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FDA clears Omeros' OMS721 IND for inhibition of complement‑mediated TMAs

FDA clears Omeros' OMS721 IND for inhibition of complement‑mediated TMAs

Omeros Corporation today announced that its Investigational New Drug Application (IND) to evaluate OMS721 for the inhibition of complement‑mediated thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) has been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]
Research findings suggest new strategy in fight against HIV infection

Research findings suggest new strategy in fight against HIV infection

New research suggests that drugs commonly used to prevent organ rejection after transplantation may also be helpful for combating HIV. The findings, which are published in the American Journal of Transplantation, suggest a new strategy in the fight against HIV and AIDS. [More]
Researcher finds simple blood test that predicts person's risk for sudden cardiac death

Researcher finds simple blood test that predicts person's risk for sudden cardiac death

A researcher at the Cardiovascular Institute (CVI) at Rhode Island, The Miriam and Newport hospitals has found that a simple blood test can predict a person's risk for sudden cardiac death, enabling physicians to more quickly and accurately assess a patient's need for an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). [More]

AB Sciex launches immunosuppressants kit to improve health care

Every organ transplant patient in the world faces the potential danger of his/her body rejecting a new organ, such as a heart, kidney or liver. Immunosuppressant drugs are required to help prevent rejection. [More]
UCLA scientist wins $3M gift for research on structural properties of key proteins in kidney

UCLA scientist wins $3M gift for research on structural properties of key proteins in kidney

UCLA Scientist Dr. Ira Kurtz has received a $3 million gift from the Donald T. Sterling Foundation to fund research on the structural properties of key proteins in the kidney that affect its function in health and disease. [More]

Low levels of sodium prior to liver transplantation do not increase risk of death, say researchers

Researchers report that low levels of sodium, known as hyponatremia, prior to transplantation does not increase the risk of death following liver transplant. Full findings are published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society. [More]

Machaon Diagnostics' aHUS Genetic Panel confirms atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in 48 hours

Machaon Diagnostics today announced the availability of its "aHUS Genetic Panel" (patent pending) to genetically confirm atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS) with a turnaround time of 48 hours. The 48 hour timeframe is a dramatic advancement over other approaches which offer results in 4-13 weeks. [More]

Americans' experience with health law depends on where they live

Some states that embraced the law, like Oregon, have had difficulty enrolling residents because of glitch-ridden online marketplaces, while others like New Hampshire have seen unexpectedly strong enrollments despite prevailing critical views. [More]
Bariatric surgery patients report better quality of life

Bariatric surgery patients report better quality of life

A study by Cleveland Clinic researchers shows bariatric surgery is a highly effective and durable treatment for type 2 diabetes in obese patients, enabling nearly all surgical patients to be free of insulin and many to be free of all diabetic medications three years after surgery. [More]
FDA grants orphan drug designation for Kite Pharma's cancer immunotherapy product

FDA grants orphan drug designation for Kite Pharma's cancer immunotherapy product

Kite Pharma, Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on developing engineered autologous T cell therapy (eACT) products for cancer, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Office of Orphan Products Development granted orphan drug designation for the Company's lead investigational therapy, an autologous engineered T cell product that targets CD19 expression on B cell malignancies, for the treatment of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). [More]

Device to improve blood flow implanted in muscular dystrophy patient

"Today, we're going to make history," said 18-year-old Eric Ramos on the day UT Southwestern Medical Center doctors operated on his ailing heart. [More]

Researchers describe benefits of establishing Center for Professional and Peer Support at BWH

There is a growing recognition that in health care institutions where professionalism is not embraced and expectations of acceptable behaviors are not clear and enforced, an increase in medical errors and adverse events and a deterioration in safe working conditions can occur. [More]
Research roundup: Distance from a transplant center; Medicaid prenatal care; metastasis of email; profiting from Medicare Advantage

Research roundup: Distance from a transplant center; Medicaid prenatal care; metastasis of email; profiting from Medicare Advantage

Centralization of specialized health care services such as organ transplantation and bariatric surgery is advocated to improve quality, increase efficiency, and reduce cost. [More]
Two pediatricians win March of Dimes/Col. Harland D. Sanders Lifetime Achievement Award in Genetics

Two pediatricians win March of Dimes/Col. Harland D. Sanders Lifetime Achievement Award in Genetics

Two pediatricians whose research led to the need for early identification of and treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and its inclusion in newborn screening have received the March of Dimes/Col. Harland D. Sanders Lifetime Achievement Award in Genetics. [More]
Study highlights benefits of using multiple injections to treat Sanfilippo syndrome type III B

Study highlights benefits of using multiple injections to treat Sanfilippo syndrome type III B

New insight has been gained into treating an inherited disorder that creates serious neurological and behavioral disabilities in children and usually leads to death in the teen years. [More]
Longer looks: Exercise to treat depression; crowdsourcing treatment decisions; nitroglycerin shortage

Longer looks: Exercise to treat depression; crowdsourcing treatment decisions; nitroglycerin shortage

Depression is the most common mental illness-;affecting a staggering 25 percent of Americans-;but a growing body of research suggests that one of its best cures is cheap and ubiquitous. [More]
Public smoking bans decrease rates of premature births, hospital visits for asthma

Public smoking bans decrease rates of premature births, hospital visits for asthma

In the first comprehensive study to look at how anti-smoking laws are affecting the health of children, researchers from University of Edinburgh collaborated with researchers from Maastricht University, Hasselt University, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the effect of smoke-free legislation on child health. [More]
Scientists move a step closer to preserving fertility in young boys with cancer

Scientists move a step closer to preserving fertility in young boys with cancer

Scientists have moved a step closer to being able to preserve fertility in young boys who undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments for cancer. The new research, published in Fertility and Sterility, the journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, addresses the safety of an option scientists are developing for boys who aren't sexually mature and cannot bank sperm. [More]

Heart failure patients benefit from new device till transplant

The largest single-center study of patients implanted with a total artificial heart finds the device may help patients in severe heart failure survive until they can receive a heart transplant, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Orthofix net sales reduce 10% to $106.1M in fourth quarter 2013

Orthofix net sales reduce 10% to $106.1M in fourth quarter 2013

Orthofix International N.V., today reported results for the fourth quarter and full year ended Dec. 31, 2013. For full-year 2013, net sales were $400.5 million, decreasing 11 percent on a reported basis and constant currency basis from $447.6 million in the prior year. [More]