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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Women may halve their stroke risk through healthy living, new study shows

Women may halve their stroke risk through healthy living, new study shows

Women who follow a healthy lifestyle may be cutting their risk of stroke by more than 50%, report Swedish researchers. [More]
Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with a healthy diet and lifestyle may be less likely to have a stroke by more than half, according to a study published in the October 8, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Temple researchers to create awareness about healthy diet among low-income Asian Americans

Temple researchers to create awareness about healthy diet among low-income Asian Americans

Although low-income Asian Americans are at a high risk for diabetes, hypertension, heart attack and stroke, they are under a misconception that their diet is healthy and not a risk factor for these chronic diseases. [More]
Discovery could lead to treatments for alcohol-related liver diseases

Discovery could lead to treatments for alcohol-related liver diseases

Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified epigenetic protein changes caused by binge drinking, a discovery that could lead to treatments for alcohol-related liver diseases. [More]
Closer monitoring needed to help prevent repeat strokes

Closer monitoring needed to help prevent repeat strokes

People who have had a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA or mini-stroke) are at high risk for a second similar event or other serious medical problems for at least five years and need better follow up and strategies to prevent these problems, according to data presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress. [More]
Sleeping with dentures increases pneumonia risk in elderly

Sleeping with dentures increases pneumonia risk in elderly

Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health-related risk factors, lead researcher Toshimitsu Iinuma, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Japan, and a team of researchers prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incidences of pneumonia in the community-living of elders 85 years of age or older. [More]
AHA and Electrolux team up to highlight the importance of healthy lifestyle

AHA and Electrolux team up to highlight the importance of healthy lifestyle

Today, Charlotte middle school students showcased their kitchen expertise in an Iron Chef style competition in the Kids Cook with Heart cooking challenge. [More]
Clot-buster shows promise in treating less severe forms of traumatic brain injury

Clot-buster shows promise in treating less severe forms of traumatic brain injury

The only drug currently approved for treatment of stroke's crippling effects shows promise, when administered as a nasal spray, to help heal similar damage in less severe forms of traumatic brain injury. [More]
Alberta study shows how smaller centers drive better outcomes for patients

Alberta study shows how smaller centers drive better outcomes for patients

A new model for stroke care is being studied in rural Alberta to reduce inequities in health across communities. This model, presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress, shows how hospitals in rural areas can mimic the type of care that's often only available in larger centres. [More]
New Aalborg University center to study link between maladaptive central nervous system, chronic pain

New Aalborg University center to study link between maladaptive central nervous system, chronic pain

A new research center at Aalborg University in Denmark will investigate how a maladaptive central nervous system can be responsible for the enduring or chronic pain that affects one in five adult Danes. If this major ambition is fulfilled, it may turn the understanding of the pain system on its head and improve treatment. [More]
State highlights: Ohio Medicaid and senior annuities; Mich. extends Medicaid dental coverage for kids

State highlights: Ohio Medicaid and senior annuities; Mich. extends Medicaid dental coverage for kids

A war is being waged in Ohio over whether elderly couples with one person in a nursing home can buy an annuity to keep the other from going broke -- and still apply for public assistance. Elder-law attorneys say the state isn't following federal laws regarding Medicaid-compliant annuities, and that's hurting middle-class seniors who worked hard and saved for a rainy day. Several courts seem to agree, with one judge recently putting the state on notice that it could lose millions of dollars in federal funding if it doesn't change its ways (Pyle, 10/6). [More]
Poor body mechanics cause chronic lower back pain

Poor body mechanics cause chronic lower back pain

If you want to steer clear of lower back pain, remember this: Arch is good, flat is bad. [More]
New implantable device can control heart failure

New implantable device can control heart failure

A new, implantable device to control heart failure is showing promising results in the first trial to determine safety and effectiveness in patients, according to lead researcher Dr. William Abraham of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. [More]
U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

Deep in the brains of the million Americans with Parkinson's disease, changes to their brain cells put them at high risk of dangerous falls -- a problem that resists even the most modern treatments. [More]
Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

At the first sign of a stroke, time is of the essence. For every minute of delay in treatment, people typically lose almost two million brain cells. Yet a new study presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress reveals that those delays - in getting the right tests and the right drugs - can be longer when people experience a stroke in a hospital. [More]
'Win-win' program provides better care to stroke patients, reduces hospital bed days

'Win-win' program provides better care to stroke patients, reduces hospital bed days

An innovative patient management system at the acute stroke unit of Kelowna (BC) General Hospital has reduced the number of stroke patient bed days by more than 25 per cent, according to a study of the system presented at the annual Canadian Stroke Congress in Vancouver. [More]
Damage to right frontal-subcortical network may cause ipsilateral spatial neglect

Damage to right frontal-subcortical network may cause ipsilateral spatial neglect

Stroke researchers have confirmed that damage to the right frontal-subcortical network may cause ipsilateral spatial neglect. Among individuals with ipsilateral neglect, a much greater proportion had frontal subcortical damage than anticipated by the investigators - 83% vs the expected 27%. [More]
Kessler Foundation, NJHF partner to advance biomedical research

Kessler Foundation, NJHF partner to advance biomedical research

The signing of a formal affiliation agreement that allows Kessler Foundation and New Jersey Health Foundation to work together to advance biomedical research, education and patient care programs has been announced by Rodger DeRose, president and chief executive officer of Kessler Foundation and James M. Golubieski, president of New Jersey Health Foundation. [More]
Blood test can help identify people at increased risk of atrial fibrillation, stroke

Blood test can help identify people at increased risk of atrial fibrillation, stroke

Many of those who are genetically predisposed to develop atrial fibrillation, which dramatically raises the risk of stroke, can be identified with a blood test. This is shown by new research from Lund University in Sweden. [More]
Large number of Canadian stroke patients not getting help to get back to active life

Large number of Canadian stroke patients not getting help to get back to active life

Too many stroke patients in Canada are not getting the rehabilitation they need to return to a healthy, active life, according to a new study which will be presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress in Vancouver tomorrow. [More]