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New book can change the way cancer is detected

New book can change the way cancer is detected

Jenny Hrbacek's new book, Cancer Free! Are You SURE? can play a role in changing the way cancer is detected. It contains lifesaving information. Far too many people – and she was one of them – get a diagnosis out of the blue and are whisked to the operating table or chemotherapy chair in a matter of days. [More]
Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. [More]
Endovascular therapy best treatment option for stroke patients

Endovascular therapy best treatment option for stroke patients

A research paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) today confirms earlier findings that a procedure called endovascular therapy (ET) for ischemic stroke is the best treatment option for many patients by reducing the incidents of disability. [More]
Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Scraped from the gums, teeth and tongue in the form of plaque, the researchers behind Canada's first plaque bank are betting that the bacterial content of plaque will open up a new frontier of medicine. [More]
UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

For the better part of the last decade, a growing body of research has been revealing more and more similarities between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism. [More]
Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 10% of natural deaths, most of which are due to ventricular fibrillation. Each year it causes 300,000 deaths in the United States and 20,000 in Spain. [More]
Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Half of all patients who survive a cardiac arrest experience problems with cognitive functions such as memory and attention. [More]
Study shows epilepsy drug can protect vision of MS patients

Study shows epilepsy drug can protect vision of MS patients

A drug commonly taken to prevent seizures in epilepsy may surprisingly protect the eyesight of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Clot removal improves outcomes in stroke patients

Clot removal improves outcomes in stroke patients

Stroke is the leading cause of severe long-term disability in the United States, and less than 40 percent of patients who experience the most severe form of stroke regain functional independence if they receive the standard drug intervention alone. [More]
Study points to potential therapeutic targets to halt tumor cell movement

Study points to potential therapeutic targets to halt tumor cell movement

Tumor cells become lethal when they spread. Blocking this process can be a powerful way to stop cancer. Historically, scientists thought that tumor cells migrated by brute force, actively pushing through whatever tissue was in their way, but recent evidence has shown that tumor cells may be more methodical. And in a new study, Cornell University researchers report that tumor cells take advantage of already-cleared paths to migrate unimpeded [More]
May issue of Red Journal focuses on role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment

May issue of Red Journal focuses on role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment

The "Radiation and the Modern Management of Lymphoma" issue (May 1, 2015) of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, is focused on the integral role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment. [More]
Tonix expert examines ways to improve sleep problems and provide relief to people with PTSD

Tonix expert examines ways to improve sleep problems and provide relief to people with PTSD

Sleep problems—a common condition among military personnel—may increase the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health conditions. So concludes a team of researchers at the RAND Corporation, whose study—published on RAND's website—was recently described in national media outlets. [More]
Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Dementia care for south Asian people could be improved after researchers from The University of Manchester adapted a commonly used tool for judging perceptions of the disease. [More]
Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

A genetic investigation of individuals in the Framingham Heart Study may prove useful to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of high blood pressure. The study, which takes a close look at networks of blood pressure-related genes, is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology. [More]
James Allison to be honored with 2015 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research

James Allison to be honored with 2015 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research

The 2015 Pezcoller Foundation-American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) International Award for Cancer Research will be presented to James P. Allison, PhD, at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency - long associated with numerous diseases, e.g. autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers - can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a biomolecular pathway that plays essential roles in developing organisms and in diseases, according to new research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. [More]
Study could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating Huntington's disease

Study could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating Huntington's disease

An international study led by researchers from Université Laval and CHU de Québec-Université Laval has identified significant vascular changes in the brains of people with Huntington's disease. This breakthrough, the details of which are published in the most recent issue of Annals of Neurology, will have significant implications for our understanding of the disease and could open the door to new therapeutic targets for treating this fatal neurodegenerative condition. [More]
New method for measuring genetic variability may help identify patients with aggressive cancers

New method for measuring genetic variability may help identify patients with aggressive cancers

A new method for measuring genetic variability within a tumor might one day help doctors identify patients with aggressive cancers that are more likely to resist therapy, according to a study led by researchers now at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
CiRA, Takeda collaborate to develop clinical applications of iPS cells

CiRA, Takeda collaborate to develop clinical applications of iPS cells

Center for iPS Cell Research Application of Kyoto University and Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited announced today that they will work together to develop clinical applications of induced pluripotent stem cells in areas such as heart failure, diabetes mellitus, neurological disorders and cancer immunotherapy. [More]
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