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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
UI study offers good news for care givers, health care providers

UI study offers good news for care givers, health care providers

A new University of Iowa study further supports an inescapable message: caregivers have a profound influence-good or bad-on the emotional state of individuals with Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Enlargement of left atrial appendage may be a risk factor of strokes with cardiac origin: Finnish study

Enlargement of left atrial appendage may be a risk factor of strokes with cardiac origin: Finnish study

More than half of the patients who have suffered a stroke with no well-defined aetiology have an enlarged left atrial appendage of the heart, according to a Finnish study. The results indicate that the enlargement of the left atrial appendage may be an independent risk factor of strokes with cardiac origin. [More]
People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

New research suggests that people without dementia who begin reporting memory issues may be more likely to develop dementia later, even if they have no clinical signs of the disease. [More]
Northwestern scientists develop first animal model for ALS dementia

Northwestern scientists develop first animal model for ALS dementia

The first animal model for ALS dementia, a form of ALS that also damages the brain, has been developed by Northwestern Medicine- scientists. The advance will allow researchers to directly see the brains of living mice, under anesthesia, at the microscopic level. This will allow direct monitoring of test drugs to determine if they work. [More]
ACT for NIH seeks significant funding increase to enhance life-saving medical research

ACT for NIH seeks significant funding increase to enhance life-saving medical research

ACT for NIH: Advancing Cures Today announced a national, non-partisan effort to seek an immediate, significant funding increase for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to enhance life-saving medical research for patients around the world. [More]
Tips for instilling positive dental habits in children

Tips for instilling positive dental habits in children

It's possible you've heard the alarming news; over 78% of adult Americans currently have some form of gum disease. [More]
Mfn2 protein: A future therapeutic target for neuronal death reduction in ischemic stroke

Mfn2 protein: A future therapeutic target for neuronal death reduction in ischemic stroke

A new study published in the prestigious publication The EMBO Journal shows that the mitochondrial protein Mfn2 may be a future therapeutic target for neuronal death reduction in the late phases of an ischemic stroke. [More]
Foot drop stimulator may facilitate recovery from common complication of stroke

Foot drop stimulator may facilitate recovery from common complication of stroke

Kessler Foundation scientists have published a study showing that use of a foot drop stimulator during a task-specific movement for 4 weeks can retrain the neuromuscular system. This finding indicates that applying the foot drop stimulator as rehabilitation intervention may facilitate recovery from this common complication of stroke. [More]
Kaiser Permanente supports AHA to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans

Kaiser Permanente supports AHA to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans

Kaiser Permanente, the nation's largest integrated health care system, will support the American Heart Association in a broad effort to improve blood pressure control for African-Americans in two U.S. cities over three years. [More]
New evidence-based guidelines for prevention, treatment of POAF

New evidence-based guidelines for prevention, treatment of POAF

The American Association for Thoracic Surgery has released new evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of perioperative and postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) and flutter for thoracic surgical procedures. [More]
Pilot study shows benefits of psychoeducational wellness program in MS people

Pilot study shows benefits of psychoeducational wellness program in MS people

Kessler researchers have published a pilot study showing the benefits of a 10-week psychoeducational wellness program in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Improvements were seen in mood, overall mental health, perceived stress, and pain. [More]
South Asians in Canada have higher rate of heart disease compared with white people

South Asians in Canada have higher rate of heart disease compared with white people

South Asians living in Canada have a higher rate of heart disease and double the rate of diabetes compared with while people, McMaster researchers have found. [More]
Pneumonia in COPD patients has distinct clinical features

Pneumonia in COPD patients has distinct clinical features

The aetiology and clinical features of community-acquired pneumonia are different in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than in those without the lung condition, Spanish research demonstrates. [More]
Metabolic abnormalities predict severe hypertension

Metabolic abnormalities predict severe hypertension

Components of the metabolic syndrome, as well as a family history of hypertension, identify people at risk of developing severe hypertension, say researchers. [More]
EYLEA Injection gets approval in Japan for treatment of myopic CNV

EYLEA Injection gets approval in Japan for treatment of myopic CNV

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that Bayer HealthCare's Japanese subsidiary, Bayer Yakuhin, Ltd. has received approval from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for myopic choroidal neovascularization (myopic CNV). [More]
Novel technique uses genetic tool and light to map neural networks

Novel technique uses genetic tool and light to map neural networks

For years, neuroscientists have been trying to develop tools that would allow them to clearly view the brain's circuitry in action-from the first moment a neuron fires to the resulting behavior in a whole organism. [More]
GWU researcher receives AHA grant to study diffuse brain swelling, injury in ICH patients

GWU researcher receives AHA grant to study diffuse brain swelling, injury in ICH patients

Shahram Majidi, M.D., a second-year resident in the Department of Neurology at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, received at $154K grant from the American Heart Association to study the presence of diffuse brain swelling and injury in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). [More]
NCH advances cardiovascular service line in northwest suburbs

NCH advances cardiovascular service line in northwest suburbs

Northwest Community Healthcare is strengthening cardiovascular care for patients in the northwest suburbs by advancing its cardiovascular service line. NCH has new relationships with cardiothoracic surgeons, vascular surgeons and cardiologists, and, in addition, has announced plans to open a new heart failure clinic this fall in Mount Prospect. [More]
Health law, Medicare remain hot topics in campaign commercials

Health law, Medicare remain hot topics in campaign commercials

Politico reports that, although the health law and other related issues may not be the flashpoints they were in other recent election years, they still have muscle on the campaign trail. [More]
People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

A new study suggests that people who experience migraine in middle age may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, or other movement disorders later in life. Those who have migraine with aura may be at double the risk of developing Parkinson's, according to the study published in the September 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]