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Research shows CRAC channel inhibitors decrease lesion size, brain hemorrhage, and neurological deficits in TBI model

Research shows CRAC channel inhibitors decrease lesion size, brain hemorrhage, and neurological deficits in TBI model

Researchers from the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and UCSF, and CalciMedica, Inc., are presenting a poster at the 46th annual Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego describing the use of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Aggressive children with high anxiety levels show better resilience when exposed to tornadoes

Aggressive children with high anxiety levels show better resilience when exposed to tornadoes

When a large group of children with aggressive behavior experienced devastating tornadoes, many of those with higher anxiety showed greater resilience, according to a study published online in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, published by the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. [More]
Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Every night while you sleep, electrical waves of brain activity circle around each side of your brain, tracing a pattern that, were it on the surface of your head, might look like the twin hair buns of Star Wars' Princess Leia. [More]
Study shows appendicitis patients can be safely discharged on same day of surgery

Study shows appendicitis patients can be safely discharged on same day of surgery

Patients with acute appendicitis who undergo laparoscopic appendectomy do not experience higher rates of postoperative complications or costly readmissions when sent home on the same day of their operations compared with patients hospitalized overnight, according to study results published online as an "article in press" on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website ahead of print publication. [More]
Excessive consumption of fatty foods could negatively affect cognitive functions in children

Excessive consumption of fatty foods could negatively affect cognitive functions in children

Chances are that children who eat excessive amounts of fatty foods will not only become obese, but will develop cognitive and psychiatric problems when they are older. [More]
Brain implant enables ALS patient to operate speech computer with the mind

Brain implant enables ALS patient to operate speech computer with the mind

In the UMC Utrecht a brain implant has been placed in a patient enabling her to operate a speech computer with her mind. [More]
Statins can help prevent first time heart attacks, strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors

Statins can help prevent first time heart attacks, strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors

Cholesterol-lowering drugs help prevent heart attacks and strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking, but have not yet had a heart attack or stroke, according to a large-scale analysis of clinical trial data led by the OHSU Pacific Northwest Evidence-Based Practice Center. [More]
Nutritional supplement can mitigate harmful consequences of early-life stress

Nutritional supplement can mitigate harmful consequences of early-life stress

Young mice that grow up in stressful circumstances go on to have fewer cognitive-impairments and memory problems as adults if they are given enriched breast milk. [More]
New study finds structural differences in the brains of adolescent boys and girls with PTSD

New study finds structural differences in the brains of adolescent boys and girls with PTSD

Traumatic stress affects the brains of adolescent boys and girls differently, according to a new brain-scanning study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
International consortium awarded $36.9 million grant to accelerate introduction of new typhoid vaccines

International consortium awarded $36.9 million grant to accelerate introduction of new typhoid vaccines

Typhoid fever, a bacterial infection that causes high fever and other disabling symptoms, remains a serious global problem in the developing world: it kills almost a quarter of a million people annually, and infects about 21 million. [More]
Penn researchers develop pilot program to train library staff into community health specialists

Penn researchers develop pilot program to train library staff into community health specialists

Libraries are uniquely positioned to address public health needs in underserved populations, according to findings from a study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Free Library of Philadelphia in this month's issue of Health Affairs. [More]
New treatment may reduce side effects linked to transfusions of red blood cells

New treatment may reduce side effects linked to transfusions of red blood cells

A new treatment may diminish a dangerous side effect associated with transfusions of red blood cells (RBCs) known as pulmonary hypertension, an elevated blood pressure in the lungs and heart that can lead to heart failure, suggests a new study published in the November issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Researchers to study integration of diabetes, hypertension screening into HIV screening

Researchers to study integration of diabetes, hypertension screening into HIV screening

The success of HIV treatment programs depends upon the identification, enrollment, and retention of HIV-infected individuals, but public health officials have learned that there are numerous barriers to such success at every point in this care continuum. [More]
Stem cell therapy appears to dampen the body's neuroinflammatory response to trauma, preserve brain tissue

Stem cell therapy appears to dampen the body's neuroinflammatory response to trauma, preserve brain tissue

Results of a cellular therapy clinical trial for traumatic brain injury (TBI) using a patient's own stem cells showed that the therapy appears to dampen the body's neuroinflammatory response to trauma and preserve brain tissue, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Brain inflammation may have direct involvement in development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

Brain inflammation may have direct involvement in development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

For the first time, researchers have shown that inflammation in the brain may have direct involvement in the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In addition, they found that the number of years one plays contact sports may predict the occurrence of CTE and that this association is partly due to increased inflammation in the brain. [More]
GW scientist awarded $2.8 million NIH grant to continue research on corneal wound healing

GW scientist awarded $2.8 million NIH grant to continue research on corneal wound healing

George Washington University researcher Mary Ann Stepp, Ph.D., received a $2.8 million, five-year R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue her 27 years of research on corneal wound healing. [More]
WHO Trauma Care Checklist Programme leads to improvements in care for injured patients

WHO Trauma Care Checklist Programme leads to improvements in care for injured patients

Injury is responsible for more than 10 percent of the global burden of disease, killing more people each year than HIV, malaria and tuberculosis combined. [More]
Study investigates long-term outcomes in trauma patients discharged to IRFs

Study investigates long-term outcomes in trauma patients discharged to IRFs

As more trauma patients survive their initial hospital stays, new study results show that acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities are the best places for some of these patients to go once they leave the hospital. [More]
Researchers explore link between childhood traumas and adult drug use

Researchers explore link between childhood traumas and adult drug use

Children who are sexually abused are nearly five times more likely to inject drugs in adulthood as those who are not — while children who witness violence are about three times more likely — according to new research released today at the American Public Health Association's 2016 Annual Meeting and Expo in Denver. [More]
Second Sight successfully implants wireless multichannel neurostimulation system in human subject

Second Sight successfully implants wireless multichannel neurostimulation system in human subject

Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. (Second Sight or the Company), a developer, manufacturer and marketer of implantable visual prosthetics to restore functional vision to blind patients, today announced the first successful implantation and activation of a wireless visual cortical stimulator in a human subject, providing the initial human proof of concept for the ongoing development of the Company's Orion™ I Visual Cortical Prosthesis (Orion I). [More]
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