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Major research project aims to reduce chances of hair loss after chemotherapy treatment

Major research project aims to reduce chances of hair loss after chemotherapy treatment

Cancer suffers who lose their hair as a consequence of chemotherapy will benefit from a major research project that will improve the scalp cooling technology that prevents hair loss. [More]
UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing — at an early stage — diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases. [More]
New study reveals link between aristolochic acid and kidney cancer

New study reveals link between aristolochic acid and kidney cancer

A new study on a large cohort of kidney cancer patients in Europe sheds light on the genetic architecture of the disease -- and reveals an apparent link between exposure to aristolochic acid and incidence of kidney cancer, particularly in Romania. [More]
Fewer women than men receive dialysis treatment for chronic kidney disease

Fewer women than men receive dialysis treatment for chronic kidney disease

Women with chronic kidney disease receive dialysis treatment far less often than men. However, women suffer more commonly than men from kidney disease. A publication by the MedUni Vienna and the Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, USA, has highlighted this difference based on international patient data. [More]
UCSD researchers validate EEG test to study, treat schizophrenia

UCSD researchers validate EEG test to study, treat schizophrenia

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have validated an EEG test to study and treat schizophrenia. The findings, published in two separate studies, offer a clinical test that could be used to help diagnose persons at risk for developing mental illness later in life, as well as an approach for measuring the efficacies of different treatment options. [More]
Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Small differences in as many as a thousand genes contribute to risk for autism, according to a study led by Mount Sinai researchers and the Autism Sequencing Consortium, and published today in the journal Nature. [More]
Researchers use DNA sequencing to uncover genes that heighten autism risk

Researchers use DNA sequencing to uncover genes that heighten autism risk

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have used DNA sequencing to uncover dozens of genes that heighten the risk for autism. Joseph Buxbaum, Ph.D., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, Mark Daly, Ph.D., Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, and their colleagues examined more than 14,000 DNA samples from affected children, parents and unrelated people. [More]
Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. [More]
UCSD researchers develop novel ultrasound technology to diagnose two heart conditions

UCSD researchers develop novel ultrasound technology to diagnose two heart conditions

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain. [More]
Sleep apnea may affect peoples' ability to form new spatial memories

Sleep apnea may affect peoples' ability to form new spatial memories

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research led by NYU Langone Medical Center sleep specialists suggests. [More]
New international consortium to advance GPCR research for drug development

New international consortium to advance GPCR research for drug development

The generation of high-resolution pictures of hundreds of medically important proteins known as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) will be the goal of an ambitious new international partnership. Called the GPCR Consortium, this non-profit initiative brings together major pharmaceutical companies and leading research institutes from three continents to advance GPCR research for drug development. [More]
Patient's gene profile influences effects of statins

Patient's gene profile influences effects of statins

The Montreal Heart Institute Research Centre is once again pushing the limits of knowledge in personalized medicine. A meta-analysis combining the results of several pharmacogenomic studies and involving over 40,000 research subjects now makes it possible to demonstrate a different response to statins according to the patient's gene profile. [More]
Royal Holloway-led researchers to develop novel spinal cord injury treatment

Royal Holloway-led researchers to develop novel spinal cord injury treatment

Dr Rafael Yáñez-Muñoz, from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, University of London, is leading a team of researchers working to develop a novel treatment for spinal cord injury - which leaves sufferers with devastating, life-long effects including paralysis. [More]
New data demonstrates improved outcomes in psoriasis patients treated with Daivobet gel

New data demonstrates improved outcomes in psoriasis patients treated with Daivobet gel

Interim results from one of the largest and longest clinical trials ever conducted for a topical treatment in psoriasis showed that after eight weeks of treatment with calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate (Daivobet gel), the treatment was highly efficacious, preferred by patients and improved patients' and the physicians’ assessments of disease severity. [More]
Dietary linoleic acid lowers risk of coronary heart disease

Dietary linoleic acid lowers risk of coronary heart disease

People who swap 5% of the calories they consume from saturated fat sources such as red meat and butter with foods containing linoleic acid—the main polyunsaturated fat found in vegetable oil, nuts, and seeds—lowered their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events by 9% and their risk of death from CHD by 13%, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

When heart symptoms strike, men and women go through similar stages of pain but women are more likely to delay seeking care and can put their health at risk, according to a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Robotically assisted CABG surgery reduces complications, cuts recovery times

Robotically assisted CABG surgery reduces complications, cuts recovery times

Robotically assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is a rapidly evolving technology that shortens hospital stays and reduces the need for blood products, while decreasing recovery times, making the procedure safer and less risky, says a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
TSRI scientists discover signaling pathway that contribute to Huntington's disease

TSRI scientists discover signaling pathway that contribute to Huntington's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a major contributor to Huntington's disease, a devastating progressive neurological condition that produces involuntary movements, emotional disturbance and cognitive impairment. [More]
Teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime, suggests UMass Amherst study

Teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime, suggests UMass Amherst study

Binge drinking can have lasting effects on brain pathways that are still developing during adolescence, say neuroscience researcher Heather N. Richardson and her colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Louisiana State University. [More]
Same cell type can give rise to different gliomas

Same cell type can give rise to different gliomas

Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumours. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. [More]