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New IMA device could improve diagnosis, treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain

More than 100 million people across Europe suffer from chronic musculoskeletal pain, with an estimated 40 per cent undiagnosed. Ageing populations throughout Europe means that this only going to increase in the coming years. [More]
FDA accepts Mundipharma EDO's Investigational New Drug Application for EDO-S101

FDA accepts Mundipharma EDO's Investigational New Drug Application for EDO-S101

Mundipharma EDO GmbH (Early Development in Oncology) is pleased to announce that the United States Food and Drug Administration has accepted the company's Investigational New Drug Application ("IND") for EDO-S101, a fusion molecule to treat relapsed/refractory haematologic malignancies and solid tumours. [More]
Taiwanese scientists propose advanced solution that can be applied to thermal cancer therapy

Taiwanese scientists propose advanced solution that can be applied to thermal cancer therapy

Precise targeting biological molecules, such as cancer cells, for treatment is a challenge, due to their sheer size. Now, Taiwanese scientists have proposed an advanced solution, based on a novel combination of previously used techniques, which can potentially be applied to thermal cancer therapy. [More]
Study focuses on regulation of neuronal plasticity

Study focuses on regulation of neuronal plasticity

A team of scientists has linked changes in the structure of a handful of central brain neurons to understanding how animals adjust to changing seasons. Its findings enhance our understanding of the mechanisms vital to the regulation of our circadian system, or internal clock. [More]
New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. [More]
Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers have identified a new mechanism that the tumor suppressor protein p53 uses to trigger cell death via apoptosis and have shown how the process could be harnessed to kill cancer cells. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the scientific journal Molecular Cell. [More]
Referral delays destroy cancer patients' confidence in healthcare system

Referral delays destroy cancer patients' confidence in healthcare system

If it takes more than three trips to the GP to be referred for cancer tests, patients are more likely to be dissatisfied with their overall care, eroding confidence in the doctors and nurses who go on to treat and monitor them. [More]

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge making splash again this August

Led by co-founders Pete Frates, Pat Quinn and Anthony Senerchia, and with the help of celebrities, the Boston Red Sox and Major League Baseball, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is making a splash again this August. [More]
Interactive Autism Network to join National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network

Interactive Autism Network to join National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network

The Interactive Autism Network, a project of the Kennedy Krieger Institute supported by the Simons Foundation, was approved today for a three-year $1.6 million funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to be part of PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network. [More]
DNA study reveals potential treatments to delay or prevent onset of Huntington's disease

DNA study reveals potential treatments to delay or prevent onset of Huntington's disease

Scientists from Cardiff University believe that a treatment to prevent or delay the symptoms of Huntington’s disease could now be much closer, following a major breakthrough. [More]
Takeda completes post-marketing commitment and data submission for pioglitazone containing medicines

Takeda completes post-marketing commitment and data submission for pioglitazone containing medicines

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited today announced the completion of the study to fulfill the post-marketing commitment and submissions of data to regulatory authorities from the Pan European Multi-Database Bladder Cancer Risk Characterization Study, a large (n= 112,674), multi-database retrospective matched cohort study, conducted in four European countries, for pioglitazone containing medicines, including ACTOS with up to 10 years of follow-up. [More]
New blood test could help diagnose severity of traumatic brain injury

New blood test could help diagnose severity of traumatic brain injury

A new blood test could help emergency room doctors quickly diagnose traumatic brain injury and determine its severity. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo, Plexxikon’s Phase 1 trial shows PLX3397 induced prolonged tumor regression in TGCT patients

Daiichi Sankyo, Plexxikon’s Phase 1 trial shows PLX3397 induced prolonged tumor regression in TGCT patients

Daiichi Sankyo Europe and Plexxikon Inc., a member of the Daiichi Sankyo Group, announced today that The New England Journal of Medicine published clinical trial results demonstrating that the investigational drug, PLX3397, an oral targeted CSF-1R inhibitor, induced prolonged tumor regressions in most patients with tenosynovial giant cell tumor, a rare, locally aggressive neoplasm of the joint or tendon sheath. [More]
Researchers develop evidence-based model that can predict amount of nicotine released from e-cigarette

Researchers develop evidence-based model that can predict amount of nicotine released from e-cigarette

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers at the VCU Center for the Study of Tobacco Products (CSTP) have developed the first ever, evidence-based model that can predict with up to 90 percent accuracy the amount of nicotine emitted by an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette). [More]
New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

The importance of a diet rich in fish oils - now a billion dollar food-supplement industry -- has been debated for over half a century. A few large clinical trials have supported the idea that fish oils confer therapeutic benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease. Researchers think that hearts and blood vessels may benefit in part from their anti-inflammatory properties. [More]
Patients with HPV traces post-treatment more likely to have oropharyngeal cancer recurrence

Patients with HPV traces post-treatment more likely to have oropharyngeal cancer recurrence

Oropharyngeal cancer patients who were found to have detectable traces of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) in their saliva following cancer treatment are at an increased risk for recurrence, a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found. [More]
IUPUI researchers receive NIH grant to study effect of depression treatment on cardiovascular disease

IUPUI researchers receive NIH grant to study effect of depression treatment on cardiovascular disease

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis researchers led by Jesse Stewart of the School of Science, have received a $2.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct the first randomized controlled trial to determine whether depression treatment can help prevent the development of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Psychotropic medication use widespread among older adults, new study finds

Psychotropic medication use widespread among older adults, new study finds

Older Americans receive prescriptions for mental health medications at more than twice the rate that younger adults do, a new study finds. [More]
Pharmacist-included medical care teams help patients better control blood pressure

Pharmacist-included medical care teams help patients better control blood pressure

If you have hypertension, it pays to include a pharmacist in a medical care team. That's the upshot from research by the University of Iowa that found patients with uncontrolled hypertension had better blood pressure control when being cared for by pharmacists working in care teams (with a physician, for example) than patients who relied mostly on a doctor for medication guidance. [More]
Study shows link between liver-produced molecules, pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis

Study shows link between liver-produced molecules, pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis

New evidence highlights the importance of the liver in immunity against bacterial pneumonia. The study is the first of its kind to directly show such a link between liver-produced molecules and pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis. [More]
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