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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Obesity is linked with premature death, particularly in men

Obesity is linked with premature death, particularly in men

Being overweight or obese is associated with an increased risk of premature death, according to the largest ever study into obesity and death. [More]
UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

More than 20 percent of all blood clots in veins occur in cancer patients. These clots, also known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), pose serious threats for cancer patients. [More]
Genes linked to Alzheimer's disease may show effects on the brain from childhood

Genes linked to Alzheimer's disease may show effects on the brain from childhood

A gene associated with Alzheimer's disease and recovery after brain injury may show its effects on the brain and thinking skills as early as childhood, according to a study published in the July 13, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers discover new biological pathway involved in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers discover new biological pathway involved in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have identified a new biological pathway involved in Alzheimer's disease. In experiments using fruit flies, blocking the pathway reduced the death of brain cells, suggesting that interfering with the pathway could represent a promising new strategy to treat the disease in human patients. [More]
Researchers identify PKD1 protein as potential cause for impaired insulin signaling in diabetics

Researchers identify PKD1 protein as potential cause for impaired insulin signaling in diabetics

Medication can help trigger the enzyme that kick starts insulin production in the body, but the drugs don't always work for those who are obese or diabetic, and most need to regulate their glucose and insulin levels. That's why a recent discovery made by Rudy Valentine and a team of researchers holds so much promise. [More]
Metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events linked to decreased sexual activity in postmenopausal women

Metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events linked to decreased sexual activity in postmenopausal women

Understanding the effects of age and disease on sexual wellbeing is crucial as sexual health is increasingly associated with vitality. In a new study published in The American Journal of Medicine, researchers looked at the role metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease play in postmenopausal women's sexual health. [More]
Researchers bring idea for transparent skull implant closer to reality

Researchers bring idea for transparent skull implant closer to reality

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside are bringing their idea for a 'Window to the Brain' transparent skull implant closer to reality through the findings of two studies that are forthcoming in the journals Lasers in Surgery and Medicine and Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine. [More]
Selfish mutant mtDNA exploits cellular defenses to cause many diseases

Selfish mutant mtDNA exploits cellular defenses to cause many diseases

Mitochondrial disorders are a chameleon-like set of diseases that take many different forms and vary widely from individual to individual. [More]
New electronic tattoo can measure activity of muscle and nerve cells

New electronic tattoo can measure activity of muscle and nerve cells

A new temporary "electronic tattoo" developed by Tel Aviv University that can measure the activity of muscle and nerve cells researchers is poised to revolutionize medicine, rehabilitation, and even business and marketing research. [More]
Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

A patch made from cryopreserved human umbilical cord may be a novel method for treating spina bifida in utero, according to researchers at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor in patients who have not responded to medication. ExAblate Neuro uses magnetic resonance (MR) images taken during the procedure to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy brain tissue in a tiny area thought to be responsible for causing tremors. [More]
New study identifies four subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells involved in diabetes

New study identifies four subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells involved in diabetes

A new study led by nationally prominent stem cell scientist Markus Grompe, M.D., has determined the existence of at least four separate subtypes of human insulin producing beta cells that may be important in the understanding and treatment of diabetes. The findings were published online today in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
TBI with LOC linked to late-life neurodegeneration but not Alzheimer's disease

TBI with LOC linked to late-life neurodegeneration but not Alzheimer's disease

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a loss of consciousness (LOC) may be associated with later development of Parkinson's disease but not Alzheimer's disease or incident dementia, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Washington School of Medicine. [More]
Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Loss or impairment of the ability to speak is one of the most feared complications of stroke--one faced by about 20% of stroke patients. Language, as one of the most complex functions of the brain, is not seated in a single brain region but involves connections between many regions. [More]
Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

According to a recent Framingham Heart Study, people who experience the heart arrhythmia atrial fibrillation (AF), may also suffer from a smaller brain, specifically reduced frontal lobe volume. [More]
Non-drug solutions for postpartum depression: an interview with Dr David Brock & Christopher Thatcher

Non-drug solutions for postpartum depression: an interview with Dr David Brock & Christopher Thatcher

Postpartum depression (PPD) is reported to occur in 10-15% of delivering women with an estimated 400,000 women affected annually in the US. It is the most common complication of childbirth and is a significant public health concern. [More]
Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Columbia University Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine, in collaboration with NewYork-Presbyterian and NYC Health + Hospitals/Harlem, have been awarded a grant from the NIH for approximately $4 million in fiscal year 2016 to enroll participants in the Cohort Program of President Barack Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI)—a large-scale research effort to improve our ability to prevent and treat disease based on individual differences in lifestyle, environment and genetics. [More]
AAN, ABF and MDA offer new two-year clinical training fellowship in muscular dystrophy

AAN, ABF and MDA offer new two-year clinical training fellowship in muscular dystrophy

The American Academy of Neurology, the American Brain Foundation and the Muscular Dystrophy Association have announced a new Clinical Research Training Fellowship in muscular dystrophy for 2017. [More]
AAN announces winners of 2016 Neuro Film Festival

AAN announces winners of 2016 Neuro Film Festival

The American Academy of Neurology is pleased to announce the winning entries to the 2016 Neuro Film Festival. [More]
Athletes may experience long-term brain changes after sports-related concussion

Athletes may experience long-term brain changes after sports-related concussion

New research finds white matter changes in the brains of athletes six months after a concussion. The study will be presented at the Sports Concussion Conference in Chicago, July 8-10, hosted by the American Academy of Neurology, the world's leading authority on the diagnosis and management of sports-related concussion. [More]
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