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American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

The care of adults over age 65 with type 2 diabetes is a growing concern: the prevalence of diabetes is highest in this age group and is expected to grow as the U.S. population ages, with many needing care at long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]
Pullman Regional Hospital implements new incident management and patient safety system

Pullman Regional Hospital implements new incident management and patient safety system

Pullman Regional Hospital and RGP Healthcare, a division of Resources Global Professionals, today jointly announced that Pullman Regional is implementing Pavisse™, a new, state-of-the-art incident management and patient safety system. [More]
Authors examine link between irrational thoughts and psychological distress

Authors examine link between irrational thoughts and psychological distress

In the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics the link between irrational thoughts and distress is critically examined. Since the cognitive revolution of the early 1950s, thoughts have been discussed as central components in the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses. [More]

Flexible duty hours safe for patients and beneficial for surgical residents

A new landmark national study led by Northwestern Medicine showed allowing surgical residents the flexibility to work longer hours in order to stay with their patients through the end of an operation or stabilize them during a critical event did not pose a greater risk to patients. [More]
New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

A new study has found a steep decline in the number of scholarly papers about basic science published in leading medical journals in the last 20 years. [More]
Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

February is National Children's Dental Health Month, an opportunity for parents of toddlers, young children or teenagers to explore questions about keeping your child's teeth clean, your child's first dental visit or how to protect children's smiles. [More]
New Brown School study examines health-related quality of life for breast cancer survivors

New Brown School study examines health-related quality of life for breast cancer survivors

Breast cancer takes a daunting toll on all women, but it hits younger women especially hard, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
Study: Young African-Americans often have distorted view of stroke risk

Study: Young African-Americans often have distorted view of stroke risk

Young African-Americans often hold a distorted view of their personal risk for a stroke, two nursing researchers at Georgia State University's Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions say in a recently published study in the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing. [More]
Black-box warnings about dangers of ADHD drugs confusing, say researchers

Black-box warnings about dangers of ADHD drugs confusing, say researchers

Black-box warnings about the dangers of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications are confusing and could have serious consequences for the risk of youth suicide, according to researchers at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal (CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal) and the University of Montreal, whose correspondence has just been published in the most recent issue of the journal The Lancet Psychiatry. [More]
New article provides guidance on managing critically ill patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal

New article provides guidance on managing critically ill patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal adds challenges to caring for critically ill patients, and nurses must be diligent at each stage of care to minimize complications, according to an article in the February issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]
Researchers publish work on how news articles shape perceptions of obesity

Researchers publish work on how news articles shape perceptions of obesity

Researchers at Chapman University, UCLA, and Stanford have just published work on how news media coverage shapes perceptions of obesity. They examined how perspectives on obesity portrayed in news articles affect people's support for different obesity-related public policies and their prejudice towards fat men and women. [More]
Researchers use new method to assess quality of colonoscopies performed in outpatient facilities

Researchers use new method to assess quality of colonoscopies performed in outpatient facilities

Colonoscopies are now a routine preventive diagnostic test for millions of Americans each year. While rates are low, complications like perforation, bleeding, and anesthesia-related heart failure can occur. Yale School of Medicine researchers have now developed a quality measure that uses follow-up hospital visits to track the variation in colonoscopy quality among outpatient facilities. [More]
New process for altering ingredients in sunscreen enables the body to produce vitamin D

New process for altering ingredients in sunscreen enables the body to produce vitamin D

For the first time researchers have developed a process for altering the ingredients in a sunscreen that does not impact its sun protection factor (SPF), but does allow the body to produce vitamin D. The findings, published in the peer reviewed journal PLOS ONE, has led to the production of a new sunscreen called Solar D. [More]
Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

New analysis from a mental health care study shows that "coordinated specialty care" (CSC) for young people with first episode psychosis is more cost-effective than typical community care. Cost-effectiveness analysis in health care is a way to compare the costs and benefits of two or more treatment options. [More]
WHO calls on governments to rate movies that portray tobacco use

WHO calls on governments to rate movies that portray tobacco use

The World Health Organization is calling on governments to rate movies that portray tobacco use in a bid to prevent children and adolescents from starting to smoke cigarettes and use other forms of tobacco. [More]

Critical access hospitals help meet need for high-quality palliative care in rural communities

Nurses at critical access hospitals are well positioned to provide high-quality palliative care close to home for millions of Americans in rural communities, according to an article in the February issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

People who are fit are more likely to survive their first heart attack, according to a study of nearly 70,000 patients of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
UW–Madison center continues to offer accurate radiation treatment

UW–Madison center continues to offer accurate radiation treatment

As radiation sources used to map disease and attack cancer grow in number and complexity, a University of Wisconsin-Madison center continues to offer the last word on accurate radiation doses. [More]
ALISON launches free online Zika virus course

ALISON launches free online Zika virus course

ALISON, the global free learning pioneer has launched a free course entitled "Zika Virus – What you need to know". The course has been developed by ALISON Pedagogic experts within the guidance issued by the World Health Organisation and the US-based Centre for Disease Control. [More]
TPC reports first cases of illness, deaths due to Dewshine mixture in Tennessee

TPC reports first cases of illness, deaths due to Dewshine mixture in Tennessee

A lethal concoction of racing fuel and Mountain Dew claimed the lives of two Tennessee teens and has sparked the Tennessee Poison Center to warn about the lethality of what has been called "Dewshine." [More]
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