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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Neuroprotective compounds can limit damage to the brain during ischemic stroke

Neuroprotective compounds can limit damage to the brain during ischemic stroke

In the 1990s, neuroscientists identified a class of drugs that showed promise in the area of stroke. NMDA receptor antagonists could limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke. But one problem complicated testing the drugs in a clinical setting: the side effects included disorientation and hallucinations. [More]
New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this week in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
North Memorial Medical Center receives Healthgrades 2015 America's 50 Best Hospitals Award

North Memorial Medical Center receives Healthgrades 2015 America's 50 Best Hospitals Award

Today, North Memorial Medical Center announced that it has received the Healthgrades 2015 America's 50 Best Hospitals Award. The distinction makes North Memorial Medical Center one of the top 1% of more than 4,500 hospitals nationwide for its consistent, year-over-year superior clinical performance as measured by Healthgrades, the leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals. [More]
FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

Actavis plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceutical company, and Medicines360, a nonprofit women's health pharmaceutical company, today announced the approval of LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use by women to prevent pregnancy for up to three years. [More]
Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Women veterans who had specialized heart tests were younger and more likely to be obese, depressed and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder than men veterans, according to a study published in an American Heart Association journal. [More]
Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has increased significantly over the last decade. The current issue of NeuroRehabilitation features a series of insightful articles that provide examples of how the ICF can be successfully implemented in clinical practice and research related to neurorehabilitation, ultimately benefiting patient care. [More]
Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Men lead women in the likelihood to die from nearly all the most common causes of death. Still, men are less likely to go to the doctor than women and often try to ignore symptoms of health problems. [More]
Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Jianmin Cui receives $1.7 million NIH grant to study heart's inner mechanisms

Jianmin Cui receives $1.7 million NIH grant to study heart's inner mechanisms

Jianmin Cui, PhD, has received a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the molecular bases for the function of potassium channels vital for the heart, brain, inner ear and other tissues. [More]
Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection has been approved by the European Commission for the treatment of visual impairment due to Macular Edema secondary to Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO). [More]
RowanSOM researcher awarded NINDS grant to develop stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease

RowanSOM researcher awarded NINDS grant to develop stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease

Paola Leone, PhD, the director of the Cell and Gene Therapy Center and a professor of Cell Biology at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, has been awarded a three-year, $477,000 grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to develop a stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease, a rare but devastating neurological disorder in children that typically takes a child's life by age 10. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Frailty assessment test can accurately predict complications after major operation

Frailty assessment test can accurately predict complications after major operation

Frailty has been used to predict how well a patient may recover from a major operation. Because frailty assessments are not routinely utilized in busy surgical practices, surgeons at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta have discovered that a short, approximately one-minute assessment can accurately determine how likely a patient is to have complications after an operation. [More]
Novel technology could improve diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease

Novel technology could improve diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease

Approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States alone are suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a common vascular problem that is caused by narrowing of the arteries as a result of plaque buildup. The plaque accumulation leads to an insufficient blood flow to the body's extremities and increases a person's risk for heart attack and stroke by up to six times. PAD is also one of the most serious complications of diabetes. [More]
UTHealth study explores use of app to help improve health of minority stroke patients

UTHealth study explores use of app to help improve health of minority stroke patients

A clinical trial investigating the use of a physician-monitored app to help first-time minority stroke patients become healthier has begun at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Study finds new approaches to manage anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage

Study finds new approaches to manage anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage

Among patients with oral anticoagulation-associated intracerebral hemorrhage (bleeding within the brain), reversal of international normalized ratio (INR; a measure used to determine the clotting tendency of blood while on medication) below a certain level within 4 hours and systolic blood pressure less than 160 mm Hg at 4 hours were associated with lower rates of hematoma (a localized swelling filled with blood) enlargement, and resumption of anticoagulant therapy was associated with a lower risk of ischemic events without increased bleeding complications, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA. [More]
Three innovative research projects aim to improve lives of people with mobility difficulties

Three innovative research projects aim to improve lives of people with mobility difficulties

A prosthetic hand controlled by the nervous system, robotic clothing to help people with walking, and biosensors to monitor how patients use equipment or exercise during rehabilitation are the focus of three research projects awarded £5.3 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. [More]
PCDS AC system optimizes delivery of anticoagulation drugs, reduces adverse events

PCDS AC system optimizes delivery of anticoagulation drugs, reduces adverse events

Point of Care Anticoagulation software (PCDS AC) optimizes delivery of anticoagulation drugs and reduces adverse events associated with anticoagulation therapy. The software was designed and developed in collaboration with leading clinical thrombosis experts, and is a decision support tool that takes the complexity out of AC management by providing a real-time AC dashboard. With intuitive, predictive clinical decision support, PCDS AC transforms evidence-based guidelines into intelligent tools that measure and improve AC therapy outcomes. [More]
PCORI funds five patient-centered comparative effectiveness research studies

PCORI funds five patient-centered comparative effectiveness research studies

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors today approved awards totaling more than $64 million to fund five large patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER) studies that will answer critical clinical questions about care for cancer, back pain, and stroke. [More]
New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

Scientists have discovered a skin test that may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a study released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]