Tumorigenesis News and Research RSS Feed - Tumorigenesis News and Research

Tumorigenesis is the process involved in the production of a new tumor or tumors.
Epigenetic switch can cause cancer, shows study

Epigenetic switch can cause cancer, shows study

Cancer has long been thought to be primarily a genetic disease, but in recent decades scientists have come to believe that epigenetic changes - which don't change the DNA sequence but how it is 'read' - also play a role in cancer. [More]
Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

The basic idea of cancer chemopre­vention is to arrest or reverse the progression of pre­malignant cells towards full malignancy, using physiological mechanisms that do not kill healthy cells. [More]
Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Before you swat away the next fruit fly, consider instead just how similar its biological complexities are to our own. [More]
Loss of p62 protein in cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can influence tumor growth

Loss of p62 protein in cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can influence tumor growth

A team of scientists from Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute has found that the loss of a protein called p62 in the cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can enhance the growth and progression of tumors. [More]
Researchers identify new protein as possible therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

Researchers identify new protein as possible therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

Researchers from IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute) have identified a new protein, galectin-1, as a possible therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. [More]
FGFR1 amplification predicts poor outcome in early-stage NSCLC

FGFR1 amplification predicts poor outcome in early-stage NSCLC

Amplification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 is associated with poor clinical outcome in patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, Swiss researchers report. [More]
Researchers identify new mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues

Researchers identify new mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues

A team of researchers led by David J. Mooney, Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, have identified a possible mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues, the tissues frequently involved in breast cancer. [More]
Molecular mechanisms regulating tumour initiation in skin SCC uncovered

Molecular mechanisms regulating tumour initiation in skin SCC uncovered

Advanced online publication in Nature: Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles, ULB uncover the molecular mechanisms regulating tumour initiation and cancer stem cells functions in skin squamous cell carcinoma. [More]
Ezyme used as target for antidepressants may also provide way to cure prostate cancer

Ezyme used as target for antidepressants may also provide way to cure prostate cancer

An international team of scientists including researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and the University of Southern California found that an enzyme commonly used as a target for antidepressants may also promote prostate cancer growth. [More]
Biologists show bioelectrical signals control tumors arising from cancer-causing genes, fatty acid

Biologists show bioelectrical signals control tumors arising from cancer-causing genes, fatty acid

Developmental biologists at Tufts University, using a tadpole model, have shown that bioelectrical signals from distant cells control the incidence of tumors arising from cancer-causing genes and that this process is impacted by levels of a common fatty acid produced by bacteria found in the tadpole and also in humans. [More]
TSRI researchers discover key proteins involved in one type of DNA repair gone awry

TSRI researchers discover key proteins involved in one type of DNA repair gone awry

Accumulation of DNA damage can cause aggressive forms of cancer and accelerated aging, so the body's DNA repair mechanisms are normally key to good health. However, in some diseases the DNA repair machinery can become harmful. [More]
Researchers discover key proteins involved in DNA repair gone awry

Researchers discover key proteins involved in DNA repair gone awry

Accumulation of DNA damage can cause aggressive forms of cancer and accelerated aging, so the body's DNA repair mechanisms are normally key to good health. However, in some diseases the DNA repair machinery can become harmful. [More]
TAG-1 induces apoptosis-related gene expression without triggering apoptosis in glioma cells

TAG-1 induces apoptosis-related gene expression without triggering apoptosis in glioma cells

A recent study reported by Haigang Chang and co-workers from the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University in China verified the effects of transient axonal glycoprotein-1 (TAG-1) on cell viability and p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular C-terminal domain (AICD) expression in U251 glioma cells. [More]
BeiGene receives $5M from Merck to develop BGB-283 BRAF inhibitor

BeiGene receives $5M from Merck to develop BGB-283 BRAF inhibitor

BeiGene (Beijing), Co., Ltd., an innovative oncology company focused on developing targeted and immune-oncology therapeutics, today announced the achievement of a clinical milestone in the company's collaboration with Merck Serono, the biopharmaceutical division of Merck, Darmstadt, Germany, for BGB-283, a second-generation BRAF inhibitor candidate currently in Phase 1 development. [More]
iQBS researchers develop new gene expression analysis approach for identifying cancer genes

iQBS researchers develop new gene expression analysis approach for identifying cancer genes

Dartmouth Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences (iQBS) researchers developed a new gene expression analysis approach for identifying cancer genes. [More]
AGA Research Foundation announces 2014 AGA Research Scholars

AGA Research Foundation announces 2014 AGA Research Scholars

The American Gastroenterological Association Research Foundation is pleased to announce the 2014 AGA Research Scholars. The AGA Research Scholar Awards program, launched in 1984, enables young investigators to develop independent and productive research careers in digestive diseases. This year, the AGA Research Scholar Awards fund an additional year allowing for three consecutive years of funding. [More]
New genetic evidence strengthens link between role of dietary fats with colon cancer progression

New genetic evidence strengthens link between role of dietary fats with colon cancer progression

Scientists have shown new genetic evidence that could strengthen the link between the role of dietary fats with colon cancer progression. [More]
Stanford researchers identify normal cell type that gives rise to most invasive bladder cancers

Stanford researchers identify normal cell type that gives rise to most invasive bladder cancers

A single type of cell in the lining of the bladder is responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Researchers discover hotspot L205R mutation is closely associated with adrenocortical tumors

Researchers discover hotspot L205R mutation is closely associated with adrenocortical tumors

Chinese researchers from Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, BGI, and other institutions have discovered that the activating hotspot L205R mutation in PRKACA gene was closely associated with adrenocortical tumors (ACTs), and the relationship of recurrently mutated DOT1L and CLASP2 with ACTs' other subtypes. [More]
Too little or too much of SRPK1 enzyme promotes cancer, shows research

Too little or too much of SRPK1 enzyme promotes cancer, shows research

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found that too little or too much of an enzyme called SRPK1 promotes cancer by disrupting a regulatory event critical for many fundamental cellular processes, including proliferation. [More]