Tamoxifen News and Research RSS Feed - Tamoxifen News and Research

Tamoxifen is a drug used to treat certain types of breast cancer in women and men. It is also used to prevent breast cancer in women who have had ductal carcinoma in situ (abnormal cells in the ducts of the breast) and in women who are at a high risk of developing breast cancer. Tamoxifen is also being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. It blocks the effects of the hormone estrogen in the breast. Tamoxifen is a type of antiestrogen. Also called tamoxifen citrate.
Personalized treatment approach may benefit patients with common breast cancer subtype

Personalized treatment approach may benefit patients with common breast cancer subtype

The second-most common type of breast cancer is a very different disease than the most common and appears to be a good candidate for a personalized approach to treatment, according to a multidisciplinary team led by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. [More]

Women with BRCA1 mutations may have increased risk for rare types of aggressive uterine cancer

Women with BRCA1 mutations may have an increased risk for developing rare types of aggressive uterine cancer despite having their ovaries and fallopian tubes removed, suggest preliminary findings being presented at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer in Tampa, Fla., March 22-25. [More]

Scientists develop new method to deliver cancer-fighting drugs directly to milk ducts

One of every eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer. Though the incidence of breast cancer began decreasing in 2000, it is still the second-leading cause of cancer death in women. [More]
Genetic testing may help select women with ER+ breast cancer for extended hormone therapy

Genetic testing may help select women with ER+ breast cancer for extended hormone therapy

Genetic analyses of results from 1125 postmenopausal women being treated for oestrogen responsive breast cancer have shown that some of them are more likely than others to have a late recurrence of their cancer and might benefit from ten years of hormone therapy rather than five. [More]
GTx provides clinical updates, reports financial results for fourth quarter and full year 2013

GTx provides clinical updates, reports financial results for fourth quarter and full year 2013

GTx, Inc. today provided a Company update and reported financial results for the fourth quarter and full year 2013. [More]
Second common type of breast cancer appears to be good candidate for personalized treatment approach

Second common type of breast cancer appears to be good candidate for personalized treatment approach

The second-most common type of breast cancer is a very different disease than the most common and appears to be a good candidate for a personalized approach to treatment, according to a multidisciplinary team led by University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) scientists. [More]
Researchers develop screening assay that quickly assesses nearly 1,500 compounds' effect on estrogen

Researchers develop screening assay that quickly assesses nearly 1,500 compounds' effect on estrogen

A team of researchers at City of Hope has developed a screening assay that can quickly assess up to 1,536 compounds' effect on estrogen activity in the body. The test can also evaluate whether chemicals act as inhibitors of aromatase, an enzyme linked to breast cancer that converts androgen to estrogen. [More]
Tamoxifen drug appears to kill fungus associated with deadly brain infection

Tamoxifen drug appears to kill fungus associated with deadly brain infection

The drug tamoxifen appears to kill a fungus associated with a deadly brain infection that afflicts HIV/AIDS patients, according to a University of Rochester study published online today by mBio, the journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Drug used for treating breast cancer also kills fungal disease

Drug used for treating breast cancer also kills fungal disease

Tamoxifen, a drug currently used to treat breast cancer, also kills a fungus that causes a deadly brain infection in immunocompromised patients. The findings, which could lead to new treatments for a disease that kills more HIV/AIDS patients than tuberculosis, appear in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM.) [More]
Moderate radiation doses can kill premalignant cells and prevent second breast cancers

Moderate radiation doses can kill premalignant cells and prevent second breast cancers

​Survivors of breast cancer have a one in six chance of developing breast cancer in the other breast. But a study conducted in mice suggests that survivors can dramatically reduce that risk through treatment with moderate doses of radiation to the unaffected breast at the same time that they receive radiation therapy to their affected breast. [More]

First Edition: January 10, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about Maryland's plan to reduce hospital spending. [More]
Bisphosphonate zoledronate treatment not effective in women with chemoresistant breast cancer

Bisphosphonate zoledronate treatment not effective in women with chemoresistant breast cancer

Treatment with the bisphosphonate zoledronate did not improve outcomes for women with chemoresistant breast cancer, according to initial results of a phase III clinical trial presented here at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 10-14. [More]

Study shows effectiveness of PAM50-based Prosigna Breast Cancer Prognostic Gene Signature Assay

NanoString Technologies, Inc., a provider of life science tools for translational research and molecular diagnostic products, today announced new results from a combined analysis of the Austrian Breast & Colorectal Cancer Study Group 8 (ABCSG-8) and Trans-Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (TransATAC) studies. These results, which evaluated samples from 2,137 patients, suggest that the PAM50-based Prosignaz Breast Cancer Prognostic Gene Signature Assay may help identify women with late distant recurrence after five years of endocrine treatment. [More]

Anastrozole drug reduces breast cancer in high risk post-menopausal women

Taking the breast cancer drug anastrozole for five years reduced the chances of post-menopausal women at high risk of breast cancer developing the disease by 53% compared with women who took a placebo, according to a study published in the Lancet today. [More]
New mutations in the estrogen receptor drive strong drug resistance exhibited by human breast tumors

New mutations in the estrogen receptor drive strong drug resistance exhibited by human breast tumors

Human breast tumors transplanted into mice are excellent models of metastatic cancer and are providing insights into how to attack breast cancers that no longer respond to the drugs used to treat them, according to research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Dasatinib+letrozole improves survival for women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

Dasatinib+letrozole improves survival for women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

Adding the drug dasatinib to a standard antihormone therapy, letrozole, doubled the time before disease progressed for women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer, according to results of a phase II clinical trial presented here at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 10-14. [More]

Z-endoxifen may provide better treatment for women with estrogen positive breast cancer

A Phase I trial of endoxifen, an active metabolite of the cancer drug tamoxifen, indicates that the experimental drug is safe, with early evidence for anti-tumor activity, a Mayo Clinic study has found. The findings indicate that Z-endoxifen, co-developed by Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute, may provide a new and better treatment for some women with estrogen positive breast cancer and, in particular, for those women who do not respond to tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. [More]

Anastrozole drug: An effective new option for breast cancer prevention for postmenopausal women

Breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women at high risk for developing the disease was significantly reduced by the antihormone therapy anastrozole, indicating that the drug may be an effective new option for breast cancer prevention for this group of women, according to initial results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial presented here at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 10-14. The study is being simultaneously published in the The Lancet. [More]
High cholesterol fuels growth and spread of breast Cancer

High cholesterol fuels growth and spread of breast Cancer

Researchers at Duke Medicine conclude that high cholesterol may make breast cancer worse when they found that a byproduct of cholesterol functions like the hormone estrogen, leading to increases in the growth and spread of breast cancer. Studies have previously shown the link between obesity and breast cancer, but the exact cause of the increased risk had not been identified. [More]

Elevated cholesterol is associated with breast cancer risk

A byproduct of cholesterol functions like the hormone estrogen to fuel the growth and spread of the most common types of breast cancers, researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute report. [More]