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Henry Ford Hospital wins Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award

Henry Ford Hospital wins Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award

The Stroke and Neurovascular Disease Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award. [More]
Coronary artery calcification scans can help identify patients at risk for early death

Coronary artery calcification scans can help identify patients at risk for early death

A study in the online edition of Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that coronary artery calcification (CAC) scans could help physicians identify patients at risk for premature death. [More]
Researchers pinpoint two biomarkers elevated in severe form of coronary disease

Researchers pinpoint two biomarkers elevated in severe form of coronary disease

Insulin resistance affects tens of millions of Americans and is a big risk factor for heart disease. Yet, some people with the condition never develop heart disease, while some experience moderate coronary blockages. Others, though, get severe atherosclerosis - multiple blockages and deterioration of coronary arteries characterized by thick, hard, plaque-ridden arterial walls. [More]
LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

Cancer's ability to grow unchecked is often attributed to cancer stem cells, a small fraction of cancer cells that have the capacity to grow and multiply indefinitely. How cancer stem cells retain this property while the bulk of a tumor's cells do not remains largely unknown. Using human tumor samples and mouse models, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that cancer stem cell properties are determined by epigenetic changes -- chemical modifications cells use to control which genes are turned on or off. [More]
UPCI scientists lead a panel of experts in revising guidelines for thyroid cancer tests

UPCI scientists lead a panel of experts in revising guidelines for thyroid cancer tests

University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute scientists recently led a panel of experts in revising national guidelines for thyroid cancer testing to reflect newly available tests that better incorporate personalized medicine into diagnosing the condition. [More]
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]
Findings reveal new pathway to develop effective treatments and therapies for asthma, allergy

Findings reveal new pathway to develop effective treatments and therapies for asthma, allergy

Investigators have discovered the precise molecular steps that enable immune cells implicated in certain forms of asthma and allergy to develop and survive in the body. The findings from Weill Cornell Medical College reveal a new pathway that scientists could use to develop more effective treatments and therapies for the chronic lung disorder. [More]
Mental-health service providers still rely on physical restraint, confinement to control psychiatric patients

Mental-health service providers still rely on physical restraint, confinement to control psychiatric patients

Providers of mental-health services still rely on intervention techniques such as physical restraint and confinement to control some psychiatric hospital patients, a practice which can cause harm to both patients and care facilities, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. [More]
Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Mohamed Boutjdir, PhD, professor of medicine, cell biology, and physiology and pharmacology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study with international collaborators identifying the mechanism by which patients with various autoimmune and connective tissue disorders may be at risk for life-threatening cardiac events if they take certain anti-histamine or anti-depressant medications. [More]
AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

In order to recognize and encourage cutting-edge research in key areas of orthopaedic sports medicine, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine will present ten research awards and seven grants during its Annual Meeting, July 9-12 in Orlando, FL. [More]
Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury less likely to get surgical treatment compared with younger patients

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury less likely to get surgical treatment compared with younger patients

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury are less likely than younger patients to receive surgical treatment and experience a significant lag between injury and surgery, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
Disproportionate number of older people hospitalized in Canada with TBI

Disproportionate number of older people hospitalized in Canada with TBI

A disproportionate number of people hospitalized in Canada with traumatic brain injuries are 65 years or older, a new study from St. Michael's Hospital has found. [More]
Extra set of guanines in DNA may function like 'spare' to help prevent cancers from developing

Extra set of guanines in DNA may function like 'spare' to help prevent cancers from developing

Carrying around a spare tire is a good thing -- you never know when you'll get a flat. Turns out we're all carrying around "spare tires" in our genomes, too. Today, in ACS Central Science, researchers report that an extra set of guanines (or "G"s) in our DNA may function just like a "spare" to help prevent many cancers from developing. [More]
Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Intermittent dosing with rapamycin selectively breaks the cascade of inflammatory events that follow cellular senescence, a phenomena in which cells cease to divide in response to DNA damaging agents, including many chemotherapies. [More]
Blood-borne molecule promotes age-related cognitive decline

Blood-borne molecule promotes age-related cognitive decline

A blood-borne molecule that increases in abundance as we age blocks regeneration of brain cells and promotes cognitive decline, suggests a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco and Stanford School of Medicine. [More]
New research suggests that Bcl-Rambo protein can protect against heart failure

New research suggests that Bcl-Rambo protein can protect against heart failure

A protein dubbed 'Bcl-Rambo' can protect against heart failure, suggests new research from King's College London and funded by the British Heart Foundation. [More]
Using nanocarriers and microbubbles in drug delivery for treating thrombotic disease

Using nanocarriers and microbubbles in drug delivery for treating thrombotic disease

Future Science Group today announced the publication of a new article in Future Science OA, covering the use of nanocarriers and microbubbles in drug delivery for thrombotic disease. [More]
Georgia State and Morehouse partner to reduce diabetes, cardiovascular disease rates in southwest Atlanta

Georgia State and Morehouse partner to reduce diabetes, cardiovascular disease rates in southwest Atlanta

The School of Public Health at Georgia State University has received nearly $400,000 in grant funds to support a three-year effort to reduce rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in African-American neighborhoods in southwest Atlanta. [More]
Pazopanib improves survival in soft tissue sarcoma patients without impairment of health-related quality of life

Pazopanib improves survival in soft tissue sarcoma patients without impairment of health-related quality of life

Results of EORTC trial 62072 appearing in Cancer show that in patients with soft tissue sarcoma, whose disease had progressed during or after prior chemotherapy, pazopanib improved progression-free survival but did not change health-related quality of life. This observed improvement in progression-free survival without impairment of health-related quality of life was considered a meaningful result. [More]
Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that a molecule commonly found “decorating” brain cells in higher animals, including humans, may affect brain structure. [More]
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