Transplant News and Research RSS Feed - Transplant News and Research

Researchers reveal how early changes in DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers reveal how early changes in DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease

A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Rush University Medical Center, reveals how early changes in brain DNA methylation are involved in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Paediatric PAH treatment goals identified

Paediatric PAH treatment goals identified

Researchers from the Netherlands have identified three baseline variables that may qualify as treatment goals in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension. [More]
First Edition: August 14, 2014

First Edition: August 14, 2014

Today's headlines include a report about an uptick in VA referrals to private physicians. Kaiser Health News staff writer Julie Appleby reports: "Some hospitals in New York, Florida and Wisconsin are exploring ways to help individuals and families pay their share of the costs of government-subsidized policies purchased though the health law's marketplaces – at least partly to guarantee the hospitals get paid when the consumers seek care. [More]
Combination of NASBA and real-time qPCR detects aspergillosis with 100% accuracy

Combination of NASBA and real-time qPCR detects aspergillosis with 100% accuracy

The fungal infection invasive aspergillosis (IA) can be life threatening, especially in patients whose immune systems are weakened by chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs. Despite the critical need for early detection, IA remains difficult to diagnose. [More]
Decline in daily functioning linked with Alzheimer's disease is related to alterations in brain activity

Decline in daily functioning linked with Alzheimer's disease is related to alterations in brain activity

Decline in daily functioning associated with Alzheimer's disease is related to alterations in activity in certain regions of the brain, according to a study published in the August 2014 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. [More]
Experts to debate healthy labor and delivery practices at Cedars-Sinai Birth Community Day

Experts to debate healthy labor and delivery practices at Cedars-Sinai Birth Community Day

Doctors, nurses, midwives and doulas will debate healthy labor and delivery practices - including the use of the synthetic hormone Pitocin to hasten childbirth and vitamin K to speed blood clotting in newborns -- at the third annual Cedars-Sinai Birth Community Day, Aug. 14. [More]
UChicago Medicine and Advocate Health Care wins NIH grant to find new ways to prevent type 1 diabetes

UChicago Medicine and Advocate Health Care wins NIH grant to find new ways to prevent type 1 diabetes

The University of Chicago Medicine and Advocate Children's Hospital / Advocate Health Care have received a five-year, $1.8-million grant from the National Institutes of Health to find new ways to delay and prevent type 1 diabetes. The grant will establish the first Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Clinical Center in Chicago. [More]
Patient with mechanical heart pump receives new gene therapy for heart failure

Patient with mechanical heart pump receives new gene therapy for heart failure

For the first time in the world, a patient with a mechanical heart pump has received a new gene therapy for heart failure at Harefield Hospital, London. [More]
University of Chicago adds six new members to governing Board of Trustees

University of Chicago adds six new members to governing Board of Trustees

The University of Chicago Medical Center added six new members to its governing Board of Trustees, and named a new president of the medical staff. [More]
3SBio enters into exclusive license with DiNonA for development of Leukotuximab

3SBio enters into exclusive license with DiNonA for development of Leukotuximab

3SBio Inc., a leading China-based biotechnology company focused on researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing biopharmaceutical products, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with DiNonA Inc. for the development, manufacturing and marketing of Leukotuximab, an anti JL-1 antibody for acute leukemia (AL), including acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), in the territory of Greater China (including Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) and the Middle East (excluding Cyprus, Egypt, Israel and Turkey). [More]
Longer looks: Kentucky is health law poster child; how to negotiate a lower medical bill; the Ebola outbreak up close

Longer looks: Kentucky is health law poster child; how to negotiate a lower medical bill; the Ebola outbreak up close

About a year ago, on Aug. 22, a team of inspectors from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) unit of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services arrived in Frankfort, Ky., to see if the people working out of a nondescript warehouse there were going to be able to pull off the launch of Kentucky's Obamacare health-insurance exchange. [More]
Higher caffeine intake associated with lower rates of tinnitus

Higher caffeine intake associated with lower rates of tinnitus

New research from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) finds that higher caffeine intake is associated with lower rates of tinnitus, often described as a ringing or buzzing sound in the ear when there is no outside source of the sounds, in younger and middle-aged women. [More]
Induced immunorejection may eliminate tumors post-cell transplantation

Induced immunorejection may eliminate tumors post-cell transplantation

Recent studies have shown that transplanting induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (iPS-NSCs) can promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury in rodents and non-human primates. However, a serious drawback to the transplantation of iPS-NSCs is the potential for tumor growth, or tumorogenesis, post-transplantation. [More]

States of Maine and Rhode Island add SCID to newborn screening panels

The Immune Deficiency Foundation commends the states of Maine and Rhode Island for adding Severe Combined Immune Deficiency to their states' newborn screening panels, effective August 1, 2014. These states join 21 other states currently screening newborns for SCID, ensuring over two thirds of all babies in the U.S. are now being screened. [More]
SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart with SynHall valves receives FDA approval

SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart with SynHall valves receives FDA approval

SynCardia Systems, Inc. received approval July 2, 2014 from the United States Federal Drug Administration for the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart with SynHall valves, giving the company control over the last key component to manufacture the Total Artificial Heart. [More]
Hepatitis C could become a rare disease by 2036

Hepatitis C could become a rare disease by 2036

Effective new drugs and screening would make hepatitis C a rare disease by 2036, according to a computer simulation conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. The results of the simulation are reported in the August 5 edition of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
New technique for studying lifecycle of hepatitis B virus can help develop cure for disease

New technique for studying lifecycle of hepatitis B virus can help develop cure for disease

A new technique for studying the lifecycle of the hepatitis B virus could help researchers develop a cure for the disease. [More]
Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

UC San Francisco is the lead institution on a new seven-year, $17 million multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health to determine if certain immune system cells and/or a drug now used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can be effective in improving and maintaining the long-term health of kidney transplant recipients. [More]
Neuralstem doses final patient with NSI-566 stem cells in Phase II trial

Neuralstem doses final patient with NSI-566 stem cells in Phase II trial

Neuralstem, Inc. announced that the final patient was treated in its Phase II trial using NSI-566 spinal cord-derived neural stem cells in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). [More]
Longer looks: Pittsburgh's 'frayed safety net'; feeding hungry kids in the summer; curing cancer

Longer looks: Pittsburgh's 'frayed safety net'; feeding hungry kids in the summer; curing cancer

More than a quarter of the hospitals in the Pittsburgh area closed in the first decade of the 21s century, drastically reducing the amount of charitable care available to the poor. [More]