Tumorigenesis News and Research RSS Feed - Tumorigenesis News and Research

Tumorigenesis is the process involved in the production of a new tumor or tumors.
UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

Scientists have long known the p53 protein suppresses tumors. However, a recent animal study by UC Davis researchers has uncovered a complicated relationship between p53 and another protein, Rbm38, highlighting how the body calibrates protein levels. Too much Rbm38 reduces p53 levels, increasing the risk of cancer. [More]
New vaccination approach can reduce tumor burden, suppress formation of lung metastases

New vaccination approach can reduce tumor burden, suppress formation of lung metastases

In a new study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget researchers from Uppsala University show that a therapeutic vaccine directed against tumor vessels can reduce tumor burden and suppress formation of spontaneous lung metastases in a mouse model for metastatic breast cancer. [More]
Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

In the first study of its kind, Rice University researchers have mapped how information flows through the genetic circuits that cause cancer cells to become metastatic. The research reveals a common pattern in the decision-making that allows cancer cells to both migrate and form new tumors. Researchers say the commonality may open the door to new drugs that interfere with the genetic switches that cancer must flip to form both cancer stem cells and circulating tumor cells -- two of the main players in cancer metastasis. [More]
Moffitt researcher uncovers new approach to treat cancer

Moffitt researcher uncovers new approach to treat cancer

The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. [More]
Game theory and the cancer ecosystem: an interview with Professor Pienta, Johns Hopkins

Game theory and the cancer ecosystem: an interview with Professor Pienta, Johns Hopkins

The classic description of game theory was described by the prisoner's dilemma, which is a situation in which two players have two options where the outcome depends on the simultaneous choice made by the other. [More]
MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process. [More]
Researchers generate fruit fly model, unveil key genetic factors behind human colon cancer

Researchers generate fruit fly model, unveil key genetic factors behind human colon cancer

Researchers at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have managed to generate a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) model that reproduces human colon cancer. With two publications appearing in PLoS One and EMBO Reports, the IRB team also unveil the function of a key gene in the development of the disease. [More]
IRCM researchers discover mechanism that promotes progression of medulloblastoma

IRCM researchers discover mechanism that promotes progression of medulloblastoma

Scientists at the IRCM discovered a mechanism that promotes the progression of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumour found in children. The team, led by Fr-d-ric Charron, PhD, found that a protein known as Sonic Hedgehog induces DNA damage, which causes the cancer to develop. [More]
Genoscience Pharma to present novel cancer therapeutic strategy at EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium

Genoscience Pharma to present novel cancer therapeutic strategy at EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium

Genoscience Pharma, a company focused on discovering and developing small molecules to treat cancer by targeting cancer stem cells, today announces that it will present data on its most promising candidate at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, in Barcelona, Spain, on November 18-21, 2014. [More]
Sequencing the Asian liver fluke genome: an interview with Dr Neil Young

Sequencing the Asian liver fluke genome: an interview with Dr Neil Young

Opisthorchis viverrini is a parasitic flatworm (or liver fluke) endemic throughout Thailand, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Vietnam and Cambodia. Humans are infected with this parasite when they eat a fluke encysted in inadequately cooked/preserved freshwater fish. [More]
Genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely driving force behind human skin cancers

Genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely driving force behind human skin cancers

A genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely the driving force behind millions of human skin cancers, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Blocking nerve signals could be effective treatment for stomach cancer

Blocking nerve signals could be effective treatment for stomach cancer

Research from Columbia University Medical Center shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease. [More]
Majority of adults need to double consumption of fruits and vegetables for crucial nutrition, health benefits

Majority of adults need to double consumption of fruits and vegetables for crucial nutrition, health benefits

New research published in the September issue of the British Journal of Nutrition and featured in the just released Global Phytonutrient Report highlights a significant shortfall in fruit and vegetable consumption in people's diets around the world. [More]
Epigenetic switch can cause cancer, shows study

Epigenetic switch can cause cancer, shows study

Cancer has long been thought to be primarily a genetic disease, but in recent decades scientists have come to believe that epigenetic changes - which don't change the DNA sequence but how it is 'read' - also play a role in cancer. [More]
Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

The basic idea of cancer chemopre­vention is to arrest or reverse the progression of pre­malignant cells towards full malignancy, using physiological mechanisms that do not kill healthy cells. [More]
Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Before you swat away the next fruit fly, consider instead just how similar its biological complexities are to our own. [More]
Loss of p62 protein in cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can influence tumor growth

Loss of p62 protein in cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can influence tumor growth

A team of scientists from Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute has found that the loss of a protein called p62 in the cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can enhance the growth and progression of tumors. [More]
Researchers identify new protein as possible therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

Researchers identify new protein as possible therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

Researchers from IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute) have identified a new protein, galectin-1, as a possible therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. [More]
FGFR1 amplification predicts poor outcome in early-stage NSCLC

FGFR1 amplification predicts poor outcome in early-stage NSCLC

Amplification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 is associated with poor clinical outcome in patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, Swiss researchers report. [More]
Researchers identify new mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues

Researchers identify new mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues

A team of researchers led by David J. Mooney, Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, have identified a possible mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues, the tissues frequently involved in breast cancer. [More]