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Study provides new ways to avert annual heat-related deaths

Study provides new ways to avert annual heat-related deaths

By the 2080s, as many as 3,331 people could die every year from exposure to heat during the summer months in New York City. The high estimate by Columbia University scientists is based on a new model--the first to account for variability in future population size, greenhouse gas trajectories, and the extent to which residents adapt to heat through interventions like air conditioning and public cooling centers. [More]
Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a condition mostly observed in older patients following surgery under general anesthesia, is characterized by impaired memory and concentration. The impairment may be temporary or permanent and incapacitating. [More]
Searing temperatures can be inherently dangerous to vulnerable children, older adults

Searing temperatures can be inherently dangerous to vulnerable children, older adults

The searing, record-setting temperatures in the West and Southwest United States flared a warning that extreme heat could be commonplace across much of the country this summer. [More]
Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

As age increases, older adults can develop problems taking their medications. But until now, few studies have examined the traits that might cause elders to need help with their medications, or how widespread a problem this might be. [More]
Johns Hopkins students improve protective suit design to help Ebola health workers

Johns Hopkins students improve protective suit design to help Ebola health workers

For health workers in the field treating people stricken with Ebola and other diseases, a protective suit is the first defense against infection. The suit and head covering itself, however, can hamper their ability to help by impeding breathing, or heating up so quickly in high temperatures and humidity that they can scarcely work for more than an hour. [More]
JAMA edition provides summary of FSMB policy recommendations about marijuana in patient care

JAMA edition provides summary of FSMB policy recommendations about marijuana in patient care

The Journal of the American Medical Association has published in its online edition a summary of new policy adopted by the Federation of State Medical Boards that provides recommendations about marijuana in patient care and a cautionary note advising actively licensed physicians to abstain from using marijuana while practicing medicine. [More]
Patients more likely to develop increased trust when surgeons disclose specialty bias

Patients more likely to develop increased trust when surgeons disclose specialty bias

A doctor's guidance may reassure us more than we realize -especially if she says she is likely to recommend treatment in her field of expertise, known as "specialty bias." [More]
Walnut consumption linked to reduced risk of developing physical function impairments in older women

Walnut consumption linked to reduced risk of developing physical function impairments in older women

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that consuming 1-2 servings of walnuts per week (1/4 cup per serving) was associated with reduced risk of developing impairments in physical function, which helps enable older women to maintain independence throughout the aging process. [More]
Researchers determine whether older adults were up-to-date with CRC screening

Researchers determine whether older adults were up-to-date with CRC screening

Who should consider colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and why? CRC is a common and costly disease, largely of the elderly, with nearly 25% of cases diagnosed among patients aged 75-84 years, but the guidelines for CRC screening of Americans aged 75 or older vary according to the source. [More]
Study examines changes in coverage among hospitalized nonelderly adults after Medicaid expansion

Study examines changes in coverage among hospitalized nonelderly adults after Medicaid expansion

In a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA, Matthew M. Davis, M.D., M.A.P.P., of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and colleagues examined changes in insurance coverage among hospitalized nonelderly adults after Michigan expanded Medicaid coverage in 2014 under the Affordable Care Act. [More]
Mitofusin 2 protein could serve as therapeutic target to ameliorate sarcopenia in older adults

Mitofusin 2 protein could serve as therapeutic target to ameliorate sarcopenia in older adults

One of the alterations that most affects the quality of life of the elderly is muscle wastage and the resulting loss of strength, a condition known as sarcopenia. At about 55 years old, people begin to lose muscle mass, this loss continues into old age, at which point it becomes critical. [More]
Alpine HC designs, launches new specification label for Mouva slings

Alpine HC designs, launches new specification label for Mouva slings

If you are a care home in the UK, you will have almost certainly thrown away a moving and handling sling in the last few months because the specification label is faded. [More]
Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

In clinical settings, mobile phones benefit patients by placing useful data and information at the fingertips of health professionals during interactions on the ward. [More]
Researchers find improvements in many aspects of U.S. diet

Researchers find improvements in many aspects of U.S. diet

In nationally representative surveys conducted between 1999 and 2012, several improvements in self-reported dietary habits were identified, such as increased consumption of whole grains, with additional findings suggesting persistent or worsening disparities based on race/ethnicity and education and income level, according to a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA. [More]
New report offers PCPs implementable strategies to encourage patients' physical activity

New report offers PCPs implementable strategies to encourage patients' physical activity

Exercise plays a crucial role in being healthy and preventing disease. Because of their close relationship to patients, primary care physicians (PCPs) can act as a catalyst to help people be more active through physical activity counseling; however, doctors often encounter barriers to being able to properly address inactivity. [More]
ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

The American College of Physicians today provided physician perspective on the escalating cost of prescription drugs, the impact of the costs on internal medicine physicians and their patients, and support for the intent of the bipartisan Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2016 to reduce anti-competitive practices. [More]
Highly structured nutrition therapy provides substantial impact on A1C, body weight and lipid profiles

Highly structured nutrition therapy provides substantial impact on A1C, body weight and lipid profiles

Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have announced the results of a study that may change how nutrition therapy is delivered to overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Assisted dying for psychiatric conditions could put vulnerable people at risk

Assisted dying for psychiatric conditions could put vulnerable people at risk

Offering medical assistance in dying to people in Canada on the basis of psychiatric illnesses could put vulnerable people at risk, argues a commentary in CMAJ. [More]
Classical music by Mozart and Strauss could lower blood pressure and heart rate

Classical music by Mozart and Strauss could lower blood pressure and heart rate

The music of Mozart and Strauss is able to lower blood lipid concentrations and the heart rate. [More]
Wolters Kluwer launches new open-access journal: Pediatric Quality and Safety

Wolters Kluwer launches new open-access journal: Pediatric Quality and Safety

Wolters Kluwer, a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, is pleased to announce the new open-access journal, Pediatric Quality and Safety, launched online on June 16, 2016. [More]
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