Transplant News and Research RSS Feed - Transplant News and Research

Breakthrough therapy shows promise in resistant forms of Hodgkin lymphoma

Breakthrough therapy shows promise in resistant forms of Hodgkin lymphoma

A therapy that liberates the immune system to attack cancer cells drove Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) into complete or partial remission in fully 87 percent of patients with resistant forms of the disease who participated in an early-phase clinical trial, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and partnering institutions report in a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and simultaneously presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Francisco. [More]
Pembrolizumab shows promising results in patients with classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

Pembrolizumab shows promising results in patients with classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

Merck, known as MSD outside of Canada and the United States, announced today early study findings demonstrating that patients treated with pembrolizumab, the company's investigational anti-PD-1 cancer therapy, achieved an overall response rate of 66 percent, as assessed by International Harmonization Project response criteria (n=19/29: 95% CI, 46-82). [More]
New treatment combinations improve outcomes for vulnerable patient with hard-to-treat disease

New treatment combinations improve outcomes for vulnerable patient with hard-to-treat disease

New treatment combinations and targeted therapies for lymphoma and multiple myeloma are improving outcomes for vulnerable patient populations with hard-to-treat disease, according to studies presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Adding maintenance therapy after transplant can improve outcomes in Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Adding maintenance therapy after transplant can improve outcomes in Hodgkin lymphoma patients

In a late-stage clinical trial, Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients who received brentuximab vedotin (BV) post-transplant lived longer without disease progression than patients who received only supportive care. This is the first time a study has demonstrated that adding a maintenance therapy after transplant can improve outcomes. [More]
Novel treatments show safe responses in patients with relapsed, treatment-resistant blood cancers

Novel treatments show safe responses in patients with relapsed, treatment-resistant blood cancers

Novel treatments that harness the body's own immune cells to attack cancer cells demonstrate safe and durable responses in patients with relapsed and treatment-resistant blood cancers, according to data presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Most parents interested in newborn genomic testing, study reveals

Most parents interested in newborn genomic testing, study reveals

A study published this week in Genetics in Medicine is the first to explore new parents' attitudes toward newborn genomic testing. The findings suggest that if newborn genomic testing becomes available, there would be robust interest among new parents, regardless of their demographic background. [More]
Scientists seek to improve stem cell transplant outcomes using DNA sequencing, mathematical modeling

Scientists seek to improve stem cell transplant outcomes using DNA sequencing, mathematical modeling

Is the human immune system similar to the weather, a seemingly random yet dynamical system that can be modeled based on past conditions to predict future states? Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center's award-winning Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program believe it is, and they recently published several studies that support the possibility of using next-generation DNA sequencing and mathematical modeling to not only understand the variability observed in clinical outcomes of stem cell transplantation, but also to provide a theoretical framework to make transplantation a possibility for more patients who do not have a related donor. [More]
Joint therapy to counter HIV and HCV increases chance of success

Joint therapy to counter HIV and HCV increases chance of success

A Spanish researcher has collaborated on a mathematical analysis, recently published in the journal 'Science Translational Medicine', which concludes that joint therapy to counter HIV in patients who also have hepatitis C increases the chance of success in the fight against both infections. Between eight and nine million people worldwide simultaneously suffer from AIDS and hepatitis C. [More]
BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have identified what they believe to be the cells responsible for fibrosis, the buildup of scar tissue. Fibrotic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease and failure, lung disease, heart failure and cirrhosis of the liver, are estimated to be responsible for up to 45 percent of deaths in the developed world. [More]
New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

Kidneys donated by people born with a small variation in the code of a key gene may be more likely, once in the transplant recipient, to accumulate scar tissue that contributes to kidney failure, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport Syndrome was first described by a physician called Cecil Alport, back in the late 1920s. It's a genetic disease that affects a certain type of collagen involved in the functioning of the kidney, the ear, and the eye. [More]
3-D printed models assist in face transplantation procedures

3-D printed models assist in face transplantation procedures

Researchers are using computed tomography (CT) and 3-D printing technology to recreate life-size models of patients' heads to assist in face transplantation surgery, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). [More]
Canadian Blood Services urges Canadians to support fundraising campaign

Canadian Blood Services urges Canadians to support fundraising campaign

On "Giving Tuesday," Dec. 2, Canadian Blood Services is encouraging Canadians to help build a national public cord blood bank by making a financial donation to the $12.5 million For All Canadians fundraising campaign. [More]
Plymouth professor awarded grant to find effective treatment for patients with mantle cell lymphoma

Plymouth professor awarded grant to find effective treatment for patients with mantle cell lymphoma

Professor Simon Rule, Professor in Haematology at Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry and Consultant Haematologist at Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, has been awarded a significant grant by Cancer Research UK to carry out a research study into the treatment of older patients with mantle cell lymphoma. [More]
Leading medical experts across the UK call for radical scale up of liver disease treatment

Leading medical experts across the UK call for radical scale up of liver disease treatment

Leading medical experts today [Thursday 27 November] warn that rising numbers of deaths from liver disease - already the UK's third commonest cause of premature death - will be unavoidable without radical improvements in treatment and detection services, and tougher government policies to control the excessive alcohol use and obesity responsible for much of the national burden of liver disease. [More]
BWH researchers identify two-faced role of TIM-3 protein

BWH researchers identify two-faced role of TIM-3 protein

A Brigham and Women's Hospital-led team has identified a long sought-after partner for a key immune protein, called TIM-3, that helps explain its two-faced role in the immune system -- sometimes dampening it, other times stimulating it. This newly identified partner not only sheds light on the inner workings of the immune system in diseases such as HIV, autoimmunity, and cancer, but also provides a critical path toward the development of novel treatments that target TIM-3. [More]
New cell therapy offers hope for patients with liver cirrhosis

New cell therapy offers hope for patients with liver cirrhosis

Liver disease patients could be helped by a new cell therapy to treat the condition. [More]
Model G: New patient hospital gown blends style and comfort

Model G: New patient hospital gown blends style and comfort

A new Detroit design is rolling off the assembly line in the Motor City in 2015, made with a cotton-poplin blend for comfort, color-coded trim for ease of use and - most importantly - a closed backside that finally offers patients more privacy and comfort in the hospital. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Gene therapy transforms life for men with severe form of hemophilia B

Gene therapy transforms life for men with severe form of hemophilia B

Gene therapy developed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, University College London and the Royal Free Hospital has transformed life for men with a severe form of hemophilia B by providing a safe, reliable source of the blood clotting protein Factor IX that has allowed some to adopt a more active lifestyle, researchers reported. [More]