Medical Condition News RSS Feed - Medical Condition News

Rare germ cell tumor creates unique bond between two young women

Rare germ cell tumor creates unique bond between two young women

Morgan Ellison and Madison McDaniel were diagnosed with a rare germ cell tumor of the ovary earlier this year. The two strangers would soon form a unique bond during their treatment in Birmingham, Alabama. [More]
Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers are one step closer to understanding the genetic and biological basis of diseases like cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and rheumatoid arthritis - and identifying new drug targets and therapies - thanks to work by three computational biology research teams from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania and Vanderbilt University. [More]
Small doses of cancer drug may be potential treatment for sepsis and other pandemics

Small doses of cancer drug may be potential treatment for sepsis and other pandemics

Results from laboratory experiments and mouse studies suggest that small doses of drugs from a specific class of approved cancer medications called topoisomerase 1 (top1) inhibitors may protect against the overwhelming immune response to infection that sometimes leads to sepsis, a bacterial condition that kills as many as 500,000 people in the United States each year. [More]
Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
NBI-facilitated bladder tumour surgery can lower risk of cancer recurrence

NBI-facilitated bladder tumour surgery can lower risk of cancer recurrence

Research into bladder tumour surgery has found that using narrow band imaging can significantly reduce the risk of disease recurrence. [More]
Scientists unveil reasons why NSAIDs, pain killers may increase heart disease risk

Scientists unveil reasons why NSAIDs, pain killers may increase heart disease risk

Researchers have known for more than a decade that the risk of heart disease and stroke increases when people take pain relievers like ibuprofen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. Now, scientists from the University of California, Davis, have uncovered some of the reasons why these drugs can harm heart tissue. [More]
Modified surgical technique may be effective treatment option for chronic temporal headache

Modified surgical technique may be effective treatment option for chronic temporal headache

A modified surgical technique may provide a simpler approach to the surgical treatment for one type of chronic headache, according to an "Ideas and Innovations" paper in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Researchers explore effects of adolescent obesity on cognitive performance in adulthood

Researchers explore effects of adolescent obesity on cognitive performance in adulthood

The Franco-Mexican research explores the cognitive performance in adulthood when the subjects have been exposed to an obesogenic environment during adolescence. [More]
Level of salts in the brain play critical role in controlling sleep-wake cycle

Level of salts in the brain play critical role in controlling sleep-wake cycle

Danish research is behind a new epoch-making discovery, which may prove decisive to future brain research. The level of salts in the brain plays a critical role in whether we are asleep or awake. This discovery may be of great importance to research on psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and convulsive fits from lack of sleep as well as post-anaesthetization confusion, according to Professor Maiken Nedergaard. [More]
NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

It is estimated that more than 72,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHL) in 2016. The sixth leading cancer diagnosis in U.S. men and women, NHL has more than 30 sub-types, each featuring unique treatment choices and challenges. [More]
New article reviews ability of different stem cells to help restore function after spinal cord injuries

New article reviews ability of different stem cells to help restore function after spinal cord injuries

Stem cell therapy is a rapidly evolving and promising treatment for spinal-cord injuries. According to a new literature review, published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, different types of stem cells vary in their ability to help restore function, and an ideal treatment protocol remains unclear pending further clinical research. [More]
Frailty, depression symptoms in older adults can affect spouses

Frailty, depression symptoms in older adults can affect spouses

Frailty, a condition that affects 10 percent of people aged 65 and older, can make older adults more prone to disability, falls, hospitalization and a shorter lifespan. Recently, researchers writing in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society examined the effects of frailty and depression on married couples. [More]
Elusive brain receptor may play vital role in death of neurons from neurological diseases

Elusive brain receptor may play vital role in death of neurons from neurological diseases

Strokes, seizures, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia: these conditions can cause persistent, widespread acidity around neurons in the brain. But exactly how that acidity affects brain function isn't well understood. [More]
Exposure to fine particulate matter in air can increase risk of cancer-specific mortality

Exposure to fine particulate matter in air can increase risk of cancer-specific mortality

In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a series of monographs on the evaluation of various carcinogenic risks. In a monograph on air pollution, the organization pointed out the difficulty of assessing the effects of pollution on multiple types of cancers, given their different etiologies, risk factors and variability in the composition of air pollutants in space and time. However, the IARC identified certain key components of air pollution, including particulates. [More]
Nuplazid (pimavanserin) tablets approved to treat hallucinations and delusions

Nuplazid (pimavanserin) tablets approved to treat hallucinations and delusions

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Nuplazid (pimavanserin) tablets, the first drug approved to treat hallucinations and delusions associated with psychosis experienced by some people with Parkinson's disease. [More]
Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Good nutrition and regular exercise combined are an effective way to reduce the risk of cancer and to prevent its recurrence. "This has been proven over and over," said Carol DeNysschen, associate professor and chair of the Health, Nutrition, and Dietetics Department at Buffalo State. "If we could only motivate people to eat better and move more, we'd have so much less chronic disease." [More]
CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology is committed to publishing impactful digestive biology research covering a broad spectrum of themes in GI, hepatology and pancreatology. We wanted to share two new CMGH articles, which both offer important insight into future interventions for chronic conditions. [More]
New oral cancer drugs getting more expensive over time, study shows

New oral cancer drugs getting more expensive over time, study shows

New cancer drugs taken in pill form have become dramatically more expensive in their first year on the market compared with drugs launched 15 years ago, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study has found. The findings call into question the sustainability of a system that sets high prices at market entry in addition to rapidly increasing those prices over time. [More]
First generic version of Crestor gets FDA approval

First generic version of Crestor gets FDA approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first generic version of Crestor (rosuvastatin calcium) tablets. [More]
Female hormones may be responsible for decreased risk of kidney failure in women than men

Female hormones may be responsible for decreased risk of kidney failure in women than men

Female hormones may play a role in women's decreased risk of developing kidney failure relative to men, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The findings may be helpful for future attempts at safeguarding women's and men's kidney health in sex-specific ways. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement