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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely - before the age of 70 - from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report. [More]
Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the aging process. [More]
MRIGlobal awarded $54 million NIH contract to provide support for drug development

MRIGlobal awarded $54 million NIH contract to provide support for drug development

MRIGlobal today announced that it has been awarded a $54 million, 10-year program from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to provide support for the development and manufacturing of drug candidates for ultimate use in human clinical trials. [More]
Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

The mortgage strain of American home ownership can lead to poor health but a new study finds that the inverse may also be true-- changes in health can serve as a predictor to mortgage distress. [More]
Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

A growing body of research suggests that the most common cause of dementia in older people is a mix of vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities, and that approximately half of people who die with Alzheimer's also have evidence of strokes in their brains. Furthermore, when strokes and hallmark Alzheimer's plaques and tangles are combined, it increases a person's likelihood of experiencing dementia. [More]
Individualized, patient-centered care needed to treat and monitor people with chronic pain

Individualized, patient-centered care needed to treat and monitor people with chronic pain

An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health concluded that individualized, patient-centered care is needed to treat and monitor the estimated 100 million Americans living with chronic pain. To achieve this aim, the panel recommends more research and development around the evidence-based, multidisciplinary approaches needed to balance patient perspectives, desired outcomes, and safety. [More]
Bayshore Community Hospital releases new Multi-specialty Interventional Suite

Bayshore Community Hospital releases new Multi-specialty Interventional Suite

Bayshore Community Hospital recently unveiled its new Multi-specialty Interventional Suite, outfitted with advanced technology capable of performing complex minimally invasive cardiovascular, endovascular, and interventional radiology procedures. [More]
TSRI researchers identify enzyme that produces inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain

TSRI researchers identify enzyme that produces inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has identified an enzyme that produces a class of inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain. Abnormally high levels of these molecules appear to cause a rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder, and that disorder now may be treatable if researchers can develop suitable drug candidates that inhibit this enzyme. [More]
Lack of information increases depression risk in people recovering from stroke

Lack of information increases depression risk in people recovering from stroke

People recovering from a stroke and living at home have generally a higher risk of suffering from depression. According to researchers lack of information is often a major concern for patients and this frequently contributes to their depression. This is the result of a new study from health sociologists of the University of Luxembourg. [More]
MID completes enrollment in STASIS trial of Permaseal

MID completes enrollment in STASIS trial of Permaseal

Micro Interventional Devices, Inc. has completed enrollment in its Secure Transapical Access and Closure Study. STASIS is a non-randomized, multi-center, CE-Mark study, evaluating the safety and performance of Permaseal the world's first automated direct myocardial ventricular access and closure technology especially designed for use in transcatheter valve replacement procedures (TAVR and TMVR). [More]
Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets, an oral, once-daily selective factor Xa-inhibitor, to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (SE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Nanoparticles, extremely tiny particles measured in billionths of a meter, are increasingly everywhere, and especially in biomedical products. Their toxicity has been researched in general terms, but now a team of Israeli scientists has for the first time found that exposure nanoparticles (NPs) of silicon dioxide (SiO2) can play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases when the NP cross tissue and cellular barriers and also find their way into the circulatory system. [More]
Neuroscientists move one step closer to solving how learning and memory work

Neuroscientists move one step closer to solving how learning and memory work

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found out how a protein crucial to learning works: by removing a biochemical "clamp" that prevents connections between nerve cells in the brain from growing stronger. [More]
Study: Synthetic triglyceride oil may provide hope for people with Huntington's disease

Study: Synthetic triglyceride oil may provide hope for people with Huntington's disease

An early study suggests that a synthetic triglyceride oil called triheptanoin may provide hope for people with Huntington's disease. The study is published in the January 7, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Quadrivalent HPV vaccine cleared of multiple sclerosis risk

Quadrivalent HPV vaccine cleared of multiple sclerosis risk

A study of almost 4 million girls and women allays fears that receipt of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine could increase the risk of developing multiple sclerosis, or other demyelinating disorders. [More]
Sheffield researchers use ‘Conversation Analysis’ to improve dementia diagnosis

Sheffield researchers use ‘Conversation Analysis’ to improve dementia diagnosis

ANALYSING distinct features of conversation and how patients describe memory loss could improve the early diagnosis of dementia, and help those whose memory concerns are not due to dementia receive reassurance sooner. [More]
Study: Placental cells may possibly treat damaged nerves

Study: Placental cells may possibly treat damaged nerves

New findings suggest that placental cells may potentially treat damaged nerves possibly leading the way to new treatment for stroke patients. [More]
Additional products seized from Calgary stores contain undeclared drug ingredients

Additional products seized from Calgary stores contain undeclared drug ingredients

Further to its recent Advisory, Health Canada has identified additional products seized from two Samson's Supplements stores in Calgary that pose a risk to health. [More]
New study finds that exercise may improve lives of Parkinson's disease patients

New study finds that exercise may improve lives of Parkinson's disease patients

Exercise may help people with Parkinson's disease improve their balance, ability to move around and quality of life, even if it does not reduce their risk of falling, according to a new study published in the December 31, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Sex enhancement product recalled after Health Canada test finds undeclared drug ingredient

Sex enhancement product recalled after Health Canada test finds undeclared drug ingredient

One lot of the sex enhancement product "Forta for Men" (NPN 80045132) is being recalled after Health Canada testing confirmed it contains an undeclared drug: homosildenafil. [More]