Stroke News and Research RSS Feed - Stroke News and Research Twitter

A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Continuous positive airway pressure treatment effective for older patients with OSA

Continuous positive airway pressure treatment effective for older patients with OSA

Continuous positive airway pressure is effective at treating sleep apnoea in older people, a new study has found. [More]
People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt than those from higher socio-economic positions, irrespective of where they live. [More]
TOBI project aims to improve quality of life for people with serious physical disabilities

TOBI project aims to improve quality of life for people with serious physical disabilities

People with serious physical disabilities are unable to do the everyday things that most of us take for granted despite having the will - and the brainpower - to do so. This is changing thanks to European projects such as TOBI (Tools for Brain-Computer Interaction). People with limited mobility can write emails and even regain control of paralysed limbs through thought alone. [More]
People with cognitive impairment are more likely to have stroke

People with cognitive impairment are more likely to have stroke

People with cognitive impairment are significantly more likely to have a stroke, with a 39% increased risk, than people with normal cognitive function, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a crucial link between high levels of insulin and pathways that lead to obesity, a finding that may have important implications when treating diabetes. [More]
Study sheds new light on sleep drunkenness disorder

Study sheds new light on sleep drunkenness disorder

A study is shining new light on a sleep disorder called "sleep drunkenness". The disorder may be as prevalent as affecting one in every seven people. The research is published in the August 26, 2014, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Reduce inflammatory reaction by losing weight, says researcher

Reduce inflammatory reaction by losing weight, says researcher

Researchers have found a possible molecular explanation for why overweight is harmful. This new knowledge may provide new drugs for heart attack, stroke, cancer and chronic intestinal inflammation. [More]
American Heart Association issues new policy recommendations on use of e-cigarettes

American Heart Association issues new policy recommendations on use of e-cigarettes

The American Heart Association issued new policy recommendations today on the use of e-cigarettes and their impact on tobacco-control efforts. The guidance was published in the association's journal, Circulation. [More]
Calcium buildup in coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients indicates heart disease risk

Calcium buildup in coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients indicates heart disease risk

Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients may be a strong indicator of heart disease risk, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). [More]
Physician develops new device to treat stroke more effectively

Physician develops new device to treat stroke more effectively

A new device developed by a physician at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and a researcher at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock could soon be available to treat stroke more effectively. [More]
Study links gum disease to lung disease, cancer and heart failure

Study links gum disease to lung disease, cancer and heart failure

Most people are very familiar with the reality that, if they don't practice regular brushing and overall good dental hygiene, they are at risk for developing gum disease. Less well known is the full extent of the potential harm caused by gum disease. [More]
FDA approves AliveCor algorithm for detecting AFib through ECG recordings on mobile phone

FDA approves AliveCor algorithm for detecting AFib through ECG recordings on mobile phone

AliveCor, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company clearance for its algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia. [More]
Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

A recent Finnish study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Vanderbilt-led research, as part of an international, multicenter trial, found regular blood transfusion therapy significantly reduces the recurrence of silent strokes and strokes in children with sickle cell anemia who have had pre-existing silent strokes, according to study results released today in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). [More]
Study suggests that colds may temporarily increase stroke risk in kids

Study suggests that colds may temporarily increase stroke risk in kids

A new study suggests that colds and other minor infections may temporarily increase stroke risk in children. The study is published in the August 20, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Not every cell in the body is the same genetically, and disease-causing mutations don't necessarily affect every cell—making these mutations easy to miss even with next-generation genomic sequencing. [More]
Researchers find current blood pressure recommendations for older patients

Researchers find current blood pressure recommendations for older patients

Confused about the new blood pressure recommendations and what you should be aiming for? You're not alone. [More]
Penn researchers analyze clinical practice guidelines

Penn researchers analyze clinical practice guidelines

The common thought in the medical community is that the randomized, controlled trial is the gold standard in medical research. [More]
First Edition: August 19, 2014

First Edition: August 19, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including stories about a how a hospital system's data was hacked, involving as many as 4.5 million patients' records. [More]
Rheumatologic diseases can initially present as neurological disorders, delay diagnosis for many months

Rheumatologic diseases can initially present as neurological disorders, delay diagnosis for many months

Lupus and other rheumatologic diseases can initially present as neurological disorders such as headaches and seizures, and thus delay diagnosis for many months, according to Loyola University Medical Center neurologists. [More]