Stroke News and Research RSS Feed - Stroke News and Research Twitter

A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Clinical review of patients with atrial fibrillation prevents hundreds of strokes, saves NHS millions of pounds

Clinical review of patients with atrial fibrillation prevents hundreds of strokes, saves NHS millions of pounds

A review of 135,000 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) at more than a 1,000 GP practices led to over 25,000 medical interventions, which is believed to have prevented hundreds of strokes and saved the NHS millions of pounds. [More]
International researchers discover 44 novel gene sites linked to hypertension

International researchers discover 44 novel gene sites linked to hypertension

In papers receiving advance online publication in Nature Genetics, two international multi-institutional research teams describe identifying a total of 44 novel gene sites associated with hypertension or high blood pressure. [More]
Researchers uncover specific sites in the genome linked to high blood pressure

Researchers uncover specific sites in the genome linked to high blood pressure

Three large, collaborating international consortia of researchers, including a team co-led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, have uncovered new genes and sites in the genome tied to elevated blood pressure, implicating certain biological pathways and pointing toward new therapeutic strategies for treating hypertension. [More]
New mouse model helps identify potential drug target for hard-to-treat social aspects of ASD

New mouse model helps identify potential drug target for hard-to-treat social aspects of ASD

A study of a new mouse model identifies a drug target that has the potential to increase social interaction in individuals with some forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The team published their work in Biological Psychiatry. [More]
Risk for depression appears to be higher in first three months after stroke, study finds

Risk for depression appears to be higher in first three months after stroke, study finds

During the first three months after stroke, the risk for depression was eight times higher than in a reference population of people without stroke, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
Different types of stroke have diverse risk profiles in overweight or obese women

Different types of stroke have diverse risk profiles in overweight or obese women

According to new research, women who are overweight or obese may have an increased risk of the most common kind of stroke, called ischemic stroke, but a decreased risk of a more often deadly stroke, called hemorrhagic stroke. [More]
Strong social support may lead to shorter stay in rehab facility, better recovery of patients

Strong social support may lead to shorter stay in rehab facility, better recovery of patients

Sometimes the best medicine is the care of family and friends. A recent study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston showed that patients with strong social support from family and friends spend less time in an inpatient rehabilitation facility. [More]
Montreal-based researchers get closer to achieving healthy longevity

Montreal-based researchers get closer to achieving healthy longevity

Hearing loss, brittle bones, sagging skin, a deteriorating mind: these are just some of the issues associated with growing old. [More]
Study reveals how sex affects heart health in later life

Study reveals how sex affects heart health in later life

Having sex frequently - and enjoying it - puts older men at higher risk for heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems. For older women, however, good sex may actually lower the risk of hypertension. [More]
New protocol may decrease occurrence of POAF in heart patients

New protocol may decrease occurrence of POAF in heart patients

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a condition in which the upper chambers of the heart contract in a way that's out of sync with the lower chambers, causing an irregular heartbeat and poor blood flow to the body. [More]
PSA failure linked to increased risk of death among healthy men

PSA failure linked to increased risk of death among healthy men

A new study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital has found that a rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in healthy men who have previously been treated for prostate cancer is significantly associated with a 1.6-fold increased risk of death. [More]
New Focused Update to CCS atrial fibrillation guidelines released

New Focused Update to CCS atrial fibrillation guidelines released

The Canadian Journal of Cardiology has just released the 2016 Focused Update to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society's atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines. [More]
Philips unveils new products for healthy lifestyle at IFA 2016

Philips unveils new products for healthy lifestyle at IFA 2016

At this year’s Internationale Funkausstellung in Berlin, Germany, Royal Philips today announced a range of new products that empower consumers to stay healthy, live well and enjoy life. [More]
Researchers uncover molecular differences between African and Asian strain of Zika virus infections

Researchers uncover molecular differences between African and Asian strain of Zika virus infections

Scientists have revealed molecular differences between how the African and Asian strains of Zika virus infect neural progenitor cells. [More]
Low levels of diastolic blood pressure linked to heart damage risk

Low levels of diastolic blood pressure linked to heart damage risk

By analyzing medical records gathered over three decades on more than 11,000 Americans participating in a federally funded study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have more evidence that driving diastolic blood pressure too low is associated with damage to heart tissue. [More]
Hospitals with high readmission rates more likely to show better mortality scores

Hospitals with high readmission rates more likely to show better mortality scores

A group of Johns Hopkins physicians and researchers today published an article in the Journal of Hospital Medicine suggesting that data on mortality and hospital readmission used by the United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid suggest a potentially problematic relationship. [More]
Taking two new epilepsy drugs during pregnancy may not harm thinking skills and IQs of children

Taking two new epilepsy drugs during pregnancy may not harm thinking skills and IQs of children

Two epilepsy drugs, levetiracetam and topiramate, may not harm the thinking skills and IQs of school-age children born to women who took them while pregnant, according to a recent study. [More]
New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias

New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias

In the August 31 issue of Science Translational Medicine, new research from the University of Chicago shows how deficits in a specific pathway of genes can lead to the development of atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, which poses a significant health risk. [More]
UTHealth scientists discover powerful predictors of congestive heart failure

UTHealth scientists discover powerful predictors of congestive heart failure

A team of scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and Baylor College of Medicine, led by Eric Boerwinkle, Ph.D., Richard Gibbs, Ph.D., and Bing Yu, Ph.D., have identified powerful predictors of congestive heart failure, a major cause of hospitalization and death in the United States. [More]
New non-invasive method could lead to better treatment and diagnosis of migraines

New non-invasive method could lead to better treatment and diagnosis of migraines

New UBC research has found that amplified electroencephalograms (EEGs) can produce diagnostic results of a brainwave associated with migraines and epilepsy that are comparable to the current, more invasive, standard--a discovery that could lead to better treatment and diagnosis of these conditions. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement