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A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted.
Study examines outcomes following mechanical prosthetic vs bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement

Study examines outcomes following mechanical prosthetic vs bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement

In a comparison of mechanical prosthetic vs bioprosthetic mitral valves among patients 50 to 69 years of age undergoing mitral valve replacement, there was no significant difference in survival at 15 years, although there were differences in risk of reoperation, bleeding and stroke, according to a study in the April 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
No effect of baseline cirrhosis on long-term TDF treatment outcomes

No effect of baseline cirrhosis on long-term TDF treatment outcomes

Research suggests that virological, serological and histological outcomes are comparable between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection undergoing long-term tenofovir disoproxil fumarate treatment. [More]
Latest findings regarding nitric oxide offer new avenues to save lives

Latest findings regarding nitric oxide offer new avenues to save lives

Professor Jonathan Stamler's latest findings regarding nitric oxide have the potential to reshape fundamentally the way we think about the respiratory system - and offer new avenues to save lives. It may be time to rewrite the textbooks. [More]
Two radiologists win Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation Leaders in Innovation Award

Two radiologists win Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation Leaders in Innovation Award

Two visionaries of interventional radiology were recently awarded the Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation Leaders in Innovation Award. The awards, to Lindsay Machan, M.D., FSIR, an interventional radiologist at Vancouver Hospital, British Columbia, and Kieran J. Murphy, M.D., FSIR, an interventional radiologist at the University of Toronto, both in Canada, were announced March 4 during the society's Annual Scientific Meeting in Atlanta. [More]

SAGE to publish WSO’s official journal, the International Journal of Stroke

SAGE, one of the world's leading independent and academic publishers, has today announced that it is to publish the International Journal of Stroke, the official journal of the World Stroke Organization (WSO) incorporating the International Stroke Society (ISS) and the World Stroke Federation (WSF). [More]
Study changes our understanding of how position and touch signals are combined in brain

Study changes our understanding of how position and touch signals are combined in brain

Two types of touch information — the feel of an object and the position of an animal's limb — have long been thought to flow into the brain via different channels and be integrated in sophisticated processing regions. [More]
DFG selects 10 researchers to receive 2015 Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prize

DFG selects 10 researchers to receive 2015 Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prize

This year's recipients of the most important prize for early career researchers in Germany have been announced. The selection committee, appointed by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), has chosen ten researchers, five women and five men, to receive the 2015 Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prizes. [More]
Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Damage to heart muscle from insufficient blood supply during cardiac arrest and reperfusion injury after blood flow is restored can be reduced by nearly 90 percent if selenide, a form of the essential nutrient selenium, is administered intravenously in the wake of the attack, according to a new preclinical study by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. [More]
Stroke patients can benefit from clot-busting drug, shows brain scan study

Stroke patients can benefit from clot-busting drug, shows brain scan study

A drug that breaks up blood clots in the brains of stroke patients could be used more widely than at present without increased risk, a brain scan study suggests. [More]
Mental practice, physical therapy effective for stroke survivors

Mental practice, physical therapy effective for stroke survivors

A combination of mental practice and physical therapy is an effective treatment for people recovering from a stroke, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Jersey Shore achieves Joint Commission certification for Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Program

Jersey Shore achieves Joint Commission certification for Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Program

Jersey Shore has earned The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for its Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Program by demonstrating compliance with The Joint Commission's national standards for health care quality and safety in disease-specific care. The certification award recognizes the hospital's dedication to continuous compliance with The Joint Commission's rigorous standards. [More]

Prolong Pharmaceuticals' SANGUINATE granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for SCD treatment

Prolong Pharmaceuticals, LLC, a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to developing products for the treatment of anemias, cancers and their debilitating comorbidities, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug Designation for its flagship product SANGUINATE for the treatment of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). [More]
Stroke patients at greater risk of committing suicide compared with other population groups

Stroke patients at greater risk of committing suicide compared with other population groups

Stroke patients can be up to twice as likely to commit suicide compared with the rest of the population, and the risk of attempted suicide is highest within the first two years after a stroke. These are the findings of a study from Umeå University published in the journal Neurology. [More]
Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

A commonly-used drug to treat inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease, has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in obese mice, potentially identifying the gut immune system as a new and effective target in treating diabetes in humans. [More]
TOAST classification remains effective, easy-to-use system to classify strokes

TOAST classification remains effective, easy-to-use system to classify strokes

In 1993, neurologists Harold P. Adams Jr., MD, and Jose Biller, MD, and colleagues proposed a new way to classify strokes. It became known as the TOAST classification. Twenty-two years later, the TOAST classification remains an effective and easy-to-use system that is routinely employed in stroke studies around the world, Drs. Adams and Biller report in the journal Stroke, published online ahead of print. [More]
Aging associated with development of dysphagia

Aging associated with development of dysphagia

Nearly 40 percent of Americans 60 and older are living with a swallowing disorder known as dysphagia. Although it is a major health problem associated with aging, it is unknown whether the condition is a natural part of healthy aging or if it is caused by an age-related disease that has yet to be diagnosed, such as Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Combination of pomegranate juice and dates protects against heart disease

Combination of pomegranate juice and dates protects against heart disease

Glorious, red pomegranates and their Middle Eastern sister, luscious toffee-like dates, are delicious, increasingly trendy, and healthy to boot. [More]
New model can help predict how humans adapt to high- and low-altitude hypoxia

New model can help predict how humans adapt to high- and low-altitude hypoxia

There are few times in life when one should aim for suboptimal performance, but new research at Rice University suggests scientists who study metabolism and its role in evolution should look for signs of just that. [More]
Graphic warning labels can motivate smokers to quit

Graphic warning labels can motivate smokers to quit

Young adults are more likely to appreciate the dangers of smoking when warnings are presented in images as well as text, according to a new study by a Washington State University Vancouver psychologist. [More]
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