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Controlling corneal blindness by 2030: an interview with Dr Pravin Vaddavalli

Controlling corneal blindness by 2030: an interview with Dr Pravin Vaddavalli

Corneal blindness is estimated to be the second most prevalent cause of blindness in many less developed countries. Globally, bilateral corneal blindness is estimated to afflict 4.9 million persons and accounts for 12% of 39 million blind, utilizing WHO 2010 global blindness data. [More]
Majority of mental health professionals believe firearm violence greater among mentally ill people

Majority of mental health professionals believe firearm violence greater among mentally ill people

A new study finds that the majority of mental health professionals believe firearm safety issues are greater among mentally ill people, yet they do not screen their clients for firearms or provide firearm safety counseling. [More]
Childhood psychological trauma can increase likelihood of drug misuse in adolescence

Childhood psychological trauma can increase likelihood of drug misuse in adolescence

Latest research from a national sample of almost 10,000 U.S. adolescents found psychological trauma, especially abuse and domestic violence before age 11, can increase the likelihood of experimentation with drugs in adolescence, independent of a history of mental illness. [More]
Barley products lower levels of two types of bad cholesterol linked to cardiovascular risk

Barley products lower levels of two types of bad cholesterol linked to cardiovascular risk

Eating barley or foods containing barley significantly reduced levels of two types of "bad cholesterol" associated with cardiovascular risk, a St. Michael's Hospital research paper has found. [More]
Need for improved care in and out of ICU to treat patients with PICS, PICS-F

Need for improved care in and out of ICU to treat patients with PICS, PICS-F

Thanks to advances in modern medicine, more ICU patients are surviving critical illness, but most are unprepared for the challenges ahead for themselves and their families on their journey toward recovery. [More]
Researchers aim to find new approach to improve chronic wound repair

Researchers aim to find new approach to improve chronic wound repair

Chronic wounds cause nearly 80,000 lower leg amputations annually in the U.S. alone and are associated with an increased likelihood of death. [More]
Researchers developing more accessible way to monitor brain health

Researchers developing more accessible way to monitor brain health

Simon Fraser University researchers hope that a brain vital-sign test becomes as routine during a doctor's check-up as taking a blood pressure or heart rate measurement. [More]
Severe obesity may contribute to infection risk after bypass surgery

Severe obesity may contribute to infection risk after bypass surgery

Severely obese patients who undergo a coronary artery bypass are more likely to develop an infection after surgery and stay in hospital longer, compared with people of normal weight, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. [More]
Supportive leadership can help overcome language barriers to educate new parents about SBS/AHT

Supportive leadership can help overcome language barriers to educate new parents about SBS/AHT

Language is a key obstacle to meeting guidelines for educating parents of newborns about "shaken baby syndrome"—also called abusive head trauma (SBS/AHT), reports a study in the Journal of Trauma Nursing, official publication of the Society of Trauma Nurses. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Scientists use optogenetics technique to increase memory in mice brain

Scientists use optogenetics technique to increase memory in mice brain

Raül Andero Galí, one of the heads of the "Neurobiology of Stress and Addiction" research group at the Institut de Neurociències of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and researcher at Harvard University, published an article in which, for the first time in Spain, optogenetics was used to increase memory. [More]
Risk group system may help better predict long-term consequences from whiplash trauma

Risk group system may help better predict long-term consequences from whiplash trauma

Possible long-term consequences from a whiplash trauma can be effectively predicted if the injured persons are subdivided into different risk groups shortly after the car accident. This is shown by a Danish study that was presented at the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen. [More]
Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly closed today after approving new resolutions on WHO's Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors; the Sustainable Development Goals; the International Health Regulations; tobacco control; road traffic deaths and injuries; nutrition; HIV, hepatitis and STIs; mycetoma; research and development; access to medicines and integrated health services. [More]
New research estimates unmet surgical needs of forcibly displaced persons

New research estimates unmet surgical needs of forcibly displaced persons

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the world's estimated 60 million refugees, displaced from their homes due to conflict, persecution or human rights violations, may need at least 2.78 million surgeries a year, something thought to be very difficult to arrange in the midst of their upheaval. [More]
Early-life stress may lead to functional dyspepsia in adulthood

Early-life stress may lead to functional dyspepsia in adulthood

Traumatic events early in life can increase levels of norepinephrine—the primary hormone responsible for preparing the body to react to stressful situations—in the gut, increasing the risk of developing chronic indigestion and anxiety during adulthood, a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology reports. [More]
Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Evidence is mounting that a diet mimicking the effects of fasting has health benefits beyond weight loss, with a new USC-led study indicating that it may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis. [More]
New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils could lead to shorter scan time periods

New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils could lead to shorter scan time periods

New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils may be able to reduce the amount of time it takes to get an MRI scan. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
UTHealth to launch clinical study of patients who require abdominal laparotomy

UTHealth to launch clinical study of patients who require abdominal laparotomy

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston plan to launch a clinical study looking at complication rates in patients who have experienced severe trauma to the abdominal area and require immediate surgery to diagnose and treat the injuries at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center. [More]
Study highlights need of better diagnostic criteria for people suffering from debilitating grief

Study highlights need of better diagnostic criteria for people suffering from debilitating grief

To better identify and diagnose those suffering from debilitating grief after the death of a loved one, proposed diagnostic criteria need significant modifications, according to research published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry - the first study of its kind to study the performance of newly proposed criteria. [More]
National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

The National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to move beyond genomics to target the proteins that are driving cancer, according to an Inova Health System and George Mason University collaborative paper published Thursday in the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
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