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Vomiting is the process the body uses to eject some or all of the contents of the stomach through the mouth.
Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Injecting modified, human, adult stem cells directly into the brains of chronic stroke patients proved not only safe but effective in restoring motor function, according to the findings of a small clinical trial led by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
Metformin along with chemotherapy/radiation improves outcomes in head and neck cancer patients

Metformin along with chemotherapy/radiation improves outcomes in head and neck cancer patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that adding increasing doses of an approved Type 2 diabetes drug, metformin, to a chemotherapy and radiation treatment regimen in head and neck cancer patients is not well tolerated if escalated too quickly, but allowing slower escalation could be beneficial. [More]
FDA approves blood-based cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2 for NSCLC patients

FDA approves blood-based cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2 for NSCLC patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2, a blood-based companion diagnostic for the cancer drug Tarceva (erlotinib). This is the first FDA-approved, blood-based genetic test that can detect epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations in non-small cell lung cancer patients. [More]
Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

A child feels nauseated all the time, but no medical test can find what is wrong. Or a child vomits regularly, but there's no illness or eating disorder to explain it. These, and other stomach and bowel-related problems with no obvious causes, are called functional gastrointestinal disorders. [More]
Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery with non-opiate anaesthesia may need less painkillers

Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery with non-opiate anaesthesia may need less painkillers

New research presented at Euroanaesthesia 2016 shows that patients undergoing breast cancer surgery need less painkilling medication post-surgery if they have anaesthesia that is free of opioid drugs. [More]
First buprenorphine implant for opioid dependence treatment gets FDA approval

First buprenorphine implant for opioid dependence treatment gets FDA approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Probuphine, the first buprenorphine implant for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Probuphine is designed to provide a constant, low-level dose of buprenorphine for six months in patients who are already stable on low-to-moderate doses of other forms of buprenorphine, as part of a complete treatment program. [More]
Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial. [More]
Fluorescent proteins help trace viral infections

Fluorescent proteins help trace viral infections

Researchers at Umea University have developed a new method to directly follow viral infections in living organisms. This method can make infected cells produce fluorescent proteins, which means that they light up and become easier to identify. [More]
Neos announces U.S. launch of Adzenys XR-ODT for ADHD

Neos announces U.S. launch of Adzenys XR-ODT for ADHD

Neos Therapeutics, Inc., a pharmaceutical company with a late‐stage pipeline of innovative extended-release (XR) product candidates for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), today announced that Adzenys XR-ODT™ is in distribution channels and is now available to prescribe for patients with ADHD in the United States. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

New analyses presented at the American Thoracic Society’s 2016 annual conference (ATS 2016) further add to the efficacy and safety profile of OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Hospitalization for rotavirus infections decreased by > 70% following the introduction of a vaccine program in Ontario, Canada, according to a study published May 11, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Wilson from Public Health Ontario and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Canada, and colleagues. [More]
UCLA study shows anti-nausea drug does not increase risk of birth defects

UCLA study shows anti-nausea drug does not increase risk of birth defects

Women suffering from extreme morning sickness often take Zofran (ondansetron) to combat their debilitating nausea and vomiting. However, two studies have found that the drug may increase risk of heart defects and cleft palate in children exposed in utero. [More]
Common misconception about penicillin allergies

Common misconception about penicillin allergies

It's time for your primary care check-up, and the doctor asks you to list any known drug allergies. "Penicillin," you say immediately, although you can't remember actually taking the drug or having a reaction to it—it was your parents who said so. According to a Texas A&M Health Science Center allergist, many people who believe they're allergic to this antibiotic may not actually be allergic at all. [More]
Study opens door for new opportunities in finding antidotes to nerve agent sarin

Study opens door for new opportunities in finding antidotes to nerve agent sarin

The nerve agent sarin causes a deadly overstimulation of the nervous system that can be stopped if treated with an antidote within minutes of poisoning. Today, a ground-breaking study has been published in PNAS, which in detail describes how such a drug works. Researchers at the Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umea University and in Germany are behind the study. [More]
Half-strength apple juice followed by preferred fluid choice better for treating kids with mild gastroenteritis

Half-strength apple juice followed by preferred fluid choice better for treating kids with mild gastroenteritis

Children with mild gastroenteritis and minimal dehydration experienced fewer treatment failures such as IV rehydration or hospitalization when offered half-strength apple juice followed by their preferred fluid choice compared with children who received electrolyte maintenance solution to replace fluid losses, according to a study published online by JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting. [More]
Outbreak of tropical parasitic infection observed for first time in the Arctic

Outbreak of tropical parasitic infection observed for first time in the Arctic

An outbreak of an intestinal parasite common in the tropics, known as Cryptosporidium, has been identified for the first time in the Arctic. The discovery was made in Nunavik, Quebec, by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, in collaboration with the Nunavik Department of Public Health, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec and Health Canada. The discovery, which was documented in the journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, could have long-term implications for the health of children in Nunavik and Nunavut's communities. [More]
Research highlights global economic burden of norovirus

Research highlights global economic burden of norovirus

While norovirus is often linked in the news to outbreaks on cruise ships, the highly contagious stomach bug sickens nearly 700 million around the world every year and results in roughly $4.2 billion in health care costs and $60.3 billion in societal costs annually, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

A non-invasive test to diagnose and monitor an inflammatory disease that injures the esophagus - called eosinophilic esophagitis or EoE - would replace the need for repeated endoscopy for a growing number of children and adults with this relatively new condition. [More]
Imatinib-related symptom burden linked to adherence in Indian CML patients

Imatinib-related symptom burden linked to adherence in Indian CML patients

Research shows low adherence to imatinib in Indian patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, with an association between nonadherence and worse symptom burden related to treatment. [More]
New KidsMD Alexa skill device allows parents to get easier to access medical information

New KidsMD Alexa skill device allows parents to get easier to access medical information

"My child has a fever of 101. Should I be concerned?" Through a new skill created for Amazon Alexa-enabled devices, parents will now be able to ask Alexa a variety of questions around fever and other common symptoms. The KidsMD Alexa skill was developed by the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator team at Boston Children's Hospital and launched today. [More]
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