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Vomiting is the process the body uses to eject some or all of the contents of the stomach through the mouth.
TTUHSC El Paso investigators receive $1.8 million grant to support digestive disorder research

TTUHSC El Paso investigators receive $1.8 million grant to support digestive disorder research

Co-principal investigators Richard McCallum, M.D., and Irene Sarosiek, M.D., have received a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. [More]
New quality improvement program reduces hospital readmission rates for weight-loss surgery patients

New quality improvement program reduces hospital readmission rates for weight-loss surgery patients

While the average hospital saw 30-day readmission rates for weight-loss surgery patients drop by about 14 percent, some hospitals had reductions as much as 32 percent after implementing a new quality improvement program, according to new research presented today at ObesityWeek 2016, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. [More]
Combining procedures under general anesthesia may improve safety of children, decrease costs

Combining procedures under general anesthesia may improve safety of children, decrease costs

Children who require both dental and non-dental medical procedures should have them completed under one general anesthesia session whenever possible, which is ideal for both the patient and family, suggests research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
Patients using public health insurance more likely to experience high pain levels in PACU, study finds

Patients using public health insurance more likely to experience high pain levels in PACU, study finds

Patients using public health insurance were more likely to experience high pain levels in the post anesthesia care unit following surgery to remove their tonsils and/or adenoids, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Lartruvo (olaratumab) with doxorubicin to treat adults with certain types of soft tissue sarcoma (STS), which are cancers that develop in muscles, fat, tendons or other soft tissues. [More]
IPC PAS researchers develop new polymer that may detect early stages of kidney disease

IPC PAS researchers develop new polymer that may detect early stages of kidney disease

The advanced phase of acute kidney injury can be fatal in even one in two patients. Fortunately, now it will be possible to detect the disease in its initial stages, when treatment is still relatively simple and the prognosis good. [More]
Tumor Paint lights the way for surgeons during brain surgery

Tumor Paint lights the way for surgeons during brain surgery

In December of last year, Laura Coffman began to notice that something wasn't quite right with her 2-year-old son, Hunter. He was leaning to one side and seemed to lose his balance easily. When he became lethargic and started vomiting a few days later on Dec. 28, she knew it was time to see the pediatrician. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Batavia Biosciences receives $8 million grant to develop safe, affordable rotavirus vaccine

Batavia Biosciences receives $8 million grant to develop safe, affordable rotavirus vaccine

Batavia Biosciences received an $8 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop a low cost manufacturing process to bring an affordable rotavirus vaccine to the global health market. [More]
Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy

Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy

Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study. [More]
Sarepta Therapeutics wins accelerated approval from FDA for Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug

Sarepta Therapeutics wins accelerated approval from FDA for Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) injection, the first drug approved to treat patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). [More]
New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

The increase in illnesses and deaths linked to medication-resistant bacteria has been well-documented by researchers and received extensive public attention in recent years. Now, UCLA-led research shows how these bacteria are making it more difficult to treat a common but severe kidney infection. [More]
New tool could help reduce antibiotic prescribing to children with cough and RTIs

New tool could help reduce antibiotic prescribing to children with cough and RTIs

Respiratory tract infections (RTI) with cough are the most common reason children are prescribed antibiotics by their doctors, but up to a third of prescriptions may be unnecessary. [More]
New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

Most people have never heard of mastocytosis. It's a rare, sometimes deadly, immune disorder. Now new research may help those with advanced mastocytosis and possibly many more people, too. [More]
People with migraine feel isolated, stigmatized and often dissatisfied with treatment, survey reveals

People with migraine feel isolated, stigmatized and often dissatisfied with treatment, survey reveals

Migraine in America 2016, a national survey by Health Union of more than 3,900 individuals experiencing migraines, reveals that patients have numerous treatment options, but are often dissatisfied with results. [More]
Cases of rotavirus infections fall by 84% thanks to vaccination

Cases of rotavirus infections fall by 84% thanks to vaccination

Figures published by Public Health England have shown that the number of diagnosed Rotavirus cases, a highly infectious virus which may cause vomiting and diarrhoea, have dropped by 84% since the introduction of a vaccine to the national childhood immunisation schedule in July 2013. [More]
Bacteria in smokeless tobacco products linked to opportunistic infections

Bacteria in smokeless tobacco products linked to opportunistic infections

Several species of bacteria found in smokeless tobacco products have been associated with opportunistic infections, according to a paper published August 26 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
New recommendations offer evidence-based strategies to help teenagers avoid obesity and eating disorders

New recommendations offer evidence-based strategies to help teenagers avoid obesity and eating disorders

A single approach can prevent both obesity and eating disorders in teenagers, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. [More]
Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

A group of scientists from several Russian universities and medical centers made progress in explaining the nature of one of the most ancient neurologic diseases – migraine. The study was conducted within a larger project to develop a device capable of remotely and effectively diagnosing this disease. [More]
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