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Parabon launches Compute Against Alzheimer's Disease research initiative

Parabon launches Compute Against Alzheimer's Disease research initiative

Parabon Computation announced today the launch of the Compute Against Alzheimer's Disease (CAAD) research initiative, which will accelerate investigations into the causes and risks of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) through the application of large-scale computational capacity donated by concerned citizens and organizations. [More]

Baxter reports topline results from BAX 111 Phase 3 trial for treatment of von Willebrand disease

Baxter International Inc. today announced topline results from a Phase 3 clinical trial evaluating the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK) of BAX 111. BAX 111 is a recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) under investigation for the treatment of bleeding episodes in patients with von Willebrand disease, the most common type of inherited bleeding disorder. [More]
Combination therapy could help prevent cardiovascular disease

Combination therapy could help prevent cardiovascular disease

Taking one pill instead of three could be a powerful ally to prevent cardiovascular disease, according to a new Cochrane systematic review of the latest research on polypills from a team of scientists at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Warwick Medical School and Northwestern Medicine. [More]

Cardiologists, cancer experts join forces to establish Cardio-Oncology Clinic at Mount Sinai Hospital

Cardiologists and cancer experts at The Mount Sinai Hospital have joined forces to establish its first Cardio-Oncology Clinic at The Tisch Cancer Institute at The Mount Sinai Hospital. [More]
New fiber-optic device helps clinicians diagnose cancer at early-stage

New fiber-optic device helps clinicians diagnose cancer at early-stage

An engineering researcher at the University of Arkansas has developed an inexpensive, endoscopic microscope capable of producing high-resolution, sub-cellular images of tissue in real time. [More]
MD Anderson honors America's future cancer leaders

MD Anderson honors America's future cancer leaders

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center this week honored 16 junior faculty members who are expected to become some of America's future cancer leaders. The faculty members are the first R. Lee Clark Fellow award winners. The new award was established to recognize outstanding work by junior faculty members and to help support their future efforts. [More]
GLNT to use $1.5M NIH award to expand Parkinson’s monitoring technology to mobile apps

GLNT to use $1.5M NIH award to expand Parkinson’s monitoring technology to mobile apps

Great Lakes NeuroTechnologies announced today they will be using a $1.5M award from NIH to expand their Parkinson’s monitoring technology to mobile applications. Repositioning GLNT’s Kinesia product line with mobile apps strategically aligns with growing trends in domestic and international healthcare landscapes regarding accessibility, costs, reimbursement, and regulatory policies. [More]

Study: Bacterium that causes whooping cough changes in Australia

The bacterium that causes whooping cough, Bordetella pertussis, has changed in Australia - most likely in response to the vaccine used to prevent the disease - with a possible reduced effectiveness of the vaccine as a result, a new study shows. [More]
Study: Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate health more poorly

Study: Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate health more poorly

Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate their health more poorly, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior. While lower income and education among minorities have been linked to poor health for decades, this study focused just on the connection between financial worries and poor health. [More]

Research sheds new light onto possible causes of sudden infant death syndrome

Research at the University of Adelaide has shed new light onto the possible causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which could help to prevent future loss of children's lives. [More]

New set of criteria for diagnosing sarcopenia in older adults

Sarcopenia - the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength - may put up to 50 percent of seniors at greater risk for disability, yet there is no consensus within the medical community for how this condition should be measured. [More]
Study sheds light on factors that lead to development of rare condition affecting inner ear

Study sheds light on factors that lead to development of rare condition affecting inner ear

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear. [More]
Vanderbilt and Tennessee partner to bring novel intervention program

Vanderbilt and Tennessee partner to bring novel intervention program

Vanderbilt University's Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Spectrum Disorders (TRIAD) and the Tennessee Department of Education are partnering to bring a novel intervention program to families of young children with autism in Middle Tennessee. [More]

Optimal use of combination therapy achieves best treatment outcomes in patients with CHB

Three new studies presented today at the International Liver CongressTM 2014 have helped clarify the optimal use of combination therapy with peginterferon and nucleoside analogues (NUCs) to achieve the best treatment outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). [More]

Researchers develop more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma

Using just a single drop of blood, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma. [More]

Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

In a study of nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs, researchers from the Bloomberg School of Public health found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a frequently prescribed treatment for depression, anxiety and other disorders, was associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delays (DD) in boys. [More]
Genetically modified neural stem cells offer potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Genetically modified neural stem cells offer potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

UC Irvine neurobiologists have found that genetically modified neural stem cells show positive results when transplanted into the brains of mice with the symptoms and pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The pre-clinical trial is published in the journal Stem Cells Research and Therapy, and the approach has been shown to work in two different mouse models. [More]

Researchers explore new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients

A new study from the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is looking at nurse- and pharmacist-led interventions to improve the standard of care for patients who have suffered minor stroke or transient ischemic attack, also known as "mini stoke." [More]
Alarming increases in diabetes and pre-diabetes cases in the U.S.

Alarming increases in diabetes and pre-diabetes cases in the U.S.

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with obesity apparently to blame for the surge. The researchers also found that the burden of the disease has not hit all groups equally, with alarming increases in diabetes in blacks, Hispanics and the elderly. [More]

Researchers examine relationship between vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment

Vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment are common in older adults, but there isn't a lot of conclusive research into whether there's a relationship between the two. [More]