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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Cardiology researchers uncover new evidence that relates to increased risk of stroke

Cardiology researchers uncover new evidence that relates to increased risk of stroke

Cardiology researchers at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital have uncovered new evidence that relates to patients with new onset atrial fibrillation (AF) and their increased risk of stroke. [More]
Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a coronary artery widening procedureused to treat heart disease, are at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Type 2 diabetes screening followed by treatment could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, death

Type 2 diabetes screening followed by treatment could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, death

Screening to identify Type 2 diabetes followed by early treatment could result in substantial health benefits, according to new research published today in Diabetes Care that combined large scale clinical observations and innovative computer modelling. [More]
Post-operative atrial fibrillation can significantly increase risk of heart attack or stroke

Post-operative atrial fibrillation can significantly increase risk of heart attack or stroke

As many as 12 percent of patients undergoing major, non-cardiac surgery experience an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation. [More]
Too much or too little sleep may up stroke risk in hypertensive patients

Too much or too little sleep may up stroke risk in hypertensive patients

High blood pressure, or hypertension, affects one third of--or 70 million--US adults, and the healthcare costs associated with treating the disease are approximately $46 billion. [More]
Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Led by Georgia State University, researchers have developed the first robust and noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer and liver metastases, in addition to other liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and liver fibrosis. [More]
Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

The firmness of your hand grip is better than your blood pressure at assessing your health, Hamilton researchers have found, and reduced muscular strength, measured by your grip, is consistently linked with early death, disability and illness. [More]
Novel computer-aided system developed for acute stroke detection

Novel computer-aided system developed for acute stroke detection

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80-100 computer images, the system is able to detect if the patient was struck by ischemic stroke or haemorrhagic stroke. [More]
Canadian Pacific, Heart and Stroke Foundation team up to improve health of all Canadians

Canadian Pacific, Heart and Stroke Foundation team up to improve health of all Canadians

Canadian Pacific and the Heart and Stroke Foundation today are teaming up to save lives and improve the health of all Canadians through the funding of research excellence in Canada. The commitment of $3 million over three years towards cardiac research represents the largest partnership in the Foundation's history. [More]
MRI screening helps in accurate and rapid stroke treatment

MRI screening helps in accurate and rapid stroke treatment

Time is critical when it comes to stroke, and early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. [More]
UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

Mike Jezdimir knows firsthand how hard it is to get appropriate medical treatment for his condition, a disease of the spinal cord called transverse myelitis. He has had it for 48 years, since he was 17. TM is fairly uncommon, and many physicians rarely encounter it. Treatment options are limited. [More]
Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs -- speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. [More]
Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries that occur during contact sports and military service may accelerate the aging process by increasing the build-up of beta-amyloid in the brain, leading to worse disease and an increased likelihood of developing dementia. In particular, boxers fared the worst among athletes and military veterans with a history of head injuries. [More]
TSRI scientists map out protein structure involved in cellular function, nervous system development

TSRI scientists map out protein structure involved in cellular function, nervous system development

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, working closely with researchers at the National Institutes of Health, have mapped out the structure of an important protein involved in cellular function and nervous system development. [More]
New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

The culmination of two decades of research, a new study reveals the genetic causes of a curious, rare syndrome that manifests as hypertension (high blood pressure) accompanied by short fingers (brachydactyly type E). [More]
Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Study finds extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in people with psychosis

Extremely high levels of cardiovascular risk factors have been found in people with established psychosis, with central obesity evident in over 80 per cent of participants, in a study by researchers from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. [More]
Discovery paves way for developing treatments for people addicted to cocaine, amphetamines

Discovery paves way for developing treatments for people addicted to cocaine, amphetamines

In a major advance in the field of neuropsychiatry, researchers in the Vollum Institute at Oregon Health & Science University have illuminated how cocaine and amphetamines disrupt the normal functioning of the dopamine transporter in the brain. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
BHI awarded NIH contract to provide mentoring and training for NINDS grantees

BHI awarded NIH contract to provide mentoring and training for NINDS grantees

BioHealth Innovation, Inc. is providing grantees of the National Institute of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke with mentoring and training designed to develop and hone their presentation skills as a step toward securing investment dollars and strategic partners. [More]
Study: Walking and cycling to work could help reduce BMI

Study: Walking and cycling to work could help reduce BMI

Leaving your car at home could help shed pounds - according to new research from the University of East Anglia and the Centre for Diet and Activity Research. New research shows that making a change from driving to work to using public transport, cycling or walking could help reduce BMI over two years. [More]
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