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RBFox2 protein plays critical role in heart failure

RBFox2 protein plays critical role in heart failure

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a key piece in the complex molecular puzzle underlying heart failure - a serious and sometimes life-threatening disorder affecting more than 5 million Americans. [More]
NYBC launches new mobile app to enhance donation experience for blood donors

NYBC launches new mobile app to enhance donation experience for blood donors

New York Blood Center recently launched a new mobile app providing a convenient, user friendly platform for blood donors to find donation locations, make and manage appointments, view donation history and donor profiles, and access the full NYBC website to manage Donor Advantage accounts, redeem points, and much more. [More]
Study explores outcomes of lung transplantations after implementing need-based allocation system

Study explores outcomes of lung transplantations after implementing need-based allocation system

Since implementation of a medical need-based allocation system of donor lungs in 2005, double-lung transplantation has been associated with better graft survival than single-lung transplantation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); at 5 years, there has been no survival difference between single- and double-lung transplant recipients in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study in the March 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
New study shows who benefits most from statin therapy

New study shows who benefits most from statin therapy

Research has demonstrated that the risk for developing coronary heart disease depends on a host of risk factors that are related both to lifestyle and genetics. In a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers tested whether a composite of genetic variants could identify the risk of cardiovascular death and heart attacks as well as identify individuals who derived greater clinical benefit from statin therapy. [More]
OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

Drug-induced acute liver failure is uncommon, and over-the-counter medications and dietary and herbal supplements -- not prescription drugs -- are its most common causes, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
CLL patients discontinue ibrutinib drug due to disease progression during clinical trials

CLL patients discontinue ibrutinib drug due to disease progression during clinical trials

About 10 percent of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) discontinued therapy with the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor drug ibrutinib because of disease progression during clinical trials, according to a study published online in JAMA Oncology. [More]
Findings reveal variations between countries and regions in use of HSCT procedure

Findings reveal variations between countries and regions in use of HSCT procedure

Since the first experimental bone marrow transplant over 50 years ago, more than one million hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT) have been performed in 75 countries, according to new research charting the remarkable growth in the worldwide use of HSCT, published in The Lancet Haematology journal. [More]
Life-saving bone marrow transplants are not available to all who need them

Life-saving bone marrow transplants are not available to all who need them

Bone marrow (hematopoietic stem cell) transplant is a life saving treatment for patients with blood cancer that replaces blood stem cells lost to disease or chemotherapy. However, for each patient to benefit a matching donor must be found to provide the stem cells for transplant. [More]
Many organ transplant surgeons in U.S. experience burnout

Many organ transplant surgeons in U.S. experience burnout

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a national study on transplant surgeon burnout. [More]
HeartWare International's revenue increases 38% to $73.2 million in Q4 2014

HeartWare International's revenue increases 38% to $73.2 million in Q4 2014

HeartWare International, Inc., a leading innovator of less invasive, miniaturized circulatory support technologies that are revolutionizing the treatment of advanced heart failure, today announced revenue of $73.2 million for the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2014, a 38% increase compared to $53.1 million in revenue for the same period of 2013. For the fiscal year 2014, the company generated revenue of $278.4 million, a 34% increase compared to revenue of $207.9 million in 2013. [More]
Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome, new research shows. [More]
Fat cell transplantation benefits systemic sclerosis patients with non-healing digital ulcers

Fat cell transplantation benefits systemic sclerosis patients with non-healing digital ulcers

Digital ulcers (DUs) are a frequent, painful, and quality of life altering complication for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), a connective tissue disease causing a progressive loss of small blood vessels and resulting changes in organs and tissues. DUs on the fingertips of SSc patients are slow to heal, if they heal at all, as many are unresponsive to any therapies. [More]
New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

A new medical device which combines nanotechnology with a pregnancy tester could help diagnose and treat the 1 million people in the UK who don’t know they have kidney disease, a new report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers reveals today. [More]

Three Austrian men undergo bionic hand reconstruction

Three Austrian men have become the first in the world to undergo a new technique called “bionic reconstruction”, enabling them to use a robotic prosthetic hand controlled by their mind, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Diets high in animal proteins can worsen progression of kidney disease

Diets high in animal proteins can worsen progression of kidney disease

An estimated 26 million people in the United States have chronic kidney disease, which can lead to complete kidney failure. Once the kidneys fail, patients either need to undergo dialysis treatments three times a week or have a kidney transplant to remain alive. [More]
Betaretrovirus may infect patients with primary biliary cirrhosis

Betaretrovirus may infect patients with primary biliary cirrhosis

In a new study published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, researchers at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry have shown that a betaretrovirus which resembles a mouse mammary tumor virus infects patients with the rare liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Study provides new insights into early events that shape cancer

Study provides new insights into early events that shape cancer

A study led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital suggests a new way to trace cancer back to its cell type of origin. By leveraging the epigenome maps produced by the Roadmap Epigenomics Program - a resource of data collected from over 100 cell types - the research team found that the unique genetic landscape of a particular tumor could be used to predict that tumor's cell type of origin. [More]
Researchers develop artificial adrenal system in animal model

Researchers develop artificial adrenal system in animal model

If the function of the adrenal gland is disturbed it does not produce enough stress-adjusting messengers. The results are serious and cause life-threatening diseases. Under the direction of Prof. Dr. Stefan R. Bornstein of the university hospital Carl Gustav Carus researchers developed an artificial adrenal system together with the medicine Nobel Prize Laureate Prof. Dr. Andrew Schally in an animal model. [More]
SLU researchers halt fatty liver disease in animal model

SLU researchers halt fatty liver disease in animal model

Doctors believe that up to 30 percent of the U.S. population may have fat accumulation in the liver, known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), that can lead to a range of damaging health consequences. [More]
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