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Tumorigenesis is the process involved in the production of a new tumor or tumors.
Using acidity to detect cancer

Using acidity to detect cancer

Normally, tissues demonstrate a slightly acidic intracellular pH (pHi) and slightly alkaline extracellular pH (pHe). However, proliferating tissues demonstrate transient pH Gradient Reversal i.e. alkalinization of pHi and acidification of pHe. [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism that allows cancer cells to grow rapidly when blood sugar levels rise

Researchers identify mechanism that allows cancer cells to grow rapidly when blood sugar levels rise

Researchers have identified a mechanism that allows cancer cells to respond and grow rapidly when levels of sugar in the blood rise. This may help to explain why people who develop conditions in which they have chronically high sugar levels in their blood, such as obesity, also have an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. [More]
UCA researchers identify compounds that favour generation of new neuronal cells

UCA researchers identify compounds that favour generation of new neuronal cells

Many neurology pathologies cause irreversible loss of neurons. They are mostly the so-called neurodegenerative diseases although there exist other causes for a focal loss of neurons, as it is the case in strokes or traumatic brain injuries. All these pathologies lack nowadays of an efficient treatment not being possible to regenerate dead neurons. In fact, although the brain has the ability to regenerate as many studies has proved, this regeneration is very low, ranging from 0.2% to a maximum of 10% depending on the type of injury and the damaged area. [More]
Researchers reveal causal association between aneuploidy and cancer

Researchers reveal causal association between aneuploidy and cancer

Publication in Nature Cell Biology: researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles - ULB Cancer Research Center, U-CRC - show the causal link between aneuploidy and cancer. [More]
Researchers identify a mechanism that may explain association between obesity and cancer

Researchers identify a mechanism that may explain association between obesity and cancer

Researchers have identified a mechanism that allows cancer cells to respond and grow rapidly when levels of sugar in the blood rise. This may help to explain why people who develop conditions in which they have chronically high sugar levels in their blood, such as obesity, also have an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists discover potential way to reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy

Mayo Clinic scientists discover potential way to reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy

Cancer researchers dream of the day they can force tumor cells to morph back to the normal cells they once were. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy. [More]
CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

The Cancer Research Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fueling the discovery and development of immunotherapies for all forms of cancer, announced that it has committed more than $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate cancer immunology research and cancer immunotherapy clinical development in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and The Netherlands. [More]
Detailed molecular analyses reveal new treatment options for aggressive childhood leukemia

Detailed molecular analyses reveal new treatment options for aggressive childhood leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) leukemia is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies. Now, an international team of scientists from Berlin, Düsseldorf, Hannover, Heidelberg, Kiel, and Zurich have succeeded in decoding the molecular characteristics of an as yet incurable subtype of leukemia, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches. [More]
Understanding the workings of error correction mechanism in cell division

Understanding the workings of error correction mechanism in cell division

Cell biologists led by Thomas Maresca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with collaborators elsewhere, report an advance in understanding the workings of an error correction mechanism that helps cells detect and correct mistakes in cell division early enough to prevent chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy, that is, having too many or too few chromosomes. [More]
Discovery paves way for new therapeutic approaches to treat fatal leukemia in children

Discovery paves way for new therapeutic approaches to treat fatal leukemia in children

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies. [More]
LMU researchers reveal role of mutations in development of Ewing's sarcoma

LMU researchers reveal role of mutations in development of Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have elucidated at the molecular level how an otherwise innocuous inherited mutation that is quite common in European populations interacts with a spontaneous somatic mutation to promote the development of Ewing's sarcoma. [More]
Researchers identify genetic abnormalities that lead to skin SCC

Researchers identify genetic abnormalities that lead to skin SCC

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is one of the most frequent cancers in humans affecting more than half million new persons every year in the world. The transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell is caused by an accumulation of genetic abnormalities in the progeny of single cells. The spectrum of genetic anomalies found in a variety of human cancers have been described. [More]
Study offers new way to suppress growth factors related to cancer cell proliferation

Study offers new way to suppress growth factors related to cancer cell proliferation

Cancer cells need life-essential molecules to proliferate. These so-called growth factors are activated by ectodomain shedding of precursor proteins on the outside of the plasma membrane, mainly carried out by three human cleavage enzymes. A pharmaceutical blocking of these enzymes could hinder cancer from growing but would also inhibit other life-essential processes. [More]
Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has named four outstanding young scientists as recipients of the prestigious Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award, committing nearly $875,000 to help address a critical shortage of funding for pediatric cancer research. [More]
Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Cancer cells defy the rules by which normal cells abide. They can divide without cease, invade distant tissues and consume glucose at abnormal rates. [More]
New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

Since their discovery in the 1950s, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have been best known for their role in helping the cell make proteins from messenger RNA templates. However, recent studies have led to a previously-unsuspected concept that tRNAs are not always the end product; namely, they further serve as a source of small RNAs. [More]
New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

A UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovery of just how a certain tumor suppressor molecule works to prevent tumor growth could lead to a personalized treatment approach for colon cancer. [More]
Caltech chemists develop new sensitive technique that can detect colorectal cancer in tissue samples

Caltech chemists develop new sensitive technique that can detect colorectal cancer in tissue samples

Chemists at Caltech have developed a new sensitive technique capable of detecting colorectal cancer in tissue samples -- a method that could one day be used in clinical settings for the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. [More]
Cell fusion triggers multiple genetic changes that convert normal cells to cancer cells

Cell fusion triggers multiple genetic changes that convert normal cells to cancer cells

Although there is no one established universal cause of cancer, genetic changes are central to its development. The accumulation of spontaneous genetic changes, or mutations, that occur when cells divide can be hastened by exposure to carcinogens such as cigarette smoke (lung cancer) and infectious agents such as the papillomavirus (cervical cancer). [More]
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