Medical Condition News RSS Feed - Medical Condition News

DaVita Kidney Care expands care of kidney patients in Malaysia

DaVita Kidney Care expands care of kidney patients in Malaysia

DaVita Kidney Care, a division of DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. and a leading provider of kidney care services, today announced it acquired three hemodialysis centers from Malaysian dialysis provider Sinar Indentiti Sbn Bhd, further expanding its care of kidney patients in the country. [More]
Neurotic people avoid action when confronted with major and minor life stressors, finds study

Neurotic people avoid action when confronted with major and minor life stressors, finds study

That person we all seem to know who we say is neurotic and unable to take action? Turns out he or she isn't unable to act but simply doesn't want to. [More]

Researchers examine interaction between alcohol and tobacco in risk of ESCC

The rate of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) nearly doubles in those who both smoke and drink compared to those who only smoke or drink, according to new research published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. [More]
Study suggests that variant of cell surface protein is ideal target to treat gastric cancer

Study suggests that variant of cell surface protein is ideal target to treat gastric cancer

New study by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and National University Hospital Singapore suggests that a variant of a cell surface protein is an ideal target for developing drugs to treat gastric cancer [More]

tPA therapy improves outcomes for patients suffering acute ischemic stroke

Administering a clot-dissolving drug to stroke victims quickly — ideally within the first 60 minutes after they arrive at a hospital emergency room — is crucial to saving their lives, preserving their brain function and reducing disability. [More]
SIOG, EORTC update expert opinion on managing treatment for aged patients with NSCLC

SIOG, EORTC update expert opinion on managing treatment for aged patients with NSCLC

Half of all patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer are 70 years of age or older, yet despite this high percentage, these elderly patients are not well represented in clinical trials. Therefore, the paucity of clinical data has made it difficult to reach evidence based clinical recommendations. [More]
Glaucoma drug may help reverse obesity-related vision loss in women

Glaucoma drug may help reverse obesity-related vision loss in women

An inexpensive glaucoma drug, when added to a weight loss plan, can improve vision for women with a disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression. [More]
New data-based model accurately estimates hemoglobin A1c using SMBG readings

New data-based model accurately estimates hemoglobin A1c using SMBG readings

Hemoglobin A1c is the standard measurement for assessing glycemic control over time in people with diabetes. [More]
Study calls for more access to on-site athletic trainers to properly assess injuries

Study calls for more access to on-site athletic trainers to properly assess injuries

​Basketball is a popular high school sport in the United States with 1 million participants annually. A recently published study by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital is the first to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]
Bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes, say researchers

Bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes, say researchers

Bariatric surgery has positive effects not only on weight loss but also on diabetes and heart disease. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy and University of Cincinnati have shown that the health benefits are not caused by a reduction in the stomach size but by increased levels of bile acids in the blood. [More]
Anxiety experienced with false-positive mammogram does not negatively impact woman's well-being

Anxiety experienced with false-positive mammogram does not negatively impact woman's well-being

Dartmouth researchers have found that the anxiety experienced with a false-positive mammogram is temporary and does not negatively impact a woman's overall well-being. Their findings are reported in "Consequences of False-Positive Screening Mammograms," which was published online in the April 21, 2014 JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]

Studies identify 2 genes highly associated with IBD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestine that result in painful and debilitating complications, affects over 1.4 million people in the U.S., and while there are treatments to reduce inflammation for patients, there is no cure. [More]

Symposium focused on Surefire Medical's COSY clinical trial to be held at ECIO meeting

Surefire Medical, Inc. announced that a symposium focused on the Coiling vs. Surefire Infusion System in Y90 (COSY) clinical trial will be held during the European Conference on Interventional Oncology (ECIO) meeting taking place in Berlin, Germany April 23-26. T [More]
Plymouth scientists receive MRC grant to lead new and effective therapies for Parkinson's disease

Plymouth scientists receive MRC grant to lead new and effective therapies for Parkinson's disease

A team of scientists led by researchers at Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, has received a grant from the Medical Research Council (MRC) for work which could lead to new and effective therapies for those with Parkinson's Disease. [More]

VHVI implants miniaturized HeartWare HVAD Pump through minimally invasive approach

Sometimes smaller is better. This is especially true of left ventricular assist devices, the mechanically operated heart pumps that are implanted in heart failure patients to bridge them to transplantation. [More]

Avedro receives Canadian approval for KXL II System

Avedro Inc., a Boston-based ophthalmic medical device and pharmaceutical company announces today the Canadian approval for the company's KXL II System. The KXL II System performs a procedure called PiXL (Photorefractive Intrastromal Cross-Linking) which has the potential to deliver non-surgical correction of myopia, and improve cataract surgery outcomes. [More]
Rhenovia Pharma's SMARTT e-Patch project wins award at the French ‘World Innovation Challenge'

Rhenovia Pharma's SMARTT e-Patch project wins award at the French ‘World Innovation Challenge'

Rhenovia Pharma, a biotechnology company specialized in the application of biosimulation to the research and development of new medicinal products, today announces that its SMARTT e-Patch project has won an award at the ‘World Innovation Challenge’; founded by the President of France to identify future champions in the French economy. [More]

Study: Excessive fetal growth may affect stillbirth risk

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch and the Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network have identified a link between stillbirth and either restricted or excessive fetal growth. Findings from the study are online in the April 22 issue of PLOS Medicine. [More]