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Use of next-generation gene sequencing in NICUs may improve diagnosis of rare diseases

Use of next-generation gene sequencing in NICUs may improve diagnosis of rare diseases

The use of next-generation gene sequencing in newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may improve the diagnosis of rare diseases and deliver results more quickly to anxious families, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

There are more well-founded therapy options for the treatment of strokes than ever before. Care has to be reorganised before these innovations are actually used on patients. At the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen, experts are discussing just how to do that successfully - from guidelines for the use of thrombectomy procedures all the way to the structure and expansion of stroke care units. [More]
Improving regulatory environment and raising the role of self-care could relieve pressure on worldwide healthcare systems

Improving regulatory environment and raising the role of self-care could relieve pressure on worldwide healthcare systems

A white paper, written by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) and released today reports that greater regulatory harmonisation and access to non-prescription medicines as a whole could improve the ability of patients to care for themselves and reduce needless costs to society, health systems, individuals and companies. Consumer Health: time for a regulatory re-think?, which is based on in-depth interviews with international experts from industry bodies, regulators, academia and patient groups, concludes that self-care and the topic of consumer health regulation is not receiving sufficient attention. [More]
Study finds no increased risk of stroke for football fans

Study finds no increased risk of stroke for football fans

Being excited for your team, rooting them on and suffering vicariously with them are the grand emotions that wash over spectators of football matches. If this increases the risk of stroke remains to be elucidated, as the number of strokes that occur on days with major matches is not significantly higher than on days when no football is played. [More]
Noise in ICUs exceeds recommended levels, disturbs patients and care givers

Noise in ICUs exceeds recommended levels, disturbs patients and care givers

A study presented at Euroanaesthesia 2016 shows that noise levels in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can go well above recommended levels, disturbing both patients and the medical teams that care for them. [More]
UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

About 800,000 strokes occur in America each year; that's about one every 40 seconds. Houston resident Joe Carrabba experienced one of them. [More]
PNNL scientists play central role in National Microbiome Initiative

PNNL scientists play central role in National Microbiome Initiative

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are playing a central role as the nation devotes more than $500 million to understand communities of microorganisms and their role in climate science, food production and human health. [More]
Error model of hospital alarms underscores need for optimum alarm systems

Error model of hospital alarms underscores need for optimum alarm systems

Hospital alarms are currently ranked as the "top medical technology hazard" within the United States. On average, there are about 480,000 patients in hospitals — each generating about 135 clinical alarms per day. But studies show that more than 90 percent of these alarms result in no action. [More]
Several medical groups urge Congress to provide required funding for Zika virus prevention, treatment

Several medical groups urge Congress to provide required funding for Zika virus prevention, treatment

The American College of Physicians along with the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists sent a letter today to House and Senate leaders urging them to immediately pass legislation that would provide the highest possible funding level for research, prevention, control, and treatment of illnesses associated with the Zika virus that is commensurate with the public health emergency that the virus represents. [More]
New research estimates unmet surgical needs of forcibly displaced persons

New research estimates unmet surgical needs of forcibly displaced persons

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the world's estimated 60 million refugees, displaced from their homes due to conflict, persecution or human rights violations, may need at least 2.78 million surgeries a year, something thought to be very difficult to arrange in the midst of their upheaval. [More]

Rise and fall of alcohol-related mortality in Scotland linked to variations in alcohol affordability

New research has found that the rise in alcohol-related mortality during the 1990s and early 2000s in Scotland, and the subsequent decline, were likely to be explained in part by increasing then decreasing alcohol affordability. [More]
Reducing use of opioid medications possible, but challenging

Reducing use of opioid medications possible, but challenging

A team of researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System recently surveyed patients to understand barriers to reducing the use of opioids to manage chronic pain. The results of those interviews are published in the current issue of the journal Pain Medicine. [More]
Inadequate monitoring places post-operative patients at risk for opioid-induced respiratory depression

Inadequate monitoring places post-operative patients at risk for opioid-induced respiratory depression

Nearly 75 percent of hospitalized patients receiving opioids for pain management are not monitored according to hospital guidelines. [More]
Pharmacist suggests education as foremost strategy to control opioid abuse

Pharmacist suggests education as foremost strategy to control opioid abuse

Technologies that make it harder for people to abuse opioids - like doctoring pills so that they produce unpleasant side effects if broken, crushed or injected -- likely will have limited effectiveness in stemming the global epidemic of opioid abuse, according to Adam Kaye, a professor of pharmacy at University of the Pacific. [More]

Study finds majority of older Americans work longer after retirement

Departing the workforce entirely and entering retirement at age 65 is no longer a reality for many older people in the United States, according to a recent survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. [More]
Overcoming barriers to move beyond race-based treatment decisions

Overcoming barriers to move beyond race-based treatment decisions

Prescribing certain medications on the basis of a patient's race has long come under fire from those uneasy with using race as a surrogate for biology when treating disease. [More]
Researcher proposes three-point plan to identify, eliminate lead exposure nationwide

Researcher proposes three-point plan to identify, eliminate lead exposure nationwide

The crisis of lead-contaminated drinking water in Flint, Mich., continues to make headlines—but it's just the most prominent example of an "ongoing and needless tragedy of childhood lead poisoning," according David E. Jacobs, PhD, CIH, a noted authority on childhood lead poisoning prevention. [More]
Military personnel with insomnia symptoms less resilient than members with healthy sleep hygiene

Military personnel with insomnia symptoms less resilient than members with healthy sleep hygiene

A new study found that military service members who reported insomnia symptoms or short sleep durations were less resilient than members who reported healthy sleep hygiene. [More]

Study underscores central role of SNSs in identifying students at risk of drinking problems

Research from North Carolina State University and Ohio University finds that having an "alcohol identity" puts college students at greater risk of having drinking problems - and that posting about alcohol use on social media sites is actually a stronger predictor of alcohol problems than having a drink. [More]
Updates on sixty-ninth World Health Assembly

Updates on sixty-ninth World Health Assembly

Delegates at the World Health Assembly have agreed resolutions and decisions on air pollution, chemicals, the health workforce, childhood obesity, violence, noncommunicable diseases, and the election of the next Director-General. [More]
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