery using custom-made spinal rods may improve outcomes

Custom fit is the key when it comes to spinal implant rods, which an estimated 38,000 people need each year. This need is especially great for people who have a spinal deformity such as scoliosis, which causes the spine to twist and turn into complex and sometimes dangerous positions. In 2011, an estimated 1.6 million people received treatment for scoliosis according to the Bone and Joint Initiative, a consortium of professional medical societies. [More]
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