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Clinicians describe placement of first implantable hemodynamic monitor in single ventricle Fontan anatomy

Clinicians describe placement of first implantable hemodynamic monitor in single ventricle Fontan anatomy

While the Fontan procedure has improved the short- and mid-term outcomes for patients born with single ventricle anatomy, long-term complications of Fontan circulation include heart failure. These complications are thought to be secondary to elevated central venous pressure, chronic venous congestion and low cardiac output. [More]
Integrating fiber optic biosensor into microfluidic chip may help in early diagnosis of diabetes

Integrating fiber optic biosensor into microfluidic chip may help in early diagnosis of diabetes

Insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia are two well-known culprits behind diabetes, both of which are reflected in blood glucose concentrations. Now, researchers are working to create ultrasensitive lab-on-a-chip devices to quickly measure glucose concentrations with the goal of developing device for early diagnosis and prevent of diabetes [More]
Dopamine neuron transplants controlled by designer drug may fight Parkinson's disease in mice

Dopamine neuron transplants controlled by designer drug may fight Parkinson's disease in mice

A University of Wisconsin-Madison neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell. The cells in question are neurons and make the neurotransmitter dopamine, whose deficiency is the culprit in the widespread movement disorder Parkinson's disease. [More]
Nicotine metabolism linked with chronic alcohol abuse may contribute to poor smoking cessation rates

Nicotine metabolism linked with chronic alcohol abuse may contribute to poor smoking cessation rates

For smokers who are addicted to alcohol, chronic alcohol abuse may increase the rate of nicotine metabolism and contribute to poor smoking cessation rates. When smokers stop drinking the nicotine metabolism rates decline significantly, according to a study conducted by an international research team led by Roswell Park Cancer Institute. The research was a collaboration of scientists from Roswell Park, the University of California, San Francisco, and the Medical University of Silesia and Center of Addiction Treatment in Poland. [More]
Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

A new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition appears to back up the adage that a little of what you fancy does you good. [More]
Extreme weather events may lead to more asthma hospitalization

Extreme weather events may lead to more asthma hospitalization

Extreme heat and heavy rainfall are related to increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland, according to a study by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers. [More]
New fluorescent chemical probes that measure enzyme levels can diagnose inherited genetic disorders

New fluorescent chemical probes that measure enzyme levels can diagnose inherited genetic disorders

Scientists at the Universities of York and Leiden have made a significant breakthrough in the treatment of an inherited genetic disorder which damages muscle and nerve cells in the body. [More]
Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

A new study shows that black raspberry extract can significantly lower a key measure of arterial stiffness-an indicator of cardiovascular disease. Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries, according to the study published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Medicinal Food website until May 28, 2016. [More]
Janssen gets positive CHMP opinion for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to treat patients with previously untreated CLL

Janssen gets positive CHMP opinion for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to treat patients with previously untreated CLL

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a Positive Opinion, recommending broadening the existing marketing authorisation for ibrutinib as a single agent for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). [More]
Quality of life assessment tools and measures not widely used in treatment of cancer patients

Quality of life assessment tools and measures not widely used in treatment of cancer patients

A new study, conducted by the not-for-profit research organisation RAND Europe, has found that measures and tools used to assess quality of life are not being used widely in the treatment and care of patients with cancer, despite being used more widely in clinical trials. [More]
Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

A Stanford-led national collaboration to procure and analyze human pancreatic tissue from deceased donors illustrates how the organ's function changes as we age, and could point the way toward new diabetes treatments. [More]
Researchers report tumors can continue to grow even without supply of new blood vessels

Researchers report tumors can continue to grow even without supply of new blood vessels

When medication is used to shut off the oxygen supply to tumor cells, the cells adapt their metabolism in the medium term -- by switching over to producing energy without oxygen. This observation by biomedical scientists at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel could be used for treatments that can inhibit tumor growth in the long term, as the researchers report in the latest issue of the journal Cell Reports. [More]
Study examines benefits of exercise, behavioral therapy in MS patients

Study examines benefits of exercise, behavioral therapy in MS patients

Groundhog Day 1994 is one Linda Friedrich will never forget. That's the day a neurologist told her, "You have multiple sclerosis and there's nothing we can do." [More]
Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Twenty-seven of 29 patients with an advanced type of leukemia that had proved resistant to multiple other forms of therapy went into remission after their T cells (disease-fighting immune cells) were genetically engineered to fight their cancers. [More]
Exposure to SSRI during gestation increases chances of adolescent offspring depression

Exposure to SSRI during gestation increases chances of adolescent offspring depression

A study to be published in the May 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that use of certain antidepressants during pregnancy can result in offspring depression by early adolescence. [More]
New miniaturized microscope offers unprecedented insight into nervous system function

New miniaturized microscope offers unprecedented insight into nervous system function

A microscope about the size of a penny is giving scientists a new window into the everyday activity of cells within the spinal cord. The innovative technology revealed that astrocytes--cells in the nervous system that do not conduct electrical signals and were traditionally viewed as merely supportive--unexpectedly react to intense sensation. [More]
Bacterial invasion of lungs can lead to inflammation in COPD

Bacterial invasion of lungs can lead to inflammation in COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common smoking-related lung illness and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Scientists have long believed that inhaling toxic gases and particles from tobacco smoke causes inflammation of the small airways in the lungs, leading to the development of COPD. However, the theory doesn't explain why airway inflammation and disease progression continue even after the patient stops smoking. [More]
Comprehensive dilated eye exams may provide clear view of eye health

Comprehensive dilated eye exams may provide clear view of eye health

David Watson has worn glasses to correct nearsightedness the majority of his life, and had his vision checked regularly to make sure his prescription was up to date. But when his wife convinced him to have a comprehensive dilated eye exam, he got a surprise. His doctor told him something didn't look right with his retina, the light sensitive tissue at the back of his eye. His retina was torn, and he had not had any symptoms. [More]
Diabetic patients at risk for developing retinal diabetic neuropathy

Diabetic patients at risk for developing retinal diabetic neuropathy

A University of Iowa-led study of diabetes-related vision impairment holds good news -- and some bad news -- for patients with signs of these disorders. [More]
People with TBI may have long-term sleep disturbances

People with TBI may have long-term sleep disturbances

People who have had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may still have sleep problems a year and a half after being injured, according to a study published in the April 27, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. In addition, people with TBI may also be unaware of just how much their sleep is disturbed. [More]
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