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Oraya Therapy now being offered at NHS hospital in the UK and at four prestigious university hospitals in Germany

Oraya Therapy now being offered at NHS hospital in the UK and at four prestigious university hospitals in Germany

Oraya Therapeutics, Inc. announced today that it is significantly expanding its presence in Europe, with Oraya Therapy being offered for the first time at a National Health Service hospital in the United Kingdom and at four prestigious university hospitals in Germany. Oraya Therapy is intended as a one-time, non-invasive treatment for wet Age-related Macular Degeneration, with the potential to maintain or enhance vision while significantly reducing the required number of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injections into the eye. [More]
Signs and symptoms of Lewy body dementia

Signs and symptoms of Lewy body dementia

"I watched my husband experience a decline in cognition followed by a period of what seemed like improved function only to plunge again into confusion with more frequent hallucinations," says one caregiver newly acquainted with Lewy body dementia (LBD). [More]
Researchers create high-precision software for better detection of eye sensitivity

Researchers create high-precision software for better detection of eye sensitivity

Researchers at the University of Alicante have developed high-precision software for diagnosing eye sensitivity. This is a new technology that allows to quantify the degree of opacity in the posterior capsule of the eye caused by the growth of cells in the intraocular lens. [More]
Brain stimulation effective for treatment of depression

Brain stimulation effective for treatment of depression

Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. [More]

Loyola burn patient boasts 0 handicap, helps other burn patients to lead normal life

Once told he would never golf again, burn victim Jamie Nieto, now head pro at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, is leading the ninth annual Burn Awareness Golf Outing and silent auction there on Friday, August 29. [More]
New discovery links two important hypotheses in Alzheimer's disease research

New discovery links two important hypotheses in Alzheimer's disease research

In Alzheimer's disease, accumulation of amyloid plaque in the brain is believed to play an important role in many characteristic disease symptoms, including memory loss and other mental state changes. [More]
New molecules and biopharmaceuticals enhance patient's immune response against tumors

New molecules and biopharmaceuticals enhance patient's immune response against tumors

Researchers at the University of Arkansas have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health to develop new molecules and biopharmaceuticals that enhance a patient's immune response against tumors. [More]
Study shows inactivation of p53 protein promotes cancer progression

Study shows inactivation of p53 protein promotes cancer progression

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the University of Barcelona have discovered the interaction between HERC2 proteins with another protein called p53 that is inactivated in more than half of human tumors. [More]
Researchers explore brain estrogens to mitigate learning and memory problems

Researchers explore brain estrogens to mitigate learning and memory problems

New studies being launched by neurobiologist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will investigate how estrogens produced in the brains of young birds enhance their ability to learn songs during a critical window during development. [More]
Chronic fatigue and rheumatoid arthritis: an interview with Ailsa Bosworth, CE, National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society

Chronic fatigue and rheumatoid arthritis: an interview with Ailsa Bosworth, CE, National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society

Chronic fatigue is about much more than merely feeling tired and when it is at its worst, people feel unable to do almost anything, so it can impact absolutely every area of their life. [More]
Peer-led interventions can reduce depression and anxiety in mothers of kids with autism

Peer-led interventions can reduce depression and anxiety in mothers of kids with autism

Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Viruses designed to kill cancer cells could boost effectiveness of chemotherapy to arms, legs

Viruses designed to kill cancer cells could boost effectiveness of chemotherapy to arms, legs

Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation, a new study reports. [More]
ROS1 fusion genes found in young East Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma

ROS1 fusion genes found in young East Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma

ROS1 fusion genes were successfully detected independent of gender or smoking history in young East Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a histological subgroup in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) diagnostic tests. [More]
Randox Cystatin C facilitates early detection and treatment of chronic kidney disease

Randox Cystatin C facilitates early detection and treatment of chronic kidney disease

As a more sensitive maker of renal dysfunction Randox Cystatin C offers several advantages over traditional creatinine assays. [More]
Elevated ASM activity linked to Alzheimer's disease

Elevated ASM activity linked to Alzheimer's disease

Unclogging the body's protein disposal system may improve memory in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study from scientists at Kyungpook National University in Korea published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Study aims at best way to treat deep vein thrombosis

Study aims at best way to treat deep vein thrombosis

Patients who have a clot in their legs and are considering whether to be treated with traditional blood-thinning medication or undergo a minimally-invasive catheter-based clot removal procedure should feel comfortable that there is no difference in death rates between the two treatments, although there are more bleeding risks with the catheter procedure, according to a study by Temple University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Study confirms effectiveness of EKF PointMan technology for isolating low-level DNA mutations in blood

Study confirms effectiveness of EKF PointMan technology for isolating low-level DNA mutations in blood

EKF Diagnostics, the global diagnostics company, announces that the latest results from its collaboration with the Institute of Life Sciences at the University of Swansea, UK, have continued to confirm the effectiveness of its PointMan DNA enrichment technology for isolating and characterizing low-level DNA mutations in blood. [More]
Researchers uncover new schizophrenia gene links

Researchers uncover new schizophrenia gene links

The discovery of over a hundred genetic risk factors linked to schizophrenia provides vital new clues in understanding what causes the condition and will kick-start the search for new treatments, according to leading UK scientists. [More]
Experts join MD Anderson to end cancer

Experts join MD Anderson to end cancer

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is pleased to announce that one of the world's preeminent experts in breast cancer research and treatment, V. Craig Jordan, Ph.D., will join the institution's efforts to end cancer. Jordan is considered the "Father of Tamoxifen," the groundbreaking therapeutic drug that has saved countless lives. [More]
Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date. [More]