Tamoxifen News and Research RSS Feed - Tamoxifen News and Research

Tamoxifen is a drug used to treat certain types of breast cancer in women and men. It is also used to prevent breast cancer in women who have had ductal carcinoma in situ (abnormal cells in the ducts of the breast) and in women who are at a high risk of developing breast cancer. Tamoxifen is also being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. It blocks the effects of the hormone estrogen in the breast. Tamoxifen is a type of antiestrogen. Also called tamoxifen citrate.
Researchers tune into previously unknown cross talk between estrogen and progesterone receptors

Researchers tune into previously unknown cross talk between estrogen and progesterone receptors

One of the first clues pathologists look for in tissue from a newly diagnosed breast cancer patient is the estrogen receptor, a nuclear protein that converts hormonal messages in the bloodstream into instructions for the cell about how to behave [More]
Pretreatment smoking linked to poor prognosis in AI-treated patients

Pretreatment smoking linked to poor prognosis in AI-treated patients

Among older aromatase inhibitor (AI)-treated patients with breast cancer, current smokers at treatment initiation have an increased risk of breast cancer events and distant metastases, say Swedish researchers. [More]
Common breast cancer treatment less effective for smokers compared to non-smokers

Common breast cancer treatment less effective for smokers compared to non-smokers

We know that individuals who smoke take major health risks. Now a new research study from Lund University in Sweden shows that common treatment for breast cancer works less well in patients who smoke, compared to non-smokers. [More]
NLCs packed with melatonin could increase effectiveness of tamoxifen drug

NLCs packed with melatonin could increase effectiveness of tamoxifen drug

Tiny bubbles filled with the sleep hormone melatonin can make breast cancer treatment more effective, which means people need a lower dose, giving them less severe side effects. [More]
Scientists find new way to slow growth of triple negative breast cancer

Scientists find new way to slow growth of triple negative breast cancer

CANCER RESEARCH UK scientists have found a new way to slow the growth of the most aggressive type of breast cancer, according to research published in the journal Oncogene today (Monday). [More]
Study opens up possibility of developing potential hormone therapies for SSc skin disease

Study opens up possibility of developing potential hormone therapies for SSc skin disease

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time a beneficial effect of oestrogens in experimental models of skin fibrosis that are representative of the disease process in systemic sclerosis (SSc). [More]
Multi-center study may help reassure breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen drug

Multi-center study may help reassure breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen drug

A study led by Loyola Medicine researchers may help reassure patients who worry the breast cancer drug tamoxifen could increase their risk of uterine cancer. [More]
Taking hormone therapy drugs for additional five years improves outcomes in breast cancer patients

Taking hormone therapy drugs for additional five years improves outcomes in breast cancer patients

Breast cancer patients significantly benefit by taking hormone therapy drugs called aromatase inhibitors for an additional five years, according to a major study presented at the Plenary Session of the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago and published in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Scientists reveal how ER+ breast cancer uses cholesterol-based molecule to evade anti-hormone treatments

Scientists reveal how ER+ breast cancer uses cholesterol-based molecule to evade anti-hormone treatments

New research funded by Breast Cancer Now has identified how the most common breast cancers could be using a cholesterol-based molecule to evade standard anti-hormone treatments, causing patients’ disease to return. [More]
Carol Fabian inducted into KU Women's Hall of Fame for contributions to breast cancer research

Carol Fabian inducted into KU Women's Hall of Fame for contributions to breast cancer research

Among the women inducted into the University of Kansas Hall of Fame on April 14, 2016, was Carol Fabian, MD. Fabian, a professor of medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center and director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Center at The University of Kansas Cancer Center, is a nationally recognized oncologist and a pioneer in in the field of breast cancer research. [More]
Combination of existing chemotherapy drugs can reduce breast cancer stem cells, improve survival

Combination of existing chemotherapy drugs can reduce breast cancer stem cells, improve survival

Two existing chemotherapy drugs appear to be a powerful pair in targeting errant stem cells that are making breast cancer and enabling its spread and recurrence, scientists report. [More]
Predictive statistical approach opens door to development of more effective therapies for breast cancer

Predictive statistical approach opens door to development of more effective therapies for breast cancer

Designing effective new drugs, especially drugs to fight cancer, demands that you know as much as you can about the molecular workings of cancer growth. Without that, it's like planning to fight a war against an enemy you've never seen. [More]
Derivatives of female sex hormones can influence natural melanin production, study suggests

Derivatives of female sex hormones can influence natural melanin production, study suggests

When skin cells responsible for pigmentation are exposed to estrogen or progesterone, the cells respond by adjusting their melanin production, resulting in either skin darkening or lightening. Although pregnant women often experience alterations in skin pigmentation, the reason for the changes has long puzzled physicians. [More]
Genetic markers may influence how breast cancer patients respond to treatment

Genetic markers may influence how breast cancer patients respond to treatment

Two previously unrecognized genetic markers may predict whether breast cancer patients would benefit from chemotherapy followed by tamoxifen, according to preclinical research from Roswell Park Cancer Institute, in collaboration with the cooperative research group SWOG and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The results of this research will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016, to be held April 16-20 in New Orleans. [More]
Alcohol consumption may increase risk for breast cancer

Alcohol consumption may increase risk for breast cancer

A University of Houston researcher and his team have discovered an important link between alcohol and breast cancer by identifying a cancer-causing gene triggered by alcohol [More]
Delivering microRNAs in cancer treatment: an interview with Dr Conde and Prof Artzi

Delivering microRNAs in cancer treatment: an interview with Dr Conde and Prof Artzi

microRNAs (miRs) are small endogenous noncoding RNA molecules (20–23 nucleotides) derived from imperfectly paired hairpin RNA structures naturally encoded in the genome that act specifically as triggering molecules to control translational repression or mRNA degradation. [More]
Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

While there are a range of reports that different foods and food groups can increase or decrease your risk of cancer, these associations are very difficult to scientifically verify. [More]
Anastrozole drug effective in treating early form of breast cancer

Anastrozole drug effective in treating early form of breast cancer

The drug anastrozole is effective in treating an early form of breast cancer, according to a clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London. The results of the IBIS-II DCIS trial show that anastrozole is as effective as tamoxifen for this type of breast cancer and could offer a new treatment option for post-menopausal women. [More]
Study reveals why anti-hormone therapy tamoxifen works better in some women than others

Study reveals why anti-hormone therapy tamoxifen works better in some women than others

The anti-hormone therapy tamoxifen can reduce breast cancer recurrence by about half in women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer. But it works better in some women than others. Researchers are not sure why. [More]
Adjuvant denosumab improves disease-free survival for postmenopausal women with early-stage, HR+ breast cancer

Adjuvant denosumab improves disease-free survival for postmenopausal women with early-stage, HR+ breast cancer

Adding denosumab to adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy improved disease-free survival for postmenopausal patients with early-stage, hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer, according to results from the phase III ABCSG-18 clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12. [More]
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