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Researchers find promising new therapy for both pediatric and adult cancers

Researchers find promising new therapy for both pediatric and adult cancers

A study conducted at Nationwide Children's Hospital has found that a new chemotherapy is effective against both pediatric and adult cancers, and that it allows other chemotherapies to more readily reach their targets. [More]
Umbilical CBT more effective than MUD bone marrow transplants for leukemia patients

Umbilical CBT more effective than MUD bone marrow transplants for leukemia patients

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study compared outcomes of leukemia patients receiving bone marrow transplants from 2009-2014, finding that three years post transplant, the incidence of severe chronic graft-versus-host disease was 44 percent in patients who had received transplants from matched, unrelated donors (MUD) and 8 percent in patients who had received umbilical cord blood transplants (CBT). [More]
Researchers test new approach to treat metabolic diseases without organ transplant

Researchers test new approach to treat metabolic diseases without organ transplant

With a shortage of donor organs, Mayo Clinic is exploring therapeutic strategies for patients with debilitating liver diseases. Researchers are testing a new approach to correct metabolic disorders without a whole organ transplant. Their findings appear in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Groundbreaking research opens door for prevention of cardiac fibrosis

Groundbreaking research opens door for prevention of cardiac fibrosis

Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta and McGill University has opened the door towards the future prevention of cardiac fibrosis—a condition leading to heart failure for which there is currently no treatment. [More]
Study shows how Medicaid expansion affects health insurance coverage of liver transplant recipients

Study shows how Medicaid expansion affects health insurance coverage of liver transplant recipients

Researchers have found that Medicaid expansion increased Medicaid enrollment among people who received liver transplants funded by commercial insurance. The findings are published inLiver Transplantation. [More]
Mice study shows stem cell infusion could help treat glaucoma

Mice study shows stem cell infusion could help treat glaucoma

An infusion of stem cells could help restore proper drainage for fluid-clogged eyes at risk for glaucoma. That's the upshot of a study led by a Veterans Affairs and University of Iowa team. [More]
New research collaboration aims to advance clinical trials of Cell Pouch System in people with type 1 diabetes

New research collaboration aims to advance clinical trials of Cell Pouch System in people with type 1 diabetes

A new research funding agreement between the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and Sernova, a clinical-stage regenerative medicine biotech, aims to address people with severe type 1 diabetes (T1D) who are hypoglycemia unaware, a condition in which a person with diabetes does not experience the usual early warning symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) following an insulin injection. [More]
Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Great question – the answer is actually unknown. Every month, there are publications that report on new cancer-related genes, so it's an area of great knowledge growth at the moment. [More]
Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Study reports BV therapy may be curative in some Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Study reports BV therapy may be curative in some Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Five-year survival data published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, suggest that the targeted therapy brentuximab vedotin may have cured some Hodgkin lymphoma patients whose disease has persisted despite receiving previous therapies. [More]
Researchers design inhibitory peptide to unleash defence mechanisms against fungal pathogens

Researchers design inhibitory peptide to unleash defence mechanisms against fungal pathogens

For most people, a simple case of thrush or athlete's foot can be quickly and easily treated using over-the-counter anti-fungal creams and pills. [More]
Novel device for mitral valve repair shows success in human study

Novel device for mitral valve repair shows success in human study

Researchers investigating a novel device to repair the mitral heart valve report 100 percent procedural success in a safety and performance study, the first such study done in humans. [More]
Researchers identify gene-based treatment that works against fungus

Researchers identify gene-based treatment that works against fungus

Fungal infections pose a major threat to hospital patients and have proven difficult to combat, but scientists have unlocked evidence that could lead to more effective treatment. [More]
Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Harvard University and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have found evidence that bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to a subset of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. [More]
New technique could make tissue regeneration cheaper and safer for transplant patients

New technique could make tissue regeneration cheaper and safer for transplant patients

A new technique developed by a UBC researcher could make tissue regeneration cheaper and safer for health-care systems and their patients. [More]
Red meat intake may increase risk of developing end-stage renal disease

Red meat intake may increase risk of developing end-stage renal disease

A new study indicates that red meat intake may increase the risk of kidney failure in the general population, and substituting red meat with alternative sources of protein from time to time may significantly reduce this risk. [More]
IDSA/ATS recommends shorter courses of antibiotics for patients with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated pneumonia

IDSA/ATS recommends shorter courses of antibiotics for patients with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated pneumonia

Hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia– which account for 20 to 25 percent of hospital-acquired infections – should be treated with shorter courses of antibiotics than they typically are, according to new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and American Thoracic Society and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Gender matching may be beneficial to reduce risk of corneal transplant rejection and failure

Gender matching may be beneficial to reduce risk of corneal transplant rejection and failure

A study of patients undergoing corneal transplants indicates that subtle differences between men and women may lead to poorer outcomes for a woman who has received a cornea from a male donor. [More]
New treatment approach may benefit relapsed post-transplant blood cancer patients

New treatment approach may benefit relapsed post-transplant blood cancer patients

For many patients with advanced blood cancers, a stem-cell transplant can drive the disease into remission. However, about one-third of these patients experience a relapse and face a very poor prognosis. [More]
New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

A new, minimally invasive procedure appears to be effective for many patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy (FED), a common eye disease, without the potential side effects and cost of the current standard of care, a cornea transplant. [More]
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