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Bristol-Myers Squibb, MD Anderson partner to evaluate multiple immunotherapies

Bristol-Myers Squibb, MD Anderson partner to evaluate multiple immunotherapies

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today announced a novel clinical research collaboration to evaluate multiple immunotherapies, including Opdivo (nivolumab), Yervoy (ipilimumab) and three early-stage clinical immuno-oncology assets from Bristol-Myers Squibb, as potential treatment options for acute and chronic leukemia as well as other hematologic malignancies. [More]
FDA grants orphan drug designation for neuroblastoma vaccine

FDA grants orphan drug designation for neuroblastoma vaccine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted orphan drug designation for a neuroblastoma vaccine from MabVax Therapeutics, providing development incentive with market exclusivity of the novel treatment for children with this deadly childhood cancer. [More]
New research on barcoding tool that tracks origin of blood cells challenges scientific dogma

New research on barcoding tool that tracks origin of blood cells challenges scientific dogma

A 7-year-project to develop a barcoding and tracking system for tissue stem cells has revealed previously unrecognized features of normal blood production: New data from Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Boston Children's Hospital suggests, surprisingly, that the billions of blood cells that we produce each day are made not by blood stem cells, but rather their less pluripotent descendants, called progenitor cells. [More]
CHLA selected as first Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute on the West Coast

CHLA selected as first Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute on the West Coast

Children's Hospital Los Angeles is honored to be selected the first Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute on the West Coast by The Healthcare Accreditation Colloquium. [More]
Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of IAFLD

Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of IAFLD

Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of a potentially devastating complication called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IAFLD). The diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of IAFLD are discussed in a new position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Retrospective study finds overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening, surveillance

Retrospective study finds overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening, surveillance

A retrospective study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), has found an overuse of colonoscopies for colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. [More]
Brain cancer patients can benefit from Rapamycin drug

Brain cancer patients can benefit from Rapamycin drug

Every day, organ transplant patients around the world take a drug called rapamycin to keep their immune systems from rejecting their new kidneys and hearts. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

The transplantation of faecal microbiota from a healthy donor has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines. [More]
Researcher calls for concerted international effort to confront organ trafficking problem

Researcher calls for concerted international effort to confront organ trafficking problem

The author of new research into organ trafficking has called for a concerted international effort to confront the problem. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo, Ambit Biosciences enter into definitive merger agreement

Daiichi Sankyo, Ambit Biosciences enter into definitive merger agreement

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Ltd. (hereinafter Daiichi Sankyo) and Ambit Biosciences, jointly announced today that they have entered into a definitive merger agreement under which Daiichi Sankyo will acquire all of the outstanding common stock of Ambit Biosciences for $15 per share in cash through a tender offer followed by a merger with a subsidiary of Daiichi Sankyo, or approximately $315 million on a fully diluted basis. [More]
CHLA achieves Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute designation

CHLA achieves Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute designation

Children's Hospital Los Angeles was honored by The Healthcare Colloquium as the first west coast pediatric hospital to achieve designation as an Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute. [More]
Cedars-Sinai scientists test ELAD bioartificial liver support system for patients with acute liver failure

Cedars-Sinai scientists test ELAD bioartificial liver support system for patients with acute liver failure

Cedars-Sinai physicians and scientists are testing a novel, human cell based, bioartificial liver support system for patients with acute liver failure, often a fatal diagnosis. [More]
Highlights: Hawaii public hospital cuts; La. struggles with state worker health program costs; aging in Ky.

Highlights: Hawaii public hospital cuts; La. struggles with state worker health program costs; aging in Ky.

Public hospitals across Hawaii are finding ways to reduce staff and cut services because they don't have enough money to make ends meet. Executives from the Hawaii Health Systems Corp. told lawmakers Friday that even after layoffs they are facing a $30 million deficit in 2015. One hospital on Maui chose to close its adolescent psychology unit because it couldn't sustain the appropriate staffing levels to provide the services. It's also considering cuts to oncology and dialysis services if the situation doesn't improve (9/20). [More]
Researchers test novel robotic system to improve prostate cancer biopsies

Researchers test novel robotic system to improve prostate cancer biopsies

A novel robotic system that can operate inside the bore of an MRI scanner is currently being tested as part of a biomedical research partnership program at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston with the aim of determining if the robot, in conjunction with real-time MRI images, can make prostate cancer biopsies faster, more accurate, less costly, and less discomforting for the patient. [More]
Researchers discover new molecule that allows for multiplication of stem cells in cord blood

Researchers discover new molecule that allows for multiplication of stem cells in cord blood

Investigators from the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer at the Université de Montréal have just published, in the prestigious magazine Science, the announcement of the discovery of a new molecule, the first of its kind, which allows for the multiplication of stem cells in a unit of cord blood. [More]
Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Scientists at the Babraham Institute, in collaboration with colleagues at the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute, have made a breakthrough in stem cell research. Their paper, published today in Cell, describes how human stem cells can be reverted back to non-specialised cells. [More]
Study finds that ambivalence is common among liver donor candidates

Study finds that ambivalence is common among liver donor candidates

Living donors are important to increasing the number of viable grafts for liver transplantation. A new study published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, found that ambivalence is common among donor candidates. [More]

Feds allege spinal surgery kickback scheme

During a secretly recorded meeting, McClatchy News reports that a salesman for Reliance Medical Systems promised spinal surgeons that within a month or two of joining the company's program, they could collect enough money to pay for their kids' college educations. [More]
Unusual kind of immune cell in tongue appears to play pivotal role in prevention of thrush

Unusual kind of immune cell in tongue appears to play pivotal role in prevention of thrush

An unusual kind of immune cell in the tongue appears to play a pivotal role in the prevention of thrush, according to the researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine who discovered them. [More]
Viewpoints: Health spending on the rise; GOP's new 'passion for the pill'

Viewpoints: Health spending on the rise; GOP's new 'passion for the pill'

The latest federal estimates of health care spending offer some good news: The growth rate for spending in 2013 will remain at a low level for the fifth straight year. [More]