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A stent is a small mesh tube that’s used to treat narrowed or weakened arteries in the body.

You may have a stent placed in an artery as part of a procedure called angioplasty (AN-jee-oh-plas-tee). Angioplasty can restore blood flow through narrowed or blocked arteries. Stents help prevent arteries from becoming narrowed or blocked again in the months or years after treatment with angioplasty. You may also have a stent placed in a weakened artery to improve blood flow and to help prevent the artery from bursting.

Stents are usually made of metal mesh, but sometimes they’re made of fabric. Fabric stents, also called stent grafts, are used in larger arteries. Some stents are coated with medicines that are slowly and continuously released into the artery. These medicines help prevent the artery from becoming blocked again.
Pre-procedural use of antiplatelet therapy becoming less routine in heart attack treatment

Pre-procedural use of antiplatelet therapy becoming less routine in heart attack treatment

Doctors worried about dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing a coronary artery procedure— such as angioplasty to treat a heart attack — will often administer antiplatelet therapy to head off complications. [More]
Strategy choice impacts long-term mortality in bifurcation stenting

Strategy choice impacts long-term mortality in bifurcation stenting

Using a provisional rather than a planned two-stent strategy for coronary bifurcation stenting may halve long-term mortality, pooled study data show. [More]
AHA/ASA targets acute ischemic stroke guidelines

AHA/ASA targets acute ischemic stroke guidelines

Acute Ischemic Stroke Guidelines are the subject of a new toolkit from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association aimed at accelerating adoption of the 2015 update regarding endovascular treatment. [More]
Japanese surgeons develop new technique to relieve airway obstruction in children

Japanese surgeons develop new technique to relieve airway obstruction in children

Several pediatric medical conditions, such as congenital heart disease, vascular compression, and congenital softening of the cartilage lining the trachea or bronchi, can compromise the airway and cause breathing difficulty. [More]
OSA patients may have 1.57 times more MACCE risk afer unplanned revascularization

OSA patients may have 1.57 times more MACCE risk afer unplanned revascularization

In an ongoing prospective study involving 1,311 patients from five nations, researchers found that untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was associated with increased risk of a Major Adverse Cardiac and Cerebrovascular Event (MACCE) -- cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (heart attack), non-fatal stroke, and unplanned revascularization such as heart bypass surgery and angioplasty. [More]
PCI with polymer-free BA9 drug-coated stent better than bare metal stent in ACS patients

PCI with polymer-free BA9 drug-coated stent better than bare metal stent in ACS patients

Patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) who are at high risk for bleeding have significantly lower rates of target lesion revascularisation and fewer adverse events after undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a polymer-free biolimus-A (BA9) drug-coated stent than with those receiving a bare metal stent (BMS) in results from a sub-study of the LEADERS FREE trial reported for the first time in a late-breaker session at EuroPCR 2016. [More]
Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

An implantable brain device that literally melts away at a pre-determined rate minimizes injury to tissue normally associated with standard electrode implantation, according to research led by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Newly developed implantable device can deliver chemotherapy drugs directly to pancreatic tumors

Newly developed implantable device can deliver chemotherapy drugs directly to pancreatic tumors

Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, in part because it is very difficult for chemotherapy drugs to reach the pancreas, which is located deep within the abdomen. [More]
Losmapimod drug fails to meet primary endpoint in clinical trial

Losmapimod drug fails to meet primary endpoint in clinical trial

Patients taking losmapimod, an anti-inflammatory drug currently being developed, for 12 weeks following a heart attack did not show improvements in the trial's primary endpoint, the rate of cardiovascular death, subsequent heart attack or urgent coronary revascularization, which includes placement of a stent or coronary artery bypass surgery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Ischemic postconditioning for STEMI patients shows no clinical outcomes

Ischemic postconditioning for STEMI patients shows no clinical outcomes

A large randomized controlled trial of ischemic postconditioning in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—failed to show that this procedure significantly reduces death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Society of Interventional Radiology honors outstanding achievers with annual awards

Society of Interventional Radiology honors outstanding achievers with annual awards

Renan Uflacker, M.D., FSIR, was honored posthumously on April 3 with the Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation Leaders in Innovation Award. The award was announced during the Society of Interventional Radiology's Annual Scientific Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia. [More]
Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Giving intravenous beta blockers before performing a coronary angioplasty in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—was safe but did not reduce heart attack severity or improve blood flow from the heart's main pumping chamber, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Deferred stent implantation fails to show benefit in STEMI patients

Deferred stent implantation fails to show benefit in STEMI patients

Delayed or deferred stent implantation in patients experiencing the deadliest form of heart attack--ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—failed to reduce death from any cause, hospitalization for heart failure, subsequent heart attacks or the need for a repeat procedure to restore blood flow to the heart, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New tool may help clinicians provide more personalized treatment strategies following coronary stent procedures

New tool may help clinicians provide more personalized treatment strategies following coronary stent procedures

Nearly 1 million people in the United States receive coronary artery stents each year. Nearly all stent patients are expected to take dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) using the combination of aspirin and a second antiplatelet medication to prevent the formation of blood clots. Exactly how long patients should receive DAPT has been debatable. [More]
LivaNova announces first implantation of Perceval sutureless valve in U.S.

LivaNova announces first implantation of Perceval sutureless valve in U.S.

LivaNova, PLC (the “Company”), a global medical technology company and a leader in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, announced the first U.S. implantation of the Perceval valve, the sutureless biological aortic replacement valve. [More]
UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year — that's one in every four deaths. The impact of cardiovascular diseases is quite large. [More]
CHLA cardiologists perform rare fetal cardiac intervention procedure

CHLA cardiologists perform rare fetal cardiac intervention procedure

Last August, when Children's Hospital Los Angeles cardiologists confirmed that the heart of a 27-week-old fetus suffered from a critical cardiac condition that prevented blood returning from the fetus's lungs from circulating back into the body, they told the parents that their child faced certain open-heart surgery after birth. Even worse, babies born with this very rare condition—hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) with restrictive atrial septum—have a 50 percent neonatal mortality rate. [More]
Doctors use supercomputers to create 3D models from heart disease patients

Doctors use supercomputers to create 3D models from heart disease patients

University of Melbourne doctors and engineers are using supercomputers to create 3D models from patients with heart disease, with photos from a camera thinner than a human hair. [More]
New CODMAN ENTERPRISE 2 Vascular Reconstruction Device launched for treatment of intracranial aneurysms

New CODMAN ENTERPRISE 2 Vascular Reconstruction Device launched for treatment of intracranial aneurysms

Codman Neuro has launched the CODMAN ENTERPRISE 2 Vascular Reconstruction Device, the latest generation of the company’s self-expanding stent and delivery system used to treat wide-necked intracranial aneurysms and to help maintain the position of endovascular coils during and after the procedure. [More]
Stenting and surgery equally effective at lowering long-term risk of stroke

Stenting and surgery equally effective at lowering long-term risk of stroke

Investigators for the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial found that stenting and surgery are equally effective at lowering the long-term risk of stroke from a narrowed carotid artery, according to a study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
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