Steroid News and Research RSS Feed - Steroid News and Research

Penn State dermatologist provides tips for treating poison ivy rash

Dr. David Adams, a dermatologist at Penn State Hershey, doesn't buy recent news reports that poison ivy has become stronger and more prevalent lately. [More]
Cosmederm Bioscience expands TriCalm's line of anti-itch products to further benefit sufferers of itch

Cosmederm Bioscience expands TriCalm's line of anti-itch products to further benefit sufferers of itch

Cosmederm Bioscience, Inc. today announced the expansion of its itch-relief product line, TriCalm, with the new TriCalm Clinical Repair Cream and TriCalm Extra Strength Spray. Following the success of the company's initial product, TriCalm Hydrogel, these two new offerings strategically expand the brand's line of steroid-free, anti-itch products to further benefit sufferers of itch. [More]
Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. Chronic inflammation is known to contribute to the development and progression of several diseases, including some cancers. [More]
Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify two proteins within fetal lungs that initiate labor process

UT Southwestern researchers identify two proteins within fetal lungs that initiate labor process

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified two proteins in a fetus' lungs responsible for initiating the labor process, providing potential new targets for preventing preterm birth. [More]
Hormones used in breast cancer treatment could affect disease progression, outcomes in some patients

Hormones used in breast cancer treatment could affect disease progression, outcomes in some patients

Recently, researchers have discovered that the hormone progesterone, an ingredient in contraceptives and menopausal hormone replacement therapies, might stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells that are resistant to anti-estrogen therapy and chemotherapy. [More]
Certain anti-nausea medications used after operation could increase risk for irregular heartbeat

Certain anti-nausea medications used after operation could increase risk for irregular heartbeat

Certain commonly prescribed anti-nausea medications given to patients during or after an operation could increase their risk of developing an irregular heartbeat, new research has found. [More]
Autoantibodies play major role in IPF patients with acute exacerbations

Autoantibodies play major role in IPF patients with acute exacerbations

Patients with acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis responded well to therapies similar to those used to treat autoimmune diseases, according to findings published today in PLOS ONE. The study suggests that autoantibodies — implicated in many autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus — also play an important role in patients with acute exacerbations of IPF, a devastating lung disease. [More]
Unsafe prescribing increases risk of life threatening asthma attacks

Unsafe prescribing increases risk of life threatening asthma attacks

Last year’s National Review of Asthma Deaths highlighted prescribing errors in nearly half of asthma deaths in primary care (47%). Now new analysis from Asthma UK, based on data from over 500 UK GP practices, reveals evidence that over 22,000 people with asthma in the UK, including 2,000 children, have been prescribed medicines (long-acting reliever inhalers) in a way that is so unsafe they have a ‘black box warning’ in the USA due to the risk they pose to the lives of people with asthma. [More]
Atopix raises additional development capital to investigate OC459 for treatment of asthma

Atopix raises additional development capital to investigate OC459 for treatment of asthma

Atopix Therapeutics Limited, a UK biopharmaceutical company developing a novel class of medicines to treat atopic dermatitis and severe asthma, today announced that it has raised additional development capital to advance its lead product OC459 for the treatment of asthma. [More]
Ampio reports effects of Ampion in treating chronic pain caused by osteoarthritis of the knee

Ampio reports effects of Ampion in treating chronic pain caused by osteoarthritis of the knee

Ampio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced three peer-review publications that report the multifaceted and synergistic effects of Ampion in the treatment of osteoarthritis in the knee. [More]
University at Albany researcher receives $1.76 million NIH grant to explore role of vitamin D in breast cancer

University at Albany researcher receives $1.76 million NIH grant to explore role of vitamin D in breast cancer

Each year, about 230,000 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in women in the U.S. It remains the third leading cause of death, behind only heart disease and lung cancer. Of the new cases, about 20 percent of women will be diagnosed with "triple negative" breast cancer (TNBC), a deadly form of breast cancer that does not respond to standard treatments such as tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors. [More]
Celldex’s lead program RINTEGA demonstrates overall survival benefit in patients with recurrent glioblastoma

Celldex’s lead program RINTEGA demonstrates overall survival benefit in patients with recurrent glioblastoma

Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. today presented positive results from the Company’s randomized, double‐blind Phase 2 study of RINTEGA (rindopepimut) in patients with EGFRvIII‐positive, recurrent glioblastoma at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. [More]
Adaptimmune presents clinical results of NY-ESO TCR therapeutic candidate at ASCO 2015

Adaptimmune presents clinical results of NY-ESO TCR therapeutic candidate at ASCO 2015

Adaptimmune Therapeutics plc, a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the use of TCR engineered T-cell therapy to treat cancer, today announced a poster presentation of data on its lead clinical program, an affinity enhanced T-cell receptor (TCR) therapeutic targeting the NY-ESO-1 cancer antigen, in both solid and hematologic cancers. [More]
Modified poliovirus therapy for glioblastoma works best at a low dosage

Modified poliovirus therapy for glioblastoma works best at a low dosage

A modified poliovirus therapy that is showing promising results for patients with glioblastoma brain tumors works best at a low dosage, according to the research team at Duke's Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center where the investigational therapy is being pioneered. [More]
Pharmacyclics’ Ibrutinib Phase Ib/II data show ibrutinib may be safe and effective in patients with cGVHD

Pharmacyclics’ Ibrutinib Phase Ib/II data show ibrutinib may be safe and effective in patients with cGVHD

Pharmacyclics LLC today announced interim results from the ongoing Phase Ib/II PCYC-1129 study suggesting that ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD) who were either refractory to steroid treatment or were steroid-dependent. [More]

Novel survey shows high rates of tattoo-related infection, itching and swelling in New Yorkers

In what they believe to be the first survey of its kind in the United States, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that as many as 6 percent of adult New Yorkers who get "inked" — in other words, those who get a tattoo — have experienced some form of tattoo-related rash, severe itching or swelling that lasted longer than four months and, in some cases, for many years. [More]
Study could offer new way to treat, prevent diabetes-associated blindness

Study could offer new way to treat, prevent diabetes-associated blindness

Reporting on their study with lab-grown human cells, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland say that blocking a second blood vessel growth protein, along with one that is already well-known, could offer a new way to treat and prevent a blinding eye disease caused by diabetes. [More]
Short course of oral steroids unlikely to provide much benefit for patients with acute sciatica

Short course of oral steroids unlikely to provide much benefit for patients with acute sciatica

Among patients with acute sciatica caused by a herniated lumbar disk (a condition also known as "acute radiculopathy"), a short course of oral steroids resulted in only modest improvement in function and no significant improvement in pain, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Combination of contraceptive and cholesterol-lowering drugs kills cancer cells in a new way

Combination of contraceptive and cholesterol-lowering drugs kills cancer cells in a new way

The combination of a cholesterol-lowering drug, Bezafibrate, and a contraceptive steroid, Medroxyprogesterone Acetate, could be an effective, non-toxic treatment for a range of cancers, researchers at the University of Birmingham have found. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement