Medical Condition News RSS Feed - Medical Condition News

FDA approves intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi)

FDA approves intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi)

Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi). Erwinaze is indicated as a component of a multi-agent chemotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who have developed hypersensitivity to E. coli-derived asparaginase. [More]
Researchers say that misfiring of the brain's control system may underpin compulsions in OCD

Researchers say that misfiring of the brain's control system may underpin compulsions in OCD

Misfiring of the brain's control system might underpin compulsions in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), according to researchers at the University of Cambridge, writing in the American Journal of Psychiatry. [More]
Scientists identify white blood cells that tumors use to suppress disease-fighting immune system

Scientists identify white blood cells that tumors use to suppress disease-fighting immune system

A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has identified the population of white blood cells that tumors use to enhance growth and suppress the disease-fighting immune system. [More]
School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

Parents of children involved in an elementary school-based community intervention to prevent obesity appear to share in its health benefits. A new analysis of Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart Play Hard shows an association between being exposed to the intervention as a parent and a modest decrease in body mass index (BMI) compared to parents in two similar control communities. [More]
Only few older adults use apps to help manage Type 2 diabetes, says new study

Only few older adults use apps to help manage Type 2 diabetes, says new study

Despite showing interest in web or mobile apps to help manage their Type 2 diabetes, only a small number of older adults actually use them, says a new study from the University of Waterloo. Approximately 2.2 million Canadians are living with Type 2 diabetes, 2 million of whom are age 50 or older. [More]
C3BS enrols 240th patient in CHART-1 European trial of C-Cure for treatment of congestive heart failure

C3BS enrols 240th patient in CHART-1 European trial of C-Cure for treatment of congestive heart failure

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery and development of regenerative, protective and reconstructive therapies, announces today the enrolment of the 240th patient in its CHART-1 European trial for C-Cure, the first and only stem cell therapeutic using guided stem cells for the treatment of congestive heart failure. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers correctly evaluate polyps using high-definition optical lenses

Mayo Clinic researchers correctly evaluate polyps using high-definition optical lenses

It may not be necessary for experienced gastroenterologists to send polyps they remove from a patient's colon to a pathologist for examination, according to a large study conducted by physician researchers at the Jacksonville campus of Mayo Clinic. [More]
New nationwide effort seeks to find novel approaches to treat ASD, intellectual disability

New nationwide effort seeks to find novel approaches to treat ASD, intellectual disability

Some of the genetic diseases that can cause autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) are so rare that even physicians who specialize in treating them can't be certain they have seen every possible symptom. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered that brain tumors are capable of burning acetate for fuel, providing a new potential target for halting tumor growth. [More]
Study: Older adults with high blood pressure appear to have good kidney health after donation

Study: Older adults with high blood pressure appear to have good kidney health after donation

With proper monitoring, kidney donation may be safe for individuals with high blood pressure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The study found that while hypertension can have negative effects on the kidneys, older adults with the condition appear to have good kidney health following donation. [More]
Gene variations predispose mestizo Mexican population to develop severe form of COPD

Gene variations predispose mestizo Mexican population to develop severe form of COPD

A study by Ramcés Falfán-Valencia, researcher at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, found that the mestizo Mexican population has a number of variations in certain genes that predispose them to develop the most severe form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
Lilly, Adocia team up to develop BioChaperone Lispro insulin for treatment of diabetes

Lilly, Adocia team up to develop BioChaperone Lispro insulin for treatment of diabetes

Eli Lilly and Company and Adocia today announced a worldwide licensing collaboration focused on developing an ultra-rapid insulin, known as BioChaperone Lispro, for treatment in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Study reveals why older people are at increased risk for developing cancer

Study reveals why older people are at increased risk for developing cancer

Why are older people at higher risk for developing cancer? Prevailing opinion holds that, over time, your body's cells accumulate DNA damage and that eventually this damage catches up with the body in a way that causes cancer. [More]
Ipsen's Somatuline Depot Injection 120 mg receives FDA approval for treatment of GEP-NETs

Ipsen's Somatuline Depot Injection 120 mg receives FDA approval for treatment of GEP-NETs

Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., an affiliate of Ipsen, today announced that Somatuline Depot (lanreotide) Injection 120 mg (referred to as Somatuline) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) in adult patients with unresectable, well or moderately differentiated, locally advanced or metastatic disease to improve progression-free survival (PFS). [More]
New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

Global life expectancy increased by 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women between 1990 and 2013, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). [More]
World’s first ehealth app launched to help patients cope with cancer

World’s first ehealth app launched to help patients cope with cancer

The world’s first ehealth app to support cancer patients and families has been launched. [More]
LSDF announces $1.2 million in grants to foster advancement of promising health-related technologies

LSDF announces $1.2 million in grants to foster advancement of promising health-related technologies

The Life Sciences Discovery Fund today announced $1.2 million in Proof of Concept grants to Washington-based organizations to foster the advancement of promising health-related technologies to commercial products. Also announced were two commercialization-focused awards, totaling $600,000, through a new funding program requiring external cash matching. [More]
Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published online in Diabetes. [More]
TUM researchers discover new mechanism for regulating programmed cell death

TUM researchers discover new mechanism for regulating programmed cell death

Programmed cell death is a mechanism that causes defective and potentially harmful cells to destroy themselves. It serves a number of purposes in the body, including the prevention of malignant tumor growth. Now, researchers at Technische Universität München have discovered a previously unknown mechanism for regulating programmed cell death. [More]
Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

The enzyme telomerase repairs cell damage produced by ageing, and has been used successfully in therapies to lengthen the life of mice. Now it has been observed that it could also be used to cure illnesses related to the ageing process. [More]