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Research: Seals and sea lions may spread tuberculosis to humans

Research: Seals and sea lions may spread tuberculosis to humans

Tuberculosis is one of the most persistent and deadliest infectious diseases in the world, killing one to two million people each year. [More]
Majority of states not measuring up on legislative solutions that fight cancer, shows report

Majority of states not measuring up on legislative solutions that fight cancer, shows report

A majority of states are not measuring up on legislative solutions that prevent and fight cancer, according to a new report released today by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN). [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim announces FDA acceptance of NDA filing for tiotropium and olodaterol FDC

Boehringer Ingelheim announces FDA acceptance of NDA filing for tiotropium and olodaterol FDC

Boehringer Ingelheim today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration accepted for review the New Drug Application (NDA) for the fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tiotropium and olodaterol delivered via the Respimat inhaler for the proposed indication of long-term, once-daily maintenance treatment of airflow obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. [More]
Investigational drug focuses on slowing Alzheimer's disease progression

Investigational drug focuses on slowing Alzheimer's disease progression

Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease currently have no treatment options to slow brain cell deterioration. Researchers at Houston Methodist's Nantz National Alzheimer Center are studying an investigational drug that proposes to do just that. [More]
Cognitive therapy combined with antidepressant drug effective for severe nonchronic depression

Cognitive therapy combined with antidepressant drug effective for severe nonchronic depression

The odds that a person who suffers from severe, nonchronic depression will recover are improved by as much as 30 percent if they are treated with a combination of cognitive therapy and antidepressant medicine rather than by antidepressants alone. [More]
Blocking nerve signals could be effective treatment for stomach cancer

Blocking nerve signals could be effective treatment for stomach cancer

Research from Columbia University Medical Center shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease. [More]
New gene therapy protects mice from life-threatening heart condition

New gene therapy protects mice from life-threatening heart condition

A new gene therapy developed by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has been shown to protect mice from a life-threatening heart condition caused by muscular dystrophy. [More]
Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

A recent Finnish study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. [More]

Painkillers may not offer relief to people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that the immune system is defective in people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, which is a major reason why sufferers have ongoing issues with pain. [More]
Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Vanderbilt-led research, as part of an international, multicenter trial, found regular blood transfusion therapy significantly reduces the recurrence of silent strokes and strokes in children with sickle cell anemia who have had pre-existing silent strokes, according to study results released today in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). [More]
Research demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of DME

Research demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of DME

Research by Keck Medicine of USC ophthalmology scientists demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of diabetic macular edema (DME), one of the leading causes of blindness in diabetic patients in the United States. [More]
New online tool helps doctors predict patients at high risk of developing diabetes

New online tool helps doctors predict patients at high risk of developing diabetes

A new online tool will help doctors predict which patients are most likely to develop diabetes. The calculator will help doctors identify high risk patients so that they can be tested for the disease and offered lifestyle advice. The test is targeted at people who have been admitted to hospital for emergency care. [More]
Scientists study about rare type of skin cancer, acral melanomas

Scientists study about rare type of skin cancer, acral melanomas

Acral melanomas, the rare type of skin cancer that caused musician Bob Marley's death, are genetically distinct from other types of skin cancer. [More]
Study suggests that colds may temporarily increase stroke risk in kids

Study suggests that colds may temporarily increase stroke risk in kids

A new study suggests that colds and other minor infections may temporarily increase stroke risk in children. The study is published in the August 20, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacterium that causes tuberculosis — from developing the active form of the disease. [More]
FDA approves GlaxoSmithKline’s Arnuity Ellipta for treatment of asthma

FDA approves GlaxoSmithKline’s Arnuity Ellipta for treatment of asthma

GlaxoSmithKline plc today announced that the FDA has approved Arnuity™ Ellipta® (fluticasone furoate inhalation powder), a once-daily inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) medicine for maintenance treatment of asthma as prophylactic therapy in patients aged 12 years and older. Arnuity is not indicated for relief of acute bronchospasm. [More]
Researchers examine effect of sleeplessness on obesity in teenagers over time

Researchers examine effect of sleeplessness on obesity in teenagers over time

Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may wake up to worse consequences than nodding off during chemistry class. According to new research, risk of being obese by age 21 was 20 percent higher among 16-year-olds who got less than six hours of sleep a night, compared with their peers who slumbered more than eight hours. [More]
Study identifies best course of treatment for endophthalmitis

Study identifies best course of treatment for endophthalmitis

The most common cause of endophthalmitis, a potentially blinding condition that can occur after eye trauma, eye surgery, and eye injections, are the well-known staphylococci ("staph") and streptococci ("strep") bacterial strains, according to a study published in the August issue of Ophthalmology and based on a review of 25 years of cases at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE). [More]
Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Not every cell in the body is the same genetically, and disease-causing mutations don't necessarily affect every cell—making these mutations easy to miss even with next-generation genomic sequencing. [More]