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CHORI scientists reveal improved protective antibody responses to new meningococcal vaccine

CHORI scientists reveal improved protective antibody responses to new meningococcal vaccine

A study conducted by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute scientists shows greatly improved protective antibody responses to a new mutant vaccine antigen for prevention of disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis - also known as meningococcus - that has the potential to improve the current vaccines for meningitis. [More]
UTHealth receives DOD award to investigate stem cell therapy in adults with TBI

UTHealth receives DOD award to investigate stem cell therapy in adults with TBI

A research team led by Charles S. Cox, Jr., M.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has been awarded $6.8 million from the U.S. Department of Defense to assess the safety and efficacy of using autologous stem cell therapy in adults with emergent traumatic brain injury. [More]
Scientists discover potential new genetic causes for intellectual disability

Scientists discover potential new genetic causes for intellectual disability

An international group of researchers has for the first time identified a set of 30 inherited recessive genes that play a role in intellectual disability (ID), a neurodevelopmental disorder that, according to the Centers for Disease Control, affects as many as 213 million people around the world. [More]
Research shows sensory receptor cells within the utricle can regenerate after injury

Research shows sensory receptor cells within the utricle can regenerate after injury

Research at Umeå University in Sweden shows that in the utricle - which is one of the internal ear's balance organs in mammals - epithelial cells can be regenerated, resulting in healthy sensory hair cells and surrounding supporting cells. [More]
Groundbreaking research on effects of NIR light could lead to effective treatment for PTSD

Groundbreaking research on effects of NIR light could lead to effective treatment for PTSD

After years of studying the effects of near-infrared light on veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injuries, a team led by a University of Texas at Arlington bioengineer has published groundbreaking research in Nature's Scientific Reports that could result in an effective, long-term treatment for brain disorders. [More]
Novel wearable device can track activities of dementia patients, help in combat training

Novel wearable device can track activities of dementia patients, help in combat training

It's like a Fitbit on steroids. Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed a multi-modal sensing device that can track the fine-grained activities and behavior of people with dementia — and it could help in Army combat training, too. [More]
New study shows lower severity trauma patients may more likely die after 2-3 weeks

New study shows lower severity trauma patients may more likely die after 2-3 weeks

A new study by University of Leicester academics has shown that lower severity trauma patients could be more likely to die after two to three weeks. [More]
Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Sepsis, according to the new clinical definition of sepsis, is organ dysfunction caused by the body’s dysregulated response to an infection. Sepsis is common, with about 20 million patients/year in the developed world. It can escalate to septic shock, which is a life-threatening condition with a mortality rate of about 40%. In fact, about every second someone in the world dies of sepsis. [More]
Epigenetic changes from stress exposure can be passed from traumatized parent to offspring

Epigenetic changes from stress exposure can be passed from traumatized parent to offspring

The children of traumatized people have long been known to be at increased risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and mood and anxiety disorders. [More]
Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

LifeVest, a technology being developed at St. Michael's Hospital to help newborns breathe, won the Global Healthcare Innovation Academy's international competition in Calgary. [More]
Surgically implanted neurostimulator system helps alleviate chronic pain

Surgically implanted neurostimulator system helps alleviate chronic pain

When the damaged nerves in Anthony Newberry's foot healed incorrectly after a workplace accident, it left him feeling "like my foot was exploding for hours at a time," he says. [More]
Researchers find better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells

Researchers find better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells

A research team including developmental biologist Stephen A. Duncan, D. Phil., SmartState Chair of Regenerative Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina, has found a better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). [More]
Study examines link between PTSD and cognitive impairment in WTC responders without head injury

Study examines link between PTSD and cognitive impairment in WTC responders without head injury

New research published by the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring confirms the connection between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cognitive impairment - in this case, among those who helped with search, rescue and cleanup efforts following the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks. [More]
Adults with moderate to severe TBI may be at greater risk of death from unintentional injuries

Adults with moderate to severe TBI may be at greater risk of death from unintentional injuries

Research examining adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who participated in rehabilitation showed that they were twice as likely to die from an unintentional injury that occurred following their TBI. [More]
Fluid-filled sacs that brain cells make to trap amyloid may contribute to Alzheimer's disease

Fluid-filled sacs that brain cells make to trap amyloid may contribute to Alzheimer's disease

Vesicles, fluid-filled sacs that brain cells make to trap amyloid, a hallmark of Alzheimer's, appear to also contribute to the disease, scientists report. [More]
MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Organogenesis' PuraPly and PuraPly AM wound care products now eligible for Medicare coverage in 10 states

Organogenesis' PuraPly and PuraPly AM wound care products now eligible for Medicare coverage in 10 states

Organogenesis Inc., a global leader in advanced wound care innovations and technologies, today announced that its PuraPly and PuraPly Antimicrobial (AM) wound management products are now eligible for Medicare coverage and reimbursement in 10 states, providing coverage for an additional 7.5 million Medicare beneficiaries, following the decision by National Government Services (NGS) to retire its local coverage determination (LCD) for cellular and tissue-based products (CTPs) effective September 1, 2016. [More]
PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

This week, PinnacleHealth became the first hospital in the country to implant the EDWARDS INTUITY Elite valve, a rapid deployment device for surgical aortic valve replacement, after U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. [More]
New guidance for administering hemorrhage prevention treatment

New guidance for administering hemorrhage prevention treatment

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is currently being administered to injured patients by many prehospital air and ground systems, despite a lack of evidence supporting or refuting its efficacy in preventing hemorrhage. Several studies examining prehospital use of TXA are currently in progress, but until now there have been no guidelines for healthcare professionals administering TXA to patients. [More]
New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
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