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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Semler receives 510(k) marketing clearance from FDA for next generation PAD testing system

Semler receives 510(k) marketing clearance from FDA for next generation PAD testing system

Semler Scientific, Inc., an emerging medical risk assessment company that develops, manufactures and markets patented products that assist healthcare providers in monitoring patients and evaluating chronic diseases, today announced receipt of 510(k) marketing clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its next generation peripheral artery disease (PAD) testing system. [More]
MTfp-­siRNA reduces blood vessel infarct, improves overall brain activity in ischemic stroke model

MTfp-­siRNA reduces blood vessel infarct, improves overall brain activity in ischemic stroke model

BIOASIS TECHNOLOGIES INC., a pioneering biopharmaceutical company focused on overcoming the limitations of therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-­‐brain barrier (BBB), announces the results from an animal ischemic stroke model performed at the National Research Council Canada with the biOasis Transcend carrier peptide, MTfp and siRNA (MTfp-­‐siRNA). [More]
New scoring system may help predict memory and thinking problems in elderly people

New scoring system may help predict memory and thinking problems in elderly people

Researchers have developed a new scoring system to help determine which elderly people may be at a higher risk of developing the memory and thinking problems that can lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the March 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Men and women who adapt their daily diet to meet current UK dietary guidelines could reduce their risk of a heart attack or a stroke by up to a third, according to a new study by King's College London. [More]
Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Hormones may not protect women from heart disease or stroke after menopause, but when combined with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, they may help protect women from these killers, shows a population study from Sweden to be published in the April issue of Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Extended dual antiplatelet therapy after DES implantation increases mortality

Extended dual antiplatelet therapy after DES implantation increases mortality

Data from a meta-analysis published today in The Lancet found that extended duration dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation was associated with significantly higher rates of mortality compared to shorter DAPT. [More]
Transcatheter MitraClip system safe, effective for valve repair treatment

Transcatheter MitraClip system safe, effective for valve repair treatment

The commercial track record with transcatheter mitral valve repair, approved for patients at high risk for surgery, compares favorably with pre-approval reports, according to findings from a U.S. registry presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Novel device improves in-hospital safety outcomes, cognitive scores at discharge

Novel device improves in-hospital safety outcomes, cognitive scores at discharge

An investigational device that deflects debris away from the brain during transcatheter aortic valve replacement seems to improve in-hospital safety outcomes and cognitive scores at discharge, according to preliminary findings from a small randomized study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Increasing diet soda intake linked to greater abdominal obesity in older adults

Increasing diet soda intake linked to greater abdominal obesity in older adults

A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society shows that increasing diet soda intake is directly linked to greater abdominal obesity in adults 65 years of age and older. Findings raise concerns about the safety of chronic diet soda consumption, which may increase belly fat and contribute to greater risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Routine use of thrombectomy in heart attack patients may increase risk of stroke

Routine use of thrombectomy in heart attack patients may increase risk of stroke

The largest study ever of its kind, led by researchers from McMaster University and the University of Toronto, has found that a routine strategy of blood clot removal during treatment for heart attacks was not beneficial and was associated with an increased risk of stroke. [More]
Simple screening test can predict increased risk of heart disease in diabetic patients

Simple screening test can predict increased risk of heart disease in diabetic patients

A simple and inexpensive screening test can show which diabetic patients face an increased risk of heart disease, which can help them get the care they need, faster — and proactively reduce their risk of heart disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. [More]
Study: Remote ischemic preconditioning not effective in improving heart bypass outcomes

Study: Remote ischemic preconditioning not effective in improving heart bypass outcomes

Patients who underwent a simple conditioning procedure involving the inflation and deflation of a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm before coronary artery bypass grafting, known as heart bypass surgery, had no better long-term health outcomes than bypass patients who did not receive the conditioning, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego. [More]
Study tracks long-term effects of weight loss on atrial fibrillation burden

Study tracks long-term effects of weight loss on atrial fibrillation burden

Obese patients with atrial fibrillation who lost at least 10 percent of their body weight were six times more likely to achieve long-term freedom from this common heart rhythm disorder compared to those who did not lose weight, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Patients who receive ablation during mitral valve surgery have less episodes of atrial fibrillation

Patients who receive ablation during mitral valve surgery have less episodes of atrial fibrillation

Patients with atrial fibrillation who received ablation while they were already undergoing surgery to correct a leaky heart valve had fewer episodes of atrial fibrillation a year later compared to patients who had the valve surgery alone, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
NYU Langone Medical Center researchers find that air pollution may pose significant stroke risk

NYU Langone Medical Center researchers find that air pollution may pose significant stroke risk

Air pollution has been linked to a dangerous narrowing of neck arteries that occurs prior to strokes, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Yale researchers test new device that protects patients' brain during heart-valve replacement procedure

Yale researchers test new device that protects patients' brain during heart-valve replacement procedure

In the first multicenter trial of its kind, Yale researchers tested a new device that lowers the risk of stroke and cognitive decline in patients undergoing heart-valve replacement. [More]
Combined use of enalapril and folic acid can significantly reduce risk of first stroke

Combined use of enalapril and folic acid can significantly reduce risk of first stroke

In a study that included more than 20,000 adults in China with high blood pressure but without a history of stroke or heart attack, the combined use of the hypertension medication enalapril and folic acid, compared with enalapril alone, significantly reduced the risk of first stroke, according to a study appearing in JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the American College of Cardiology Annual Scientific Session. [More]
AASM publishes new quality measures for common sleep disorders

AASM publishes new quality measures for common sleep disorders

Today the American Academy of Sleep Medicine published new quality measures for five common sleep disorders, which represents a landmark achievement in the promotion of high quality, patient-centered care in the medical subspecialty of sleep medicine. [More]
Creatine monohydrate disappoints in Parkinson’s disease

Creatine monohydrate disappoints in Parkinson’s disease

Creatine monohydrate fails to live up to its early promise in patients with Parkinson’s disease, show the results of the Long-term Study 1. [More]
Metabolic derangement may facilitate cell proliferation in PAH

Metabolic derangement may facilitate cell proliferation in PAH

An enzyme that facilitates modification of proteins via a glucose metabolism pathway may promote cell proliferation in the lung tissue of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, say researchers. [More]
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