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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Advances in fight against TB, sudden cardiac death

Advances in fight against TB, sudden cardiac death

Research projects into two of the biggest killers in worldwide health, tuberculosis and sudden cardiac death, will be the subjects of the University of Leicester Graduate School Doctoral Inaugural Lectures, delivered by two of the winners of this year's PhD prizes in the College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Engineering. [More]
Weight loss surgery and exercise lower risks of serious health problems

Weight loss surgery and exercise lower risks of serious health problems

Throughout the past year, studies on the positive effects of weight loss surgery have been published in a variety of medical journals in the US and abroad. We learned that weight loss surgery is relatively safe, and that it is effective in improving serious health conditions. More recently, we also learned that it is a factor in preventing Type 2 diabetes from developing in people considered to be pre-diabetic. [More]
Zydus Cadila becomes world's first company to launch biosimilar of Adalimumab

Zydus Cadila becomes world's first company to launch biosimilar of Adalimumab

After more than a decade-long wait, the revolutionary therapy that provided a new lease of life to millions of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and other auto immune disorders globally will now be accessible to patients in India. Zydus Cadila becomes the first company anywhere in the world to launch the biosimilar of Adalimumab - the world's largest selling therapy. [More]
Scientists receive NIH grants to explore sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Scientists receive NIH grants to explore sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Nine groups of scientists will receive funding totaling $5.9 million in 2014 to work together on increasing the understanding of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), the leading cause of death from epilepsy. The consortium becomes the second Center Without Walls, an initiative to speed the pace of research on difficult problems in epilepsy by promoting collaborative research. [More]
Case Western Reserve selected to lead $27.3 million international effort to identify causes of SUDEP

Case Western Reserve selected to lead $27.3 million international effort to identify causes of SUDEP

Case Western Reserve is one of two universities in the country selected to lead a $27.3 million international effort to identify the causes of a mysterious and deadly phenomenon that strikes people with epilepsy without warning. [More]
Studies presented at ASH meeting compare new, standard-of-care treatments for blood clots

Studies presented at ASH meeting compare new, standard-of-care treatments for blood clots

Studies presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition compare new and standard-of-care treatments for blood clots and further illuminate clot risks in vulnerable populations, such as cancer patients. [More]
Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

Verizon announces winners of 2014 Powerful Answers Award

The wait is over. Verizon is proud to announce the winners of Verizon's 2014 Powerful Answers Award, three in each of the following categories: education, health care, sustainability and transportation. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo releases new formulation of LIXIANA 60 mg Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo releases new formulation of LIXIANA 60 mg Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that it has launched a new formulation of LIXIANA 60 mg Tablets (JAN: Edoxaban Tosilate Hydrate, INN: edoxaban, approval to market: September 26, 2014; NHI drug price listing: November 25, 2014) in Japan for the recently approved indications: the prevention of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and the treatment and recurrence prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) [deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary thromboembolism (PE)]. [More]
Jakafi receives expanded approval from FDA for use in treatment of polycythemia vera

Jakafi receives expanded approval from FDA for use in treatment of polycythemia vera

Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc., the nation's largest independent specialty pharmacy, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved an expanded indication of Jakafi (ruxolitinib). [More]

Computer games benefit stroke survivors, improve arm movements

Stroke survivors can have "significant" improvement in arm movements after using the Nintendo Wii as physiotherapy according to researchers. [More]
Are you eating yourself to an early grave?

Are you eating yourself to an early grave?

A new study, published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, has shown that obesity may shorten life expectancy by ≤8 years and reduce the duration of healthy life by ≤19 years as a consequence of developing diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researchers evaluate barriers to coordinating 'transitional care' of older adults

Researchers evaluate barriers to coordinating 'transitional care' of older adults

In what is believed to be the first interview-style qualitative study of its kind among health care providers in the trenches, a team led by a Johns Hopkins geriatrician has further documented barriers to better care of older adults as they are transferred from hospital to rehabilitation center to home, and too often back again. [More]
UB researchers explore link between behavioral symptoms and chronic traumatic encephalopathy

UB researchers explore link between behavioral symptoms and chronic traumatic encephalopathy

Aggression, violence, depression, suicide. Media reports routinely link these behavioral symptoms with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the neurodegenerative brain disease, in former football players. [More]
Disease-associated malnutrition imposes economic burden on society

Disease-associated malnutrition imposes economic burden on society

Even in food-abundant industrialized countries like the U.S., an alarming number of people, particularly seniors, are in a state of diseased-associated malnutrition. Because of the impact on patient health, disease-associated malnutrition imposes a significant economic burden on society of $157 billion per year, according to new research published in a supplemental issue of the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and supported by Abbott. [More]
New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

Scientist in the U.S have developed a drug that could help paralysed victims of spinal cord injury regain their ability to move. [More]
Study explores association between statin use and cataracts

Study explores association between statin use and cataracts

Few classes of drugs have had such a transformative effect on the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) as have statins, prescribed to reduce total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. [More]

Controlling neural excitations may help prevent detrimental effects like those in stroke, say scientists

What do lasers, neural networks, and spreading epidemics have in common? They share a most basic feature whereby an initial pulse can propagate through a medium - be it physical, biological or socio-economic, respectively. The challenge is to gain a better understanding - and eventually control - of such systems, allowing them to be applied, for instance to real neural systems. This is the objective of a new theoretical study published in EPJ B by Clemens Bachmair and Eckehard Schöll from the Berlin University of Technology in Germany. [More]
New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

Case Western Reserve scientists have developed a new chemical compound that shows extraordinary promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury. The compound, which the researchers dubbed intracellular sigma peptide (ISP), allowed paralyzed muscles to activate in more than 80 percent of the animals tested. [More]
Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Daniel Thomas will be conducting a ground-breaking study to determine if cognitive decline due to memory-destroying Alzheimer's disease can begin to be reversed in 90 days by combating the root causes using an innovative combination of diet, exercise, vitamin supplements, hormone therapy, and intravenous nutrition. [More]
St. Mary's Medical Center adds Mazor Renaissance robot-assisted system to Spine Center

St. Mary's Medical Center adds Mazor Renaissance robot-assisted system to Spine Center

Dignity Health St. Mary's Medical Center has added the Mazor Robotics Renaissance computer-generated guidance system to its multidisciplinary Spine Center. St. Mary's is the only hospital in the Bay Area to exclusively offer this state-of-the-art technology for spine surgery. [More]