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Statins are drugs used to lower cholesterol. Your body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, it can stick to the walls of your arteries, narrowing or even blocking them.
Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

An experimental nanoparticle therapy that combines low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and fish oil preferentially kills primary liver cancer cells without harming healthy cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has approved the cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection, the first proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor to be approved in Japan. [More]
Best management unclear for patients needing carotid revascularisation

Best management unclear for patients needing carotid revascularisation

Research highlights the vulnerability of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis to stroke while awaiting revascularisation. [More]
Using statins before and after heart surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, mortality risks

Using statins before and after heart surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, mortality risks

Using statins before and after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, such as atrial fibrillation, following surgery and also can reduce the risk of death during and after surgery, according to a review article posted online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin could become effective treatment for Parkinson's

Cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin could become effective treatment for Parkinson's

A clinical trial using cholesterol-lowering treatment Simvastatin in people living with Parkinson's is getting underway in centres across the country -- with the hope that it could become one of a number of effective treatments available to treat Parkinson's. [More]
Gallstones, statins increase risk of acute pancreatitis, shows study

Gallstones, statins increase risk of acute pancreatitis, shows study

Idiopathic pancreatitis is often caused by small gallstones that are difficult to observe prior to surgery, shows a study from the University of Eastern Finland. Small gallstones were found in surgery from two out of three idiopathic pancreatitis patients. [More]
Could statins treat muscular dystrophy? An interview with Dr. Nick Whitehead and Dr Stan Froehner

Could statins treat muscular dystrophy? An interview with Dr. Nick Whitehead and Dr Stan Froehner

In addition to their well established cholesterol lowering benefits, statins also have potent anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and antioxidant effects, which continue to be identified in a wide range of diseases. [More]
Columbia University data scientists create world's first catalog of therapeutic venom

Columbia University data scientists create world's first catalog of therapeutic venom

What doesn't kill you could cure you. A growing interest in the therapeutic value of animal venom has led a pair of Columbia University data scientists to create the first catalog of known animal toxins and their physiological effects on humans. [More]
Urine-derived iPSCs model could help predict patient response to cholesterol-lowering drugs

Urine-derived iPSCs model could help predict patient response to cholesterol-lowering drugs

We all know how important it is to keep our levels of blood cholesterol - especially the 'bad' variety - in check with a healthy diet and regular exercise. Although cholesterol is a key structural component of cell membranes and is vital for the biosynthesis of certain hormones and vitamins, high levels can lead to the formation of arterial plaques, which are a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers present new healthcare tips from American Heart Association Meeting

Johns Hopkins researchers present new healthcare tips from American Heart Association Meeting

Linking digital activity trackers to smartphones and periodically pinging users with personalized texts that urge them to walk more can significantly increase physical activity levels and spark healthy behavior changes, according to findings of a pilot study conducted at Johns Hopkins. [More]
Disclosing genetic risk for CHD results in lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

Disclosing genetic risk for CHD results in lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

A group of researchers led by Mayo Clinic has discovered that disclosing genetic risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) results in lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), also known as bad cholesterol. The findings of the Myocardial Infarction Genes (MI-GENES) Study were presented today at the annual American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2015 as a late-breaking clinical trial. [More]
Patients who take cholesterol medications before endovascular surgery experience better outcomes

Patients who take cholesterol medications before endovascular surgery experience better outcomes

Rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is one of the most dramatic medical emergencies a person can face. It usually strikes without warning, killing approximately 50 percent of those who experience it before they reach a hospital. Of those who do get to a health facility alive, only about 50 percent survive. [More]
New studies raise important questions about impact of statin therapy on effectiveness of flu vaccines

New studies raise important questions about impact of statin therapy on effectiveness of flu vaccines

A new pair of studies suggests that statins, drugs widely used to reduce cholesterol, may have a detrimental effect on the immune response to influenza vaccine and the vaccine's effectiveness at preventing serious illness in older adults. Published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, the findings, if confirmed by additional research, may have implications for flu vaccine recommendations, guidelines for statin use around the time of vaccination, and future vaccine clinical trials in seniors. [More]
Stopping cholesterol medications before surgery may increase risk of death during recovery

Stopping cholesterol medications before surgery may increase risk of death during recovery

Patients who stop taking cholesterol medications before surgery are following outdated recommendations, and significantly increasing their risk of death if they don't resume taking the medications within two days after surgery, according to a study of more than 300,000 patients being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting. [More]
Medlab granted ethics approval to begin human trials using nanotechnology delivery platform

Medlab granted ethics approval to begin human trials using nanotechnology delivery platform

Sydney-based, ASX listed, biopharmaceutical company, Medlab Clinical Ltd has been granted ethics approval to progress to two separate human trials using its nanotechnology delivery platform. [More]
Repatha (evolocumab) injection gets FDA approval for high cholesterol

Repatha (evolocumab) injection gets FDA approval for high cholesterol

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Repatha (evolocumab) injection for some patients who are unable to get their low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol under control with current treatment options. [More]
UT Southwestern Medical Center geneticist named 2015 recipient of Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

UT Southwestern Medical Center geneticist named 2015 recipient of Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

UT Southwestern Medical Center geneticist Dr. Helen Hobbs is the 2015 recipient of the prestigious Pearl Meister Greengard Prize. The prize recognizes Dr. Hobbs' research, which advances understanding of heart disease and other complex disorders. [More]
Novel approach to reduce 'bad' lipids in blood circulation

Novel approach to reduce 'bad' lipids in blood circulation

Xian-Cheng Jiang, PhD, professor of cell biology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study identifying a new approach for lowering "bad" lipids in blood circulation, a critical means to combat devastating cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The research was published in the online edition of Gastroenterology. [More]
Treatment with life-saving medications increases in IHD but levels still suboptimal

Treatment with life-saving medications increases in IHD but levels still suboptimal

Treatment with life-saving medications has increased over the past ten years in ischaemic heart disease but levels are still suboptimal, according to the first results of the Chronic Ischaemic Cardiovascular Disease (CICD) Pilot Registry presented today at ESC Congress 2015 and published in European Heart Journal. [More]
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