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Immunomic Therapeutics, Astellas Pharma sign license deal to develop LAMP-vax DNA vaccines

Immunomic Therapeutics, Astellas Pharma sign license deal to develop LAMP-vax DNA vaccines

Immunomic Therapeutics, Inc. ("Immunomic Therapeutics"), a company developing next-generation vaccines based on the LAMP-vax platform, and Astellas Pharma Inc. ("Astellas") today announced they have entered into an exclusive license agreement for Japan to develop and commercialize JRC2-LAMP-vax, Immunomic Therapeutics' vaccine designed to treat allergies induced by Japanese red cedar pollen. [More]
Adropin hormone offers a promising treatment option for type 2 diabetes

Adropin hormone offers a promising treatment option for type 2 diabetes

In a study published in Molecular Metabolism, a SLU researcher has found that adropin, a hormone that regulates whether the body burns fat or sugar during feeding and fasting cycles, can improve insulin action in obese, diabetic mice, suggesting that it may work as a therapy for type 2 diabetes. [More]
Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

During Heart Month, the Cardiovascular Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is promoting the importance of controlling high blood pressure, also called hypertension, in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and other related chronic disorders in adults. [More]
Gluten-free diet important for people with celiac disease

Gluten-free diet important for people with celiac disease

You'd never suspect it from the proliferation of gluten-free items on supermarket shelves. Yet only one in approximately 133 people - that's 0.75 percent of the population - has celiac disease, a genetic autoimmune disorder that causes the body to react negatively to the intake of gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and their derivatives. [More]
New eye-tracking device measures severity of concussion and brain injury

New eye-tracking device measures severity of concussion and brain injury

New research out of NYU Langone Medical Center could move the medical community one step closer toward effectively detecting concussion and quantifying its severity. [More]
Magnus Life Science commemorates unique partnership with UCL to advance bio-medical research

Magnus Life Science commemorates unique partnership with UCL to advance bio-medical research

Magnus Life Science is today celebrating its unique collaboration with University College London (UCL), one of the world's leading universities, to advance bio-medical research and bring real innovation to areas of high unmet medical need. [More]
Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Jesse Stewart, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and two colleagues have received a $2.2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the links between depression, depression treatment and cardiovascular disease in adults with HIV. [More]
AP39 compound could help lower heart rate, blood pressure, and blood vessel stiffness

AP39 compound could help lower heart rate, blood pressure, and blood vessel stiffness

A gas that gives rotten eggs their distinctive odour could one day form the basis of new cardiovascular therapies. [More]
Sebacia reports positive clinical results from two independent studies in people with acne

Sebacia reports positive clinical results from two independent studies in people with acne

Sebacia, Inc., a company dedicated to delivering breakthrough topical treatments to advance dermatology, has announced the presentation of positive clinical results from two independent studies conducted in Europeinvestigating the use of Sebacia gold microparticles to treat acne. [More]
Finding could improve treatment, diagnosis of common reading disorders

Finding could improve treatment, diagnosis of common reading disorders

A neuroimaging study by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that phonics, a method of learning to read using knowledge of word sounds, shouldn't be overlooked in favor of a whole-language technique that focuses on visually memorizing word patterns, a finding that could help improve treatment and diagnosis of common reading disorders such as dyslexia. [More]
OCC partners commend EU decision that supports disability protections for obesity

OCC partners commend EU decision that supports disability protections for obesity

In a joint position statement, Obesity Care Continuum (OCC) partners agree with the premise behind a recent European Court of Justice ruling supporting disability protections for obesity under certain circumstances and call for these protections to be enacted in the United States. [More]

Young Researcher's Meeting on Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia to be held in Bern, Switzerland

Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disorder that affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals. [More]
3D printing technology can make heart surgery safer for children with congenital anomaly

3D printing technology can make heart surgery safer for children with congenital anomaly

Three-dimensional printing technology can make surgery safer for children with congenital heart disease and reduce the duration as well as the number of invasive procedures required. [More]
Scientists publish catalog of genetic mutations found in head and neck cancers

Scientists publish catalog of genetic mutations found in head and neck cancers

Scientists have published the first comprehensive catalog of genetic mutations and other abnormal changes found in 279 cancers of the head and neck, and have identified several broken molecular pathways that might be targeted by existing and future cancer drugs. [More]
Study: Green tea compound may activate a cycle that kills oral cancer cells

Study: Green tea compound may activate a cycle that kills oral cancer cells

A compound found in green tea may trigger a cycle that kills oral cancer cells while leaving healthy cells alone, according to Penn State food scientists. The research could lead to treatments for oral cancer, as well as other types of cancer. [More]
GW Cancer Institute selected to study health disparities in cancer care

GW Cancer Institute selected to study health disparities in cancer care

The George Washington University Cancer Institute received a $97K grant from Genentech to address health disparities in cancer care. [More]
CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

Full implementation of new hypertension guidelines could prevent 56,000 cardiovascular disease events (mostly heart attacks and strokes) and 13,000 deaths each year, without increasing overall health care costs, an analysis conducted by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found. [More]
Researchers discover novel compound that helps curtail progression of temporal lobe epilepsy

Researchers discover novel compound that helps curtail progression of temporal lobe epilepsy

Researchers at the LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence have found that a novel compound they discovered helps curtail the onset and progression of temporal lobe epilepsy. [More]
Researchers one step closer to identifying how lung cancer cells metastasize

Researchers one step closer to identifying how lung cancer cells metastasize

Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, and it is estimated that more than 159,000 people in the United States died from the disease last year. Most of these deaths were because the cancer had spread to other organ sites. Following their recent discovery of a protein pathway, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are one step closer to understanding how lung cancer cells metastasize. [More]
Primary care physicians unfamiliar with California breast density law, shows UC Davis study

Primary care physicians unfamiliar with California breast density law, shows UC Davis study

Ten months after California legislators enacted a controversial law mandating that radiologists notify women if they have dense breast tissue, UC Davis researchers have found that half of primary care physicians are still unfamiliar with the law and many don't feel comfortable answering breast density-related questions from patients. [More]