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New hope for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

New hope for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

Although it is rare, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) can be a difficult and frightening diagnosis for parents and children. The genetic disorder causes nonmalignant tumors to form in many different organs, including the brain, eyes, kidneys and heart. [More]
Mice fed with omega 3 fatty acids have healthier joints

Mice fed with omega 3 fatty acids have healthier joints

Mice consuming a supplement of omega 3 fatty acids had healthier joints than those fed diets high in saturated fats and omega 6 fatty acids, according to Duke Medicine researchers. [More]
Mayo Clinic calls for safer pediatric imaging

Mayo Clinic calls for safer pediatric imaging

The benefits of medical imaging far outweigh the risks when children receive The Right Exam, ordered The Right Way, with The Right Radiation Dose. However, overuse and misuse of imaging change the benefit-risk ratio and Mayo Clinic is leading a collaborative effort to ensure a national protocol is put into action. [More]

Researchers invent injectable foam system to stop profuse bleeding from wound

Without prompt care, a badly wounded soldier can easily bleed to death while being transported to a distant medical station. Two traditional treatments—tourniquets and medicated gauze pads—often cannot stop the blood loss from a deep wound at the neck, shoulder or groin. [More]
Parkinson's disease drug could also help people with phobias or PTSD

Parkinson's disease drug could also help people with phobias or PTSD

A drug used to treat Parkinson's disease could also help people with phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Scientists of the Translational Neurosciences Research Center at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz are currently exploring the effects of psychotherapy to extinguish fears in combination with L-dopa. [More]
New study reveals unique health challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada

New study reveals unique health challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada

For the first time, researchers have access to detailed information about how an urban Aboriginal population in Canada uses health care. A new study, called Our Health Counts, uses this health database to clearly demonstrate the unique challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada - according to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
Trauma device and reconstructive joint implant market in Latin America expected to reach $1.75 billion by 2022

Trauma device and reconstructive joint implant market in Latin America expected to reach $1.75 billion by 2022

Decision Resources Group finds that the market for trauma devices and reconstructive joint implants in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico will be driven by favorable demographics, high numbers of motor vehicle accidents and improving access to health care, which will allow more patients to undergo these procedures. [More]
Doctors offer new minimally invasive system to treat patients with narrowed, failing aortic heart

Doctors offer new minimally invasive system to treat patients with narrowed, failing aortic heart

Doctors at the Orlando Health Heart Institute are offering a new minimally invasive system to treat patients with narrowed, failing aortic heart valves who are considered to be at high risk to undergo surgery. Orlando Health is the only hospital in Orlando currently offering the Medtronic CoreValve® System. [More]
Lines drawn over San Francisco court-ordered outpatient mental illness treatment

Lines drawn over San Francisco court-ordered outpatient mental illness treatment

Family members of those who have suffered multiple mental health crises and refuse help or fail to stick with it are begging for a Laura's Law program -- which could court-order the intractably ill into outpatient treatment. Police officers and firefighters who see the same people cycle through hospitalizations and jail want it too. Then there are the mental health consumers who are well enough to speak of the trauma inflicted by coercive care. It doesn't work, they say. It drives people from treatment (Romney, 7/6). [More]
First Edition: July 7, 2014

First Edition: July 7, 2014

Today's headlines include a range of stories related to the implementation of the health law, and the politics surrounding it. [More]
Researchers use simple tactics to reduce unnecessary blood tests, health care spending

Researchers use simple tactics to reduce unnecessary blood tests, health care spending

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center used two relatively simple tactics to significantly reduce the number of unnecessary blood tests to assess symptoms of heart attack and chest pain and to achieve a large decrease in patient charges. [More]
Study explores neurological outcomes in patients treated for traumatic brain injury

Study explores neurological outcomes in patients treated for traumatic brain injury

In patients with a traumatic brain injury (TBI), neither the administration of the hormone erythropoietin (EPO) or maintaining a higher hemoglobin concentration through blood transfusion resulted in improved neurological outcome at 6 months, according to a study in the July 2 issue of JAMA. [More]
Seattle magazine names 36 EvergreenHealth physicians to "Top Doctors" list

Seattle magazine names 36 EvergreenHealth physicians to "Top Doctors" list

The latest issue of Seattle magazine names 36 physicians within the EvergreenHealth network to the publication's annual "Top Doctors" list. [More]
Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries on weekends are more likely to die

Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries on weekends are more likely to die

Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries, such as hernia repairs or appendix removals, on weekends are more likely to suffer complications and even die than children getting the same kind of treatment during the week, according to results of a Johns Hopkins Children's Center study. [More]
Viewpoints: Nothing in health care is free; Obamacare opponents lack facts; 'Nurse Jackie' and the ER

Viewpoints: Nothing in health care is free; Obamacare opponents lack facts; 'Nurse Jackie' and the ER

The Department of Health and Human Services released a report Friday declaring that 76 million Americans with private insurance became eligible for more preventive services with no out-of-pocket fees as a result of the 2010 healthcare law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. Obamacare). Because Democrats are counting on female voters to help them at the polls in November, the report highlighted how women had been helped by that aspect of Obamacare. [More]
Researchers make giant leap towards goal of 'bio-printing' transplantable tissues, organs

Researchers make giant leap towards goal of 'bio-printing' transplantable tissues, organs

Researchers have made a giant leap towards the goal of 'bio-printing' transplantable tissues and organs for people affected by major diseases and trauma injuries, a new study reports. [More]
Research finding may accelerate development of treatments for PTSD

Research finding may accelerate development of treatments for PTSD

Scientists at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have identified a drug that appears to make memories of fearsome events less durable in mice. [More]
Omega-3 PUFAs offer an affordable way to reduce effects of traumatic brain, spinal cord injuries

Omega-3 PUFAs offer an affordable way to reduce effects of traumatic brain, spinal cord injuries

The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) found in seafood and marine oils called EPA and DHA may offer a simple, affordable way to reduce the effects of traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries by decreasing inflammation and nerve cell damage. [More]

Stryker Corporation to acquire all assets of Small Bone Innovations for $375M

Small Bone Innovations, Inc. (SBi) today announced that Stryker Corporation will acquire substantially all the assets of SBi in an all cash transaction for up to $375 million. [More]
Outpatient hysteroscopy before IVF doesn't seem to improve IVF results

Outpatient hysteroscopy before IVF doesn't seem to improve IVF results

A large multicentre trial seems finally to have resolved one of IVF's long-running controversies - whether the outlook for women with a poor IVF record can be improved by routine hysteroscopy performed before further IVF treatment. [More]