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Study reports significant under-use of topical INS therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis patients

Study reports significant under-use of topical INS therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis patients

Topical intranasal steroid therapy continues to be underused for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) despite practice guidelines that recommend daily use, according to a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. [More]
Seeds of tropical shrub guarana contain ten times more amount of catechins than green tea

Seeds of tropical shrub guarana contain ten times more amount of catechins than green tea

The millions of people who consume green tea all over the world benefit from the catechins it contains. [More]
Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Because of the beneficial effect of corticosteroids on lung function, especially in infants who are ventilator dependent, corticosteroids are, at times, administered to very low birth weight neonates to treat established or evolving lung disease. However, it has long been suspected that steroids may have negative neurodevelopmental effects on very premature infants. [More]
Thymectomy confers benefit to MG patients who do not have chest tumor, study shows

Thymectomy confers benefit to MG patients who do not have chest tumor, study shows

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine addresses a question doctors have sought to clarify for decades: whether a surgery conducted since the 1940s benefits the patients it targets. [More]
Noninvasive approach using pulsed electric fields may reduce scarring after burn injuries

Noninvasive approach using pulsed electric fields may reduce scarring after burn injuries

A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has reported that repeated treatment with pulsed electric fields - a noninvasive procedure that does not generate heat - may help reduce the development of scarring. [More]
Scarring can have negative impact on patients' quality of life

Scarring can have negative impact on patients' quality of life

Whether it's from sudden trauma, scheduled surgery or serious acne, scarring can have a profound impact on patients. [More]
New series of treatments may provide another option for families of unborn babies with CPAM

New series of treatments may provide another option for families of unborn babies with CPAM

A medical team at Osaka University Hospital, Japan, has conducted successful treatment for the fetal lung disorder Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformattion (CPAM), also known as Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation (CCAM). [More]
Scientists develop prediction score to identify older adults at risk of developing pneumonia

Scientists develop prediction score to identify older adults at risk of developing pneumonia

In a study published in the Journal of American Geriatrics Society, researchers developed a "prediction score" to help healthcare professionals determine which older adults might be most at risk for developing pneumonia. [More]
Male hormones can reverse biological drivers of aging, study shows

Male hormones can reverse biological drivers of aging, study shows

Telomerase, an enzyme naturally found in the human organism, is the closest of all known substances to a "cellular elixir of youth." In a recent study, Brazilian and US researchers show that sex hormones can stimulate production of this enzyme. [More]
Study identifies ADAM33 gene as novel target for preventing asthma

Study identifies ADAM33 gene as novel target for preventing asthma

Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a potential and novel way of preventing asthma at the origin of the disease, a finding that could challenge the current understanding of the condition. [More]
UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health

UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is the only university to be awarded grants in all three perinatal networks from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to improve maternal and infant health. [More]
Scientists discover novel genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of femoral head

Scientists discover novel genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of femoral head

Scientists at the Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre have discovered a new genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of the hip, specifically the femoral head - the spherical-shaped mass at the top of the femur. [More]
New opioid use among older adults with COPD linked to increased risk for respiratory-related death

New opioid use among older adults with COPD linked to increased risk for respiratory-related death

Older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who start using opioids have a more than two-fold higher risk of dying from a respiratory-related complication compared to non-opioid users, St. Michael's Hospital researchers have found. [More]
New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

A new, minimally invasive procedure appears to be effective for many patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy (FED), a common eye disease, without the potential side effects and cost of the current standard of care, a cornea transplant. [More]
Researchers discover mechanism of gene silencing in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells

Researchers discover mechanism of gene silencing in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells

Sometimes, the silencing of a gene is as important as its activation. Nonetheless, up to now, most studies on hormone-mediated gene regulation have focused on researching the factors that influence the activation of certain genes. Little attention has been paid to gene silencing. [More]
New report reveals commonly available chemicals endanger brain development in fetuses, children

New report reveals commonly available chemicals endanger brain development in fetuses, children

In a new report, dozens of scientists, health practitioners and children's health advocates are calling for renewed attention to the growing evidence that many common and widely available chemicals endanger neurodevelopment in fetuses and children of all ages. [More]
Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Poisonous plants cause the most common allergic reactions to the skin, affecting as many as 50 million Americans each year, according to the American Skin Association. University of Alabama at Birmingham associate professor of Emergency Medicine, Walter Schrading, M.D., says it is important people are able to identify poisonous plants, prevent an allergic reaction and treat skin irritations after contact. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that putting liver cancer patients on a medication regimen prior to undergoing a certain treatment could lead to shorter hospital stays and less chance for readmission due to complications. [More]
Misuse of anabolic steroids may increase heart problems in ARVC patients

Misuse of anabolic steroids may increase heart problems in ARVC patients

Research has already shown that taking anabolic steroids is associated with high blood pressure and an increased risk of developing heart conditions such as left ventricular hypertrophy. [More]
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