Medical Condition News RSS Feed - Medical Condition News

New survey shows majority of patients happy with how physicians manage discussion on IPF diagnosis

New survey shows majority of patients happy with how physicians manage discussion on IPF diagnosis

A diagnosis of IPF is news that few patients want to hear from their physician, but the reality is that approximately 3 million people worldwide are living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding the workings of the cellular machinery involved in a host of inflammatory diseases. [More]
Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

An antibody drug that targets a surface marker on cancer stem cells could offer a promising new therapeutic approach for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a form of blood cancer that affects an estimated 50,000 people in Saudi Arabia. [More]
British Lung Foundation announces funding for IPF research

British Lung Foundation announces funding for IPF research

Britons are officially three times more likely to die of the incurable lung condition idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), than in a road accident. Despite this, the disease is so unheard of and underfunded in research doctors still don’t know what causes it. [More]
New project receives grant to develop revolutionary bowel cancer surgery tool

New project receives grant to develop revolutionary bowel cancer surgery tool

A project to develop a revolutionary new bowel cancer surgery tool that will enable surgeons to carry out operations with far greater precision than ever before has received £628,000 in funding. [More]
Radiometer to sponsor 2016 EuSEM Congress in Vienna, Austria

Radiometer to sponsor 2016 EuSEM Congress in Vienna, Austria

Radiometer is proud to be a gold sponsor of this year’s European Congress on Emergency Medicine organized by the European Society for Emergency Medicine (EuSEM) in Vienna, Austria, October 1-5. [More]
Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Many know Botox as a trendy way to get rid of wrinkles, but the popular drug — made from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) — can do more than just fill lines. [More]
Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design

Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design

Previous studies have shown a correlation between the design of cities and growing epidemics of injuries and non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. [More]
FDA approves new biosimilar for multiple inflammatory diseases

FDA approves new biosimilar for multiple inflammatory diseases

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Amjevita (adalimumab-atto) as a biosimilar to Humira (adalimumab) for multiple inflammatory diseases. [More]
New global map shines light on genetic roots of diseases

New global map shines light on genetic roots of diseases

A global genetic interaction map is revolutionizing how genes are being studied. A new study, involving University of Minnesota researchers, is no longer looking at genes as loners, but instead as a social network of the body, interacting in groups. The new approach may ultimately change our understanding of the genetic roots of diseases. [More]
Yale researchers compare efficacy of four PD-L1 assay tests

Yale researchers compare efficacy of four PD-L1 assay tests

In a recent study, a Yale Cancer Center team compared the performance of the four available PD-L1 assay tests. [More]
High levels of childhood muscular fitness may protect against metabolic syndrome in adult life

High levels of childhood muscular fitness may protect against metabolic syndrome in adult life

About 20-25 percent of adults have the metabolic syndrome and have increased risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Scientist uses stem cells derived from dental pulp to return hearing to deaf people

Scientist uses stem cells derived from dental pulp to return hearing to deaf people

Deafness is a condition in which the hearing diminishes or disappears; currently there are few procedures to treat because it often is irreversible. Also, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), the disease globally affects 360 million people. [More]
CRNAs use holistic approach to effectively manage pain with less opioid dependency

CRNAs use holistic approach to effectively manage pain with less opioid dependency

The holistic approach to patient care and pain management used by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists can help prevent opioid dependency, substance use disorder, drug overdoses and death, according to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. [More]
Higher proportion of CKD patients receive renal replacement therapy in the U.S. than other countries

Higher proportion of CKD patients receive renal replacement therapy in the U.S. than other countries

A new study indicates that a much higher proportion of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD)—even those ≥85 years of age—receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) such as maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation in the United States than in other developed countries. [More]
Researchers receive grant to help develop stem cell therapy for glaucoma

Researchers receive grant to help develop stem cell therapy for glaucoma

Researchers from the University's Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease have been awarded a pump-priming grant to help develop a stem cell therapy for glaucoma. [More]
Scientists discover potential way of stopping most aggressive brain tumour

Scientists discover potential way of stopping most aggressive brain tumour

Researchers from the University of Southampton have discovered a potential way of stopping one of the most aggressive types of brain tumour from spreading, which could lead the way to better patient survival. [More]
DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

Results of a study published this week show that the effects of smoking on DNA are wide-reaching and some persist long after a person has stopped smoking. The information gained may help improve our understanding of smoking-related diseases. [More]
Amount of gluten triggers genetic risk of celiac disease, research shows

Amount of gluten triggers genetic risk of celiac disease, research shows

The amount of gluten could be a more important clue than breast-feeding or the timing of the introduction of gluten for continued research into the causes of celiac disease (gluten intolerance). [More]
Precision medicine trial shows analysing person's DNA improves treatment options for cancer patients

Precision medicine trial shows analysing person's DNA improves treatment options for cancer patients

A clinical trial for types of advanced cancer is the first of its kind to show that precision medicine - or tailoring treatment for individual people - can slow down the time it takes for a tumour to grow back, according to research presented at the Molecular Analysis for Personalised Therapy (MAP) conference, today (Friday). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement