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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
First national PSA campaign launched with strong message: No one is excused from prediabetes

First national PSA campaign launched with strong message: No one is excused from prediabetes

Losing weight and being healthier are at the top of everyone’s New Year’s resolutions. But, despite the best intentions, work, kids, and social events often push lifestyle changes to the bottom of the list. [More]
Study reveals new clue to possible misdiagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

Study reveals new clue to possible misdiagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

Correctly diagnosing Alzheimer's disease remains a challenge for medical professionals. Now, a new study published in the current issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease reveals a new clue to possible misdiagnosis. [More]
Young blacks at three times greater risk of first stroke than white counterparts

Young blacks at three times greater risk of first stroke than white counterparts

A first-of-its-kind study found that young blacks, age 45, are at a three times greater risk of having a first stroke than their white counterparts. However, they may not be at a higher risk for the second stroke. [More]
Study shows African-Americans may not be at higher risk for second stroke

Study shows African-Americans may not be at higher risk for second stroke

Even though young African-Americans are at three times greater risk of a first stroke than their white counterparts, they may not be at a higher risk for a second stroke, according to a study published in the January 20, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the first of its kind to look at race and second stroke risk. [More]
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty treatment may offer new solution for obese patients

Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty treatment may offer new solution for obese patients

In the fight against obesity, bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment; however, only 1 to 2 percent of qualified patients receive this surgery due to limited access, patient choice, associated risks and the high costs. A novel treatment method -- endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty -- might offer a new solution for obese patients. [More]
Mayo Clinic study finds no association between surgical anesthesia and development of MCI later in life

Mayo Clinic study finds no association between surgical anesthesia and development of MCI later in life

A Mayo Clinic study of people who received anesthesia for surgery after age 40 found no association between the anesthesia and development of mild cognitive impairment later in life. Mild cognitive impairment is a stage between the normal cognitive decline of aging and dementia. [More]
Study findings may help explain why risk of stroke changes after menopause

Study findings may help explain why risk of stroke changes after menopause

Risk of stroke in women may come down to a compound the body produces from estrogen known as 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME). Furthermore, the compound's therapeutic potential may extend beyond treating stroke in women to healing brain injuries in men, a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism reports. [More]
Dartmouth investigators show how vestibular system's horizontal canals influence navigation

Dartmouth investigators show how vestibular system's horizontal canals influence navigation

Dartmouth researchers have found the first direct evidence showing how the vestibular system's horizontal canals play a key role in sensing our direction in the environment. [More]
AASM officially launches new telemedicine system to increase patient access to sleep medicine

AASM officially launches new telemedicine system to increase patient access to sleep medicine

Today the American Academy of Sleep Medicine officially launched AASM Sleep, a new state-of-the-art telemedicine platform that will dramatically increase patient access to the expertise of board-certified sleep medicine physicians and accredited sleep centers. [More]
Four USF professors selected as AIMBE College of Fellows

Four USF professors selected as AIMBE College of Fellows

Four University of South Florida professors have been elected to the 2016 College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE): Cesario Borlongan and Shyam Mohapatra from the USF Morsani College of Medicine, USF Health; and Robert Frisina, Jr., and Sudeep Sarkar from the USF College of Engineering. [More]
Best management unclear for patients needing carotid revascularisation

Best management unclear for patients needing carotid revascularisation

Research highlights the vulnerability of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis to stroke while awaiting revascularisation. [More]
Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration is a condition of the macula, a tiny area of the retina at the back of the eye. Your macula is only about the size of the grain of rice, that’s about four millimeters across. [More]
New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

The number of people living in high-rise buildings in rising, but along with the convenience and panoramic views of a downtown condo comes a risk: a new study found that survival rates from cardiac arrest decrease the higher up the building a person lives. [More]
TCAR procedure offers potentially safer method for high-risk stroke patients

TCAR procedure offers potentially safer method for high-risk stroke patients

The carotid arteries supply oxygenated blood to the brain. Every year, more than 300,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with blockages, or plaques, in their carotid artery. When these arteries become blocked due to plaque build-up, an individual is at high risk for a stroke if the plaque ruptures and flows to the brain. [More]
ABPI responds to latest publication of Scorecard data on use of NICE-approved medicines across NHS in England

ABPI responds to latest publication of Scorecard data on use of NICE-approved medicines across NHS in England

The figures, published today [Tuesday, 12 January] are from latest publication of the NICE Technology Appraisals in the NHS in England - Innovation Scorecard. [More]
Graph theoretical analysis may help predict recovery of motor function after stroke

Graph theoretical analysis may help predict recovery of motor function after stroke

Graph theoretical analysis is proving to be helpful in understanding complex networks in the brain. Investigators in the Republic of Korea used a graph theoretical approach in examining the changes in the configuration of the two hemispheres of the brain in 12 patients after stroke. [More]
Determining ectopeptidase activity: an interview with Professor Stephen Weber, University of Pittsburgh

Determining ectopeptidase activity: an interview with Professor Stephen Weber, University of Pittsburgh

The scope of the activity of neuropeptides is remarkably broad. For example, neuropeptides are involved in pain control, mood/depression/eating disorders, social and emotional behaviour, body weight, drug abuse, stress, reproduction, motor control, memory, and in maintaining neuronal health when they are stressed. [More]
New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

Buck Institute faculty Judith Campisi, PhD, says age researchers need to stop thinking of cellular senescence, now accepted as an important driver of aging, as a single phenotype that stems from genotoxic stress. Research from her lab reveals that cellular senescence, a process whereby cells permanently lose the ability to divide, is also induced by signaling from dysfunctional mitochondria - and that the arrested cells secrete a distinctly different "stew" of biologically active factors in a process unrelated to the damaging free radicals that are created in mitochondria as part of oxygen metabolism. [More]
Using statins before and after heart surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, mortality risks

Using statins before and after heart surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, mortality risks

Using statins before and after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, such as atrial fibrillation, following surgery and also can reduce the risk of death during and after surgery, according to a review article posted online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
New clinical study reveals previously unknown risk factors linked to keratoconus

New clinical study reveals previously unknown risk factors linked to keratoconus

A large new study reveals previously unknown risk factors associated with an eye condition that causes serious progressive nearsightedness at a relatively young age. [More]
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