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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

In middle aged populations, the risks of cardiovascular conditions are progressively lower the longer a person's parents lived past 69 years old, according to a study of 186,000 participants using a voluntary database published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
New, non-invasive way to monitor progression of Parkinson's disease may help improve treatment

New, non-invasive way to monitor progression of Parkinson's disease may help improve treatment

A new, non-invasive way to track the progression of Parkinson's disease could help evaluate experimental treatments to slow or stop the disease's progression. [More]
Multi-user virtual reality world can improve communication in stroke survivors with aphasia

Multi-user virtual reality world can improve communication in stroke survivors with aphasia

A virtual reality world called EVA Park can improve the communication of those who have impaired speech and language following a stroke, according to research by academics at City University London. [More]
Six tips to incorporate movement into everyday life

Six tips to incorporate movement into everyday life

Commuters and desk sitters have probably heard the news that sitting is not good for our health. [More]
Scientists find new functions of ANG protein that plays key role in regulation of blood cell formation

Scientists find new functions of ANG protein that plays key role in regulation of blood cell formation

Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University scientists have found exciting, new functions of the protein angiogenin that play a significant role in the regulation of blood cell formation, important in bone marrow transplantation and recovery from radiation-induced bone marrow failure. [More]
New research shows high and low levels of HDL cholesterol may increase risk of early death

New research shows high and low levels of HDL cholesterol may increase risk of early death

Commonly touted as "good cholesterol" for helping to reduce risk of stroke and heart attack, both high and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol may increase a person's risk of premature death, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. [More]
Ongoing Europe-wide study reveals people who drive cars heavier than cyclists

Ongoing Europe-wide study reveals people who drive cars heavier than cyclists

People who drive cars as their main form of transport are on average heavier than those who cycle, according to an ongoing Europe-wide study. [More]
Early treatment of multiple sclerosis may offer long-lasting effect on disease activity

Early treatment of multiple sclerosis may offer long-lasting effect on disease activity

Starting medication for multiple sclerosis (MS) in people who show the beginning signs of the disease is associated with prolonging the time before the disease is definitively diagnosed, according to a long-term study published in the August 10, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Seventy million people in this country - 20 percent of the US population -- will be 65 or older by 2030. If you're one of them, you probably think often about how to stay as fit and healthy as possible. But, you may not be giving as much thought to the health of your teeth. [More]
Easy-to-test clinical markers may help identify people at risk for age-related neurological diseases

Easy-to-test clinical markers may help identify people at risk for age-related neurological diseases

A new study, based on data from the Framingham Heart Study suggests a simple test of physical functioning may be able to help physicians identify individuals who are at a higher risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and stroke. [More]
Commonly-used stroke prevention drug may not control blood clotting over long term

Commonly-used stroke prevention drug may not control blood clotting over long term

Warfarin prescribed to prevent strokes in atrial fibrillation may not adequately control blood clotting over the long-term, even when patients have been historically stable on the drug, according to a study from the Duke Clinical Research Institute. [More]
Cerebral protection device reduces brain lesions after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis

Cerebral protection device reduces brain lesions after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis

Among patients with severe aortic stenosis (narrowing of the aortic valve) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation, the use of a cerebral protection device (a filter that captures debris [tissue and plaque] dislodged during the procedure) reduced the number and volume of brain lesions, according to a study appearing in the August 9 issue of JAMA. [More]
New bioinspired device could diagnose formation of blood clots

New bioinspired device could diagnose formation of blood clots

When in dysfunction, the vascular endothelium -- the tissue that lines the blood vessels throughout our body's entire circulatory system -- plays a big role in the development of many human diseases, including diabetes, stroke, heart disease, viral infections and cancer. [More]
Working or volunteering could decrease chances of physical disability in elders

Working or volunteering could decrease chances of physical disability in elders

Working or volunteering can reduce the chances of chronic health conditions leading to physical disability in older Americans, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Florida State University. [More]
Researcher receives grant to study how changes in gut bacteria could lead to obesity-related disorders

Researcher receives grant to study how changes in gut bacteria could lead to obesity-related disorders

Andrew Gewirtz, a professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, has received a four-year, $1.8-million federal grant to study how changes in intestinal bacteria could lead to obesity and metabolic syndrome. [More]
Gasotransmitters in the body could potentially be used to develop new drugs

Gasotransmitters in the body could potentially be used to develop new drugs

Gases once thought of only as environmental pollutants are now known to be produced by the body. They could potentially be used to develop drugs to treat diseases including heart failure and cancer. [More]
High medical costs force many Australians to skip healthcare treatment

High medical costs force many Australians to skip healthcare treatment

New research shows one in four chronically ill Australians is skipping healthcare because of high costs. [More]
Triple therapy approach helps Type 1 diabetes patients improve blood sugar control, lose weight

Triple therapy approach helps Type 1 diabetes patients improve blood sugar control, lose weight

A combination of three medications—dapagliflozin, liraglutide and insulin—helped people with Type 1 diabetes improve blood sugar control and lose weight, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Proper technique, training can prevent shoulder injuries in elite and competitive swimmers

Proper technique, training can prevent shoulder injuries in elite and competitive swimmers

Elite and competitive swimmers log between 60,000 and 80,000 meters weekly--swimming the length of an Olympic-sized pool 1,200 times--which places significant stress on their shoulder joints. [More]
Watch-and-wait approach may prove successful in subset of adults with advanced kidney cancer

Watch-and-wait approach may prove successful in subset of adults with advanced kidney cancer

Watch-and-wait approach means some patients could delay taking highly toxic non-curative anticancer drugs that come with substantial side effects [More]
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