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Vomiting is the process the body uses to eject some or all of the contents of the stomach through the mouth.
FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. [More]
Clinical trial to test efficacy of new drug for chronic cough

Clinical trial to test efficacy of new drug for chronic cough

The National Institute for Health Research has today announced its participation in a clinical trial to test a promising new treatment for chronic cough. If approved, this would be the first new cough drug in 50 years and offer hope to the millions of people living with chronic cough for whom few, if any, effective treatments exist. [More]
FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vaxchora, a vaccine for the prevention of cholera caused by serogroup O1 in adults 18 through 64 years of age traveling to cholera-affected areas. Vaxchora is the only FDA-approved vaccine for the prevention of cholera. [More]
Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Using an advanced imaging technique, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System were able to predict which patients who'd recently suffered concussions were likely to fully recover. [More]
Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that putting liver cancer patients on a medication regimen prior to undergoing a certain treatment could lead to shorter hospital stays and less chance for readmission due to complications. [More]
PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

Although surgery can prolong the lives of patients with an aggressive type of cancer called malignant pleural mesothelioma, many patients avoid the operation for fear it will degrade their quality of life. [More]
Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Once inside the human body, infectious microbes like Salmonella face a fluid situation. They live in a watery world, surrounded by liquid continually flowing over and abrading their cell surfaces--a property known as fluid shear. [More]
Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

The metabolite of a drug that is helping patients battle multiple sclerosis appears to significantly slow the onset of Parkinson's disease, researchers say. [More]
Cabozantinib drug can extend lives of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

Cabozantinib drug can extend lives of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

Data presented today at the American Society of Clinical Oncology congress showed that cabozantinib, a next generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) can extend the lives of patients by nearly two years following failure of one or more anti-angiogenic therapies almost five months longer than everolimus, a current standard of care therapy. [More]
Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Injecting modified, human, adult stem cells directly into the brains of chronic stroke patients proved not only safe but effective in restoring motor function, according to the findings of a small clinical trial led by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
Metformin along with chemotherapy/radiation improves outcomes in head and neck cancer patients

Metformin along with chemotherapy/radiation improves outcomes in head and neck cancer patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that adding increasing doses of an approved Type 2 diabetes drug, metformin, to a chemotherapy and radiation treatment regimen in head and neck cancer patients is not well tolerated if escalated too quickly, but allowing slower escalation could be beneficial. [More]
FDA approves blood-based cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2 for NSCLC patients

FDA approves blood-based cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2 for NSCLC patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2, a blood-based companion diagnostic for the cancer drug Tarceva (erlotinib). This is the first FDA-approved, blood-based genetic test that can detect epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations in non-small cell lung cancer patients. [More]
Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

A child feels nauseated all the time, but no medical test can find what is wrong. Or a child vomits regularly, but there's no illness or eating disorder to explain it. These, and other stomach and bowel-related problems with no obvious causes, are called functional gastrointestinal disorders. [More]
Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery with non-opiate anaesthesia may need less painkillers

Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery with non-opiate anaesthesia may need less painkillers

New research presented at Euroanaesthesia 2016 shows that patients undergoing breast cancer surgery need less painkilling medication post-surgery if they have anaesthesia that is free of opioid drugs. [More]
First buprenorphine implant for opioid dependence treatment gets FDA approval

First buprenorphine implant for opioid dependence treatment gets FDA approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Probuphine, the first buprenorphine implant for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Probuphine is designed to provide a constant, low-level dose of buprenorphine for six months in patients who are already stable on low-to-moderate doses of other forms of buprenorphine, as part of a complete treatment program. [More]
Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial. [More]
Fluorescent proteins help trace viral infections

Fluorescent proteins help trace viral infections

Researchers at Umea University have developed a new method to directly follow viral infections in living organisms. This method can make infected cells produce fluorescent proteins, which means that they light up and become easier to identify. [More]
Neos announces U.S. launch of Adzenys XR-ODT for ADHD

Neos announces U.S. launch of Adzenys XR-ODT for ADHD

Neos Therapeutics, Inc., a pharmaceutical company with a late‐stage pipeline of innovative extended-release (XR) product candidates for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), today announced that Adzenys XR-ODT™ is in distribution channels and is now available to prescribe for patients with ADHD in the United States. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

New analyses presented at the American Thoracic Society’s 2016 annual conference (ATS 2016) further add to the efficacy and safety profile of OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Hospitalization for rotavirus infections decreased by > 70% following the introduction of a vaccine program in Ontario, Canada, according to a study published May 11, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Wilson from Public Health Ontario and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Canada, and colleagues. [More]
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