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New technology holds potential to identify cardiac disease using video monitoring

New technology holds potential to identify cardiac disease using video monitoring

To the careful observer, a person's face has long provided insight into what is going on beneath the surface. Now, with the assistance of a web camera and software algorithms, the face can also reveal whether or not an individual is experiencing atrial fibrillation, a treatable but potentially dangerous heart condition. [More]
UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty have received 19 grants totaling more than $26 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to expand cancer screenings, investigate the effectiveness and viability for cancer therapies and radiation treatments, conduct research into cancer biology, and recruitment. [More]
Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen Research & Development, LLC and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, announced today the expansion of the EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to include additional high-risk patient populations. [More]
Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

The failing in the work of nerve cells: An international team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Chris Meisinger from the Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Freiburg has discovered how Alzheimer's disease damages mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell. [More]
Childhood burns victims experience higher rates of depression, suicidal thoughts

Childhood burns victims experience higher rates of depression, suicidal thoughts

Adults who have been hospitalized for a burn as a child experience higher than usual rates of depression and suicidal thoughts, according to new research at the University of Adelaide. [More]
InnoPharma receives FDA approval for generic DACOGEN

InnoPharma receives FDA approval for generic DACOGEN

InnoPharma, Inc. today announced the approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for decitabine for injection, a generic version of Eisai Inc.'s DACOGEN. [More]
New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

A new method for measuring and imaging how quickly blood flows in the brain could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain, which may aid in improving brain-cancer surgery and tissue engineering, and lead to better treatment options for recovering drug addicts. [More]
Tax on sugar-sweetened beverages may reduce obesity in adolescents, say researchers

Tax on sugar-sweetened beverages may reduce obesity in adolescents, say researchers

Childhood obesity in the United States remains high. A tax on sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, energy drinks, sweet teas, and sports drinks would reduce obesity in adolescents more than other policies, such as exercise or an advertising ban, and would also generate significant revenue for additional obesity prevention activities, say researchers writing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Report: Global Multiple Sclerosis Drugs market to grow at 5.56% CAGR over 2013-2018

Report: Global Multiple Sclerosis Drugs market to grow at 5.56% CAGR over 2013-2018

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Multiple Sclerosis Drugs Market 2014-2018" report to their offering. [More]
Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Young athletes today often participate in sports year round and with increasingly competitive club and school sports, it has become common to choose one sport to specialize at a young age. While this specialization may seem like a competitive edge, new Northwestern Medicine research suggests that repetitive activity in just one sport, high impact or not, may not be a great idea for growing athletes. [More]
New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

Sudden unexpected death (SUD) results from a malfunction of the heart and causes a rapid loss of blood flow through the body, leading to death. It is a very rapid process and may have few or no known warning signs. The overall survival rate for out-of-hospital arrest is only 5-10%. SUD is responsible for upwards of 450,000 people in the United States each year, with North Carolina experiencing an average of 32 SUD-related deaths each day. [More]
Philips to highlight full range of cardiology solutions at ESC Congress 2014

Philips to highlight full range of cardiology solutions at ESC Congress 2014

Royal Philips today announced its presence at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014, where the company is highlighting the full range of its cardiology solutions serving clinicians and patients across the care continuum from prevention and diagnosis, to treatment, recovery and wellness. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center receives NCORP grant to conduct cancer clinical trials

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center receives NCORP grant to conduct cancer clinical trials

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has received an $18 million, five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute's Community Oncology Research Program to design and conduct community-based, multi-center screening, prevention and control cancer clinical trials. [More]
Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

In a comprehensive review of recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies of diabetes and nutrition, Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard School of Public Health investigators have identified specific foods and dietary patterns that are beneficial in preventing and controlling diabetes. [More]
Statistical analysis finds correlation between high BMI, cigarette smoking in teens

Statistical analysis finds correlation between high BMI, cigarette smoking in teens

A study examining whether overweight or obese teens are at higher risk for substance abuse finds both good and bad news: weight status has no correlation with alcohol or marijuana use but is linked to regular cigarette smoking. [More]
CTC clusters cause metastasis

CTC clusters cause metastasis

Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters - clumps of from 2 to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream - appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. [More]
Damp and mould in homes pose significant health risk to people with asthma

Damp and mould in homes pose significant health risk to people with asthma

Damp and mould in homes could pose a significant health risk to people with asthma according to a new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Study: One in every 200 Ontarians diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease

Study: One in every 200 Ontarians diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease

One in every 200 Ontarians has been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with the number of people living with the disease increasing by 64 per cent between 1999 and 2008, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [More]
Irinotecan-based therapy improves survival rates for patients with stage III colon cancer

Irinotecan-based therapy improves survival rates for patients with stage III colon cancer

A subset of patients with stage III colon cancer had improved survival rates when treated with irinotecan-based therapy, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients' developmental disabilities. [More]