Stroke News and Research RSS Feed - Stroke News and Research Twitter

A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
New anti-inflammatory drug reduces death of existing brain cells then repairs damage after stroke

New anti-inflammatory drug reduces death of existing brain cells then repairs damage after stroke

Researchers at The University of Manchester have discovered that a potential new drug reduces the number of brain cells destroyed by stroke and then helps to repair the damage. [More]
Vitamin D supplements do not prevent disease in the majority, says study

Vitamin D supplements do not prevent disease in the majority, says study

Current evidence does not support that vitamin D supplementation does anything to help prevent disease among the majority of people, according to a new study published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). [More]
Improving innovation uptake in the NHS

Improving innovation uptake in the NHS

I think innovation is one of those rather slippery terms that means different things to different people. First of all, I would make a distinction between innovations that are essentially about a new, physical product and innovations that are more to do with services or processes. [More]
Study finds upward trend in stroke rates among younger generations

Study finds upward trend in stroke rates among younger generations

Older baby boomers—those born between 1945 and 1954—can proudly boast a new label: the "stroke-healthiest generation," according to a Rutgers study that found the lowest incidence of ischemic stroke in this age group within the past 20 years. [More]
ADD Program receives $19.5 million NIH contract to test drugs for treating epilepsy

ADD Program receives $19.5 million NIH contract to test drugs for treating epilepsy

The University of Utah College of Pharmacy's Anticonvulsant Drug Development Program has been awarded a five-year $19.5 million contract renewal with the National Institutes of Health to test drugs to treat epilepsy, and the major focus of the project is to address needs that affect millions of people worldwide -identify novel investigational compounds to prevent the development of epilepsy or to treat refractory, or drug-resistant, epilepsy. [More]
UAB case study details patient experiencing hemorrhagic stroke after consumption of energy drink

UAB case study details patient experiencing hemorrhagic stroke after consumption of energy drink

Investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have presented the first case study of a patient experiencing a hemorrhagic stroke — a brain bleed — following consumption of an energy drink. [More]
Intensive SBP lowering may prevent over 100,000 deaths in the U.S. annually, study finds

Intensive SBP lowering may prevent over 100,000 deaths in the U.S. annually, study finds

Intensive systolic blood pressure (SBP) lowering may prevent more than 100,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15¬-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL. [More]
ASN to honor Amit X. Garg with Young Investigator Award

ASN to honor Amit X. Garg with Young Investigator Award

The American Society of Nephrology will honor Amit X. Garg, MD, PhD by presenting him with the ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award during the society's annual meeting, ASN Kidney Week 2016, held November 15-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL. [More]
Cluster headaches give intense pain but can be treated, says expert

Cluster headaches give intense pain but can be treated, says expert

Often called the suicide headache because of the excruciating intensity of the pain, cluster headaches are three times more likely to strike men than women. [More]
Scientists identify naturally occurring molecule that plays protective role in ALS

Scientists identify naturally occurring molecule that plays protective role in ALS

Researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have identified a naturally occurring molecule that has the potential for preserving sites of communication between nerves and muscles in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and over the course of aging -- as well as a molecule that interferes with this helpful process. [More]
Global high blood pressure has almost doubled over past 40 years, shows study

Global high blood pressure has almost doubled over past 40 years, shows study

In the past 40 years, there has been a large increase in the number of people living with high blood pressure worldwide because of population growth and ageing—rising from 594 million in 1975 to over 1.1 billion in 2015. [More]
Growing understanding of neuroplasticity could drive development of new therapeutic interventions

Growing understanding of neuroplasticity could drive development of new therapeutic interventions

A growing understanding of the highly "plastic," changeable nature of the brain--from the level of DNA, proteins, neuronal connections and networks, up to communication across brain regions--is driving the development of new therapeutic approaches to treat chronic pain, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and a variety of other disorders described in an article in Alternative and Complementary Therapies, a journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
NYU Langone-led study to examine longer-term use of suppressive antiviral medication to reduce shingles

NYU Langone-led study to examine longer-term use of suppressive antiviral medication to reduce shingles

NYU Langone Medical Center will lead a five-year, 60-center clinical trial to evaluate new treatment protocols for herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO), a form of shingles that can seriously and permanently affect the eye. [More]
Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy

Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy

A new study shows a link between mothers with rheumatoid arthritis and children with epilepsy. [More]
Early treatment for stroke patients could help prevent disability and improve chances of recovery

Early treatment for stroke patients could help prevent disability and improve chances of recovery

Following the onset of a stroke, restoring blood flow to the brain as quickly as possible is critical for preventing disability and improving the chances of recovery. [More]
Early identification may be key to stop type 2 diabetes

Early identification may be key to stop type 2 diabetes

What's the best way to stop type 2 diabetes? Find it before it becomes a problem. "The phrase I use is prevention by detection," said Joseph Aloi, M.D., section chief of endocrinology and metabolism at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. [More]
Barriers to internet use for self-care may be preventing women from managing chronic conditions

Barriers to internet use for self-care may be preventing women from managing chronic conditions

Barriers to internet use may be preventing chronically ill middle-aged and older women from being as healthy as they otherwise could be, new research from Oregon State University suggests. [More]
Atrial fibrillation patients treated with anticoagulant drug have higher risk of developing dementia

Atrial fibrillation patients treated with anticoagulant drug have higher risk of developing dementia

Atrial fibrillation patients who use the drug, warfarin, to prevent harmful blood clots from forming in their hearts to lower risk of stroke are at higher risk of developing dementia than patients who use warfarin for non-atrial fibrillation conditions, according to a new study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute. [More]
Eminent physician Kenneth Walker receives Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award

Eminent physician Kenneth Walker receives Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award

Grady Health System Assistant Chief of Internal Medicine and Emory University School of Medicine Professor H. Kenneth Walker, M.D., was awarded the prestigious Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award at the Georgia Hospital Association's (GHA) Annual Meeting on Nov. 11. [More]
Bionik Laboratories to introduce upper body robot-assisted therapy for stroke victims

Bionik Laboratories to introduce upper body robot-assisted therapy for stroke victims

We are at the point of paradigm shift in treating stroke victims. High tech solutions are about to bring improvements that have been unthinkable. Bionik Laboratories is a pioneer in the field with a clear path to extraordinary growth. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement