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Envision Conference 2014 kicks off with presentation of two prestigious awards

Envision Conference 2014 kicks off with presentation of two prestigious awards

Envision announced today that Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., a San Fernando Valley, Calif.-based medical device manufacturer, and Janet Sunness, M.D., Medical Director of Richard E. Hoover Low Vision Rehabilitation Services at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson, Md., were named the 2014 recipients, respectively, of the Envision Oculus Award and Envision Award in Low Vision Research, two prestigious honors acknowledging substantial contributions to furthering research and facilitating collaborative efforts toward addressing low vision and the conditions that cause it. [More]
Research could help eventual treatment of degenerative muscle, brain diseases

Research could help eventual treatment of degenerative muscle, brain diseases

Our genetic information is stored in DNA, tiny strands of nucleic acid that contain instructions for the functioning of our bodies. To express this genetic data, our DNA is copied into RNA molecules, which then translate the instructions into proteins that perform tasks in our cells. [More]
Researchers identify control mechanism for mood disorders

Researchers identify control mechanism for mood disorders

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a control mechanism for an area of the brain that processes sensory and emotive information that humans experience as "disappointment." [More]
NPS MedicineWise launches new educational activity for pharmacists to improve asthma control

NPS MedicineWise launches new educational activity for pharmacists to improve asthma control

A new NPS MedicineWise educational activity has been launched specifically for pharmacists to help people achieve better asthma control. Around 50% of people with asthma live with poor control of their condition and consider this to be normal. [More]
Genetic testing for breast cancer doubled due to 'Angelina Jolie effect'

Genetic testing for breast cancer doubled due to 'Angelina Jolie effect'

In May 2013 Angelina Jolie, who was then Hollywood's highest-paid actress, underwent a double mastectomy after testing positive for a BRCA1 gene mutation that significantly increases the risk of developing breast cancer. A recent study, published by Breast Cancer Research has found that, public knowledge of her decision doubled NHS referrals for genetic testing for breast cancer risk. [More]

Regulus begins ATHENA study to monitor changes in renal function in Alport syndrome patients

Regulus Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, announced today it has initiated its ATHENA natural history of disease study in patients with Alport syndrome, a life-threatening genetic kidney disease with no approved therapy. [More]
PET-CT more accurate than conventional CT in evaluating patients with follicular lymphoma

PET-CT more accurate than conventional CT in evaluating patients with follicular lymphoma

Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) is more accurate than conventional CT scanning in measuring response to treatment and predicting survival in patients with follicular lymphoma, and should be used routinely in clinical practice, according to new research published in The Lancet Haematology. [More]
Rosuvastatin drug more effective among prediabetic patients, finds new study

Rosuvastatin drug more effective among prediabetic patients, finds new study

Cardiovascular disease is the leading causes of death worldwide and high cholesterol plays a major role in accelerating its progression. Medical practitioners have turned to statins as a treatment to decrease cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins such as small dense lipoproteins (sdLDL), considered to be especially harmful. [More]
Activation of MMP-9 enzyme leads to behavioral problems connected to chronic stress

Activation of MMP-9 enzyme leads to behavioral problems connected to chronic stress

Why is it that when people are too stressed they are often grouchy, grumpy, nasty, distracted or forgetful? Researchers from the Brain Mind Institute at EPFL have just highlighted a fundamental synaptic mechanism that explains the relationship between chronic stress and the loss of social skills and cognitive impairment. When triggered by stress, an enzyme attacks a synaptic regulatory molecule in the brain. This was revealed by a work published in Nature Communications. [More]
LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

Research led by Paulo Rodriguez, PhD, an assistant research professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans' Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has identified the crucial role an inflammatory protein known as Chop plays in the body's ability to fight cancer. [More]
Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

The link between a protein typically associated with Alzheimer's disease and its impact on memory and cognition may not be as clear as once thought, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center. [More]
Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Study after study has proven it true: exercise is good for you. But new research from University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that exercise may have an added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. [More]
Reducing insomnia can decrease inflammation, lower risk for chronic disease in older adults

Reducing insomnia can decrease inflammation, lower risk for chronic disease in older adults

Lack of sleep can make you sick. And while everybody has the occasional restless night, for those who suffer from chronic insomnia — some 15 percent of older adults in the United States — that sleep loss can increase the risk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, weight gain, type 2 diabetes, and even lead to an earlier death. [More]
People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

A new study suggests that people who experience migraine in middle age may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, or other movement disorders later in life. Those who have migraine with aura may be at double the risk of developing Parkinson's, according to the study published in the September 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute. The five-year Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant will fund four new melanoma research projects that aim to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to treat melanoma and other skin cancers. [More]
Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have found that the most common variant of the circulating protein apolipoprotein E, called apoE3, helps repair the lining of blood vessels. Individuals with another variant, called apoE4, do not get the benefit of this repair, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
New approach to imaging metastatic tumors

New approach to imaging metastatic tumors

Bioluminescence, nanoparticles, gene manipulation - these sound like the ideas of a science fiction writer, but, in fact, they are components of an exciting new approach to imaging local and metastatic tumors. [More]
UAB researchers discover novel mechanism involved in formation of memory, learning

UAB researchers discover novel mechanism involved in formation of memory, learning

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham report the discovery of a novel mechanism in the brain involved in the formation of memory and learning. In findings reported online this week in Nature, the research team describes the role of a histone subunit known as H2A.Z. [More]
Studies explore role of STXBP5 gene in development of cardiovascular disease

Studies explore role of STXBP5 gene in development of cardiovascular disease

Two independent groups of researchers led by Sidney (Wally) Whiteheart, PhD, of the University of Kentucky, and Charles Lowenstein, MD, of the University of Rochester, have published important studies exploring the role that a gene called STXBP5 plays in the development of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Acclarent releases ACCLARENT AERA Eustachian Tube Balloon Dilation System for ETD treatment

Acclarent releases ACCLARENT AERA Eustachian Tube Balloon Dilation System for ETD treatment

Acclarent, Inc. announced today the launch of the ACCLARENT AERA Eustachian Tube Balloon Dilation System for the treatment of adult patients with Eustachian Tube Dysfunction (ETD), a condition marked by ear pain, pressure and dulled hearing. [More]