Stroke News and Research RSS Feed - Stroke News and Research Twitter

A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Dense blood clots linked to increased risk of premature death in hemodialysis patients

Dense blood clots linked to increased risk of premature death in hemodialysis patients

Dialysis patients may have altered blood clots that increase their risk of dying prematurely, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology [More]
Researchers develop innovative technique to examine and quantify blood vessels in the brain

Researchers develop innovative technique to examine and quantify blood vessels in the brain

A study published today in the Journal of Anatomy has made an important breakthrough in the examination of blood vessels in the brain giving scientists a clearer understanding of how dementia, brain cancer and stroke can affect veins and capillaries in this organ. [More]
Mediterranean diet may help provide long-term protection to the brain

Mediterranean diet may help provide long-term protection to the brain

A new study shows that older people who followed a Mediterranean diet retained more brain volume over a three-year period than those who did not follow the diet as closely. [More]
Study to test impact of diet on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias

Study to test impact of diet on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias

The first study of its kind designed to test the effects of a diet on the decline of cognitive abilities among a large group of individuals 65 to 84 years who currently do not have cognitive impairment will begin in January. [More]
Low neighborhood socioeconomic status linked to increased cardiovascular disease risk among black residents

Low neighborhood socioeconomic status linked to increased cardiovascular disease risk among black residents

The lower a neighborhood's socioeconomic status is, the more likely its black residents are to develop heart disease and stroke, according to a new Drexel University-led public health study. [More]
Afib patients more likely to discontinue anticoagulant therapy after procedure, research finds

Afib patients more likely to discontinue anticoagulant therapy after procedure, research finds

For patients with atrial fibrillation, the most common form of heart arrhythmia, a main goal of treatment is stroke prevention. [More]
New research suggests novel combination approach to fight against gliomas

New research suggests novel combination approach to fight against gliomas

"Devastating" and "dismal." That's how leading researchers describe the present outlook for malignant brain tumors. The median survival rate for patients with glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM, is a mere 14.2 months. [More]
Research findings on sweat glands have potential to improve methods for culturing skin grafts

Research findings on sweat glands have potential to improve methods for culturing skin grafts

As early humans shed the hairy coats of their closest evolutionary ancestors, they also gained a distinct feature that would prove critical to their success: a type of sweat gland that allows the body to cool down quickly. Those tiny glands are enormously useful, allowing us to live in a wide variety of climates, and enabling us to run long distances. [More]
Study shows new role of zinc in optic nerve injury

Study shows new role of zinc in optic nerve injury

For more than two decades, researchers have tried to regenerate the injured optic nerve using different growth factors and/or agents that overcome natural growth inhibition. [More]
Researchers examine national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after noncardiac surgery

Researchers examine national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after noncardiac surgery

In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Sripal Bangalore, M.D., M.H.A., of the New York University School of Medicine, New York, and colleagues examined national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after major noncardiac surgery. [More]
Fenofibrate drug may reduce risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes

Fenofibrate drug may reduce risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes

A new study shows that the drug fenofibrate might reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes who have high levels of triglycerides and low levels of "good" cholesterol, despite being treated with statins. [More]
Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that get worse with exposure

Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that get worse with exposure

Welders can develop Parkinson's disease-like symptoms that may get worse the longer and more they are exposed to the chemical element manganese from welding fumes, according to a study published in the December 28, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New comprehensive study lists top personal health expenses in the U.S.

New comprehensive study lists top personal health expenses in the U.S.

Just 20 conditions make up more than half of all spending on health care in the United States, according to a new comprehensive financial analysis that examines spending by diseases and injuries. [More]
New findings about key cellular protein could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative diseases

New findings about key cellular protein could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative diseases

New details learned about a key cellular protein could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Saint Louis University geriatrician urges older patients to talk to doctors about too many pills

Saint Louis University geriatrician urges older patients to talk to doctors about too many pills

If you're 65 or older and taking more than four medications, resolve to talk to your doctor about doing a New Year's triage to make sure too many pills aren't making you sick, advises Milta Little, D.O., associate professor of geriatrics at Saint Louis University. [More]
Study highlights barriers to HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa

Study highlights barriers to HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa

Barriers to diagnosis and lack of access to modern medications have combined to place caregivers and HIV-positive patients in sub-Saharan Africa between a rock and a hard place. [More]
Cycle Pharmaceuticals receives license for IP on PARP inhibitor drugs for treating vascular disease

Cycle Pharmaceuticals receives license for IP on PARP inhibitor drugs for treating vascular disease

Cambridge Enterprise has exclusively licensed intellectual property relating to the use of PARP inhibitor drugs for treating vascular disease to CYCLE Pharmaceuticals. [More]
Cedars-Sinai expert explains how to recognize signs and symptoms of stroke during the holidays

Cedars-Sinai expert explains how to recognize signs and symptoms of stroke during the holidays

Along with increased cheer and festivities during the holidays comes an increased risk of stroke, one of the leading causes of death and disability in the U.S. [More]
Scientists discover OGDHL and NRD1 genes linked to progressive loss of neurological function

Scientists discover OGDHL and NRD1 genes linked to progressive loss of neurological function

An international team of scientists has discovered that the gene, OGDHL, a key protein required for normal function of the mitochondria -- the energy-producing factory of the cell -- and its chaperone, nardilysin (NRD1) are linked to progressive loss of neurological function in humans. [More]
Recovery from TBI appears to go hand-in-hand with improvement of sleep problems

Recovery from TBI appears to go hand-in-hand with improvement of sleep problems

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), people also experience major sleep problems, including changes in their sleep-wake cycle. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement