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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Study: History of stroke associated with increased risk of adverse events after elective noncardiac surgery

Study: History of stroke associated with increased risk of adverse events after elective noncardiac surgery

In an analysis that included more than 480,000 patients who underwent elective noncardiac surgery, a history of stroke was associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and death, particularly if time elapsed between stroke and surgery was less than 9 months, according to a study in the July 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai Heart at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has been awarded a $3.8 million grant by the American Heart Association to promote cardiovascular health among high-risk New York City children, and their parents, living in Harlem and the Bronx. With assistance from the NYC Administration for Children's Services, the research team's mission is to reduce each child's future risk of obesity, heart attack, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Rates of stroke incidence, subsequent death decrease among black and white U.S. adults

Rates of stroke incidence, subsequent death decrease among black and white U.S. adults

In a study that included a large sample of black and white U.S. adults from several communities, rates of stroke incidence and subsequent death decreased from 1987 to 2011, with decreases varying across age-groups, according to a study in the July 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
NBCCEDP program markedly reduces death, illness from cervical cancer

NBCCEDP program markedly reduces death, illness from cervical cancer

A 23-year old federal program for the early detection and treatment of cervical cancer markedly reduces illness and death among underserved, low-income women, yet its impact has been reduced by the fact that it has reached only 10 percent of the eligible population, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
‘No convincing evidence’ for zinc supplements to prevent otitis media

‘No convincing evidence’ for zinc supplements to prevent otitis media

There is no convincing evidence that zinc supplements reduce the risk of otitis media in children or adults, say the authors of an updated Cochrane review. [More]
Healthy lifestyle helps hard-to-treat hypertensive patients

Healthy lifestyle helps hard-to-treat hypertensive patients

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle can prevent cardiovascular events even among patients with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension, say researchers. [More]
Localised inflammation found in eosinophilic otitis media

Localised inflammation found in eosinophilic otitis media

Antigen-specific immunoglobulin E is produced locally in the middle ear mucosa of patients with eosinophilic otitis media, clinical research indicates. [More]
B vitamins do not prevent Alzheimer's disease

B vitamins do not prevent Alzheimer's disease

Taking B vitamins doesn't slow mental decline as we age, nor is it likely to prevent Alzheimer's disease, conclude Oxford University researchers who have assembled all the best clinical trial data involving 22,000 people to offer a final answer on this debate. [More]
Virtual reality interface devices in reorganization of brain neural networks in neurological diseases patients

Virtual reality interface devices in reorganization of brain neural networks in neurological diseases patients

Virtual reality interface devices permit the user to interact with the virtual world in real time through a variety of multisensory channels including hearing, sight, touch and smell. [More]
Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

In the 2,500+ years that have passed since acupuncture was first used by the ancient Chinese, it has been used to treat a number of physical, mental and emotional conditions including nausea and vomiting, stroke rehabilitation, headaches, menstrual cramps, asthma, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, to name just a few. [More]
Acute glaucoma is largely an inflammatory disease, say researchers

Acute glaucoma is largely an inflammatory disease, say researchers

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Sun Yat-sen University in China have shown that acute glaucoma in mice is largely an inflammatory disease and that high pressure in the eye causes vision loss by setting in motion an inflammatory response similar to that evoked by bacterial infections. [More]
Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). [More]
Study: People with mobility impairments under age 65 have higher rates of smoking

Study: People with mobility impairments under age 65 have higher rates of smoking

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that people with mobility impairments under age 65 have significantly higher rates of smoking than those without mobility impairments. [More]
UN Member States reaffirm commitment to reduce avoidable burden of NCDs

UN Member States reaffirm commitment to reduce avoidable burden of NCDs

UN Member States have reaffirmed their commitment to take bold measures to reduce the avoidable burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). These ailments, including heart disease and stroke, cancer, diabetes and lung disease kill 38 million people every year, many of them before they reach the age of 70. [More]
New way to protect crops from insect plagues in safe and environmentally responsible way

New way to protect crops from insect plagues in safe and environmentally responsible way

Using spider toxins to study the proteins that let nerve cells send out electrical signals, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have stumbled upon a biological tactic that may offer a new way to protect crops from insect plagues in a safe and environmentally responsible way. [More]
Researchers examine which teens have emotional symptoms after concussion

Researchers examine which teens have emotional symptoms after concussion

After a concussion, teens who are sensitive to light or noise may be more likely to also have emotional symptoms such as anxiety, according to a study released today that will be presented at The Sports Concussion Conference in Chicago, July 11 to 13, 2014, hosted by the American Academy of Neurology, the world's leading authority on diagnosing and managing sports concussion. [More]
New drug delivered through skin effective in treatment of breast cancer

New drug delivered through skin effective in treatment of breast cancer

A drug that has proven effective in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, but with serious side-effects, may be delivered effectively through the skin using a new topical drug-delivery system. [More]
Endomedix develops spray-on gel to staunch bleeding during brain surgery

Endomedix develops spray-on gel to staunch bleeding during brain surgery

Endomedix, a start-up company housed at NJIT's business incubator, received a $1.4 million federal grant to develop a spray-on gel that surgeons will use to staunch bleeding during brain surgery. [More]
UT Southwestern named one of nation's "Most Wired" hospitals for fourth consecutive year

UT Southwestern named one of nation's "Most Wired" hospitals for fourth consecutive year

UT Southwestern Medical Center is on the national "Most Wired" hospitals list for a fourth consecutive year, thanks to its use of such technologies as databases to help physicians better identify high-risk patients and tools that keep physicians, nurses, and patients communicating effectively. [More]
New paper states that doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion

New paper states that doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the largest professional association of neurologists and a leading authority on sports concussion, is releasing a new position paper that states doctors have an ethical obligation to educate and protect athletes from sports concussion and clear them to play only when the athlete is medically ready, standing firm against objections from players, parents or coaches. [More]