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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Uninterrupted NOAC treatment during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is safe, shows research

Uninterrupted NOAC treatment during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is safe, shows research

Uninterrupted treatment with novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is safe, reveals research presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2015 by Dr Carsten Wunderlich, senior consultant in the Department of Invasive Electrophysiology, Heart Centre Dresden, Germany. [More]
Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

For 140 years, scientists' understanding of language comprehension in the brain came from individuals with stroke. Based on language impairments caused by stroke, scientists believed a single area of the brain -- a hotdog shaped section in the temporal lobe of the left hemisphere called Wernicke's region -- was the center of language comprehension. [More]
Noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, increase stroke risk

Noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, increase stroke risk

Living in an area with noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal. [More]
Brainpaths neurological device stimulates brain‘s sensory cortex

Brainpaths neurological device stimulates brain‘s sensory cortex

Brainpaths is a BREAKTHROUGH: a Neurological Medical Device that stimulates the sensory cortex of the brain; Brainpaths Medical Device is non-powered, approved for home use and can be purchased without a prescription for under $40. [More]
OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

On July 6, 2015, OhioHealth will open its doors to the new OhioHealth Neuroscience Center on Riverside Methodist Hospital's campus. [More]
First ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias, CKD published in EP Europace

First ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias, CKD published in EP Europace

The first ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2015 and published in EP Europace. [More]
10-week reading intervention improves brain activity in autistic children

10-week reading intervention improves brain activity in autistic children

Ten weeks of intensive reading intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder was enough to strengthen the activity of loosely connected areas of their brains that work together to comprehend reading, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found. [More]
NIH awards $1.8 million grant for brain imaging technique

NIH awards $1.8 million grant for brain imaging technique

A researcher at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has received a four-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a new technique for imaging blood flow across the surface of the brain that could help patients undergoing neurosurgery. [More]
Stanford researchers find how neurons work together to control movement in people with paralysis

Stanford researchers find how neurons work together to control movement in people with paralysis

Stanford University researchers studying how the brain controls movement in people with paralysis, related to their diagnosis of Lou Gehrig's disease, have found that groups of neurons work together, firing in complex rhythms to signal muscles about when and where to move. [More]
Climate change poses medical emergency, threatens 50 years of gains in global health

Climate change poses medical emergency, threatens 50 years of gains in global health

Climate change is a “medical emergency” says Commission author, but tackling it could be the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century [More]
Hiroshima University researchers study promising biomarker for severity of ARWMCs, endothelial function

Hiroshima University researchers study promising biomarker for severity of ARWMCs, endothelial function

A promising biomarker for the severity of age-related white matter changes (ARWMCs) and endothelial function was evaluated at Hiroshima University, Japan. The relationship between this biomarker, the telomeric 3'-overhang (G-tail) length, and cardiovascular risk in humans is unclear so far. [More]
Atrial fibrillation patients who stop blood thinners before elective surgery have less risk of major bleeding

Atrial fibrillation patients who stop blood thinners before elective surgery have less risk of major bleeding

Patients with atrial fibrillation who stopped taking blood thinners before they had elective surgery had no higher risk of developing blood clots and less risk of major bleeding compared to patients who were given a "bridge" therapy, according to research led by Duke Medicine. [More]
The Miriam Hospital offers new surgical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia

The Miriam Hospital offers new surgical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia

The Minimally Invasive Urology Institute at The Miriam Hospital is offering UroLift as one of the newest surgical treatments available for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an enlarged prostate condition. [More]
Findings could help improve patient care, reduce cancer screening costs around the world

Findings could help improve patient care, reduce cancer screening costs around the world

A large clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa has found that contrary to expectations, a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis does not improve cancer detection in people with unexplained blood clots in their legs and lungs. [More]
Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty in the homes of people with sickle cell disease could reduce debilitating attacks and save significant money for the NHS, according to a study by Sheffield Hallam University funded by the Chesshire Lehmann Fund. [More]
Benitec, ReNeuron collaborate to launch new exploratory cellular therapy program

Benitec, ReNeuron collaborate to launch new exploratory cellular therapy program

Benitec Biopharma is pleased to announce the launch of a new exploratory cellular therapy program including exosome-based delivery utilising the Company's proprietary ddRNAi technology. Entry into these areas have been facilitated by the commencement of a collaboration with UK-based stem cell therapeutics company, ReNeuron. [More]
Ortho Clinical Diagnostics announces FDA approval of VITROS Chemistry Products HbA1c Reagent Kit for diagnosis of diabetes

Ortho Clinical Diagnostics announces FDA approval of VITROS Chemistry Products HbA1c Reagent Kit for diagnosis of diabetes

Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the VITROS Chemistry Products HbA1c Reagent Kit to be used on the VITROS 5600 Integrated System, VITROS 4600 Chemistry System, and the VITROS 5,1 FS Chemistry System. The test can be used for the quantitative determination of percent glycated hemoglobin A1c (DCCT/NGSP) and mmol/mol hemoglobin A1c (IFCC) in human whole blood. [More]

Monash University researchers find physical differences between emotional and rational brains

Researchers at Monash University have found physical differences in the brains of people who respond emotionally to others' feelings, compared to those who respond more rationally, in a study published in the journal NeuroImage. [More]
Cosmetic surgery could improve lives of people with facial paralysis

Cosmetic surgery could improve lives of people with facial paralysis

A cosmetic surgery that uses injections of hyaluronic acid to make lips appear fuller could also improve the lives of people with facial paralysis, according to results of a small study by researchers at Johns Hopkins and Stanford universities. [More]
AliveCor Mobile ECG now available in Canada

AliveCor Mobile ECG now available in Canada

AliveCor, Inc., the leader in FDA-cleared ECG technology for smartphones, announced today that the AliveCor Mobile ECG is now available for patients and physicians in Canada. With the AliveCor Mobile ECG and the AliveECG app users can instantly detect the presence of atrial fibrillation (AF or AFib), a leading cause of stroke, in an electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) and manage their heart health with an FDA-cleared and Health Canada Licensed electrocardiogram ECG monitor, anywhere and at anytime. [More]
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