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Rates of type 1 diabetes increase significantly among non-Hispanic white youth

Rates of type 1 diabetes increase significantly among non-Hispanic white youth

The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes. [More]
Study reveals subtypes, potential diagnostic and treatment clues for papillary thyroid carcinomas

Study reveals subtypes, potential diagnostic and treatment clues for papillary thyroid carcinomas

A comprehensive analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) – the most common form of thyroid cancer – has provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other genomic alterations that drive disease development. [More]
Study finds lower mortality at hospitals that treat high volume of SAH cases

Study finds lower mortality at hospitals that treat high volume of SAH cases

For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of SAH cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Swimming-induced pulmonary oedema cases higher among athletes taking part in triathlons

Swimming-induced pulmonary oedema cases higher among athletes taking part in triathlons

Endurance athletes taking part in triathlons are at risk of the potentially life-threatening condition of swimming-induced pulmonary oedema. Cardiologists from Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton, writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, say the condition, which causes an excess collection of watery fluid in the lungs, is likely to become more common with the increase in participation in endurance sports. [More]
Research could pave way for more effective drugs to treat inflammation

Research could pave way for more effective drugs to treat inflammation

Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. [More]
Mindfulness improves cardiovascular health

Mindfulness improves cardiovascular health

Pay attention to the implication of these new research results: People who pay more attention to their feelings and experiences tend to have better cardiovascular health. [More]
Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Our immune system defends us from harmful bacteria and viruses, but, if left unchecked, the cells that destroy those invaders can turn on the body itself, causing auto-immune diseases like type-1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis. A molecule called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) boosts the body's natural defence against this 'friendly fire', scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Monterotondo, Italy, have found. [More]
Duke researchers develop new collaborative cancer care model for patients

Duke researchers develop new collaborative cancer care model for patients

Doctors at Duke University Hospital have developed a new collaborative model in cancer care that reduced the rates at which patients were sent to intensive care or readmitted to the hospital after discharge. [More]
Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

UNC School of Medicine researchers have pinpointed a set of intriguing characteristics in a previously unknown subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors. These cells, which mimic non-cancerous endothelial cells that normally populate blood vessels in tumors, could provide researchers with another target for cancer therapies. [More]
BRI receives FDA permission to conduct study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in DIPG patients

BRI receives FDA permission to conduct study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in DIPG patients

Burzynski Research Institute, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given the company permission to conduct an open-label study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients > 3 months of age with a diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma (DIPG). [More]
Nano-sized discovery helps explain bipolar disorder

Nano-sized discovery helps explain bipolar disorder

A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine® scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness. [More]
Autism Speaks grants $1M to Children's Hospital Los Angeles to improve GI symptoms associated with ASD

Autism Speaks grants $1M to Children's Hospital Los Angeles to improve GI symptoms associated with ASD

Pat Levitt, PhD, Simms/Mann Chair in Developmental Neurogenetics at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has received a grant of nearly $1 million from Autism Speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization. [More]
Experimental drug may help fight cervical cancer

Experimental drug may help fight cervical cancer

University of Leicester academic leads study into effects of cediranib drug in chemotherapy treatment of cervical cancer. [More]
Bariatric surgery may be risk factor for condition that causes severe headaches

Bariatric surgery may be risk factor for condition that causes severe headaches

Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according to a study published in the October 22, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Research shows FGF21 hormone acts directly on brain to regulate obesity

Research shows FGF21 hormone acts directly on brain to regulate obesity

A hormone seen as a popular target to develop weight-loss drugs works by directly targeting the brain and triggering previously unknown activity in the nervous system, UT Southwestern Medical Center obesity researchers have found. [More]
MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process. [More]
Study finds that beetroot can improve athletic performance, benefit heart failure patients

Study finds that beetroot can improve athletic performance, benefit heart failure patients

Football teams are claiming it improves their athletic performance, and according to new research from Kansas State University, it also benefits heart failure patients. The special ingredient: beetroot. [More]
French hospital uses Sophia DDM Platform to improve diagnostic testing of congenital disorders

French hospital uses Sophia DDM Platform to improve diagnostic testing of congenital disorders

The Hospices Civils de Lyon, the second-largest University Hospital Network in France, has elected to use the Sophia Genetics Data Driven Medicine (DDM) Platform to support improvements in diagnostic testing for patients suffering from congenital disorders. [More]
electroCore’s gammaCore device effective for treating migraines, shows trial results

electroCore’s gammaCore device effective for treating migraines, shows trial results

Preliminary results of an open-label trial carried in the journal of Headache and Pain reported that a single treatment with electroCore’s hand held non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) device gammaCore, completely resolved 44.8% of migraines within 30 minutes, with an additional 11.4% experiencing moderate benefits (incomplete resolution of their headaches) by 2 hours. [More]
New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately. [More]