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Existing MCI screening tools result in more than 7% false-negative error rate, study finds

Existing MCI screening tools result in more than 7% false-negative error rate, study finds

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a slight but noticeable and measurable decline in cognitive abilities, such as remembering names or a list of items. While changes may not be severe enough to disrupt daily life, a clinical diagnosis of MCI indicates an increased risk of eventually developing Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia. [More]
Study explores incidence of heart failure following myocardial infarction

Study explores incidence of heart failure following myocardial infarction

One in four patients develop heart failure within four years of a first heart attack, according to a study in nearly 25 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Johannes Gho, a cardiology resident at the University Medical Center Utrecht, in Utrecht, the Netherlands. [More]
Researchers discover new potential treatment target for liver cancer

Researchers discover new potential treatment target for liver cancer

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen have discovered a new molecular mechanism that can be used to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma, which is the most common liver cancer. [More]
National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

The National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to move beyond genomics to target the proteins that are driving cancer, according to an Inova Health System and George Mason University collaborative paper published Thursday in the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Purdue researchers find potential way to overcome limitations posed by CAR T-cell therapy

Purdue researchers find potential way to overcome limitations posed by CAR T-cell therapy

Purdue University researchers may have figured out a way to call off a cancer cell assassin that sometimes goes rogue and assign it a larger tumor-specific "hit list." [More]
Rice University researchers set stage for large-scale synthesis of cytotoxic agent to treat cancer

Rice University researchers set stage for large-scale synthesis of cytotoxic agent to treat cancer

The lab of Rice University synthetic organic chemist K.C. Nicolaou has reported the streamlined total synthesis of delta12-prostaglandin J3, a molecule previously claimed to kill leukemic cancer cells. [More]
Researchers find genetic mutations linked to increased risk factor for PTSD

Researchers find genetic mutations linked to increased risk factor for PTSD

In the largest study of DNA samples from service members with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), researchers have identified genetic mutations that may be associated with an increased risk factor for PTSD. [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Personalized DXM-loaded leukosomes may help treat inflammation

Personalized DXM-loaded leukosomes may help treat inflammation

Nanosized Trojan horses created from a patient's own immune cells have successfully treated inflammation by overcoming the body's complex defense mechanisms, perhaps leading to broader applications for treating diseases characterized by inflammation, such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Rare mutation may reduce risk of developing arteriosclerosis by 34%

Rare mutation may reduce risk of developing arteriosclerosis by 34%

According to new international research, just less than one per cent of the population is naturally protected against developing chronic coronary artery diseases. [More]
Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered mutations that may fuel early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue from high-risk patients. [More]
Georgia Tech engineers developing device to listen to and measure sounds inside the joint

Georgia Tech engineers developing device to listen to and measure sounds inside the joint

You've injured your knee. A doctor straps a listening device to it, and the noises you hear coming out of it are cringe-worthy. "Crackle! Krglkrglkrgl! Snap!" [More]
Raman spectroscopic technique helps detect unique cellular changes that occur following radiation

Raman spectroscopic technique helps detect unique cellular changes that occur following radiation

The Irving K Barber School of Arts and Sciences at the University of British Columbia, Canada, hosts a multidisciplinary group of physics, engineering and radiation oncology scientists. [More]
Transplanted human stool may offer treatment hope for ulcerative colitis patients

Transplanted human stool may offer treatment hope for ulcerative colitis patients

Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) may improve their symptoms with a transplantation of healthy stool from donors, according to Australian researchers. The findings were presented by Dr Sudarchan Paramsothy MD, a gastroenterologist from the University of New South Wales, Australia at the Digestive Disease Week conference in San Diego, California between the 21st to 24th May. [More]
Researchers find ways to switch on Natural Killer cells to combat cancer

Researchers find ways to switch on Natural Killer cells to combat cancer

Our bodies are constantly and successfully fighting off the development of cells that lead to tumours - but when there is disruption to this process cancer is free to develop. [More]
Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in New Taipei City, Taiwan. [More]
Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

The flu jab is associated with a reduced risk of hospitalisation in patients with heart failure, according to research presented today in a late breaking trial session at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Researchers explore phenomenon that causes late mortality in sepsis patients

Researchers explore phenomenon that causes late mortality in sepsis patients

It's known that many patients die in the months and years after sepsis. But no one has known if this increased risk of death (in the 30 days to 2 years after sepsis) is because of sepsis itself, or because of the pre-existing health conditions the patient had before acquiring the complication. [More]
Ongoing treatment with nivolumab shows benefit in advanced kidney cancer patients

Ongoing treatment with nivolumab shows benefit in advanced kidney cancer patients

Only 12% of kidney cancer patients with advanced disease survive five years after their initial treatment. In a Roswell Park Cancer Institute-led study, scientists report that some patients with advanced kidney cancer who continued to receive a novel immunotherapy drug after their disease progressed saw clinical benefit. [More]
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