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UCSF-led study shows increase in use of CT scans in patients with non-serious injuries

UCSF-led study shows increase in use of CT scans in patients with non-serious injuries

Twice as many patients with non-serious injuries, such as fractures or neck strain, are undergoing CT scans in emergency departments at California hospitals, according to a UCSF-led study, which tracked the use of the imaging from 2005 to 2013. [More]
Dartmouth investigators show how vestibular system's horizontal canals influence navigation

Dartmouth investigators show how vestibular system's horizontal canals influence navigation

Dartmouth researchers have found the first direct evidence showing how the vestibular system's horizontal canals play a key role in sensing our direction in the environment. [More]
Johns Hopkins study shows high doses of cocaine kill brain cells

Johns Hopkins study shows high doses of cocaine kill brain cells

Working with mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins have contributed significant new evidence to support the idea that high doses of cocaine kill brain cells by triggering overactive autophagy, a process in which cells literally digest their own insides. Their results, moreover, bring with them a possible antidote, an experimental compound dubbed CGP3466B. [More]
New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

The number of people living in high-rise buildings in rising, but along with the convenience and panoramic views of a downtown condo comes a risk: a new study found that survival rates from cardiac arrest decrease the higher up the building a person lives. [More]
UM SOM selected to work with BARDA to develop radiologic and nuclear countermeasures

UM SOM selected to work with BARDA to develop radiologic and nuclear countermeasures

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology Chair and Professor William F. Regine, MD, FACR, FACRO, and UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that researchers at the UM SOM have been selected as key contractors by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, for its Radiation Nuclear Animal Model Development program. [More]
PK molecule could be a target for vascular complications linked to type 1 diabetes

PK molecule could be a target for vascular complications linked to type 1 diabetes

In an article published ahead of print on November 24, 2015 in the journal Diabetes (available at http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db15-0930), researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina, the American University of Beirut, and Case Western Reserve University report that a molecule called pre-kallikrein (PK) could be a target for the vascular complications associated with type 1 diabetes. [More]
Less physically mature ice hockey players have significantly increased risk of prolonged concussion symptoms

Less physically mature ice hockey players have significantly increased risk of prolonged concussion symptoms

A study led by a Hasbro Children's Hospital sports medicine physician found that male student ice hockey players in earlier pubertal stages had a significantly increased risk of prolonged symptoms from concussion compared with advanced pubertal and postpubescent players. [More]
Wearing helmet could cut life-threatening sledding injuries in kids

Wearing helmet could cut life-threatening sledding injuries in kids

With the coldest months of the year upon us, it’s only a matter of time until the first snowfall of the season hits. Sledding, a seasonal favorite for children of all ages seeking thrills, is probably high on kids’ to-do lists as the first flakes hit the ground. [More]
New nursing competencies may help improve veterans' health care needs

New nursing competencies may help improve veterans' health care needs

As the daughter of a 27-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force, and herself an intensive care nurse for more than 20 years, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Professor Jacqueline Moss, Ph.D., is familiar with the U.S. military and caring for its veterans. [More]
UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

The Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine will participate in a partnership with industry to develop a vaccine to prevent a group of deadly bacterial infections that occur commonly among hospital patients. [More]
Standardized treatment approach makes outpatient thyroid surgery a safe option for elderly patients

Standardized treatment approach makes outpatient thyroid surgery a safe option for elderly patients

A standardized treatment approach that starts with good screening and ends with patients going home to well-prepared caregivers, means outpatient thyroid surgery is safe for the vast majority of patients, including the elderly and super-elderly, physician-scientists say. [More]
Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation benefits active-duty service members

Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation benefits active-duty service members

Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation enables some active duty service members battling post-traumatic stress disorder to reduce or even eliminate their psychotropic medication and get better control of their often-debilitating symptoms, researchers report in the journal Military Medicine. [More]
New article suggests that playing American football may contribute to hypertension

New article suggests that playing American football may contribute to hypertension

As National Football League playoff games are underway, a new article published in the "Hypotheses" section of the January 2016 issue of The FASEB Journal, suggests that the toll the sport takes on players' bodies extends beyond head trauma and damage to limbs and joints. The trauma and damage associated with football participation may also be linked to elevations in blood pressure through immune system activation and inflammation. [More]
Higher-fat DASH diet significantly reduces blood pressure and triglycerides

Higher-fat DASH diet significantly reduces blood pressure and triglycerides

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, which is high in fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy foods, significantly lowers blood pressure as well as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. [More]
Using skin cells to treat injured hearts

Using skin cells to treat injured hearts

Following a heart attack or other heart trauma, the heart is unable to replace its dead cells. Patients are often left with little option other than heart transplants, which are rarely available, or more recently cell therapies that transplant heart cells into the patient's heart. In far too many cases, however, the transplanted heart cells do not engraft well, resulting in poor recovery. [More]
ImpediMed introduces L-Dex system for clinical assessment of lymphedema in U.S.

ImpediMed introduces L-Dex system for clinical assessment of lymphedema in U.S.

ImpediMed Limited, a global provider of medical technology to measure, monitor and manage fluid status in patients, has announced the U.S. commercial launch of its L-Dex system to aid in the clinical assessment of lymphedema. [More]
New handheld blood test to detect and evaluate concussions to be developed by Philips and Banyan Biomarkers

New handheld blood test to detect and evaluate concussions to be developed by Philips and Banyan Biomarkers

Royal Philips and Banyan Biomarkers, Inc. today announced that they have entered into a multi-year joint development agreement to develop and commercialize a new handheld blood test to detect and evaluate mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) - also known as concussion - at the point of care. [More]
QT Vascular reports initial results from first-in-human study of Chocolate Heart drug-coated balloon

QT Vascular reports initial results from first-in-human study of Chocolate Heart drug-coated balloon

QT Vascular Ltd., together with its subsidiaries (the "Company" or "QT Vascular", and together with its subsidiaries, the "Group"), a global company engaged in the design, assembly and distribution of advanced therapeutic solutions for the minimally invasive treatment of vascular disease, announce today the release of the initial results from the first-in-human study of its unique drug-coated balloon, Chocolate Heart. [More]
Critically ill patients exposed to higher ozone levels more likely to develop ARDS

Critically ill patients exposed to higher ozone levels more likely to develop ARDS

Critically ill patients who are exposed to higher daily levels of ozone are more likely to develop acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS), according to a new study published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) is used clinically to promote bone repair. However, the high BMP2 concentrations required to stimulate bone growth in humans may produce life-threatening adverse effects such as cervical swelling in spinal fusion procedures, a problem that prompted an FDA warning in 2008. [More]
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