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Major bone fracture may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life

Major bone fracture may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life

Breaking a major bone may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life, a new study has found. [More]
Researchers identify factors that may predict outcomes in pediatric patients with intracranial GSWs

Researchers identify factors that may predict outcomes in pediatric patients with intracranial GSWs

Researchers from Memphis, Tennessee, have examined intracranial gunshot wounds (GSWs) in children and adolescents, and identified nine clinical, laboratory, and radiological factors that were predictive of these patients' outcomes. [More]
Back pain becoming more common in children and adolescents

Back pain becoming more common in children and adolescents

According to a new literature review in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, it's becoming more common for children and adolescents to seek medical care for back pain. Even with expensive, advanced tests like MRI scans, doctors may not be able to find the exact cause for the pain. [More]
AlloSource receives two patents for cartilage repair allografts

AlloSource receives two patents for cartilage repair allografts

AlloSource, one of the nation's largest providers of cartilage, cellular, bone, skin and soft-tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures and wound care to advance patient healing, received two patents from the United States Patent and Trademark Office for cartilage repair allografts. [More]
Five Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush physicians named ‘Top Doctors’ in Chicago Magazine

Five Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush physicians named ‘Top Doctors’ in Chicago Magazine

Five Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush physicians were named among the Chicago area's "Top Doctors" in the January 2016 issue of Chicago Magazine. T [More]
NEJM publishes results of Cosentyx Phase III studies in ankylosing spondylitis

NEJM publishes results of Cosentyx Phase III studies in ankylosing spondylitis

Novartis announced today that the results of the MEASURE 1 and MEASURE 2 Phase III studies for Cosentyx® (secukinumab) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were published in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). These pivotal studies demonstrated significant clinical improvements with Cosentyx versus placebo in reducing the signs and symptoms of active AS – a long-term, painful and debilitating inflammation of the spine. [More]
Helmetless-tackling drills effective in reducing head impacts by 28%

Helmetless-tackling drills effective in reducing head impacts by 28%

The national debate around football-related head impacts, and their relationship to concussions and spinal injuries, continues to raise concern in the United States. Sparked by efforts to help make the sport safer for players, research at the University of New Hampshire has found that a novel set of helmetless-tackling drills are effective in reducing head impacts by 28 percent in one season. [More]
AlloSource expands wound care portfolio with new US patent for novel dermal allograft

AlloSource expands wound care portfolio with new US patent for novel dermal allograft

AlloSource, one of the nation's largest providers of cartilage, cellular, bone, skin and soft-tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures and wound care to advance patient healing, has been granted a patent for an acellular human dermal matrix processed to be delivered via syringe. [More]
REGENSCIENTIFIC obtains CE-mark for Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant

REGENSCIENTIFIC obtains CE-mark for Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant

REGENSCIENTIFIC announced today that it has received the CE-mark (CE 630688) for the Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant for Lipoatrophy, Vocal Fold Insufficiency and Soft Tissue Augmentation. [More]
New study may help understand how estrogens affect cognition and memory in women

New study may help understand how estrogens affect cognition and memory in women

A new study by University of Guelph researchers that narrows down where and how estrogens affect the brain may help in understanding how the hormones affect cognition and memory in women, says psychology professor Elena Choleris. [More]
CHLA announces availability of the EOS Imaging System to improve pediatric care

CHLA announces availability of the EOS Imaging System to improve pediatric care

Children's Hospital Los Angeles announces the availability of the EOS Imaging System, the first technology capable of providing head-to-toe images of patients in both 2D and 3D while using up to 90 percent less radiation than X-rays. [More]
Researchers discover first broad spectrum drug that can potently kill aging cells in culture

Researchers discover first broad spectrum drug that can potently kill aging cells in culture

Researchers from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and other institutions are reporting the discovery of the first broad spectrum drug that can potently kill senescent (or aging) cells in culture and effectively clear the cells in animals by specifically targeting a pathway that is critical for the survival of senescent cells. [More]
Memorial Hermann reminds people to follow holiday fall prevention tips

Memorial Hermann reminds people to follow holiday fall prevention tips

With the holiday season in full swing, families are finding joy by decorating their homes and yards. Unfortunately, several of these practices can result in injuries that make the holidays not very merry. Falls are among the most common mechanisms of injury with adults at Memorial Hermann Texas Trauma Institute, and activities such as hanging lights and decorations only increase the risk. [More]
CRISPR-Cas9 can help knock out genes in exotic animals

CRISPR-Cas9 can help knock out genes in exotic animals

The simplicity of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing will soon make studying the genes of any organism, from the simplest slime mold to the octopus, as easy as it now is to study the genes controlling development in standard lab animals such as nematodes, fruit flies, frogs and mice. [More]
Children with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida at increased risk for abuse

Children with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida at increased risk for abuse

Children born with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida are at an increased risk for abuse before the age of 2, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
CareFusion obtains two FDA clearances for spine augmentation devices

CareFusion obtains two FDA clearances for spine augmentation devices

CareFusion, a BD company, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared two 510(k)s for its spine augmentation devices. [More]
Novel technology can improve quality of life for children with scoliosis

Novel technology can improve quality of life for children with scoliosis

Scoliosis - typically defined as the curvature of the spine— affects around 3 out of every 100 people. While most cases of scoliosis are mild, some children develop spine deformities that continue to get more severe as they grow. An especially severe spinal curve can reduce the amount of space within the chest, making it difficult for the lungs to function properly. [More]
Combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone may speed healing process for bone fractures

Combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone may speed healing process for bone fractures

A combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone significantly increased new bone formation in laboratory animals and may speed the healing process for human bone fractures caused by osteoporosis, a new study shows. [More]
UW named a final winner in Head Health Challenge II

UW named a final winner in Head Health Challenge II

Today, the University of Washington was named a final winner in the Head Health Challenge II, a collaboration among the NFL, Under Armour, and GE to identify and fund innovations that improve head health for athletes, members of the military and society at-large. [More]
XARELTO reduces rates of major bleeding, recurrent blood clots in people with deep vein thrombosis

XARELTO reduces rates of major bleeding, recurrent blood clots in people with deep vein thrombosis

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the results from their real-world study XALIA showing that, in people with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), the rates of major bleeding and recurrent blood clots for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) in routine clinical practice were generally consistent with those observed in Phase 3 research. [More]
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