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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company today announced positive top-line results from EMPA-REG OUTCOME. This is a long-term clinical trial investigating cardiovascular (CV) outcomes for Jardiance (empagliflozin) in more than 7,000 adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) at high risk for CV events. [More]
Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island researchers awarded NSF grant to develop innovative brain imaging technologies

Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island researchers awarded NSF grant to develop innovative brain imaging technologies

The National Science Foundation has awarded $6 million to researchers in Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island to develop innovative and broadly accessible brain imaging technologies to provide insight into how the nervous system functions in health and disease. [More]
GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

New analyses from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) will be presented at ESC Congress 2015 to be held in London, United Kingdom, from August 29 to September 2, 2015. [More]
Stress hormone cortisol tied to thinking problems in healthy older people

Stress hormone cortisol tied to thinking problems in healthy older people

Testing the saliva of healthy older people for the level of the stress hormone cortisol may help identify individuals who should be screened for problems with thinking skills, according to a study published in the August 19, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Ancient Chinese practice lowers hypertension, may lessen risks of stroke and heart disease

Ancient Chinese practice lowers hypertension, may lessen risks of stroke and heart disease

Patients with hypertension treated with acupuncture experienced drops in their blood pressure that lasted up to a month and a half, researchers with the Susan Samueli Center for Integrative Medicine have found. [More]
Survey identifies key factors linked to pediatric safety events in out-of-hospital emergent care situations

Survey identifies key factors linked to pediatric safety events in out-of-hospital emergent care situations

A national survey of more than 750 emergency medical services providers conducted by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University identified airway management skills, personal anxiety and limited pediatric care proficiency among key factors that may contribute to pediatric safety events for children in out-of-hospital emergent care situations. [More]
Scientists discover special brain mechanism that can retrieve unconscious memories

Scientists discover special brain mechanism that can retrieve unconscious memories

Some stressful experiences - such as chronic childhood abuse - are so overwhelming and traumatic, the memories hide like a shadow in the brain. [More]
Patient satisfaction a poor proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery

Patient satisfaction a poor proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery

Patient satisfaction is a very poor proxy for quality of care comparisons in elective cranial neurosurgery. Because deaths are rare events in elective cranial neurosurgery, reporting of surgeon or even department-specific mortality figures cannot differentiate a high or low level of the quality of care. [More]
Nuclear process in the brain may play critical role in health and disease

Nuclear process in the brain may play critical role in health and disease

Every brain cell has a nucleus, or a central command station. Scientists have shown that the passage of molecules through the nucleus of a star-shaped brain cell, called an astrocyte, may play a critical role in health and disease. [More]
Regulation of tumor microenvironment may offer alternate method for cancer treatment

Regulation of tumor microenvironment may offer alternate method for cancer treatment

Scientists know that activation of growth factor receptors like epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) promote tumor progression in many types of cancer. [More]
Newly developed technique delivers wireless power for optogenetics

Newly developed technique delivers wireless power for optogenetics

A miniature device that combines optogenetics - using light to control the activity of the brain - with a newly developed technique for wirelessly powering implanted devices is the first fully internal method of delivering optogenetics. [More]
PHIV children may lack immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella despite vaccination

PHIV children may lack immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella despite vaccination

Between one-third and one-half of individuals in the United States who were infected with HIV around the time of birth may not have sufficient immunity to ward off measles, mumps, and rubella--even though they may have been vaccinated against these diseases. [More]
ESC Congress to highlight results from global trials in six press conferences

ESC Congress to highlight results from global trials in six press conferences

Members of the press will be the first to hear the highly anticipated results from global trials in six press conferences devoted to hot lines research. [More]
New study explains why statins are more beneficial than others in some cases

New study explains why statins are more beneficial than others in some cases

Statins' success in reducing atherosclerosis-related events has elevated the medications to wonder-drug status, with some researchers advocating for their wider use as a preemptive therapy for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Study suggests potential target for treating familial form of ALS

Study suggests potential target for treating familial form of ALS

A healthy motor neuron needs to transport its damaged components from the nerve-muscle connection all the way back to the cell body in the spinal cord. If it cannot, the defective components pile up and the cell becomes sick and dies. Researchers at the NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke have learned how a mutation in the gene for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes ALS, leads cells to accumulate damaged materials. [More]
Regular exercise benefits children with multiple sclerosis

Regular exercise benefits children with multiple sclerosis

A new study suggests children with multiple sclerosis (MS) who exercise regularly may have a less active disease. The research is published in the August 12, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Common marker can help identify patients at high risk for deadly cardiac events

Common marker can help identify patients at high risk for deadly cardiac events

A marker commonly used to determine if a patient is having a heart attack can also be used to identify stable patients at high risk for deadly cardiac events, according to a new study led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital. [More]
Saturated fats may not be so bad for our health after all

Saturated fats may not be so bad for our health after all

A study led by scientists at McMaster University has found that saturated fats may not be as bad for our health as previously thought. [More]
Johns Hopkins and Mayo Clinic cardiologists suggest upgrades to controversial heart disease prevention guidelines

Johns Hopkins and Mayo Clinic cardiologists suggest upgrades to controversial heart disease prevention guidelines

Acknowledging key strengths and "lessons learned," preventive cardiologists from Johns Hopkins and Mayo Clinic have developed a short list of suggested upgrades to the controversial heart disease prevention guidelines issued jointly in 2013 by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. [More]
TEAAM trial finds that testosterone has no effect on atherosclerosis progression

TEAAM trial finds that testosterone has no effect on atherosclerosis progression

Testosterone sales have grown rapidly over the last decade, but few studies have examined the long-term effects of taking testosterone on cardiovascular health and other important outcomes. This week, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital report the results of the Testosterone's Effects on Atherosclerosis Progression in Aging Men (TEAAM) trial in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
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