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CytoSorbents starts trading on The Nasdaq Capital Market

CytoSorbents starts trading on The Nasdaq Capital Market

CytoSorbents Corporation, a critical care immunotherapy company commercializing its CytoSorb® extracorporeal cytokine adsorber to reduce deadly inflammation in critically-ill and cardiac surgery patients, announced that it will commence trading today on The Nasdaq Capital Market under its current ticker symbol "CTSO". [More]
Loyola Burn Center helps patient overcome life-threatening job injury

Loyola Burn Center helps patient overcome life-threatening job injury

When an electric panel exploded on union electrician, Mike Sliwinski, it caused much more than a building power outage. It almost ended the life of the husband, father and beloved Franklin Park youth hockey coach. [More]
K2M completes first surgical case using innovative corpectomy cage system

K2M completes first surgical case using innovative corpectomy cage system

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine technologies, techniques and minimally invasive procedures, today announced the completion of the first surgical case using the Company's CAPRI™ Corpectomy Cage System, an expandable vertebral body replacement device that provides structural stability following a corpectomy or vertebrectomy. [More]
Teens misuse holiday baking ingredients in high-risk games

Teens misuse holiday baking ingredients in high-risk games

Watch your kitchen cupboards this season as thrill seekers look to common holiday baking ingredients for a rise - cinnamon, nutmeg and even marshmallows are the primary ingredients in an increasingly popular and high-risk game of "chicken." [More]
Study: Fear of terrorism, existential anxiety increase pulse rate and risk of death

Study: Fear of terrorism, existential anxiety increase pulse rate and risk of death

A new study of over 17,000 Israelis has found that long-term exposure to the threat of terrorism can elevate people's resting heart rates and increase their risk of dying. [More]
Research: Reducing emergency surgery for common procedures could cut health care costs

Research: Reducing emergency surgery for common procedures could cut health care costs

New research indicates that reducing emergency surgery for three common procedures by 10 percent could cut $1 billion in health care costs over 10 years. [More]
Bilateral shoulder-level amputee controls APL's Modular Prosthetic Limbs

Bilateral shoulder-level amputee controls APL's Modular Prosthetic Limbs

A Colorado man made history at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) this summer when he became the first bilateral shoulder-level amputee to wear and simultaneously control two of the Laboratory's Modular Prosthetic Limbs. [More]
Bloodstream infections differ based on distance from the equator, health care spending

Bloodstream infections differ based on distance from the equator, health care spending

Where you live affects the type of bacteria that cause bloodstream infections, according to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and an international team of investigators. The closer you live to the equator, the greater the likelihood of a bloodstream infection caused by a group of bacteria called Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in warm and moist environments, compared to another group of bacteria referred to as Gram-positive bacteria. [More]
New study compares usefulness of two biomarkers released into the blood after TBI

New study compares usefulness of two biomarkers released into the blood after TBI

In cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI), predicting the likelihood of a cranial lesion and determining the need for head computed tomography (CT) can be aided by measuring markers of bone injury in the blood. [More]
Researchers find that one in six Ontario adults reports a history of TBI

Researchers find that one in six Ontario adults reports a history of TBI

Nearly seventeen per cent of adults surveyed in Ontario said they have suffered a traumatic brain injury that left them unconscious for five minutes or required them to be hospitalized overnight, according to new research. These same adults also reported more substance use, smoking and recent psychiatric distress. [More]
Smaller blood transfusions during surgeries better for patients with heart disease

Smaller blood transfusions during surgeries better for patients with heart disease

Patients with heart disease who receive transfusions during surgeries do just as well with smaller amounts of blood and face no greater risk of dying from other diseases than patients who received more blood, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
Study reveals how the human brain heals itself after surgical removal of brain tumor

Study reveals how the human brain heals itself after surgical removal of brain tumor

An interdisciplinary team of neuroscientists and neurosurgeons from the University of Rochester has used a new imaging technique to show how the human brain heals itself in just a few weeks following surgical removal of a brain tumor. [More]
Researchers identify way to assess women at increased risk for UTI after pelvic-floor surgery

Researchers identify way to assess women at increased risk for UTI after pelvic-floor surgery

Researchers at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine may have identified a way to assess who is at risk for developing a urinary tract infection (UTI) following pelvic-floor surgery. [More]
Stem cells from healthy eye could one day be used to repair scarred cornea

Stem cells from healthy eye could one day be used to repair scarred cornea

Treating the potentially blinding haze of a scar on the cornea might be as straightforward as growing stem cells from a tiny biopsy of the patient's undamaged eye and then placing them on the injury site, according to mouse model experiments conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
Golden Jubilee National Hospital first to use revolutionary technology in rib fracture surgery

Golden Jubilee National Hospital first to use revolutionary technology in rib fracture surgery

The Golden Jubilee National Hospital recently became the first hospital in Scotland to use a revolutionary new technology on a patient suffering from a severe rib fracture. [More]
UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

Children who are having difficulty processing trauma or loss can now turn to the Trauma and Grief Center for Youth at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
University of Chicago Medicine takes steps to increase age limit of pediatric trauma program

University of Chicago Medicine takes steps to increase age limit of pediatric trauma program

The University of Chicago Medicine is taking formal steps to raise the age limit of its pediatric trauma program by two years to include 16- and 17-year-old children. [More]
Case Western Reserve selected to lead $27.3 million international effort to identify causes of SUDEP

Case Western Reserve selected to lead $27.3 million international effort to identify causes of SUDEP

Case Western Reserve is one of two universities in the country selected to lead a $27.3 million international effort to identify the causes of a mysterious and deadly phenomenon that strikes people with epilepsy without warning. [More]
Adverse childhood experiences impact child health, school outcomes

Adverse childhood experiences impact child health, school outcomes

Nearly half of all children in the United States are exposed to at least one social or family experience that can lead to traumatic stress and impact their healthy development - be it having their parents divorce, a parent die or living with someone who abuses alcohol or drugs - increasing the risk of negative long-term health consequences or of falling behind in school, suggests new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Simple rectal swab cultures can thwart drug-resistant E. coli in patients undergoing TRUSBx procedures

Simple rectal swab cultures can thwart drug-resistant E. coli in patients undergoing TRUSBx procedures

Some infections after prostate biopsy due to drug-resistant Escherichia coli can be thwarted by simple rectal swab cultures prior to the procedure. The cultures test for antibiotic-resistant E. coli, and the findings are used to direct the selection of antimicrobial prophylaxis used for the procedure, according to Rhode Island Hospital researchers. [More]