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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms that drive ferroptosis signaling

Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms that drive ferroptosis signaling

Ferroptosis is a recently recognized form of regulated necrosis. Up until now, this form of cell death has only been thought to be a possible therapeutic approach to treat tumour cells. Yet, ferroptosis also occurs in non-transformed tissues as demonstrated by this study, thus implicating this cell death pathway in the development of a wide range of pathological conditions. More specifically, the deletion of the ferroptosis-regulating enzyme Gpx4 in a pre-clinical model results in high ferroptosis rates in kidney tubular epithelial cells causing acute renal failure. [More]
Janssen announces submission of NDA for three-month paliperidone palmitate

Janssen announces submission of NDA for three-month paliperidone palmitate

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a New Drug Application (NDA) for three-month atypical antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The NDA seeks approval for the medication as a treatment for schizophrenia in adults. [More]
Cholesterol efflux appears to be superior indicator of cardiovascular risk

Cholesterol efflux appears to be superior indicator of cardiovascular risk

Groundbreaking research from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that cholesterol efflux capacity (cholesterol efflux), which measures HDL cholesterol function, appears to be a superior indicator of cardiovascular risk and a better target for therapeutic treatments than standard measurements of HDL. Current measurement methods reflect only the circulating levels of HDL and not the functional properties of this lipoprotein. [More]
Health Canada to review evidence on the safety of long-term use of prescription blood-thinners

Health Canada to review evidence on the safety of long-term use of prescription blood-thinners

Health Canada is aware of and will be reviewing new evidence on the safety of long-term use of the prescription blood-thinners clopidogrel (Plavix) and prasugrel (Effient). [More]
Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

The landmark discovery of a tiny defect in a vital heart protein has for the first time enabled heart specialists to accurately pinpoint a therapeutic target for future efforts in developing a drug-based cure for cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Asthma associated with higher risk of heart attack or stroke

Asthma associated with higher risk of heart attack or stroke

Asthma that requires daily medication is associated with a significantly higher risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. [More]
Adding ezetimibe to statin therapy reduces cardiovascular events

Adding ezetimibe to statin therapy reduces cardiovascular events

More than a decade ago, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital demonstrated that a high dose statin, which lowered cholesterol further than a regular dose statin, provided better clinical outcomes. But questions remained about whether further reducing cholesterol would be even more effective in reducing cardiovascular-related events. [More]
Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Black patients who have been diagnosed with heart failure are no less likely than white patients to get atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia), according to a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which was presented today at the 2014 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association. [More]
UMMS scientists awarded $9.5 million grant to study Fragile X syndrome

UMMS scientists awarded $9.5 million grant to study Fragile X syndrome

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $9.5 million grant to investigators at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to establish a Center for Collaborative Research in Fragile X, one of three centers designated by the NIH. [More]
Three Johns Hopkins hospitals recognized as Top Performer on Key Quality Measures

Three Johns Hopkins hospitals recognized as Top Performer on Key Quality Measures

Three Johns Hopkins Medicine hospitals are recipients of The Joint Commission’s 2013 Top Performer on Key Quality Measures award. The Top Performer program recognizes hospitals for improving performance on evidence-based interventions that increase the chances of healthy outcomes for patients with certain conditions, including heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, surgical care, children’s asthma, stroke, venous thromboembolism (VTE) and perinatal care, as well as for inpatient psychiatric services and immunizations. [More]
New anti-cancer drug may protect normal cells against radiation

New anti-cancer drug may protect normal cells against radiation

Although radiation treatments have become much more refined in recent years, it remains a challenge to both sufficiently dose the tumor while sparing the surrounding tissue. [More]
Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

When individuals suffer a spinal cord injury, paralysis is only a part of the major impact on quality of life. Often they also lose bladder control, which frequently causes infections that can lead to kidney damage. [More]
Impaired brain circulation in African Americans can increase risk of cerebrovascular disease

Impaired brain circulation in African Americans can increase risk of cerebrovascular disease

Researchers at The University of Texas have found that compared to Caucasian Americans, African Americans have impaired blood flow regulation in the brain that could contribute to a greater risk of cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke, transient ischaemic attack ("mini stroke"), subarachnoid haemorrhage or vascular dementia. [More]
Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

What makes some women more susceptible to heart disease than others? To help answer that question, researchers at Western University's Robarts Research Institute have identified that an estrogen receptor, previously shown to regulate blood pressure in women, also plays an important role in regulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. [More]
Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Taking vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements may not reduce the risk of memory and thinking problems after all, according to a new study published in the November 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the largest to date to test long-term use of supplements and thinking and memory skills. [More]
Prescription opioids involved in 67.8% of nationwide ED visits in 2010, find researchers

Prescription opioids involved in 67.8% of nationwide ED visits in 2010, find researchers

Researchers from Rhode Island and The Miriam hospitals and the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that prescription opioids, including methadone, were involved in 67.8 percent of (or over 135,971 visits to) nationwide emergency department (ED) visits in 2010, with the highest proportion of opioid overdoses occurring in the South. [More]
Rose Medical Center becomes first hospital in Colorado to perform new procedure for PAD patients

Rose Medical Center becomes first hospital in Colorado to perform new procedure for PAD patients

Rose Medical Center is the first hospital in Colorado to perform a new and innovative procedure for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Utilizing the Lutonix 035 Drug Coated Balloon PTA Catheter, surgeons are able to perform a balloon angioplasty in patients with PAD using a special drug-coated balloon (DCB) that delivers a small amount of medication to the inside walls of the diseased portion of the artery. [More]
Study: Heart attack, stroke survivors' physical limitations rapidly increase over decade

Study: Heart attack, stroke survivors' physical limitations rapidly increase over decade

A record number of people are surviving heart attacks and stroke but those who do may experience a sharp decline in physical abilities that steadily accelerates over time, according to a new nationally-representative study led by the University of Michigan. [More]
First steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer identified by Mayo Clinic researchers

First steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer identified by Mayo Clinic researchers

Researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville say they have identified first steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer and that their findings suggest preventive strategies to explore. [More]
Effective health interventions needed to increase life expectancy of older people

Effective health interventions needed to increase life expectancy of older people

A major new Series on health and ageing, published in "The Lancet", warns that unless health systems find effective strategies to address the problems faced by an ageing world population, the growing burden of chronic disease will greatly affect the quality of life of older people. As people across the world live longer, soaring levels of chronic illness and diminished wellbeing are poised to become a major global public health challenge. [More]