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Scientists discover new way to predict risk for delayed recovery in children with AML

Scientists discover new way to predict risk for delayed recovery in children with AML

The chemotherapy treatments necessary to treat Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in children can be grueling on the body, and can cause health-related complications during therapy, as well as long down the road after remission. [More]
Study shows low incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps

Study shows low incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps

For the majority of patients with large or difficult to remove colorectal polyps (growths in the colon), the incidence of cancer is actually lower than previously thought, and using more advanced endoscopic techniques that spare the colon may be a better, safer alternative to a traditional operation in certain cases, according to study results published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
Study finds better way to evaluate operating skills of orthopaedic residents

Study finds better way to evaluate operating skills of orthopaedic residents

In a small study to determine the best way to assess the operating skills of would-be orthopaedic surgeons, Johns Hopkins researchers found that tracking the trainees’ performance on cadavers using step-by-step checklists and measures of general surgical skills works well but should be coupled with an equally rigorous system for tracking errors. [More]
Transorbital ACS can improve vision in patients with glaucoma, optic nerve damage

Transorbital ACS can improve vision in patients with glaucoma, optic nerve damage

Vision loss due to glaucoma or optic nerve damage is generally considered irreversible. Now a new prospective, randomized, multi-center clinical trial demonstrates significant vision improvement in partially blind patients after 10 days of noninvasive, transorbital alternating current stimulation. [More]
Surgeons outline complete face transplant procedure in facial burn patients

Surgeons outline complete face transplant procedure in facial burn patients

Last year, the most extensive clinical face transplant to date was successfully carried out at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Google Glass shows promising plastic surgical application in operating room

Google Glass shows promising plastic surgical application in operating room

Plastic surgeons see some clear advantages of using Google Glass in the operating room, reports a survey study in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery,the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Acupuncture improves headache-related QoL in TBI patients

Acupuncture improves headache-related QoL in TBI patients

A study comparing the effectiveness of usual care alone to usual care plus either auricular or traditional Chinese acupuncture in treating patients with headaches due to a previous traumatic brain injury (TBI) showed a significant improvement in headache-related quality of life (QoL) with the addition of acupuncture. [More]
Stem cell procedure may be safe for ALS patients

Stem cell procedure may be safe for ALS patients

A phase II clinical trial in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, suggests that transplanting human stem cells into the spinal cord may be done safely. [More]
ADAPT technique offers promising outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots

ADAPT technique offers promising outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots

In an article published online April 16, 2016 by the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery, investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina report promising 90-day outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots who underwent thrombectomy or clot removal using the direct-aspiration, first pass technique. [More]
Testosterone therapy improves sexual activity in older men

Testosterone therapy improves sexual activity in older men

Older men with low libido and low testosterone levels showed more interest in sex and engaged in more sexual activity when they underwent testosterone therapy, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
New research could pave way for improving retinal implants

New research could pave way for improving retinal implants

Engineers and neuroscientists at the University of Sheffield have demonstrated for the first time that the cells in the retina carry out key processing tasks. This could pave the way for improving retinal implants and therefore the sight of thousands of people suffering from retinal disorders. [More]
Study highlights role of CMV in patients with leukemia after bone marrow transplantation

Study highlights role of CMV in patients with leukemia after bone marrow transplantation

Recent studies on a small number of patients with leukemia treated with bone marrow transplantation have suggested that the presence of the common cytomegalovirus (CMV) in patients or their donors may protect against relapse or even death after the transplant. [More]
Non-invasive fluid-based biomarker could help identify aggressive prostate cancer before surgery

Non-invasive fluid-based biomarker could help identify aggressive prostate cancer before surgery

Prostate cancer researchers have discovered biomarkers using non-invasive liquid biopsies to identify aggressive disease before surgery. [More]
LIF-treated muscle stem cells show promise in treatment of muscular dystrophy

LIF-treated muscle stem cells show promise in treatment of muscular dystrophy

Satellite cells are stem cells found in skeletal muscles. While transplantation of such muscle stem cells can be a potent therapy for degenerative muscle diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, these cells tend to lose their transplantation efficiency when cultured in vitro. [More]
The scent dogs smell on diabetics’ breath could offer key to new tests

The scent dogs smell on diabetics’ breath could offer key to new tests

An increase in the level of the chemical isoprene may be the warning sign some dogs can detect in the breath of patients with type 1 diabetes who are reaching risky low levels of blood sugar, according to research by the University of Cambridge. [More]
Cisplatin-based chemotherapy may lead to hearing loss in many testicular cancer survivors

Cisplatin-based chemotherapy may lead to hearing loss in many testicular cancer survivors

Many testicular cancer survivors experience hearing loss after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, according to researchers at Indiana University. [More]
Prognostic factor could help identify tumor recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer

Prognostic factor could help identify tumor recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer

Slightly more than 10% of all patients who undergo successful surgery for prostate cancer have an elevated risk of tumor recurrence afterwards - especially as metastases. [More]
Researchers receive grant to improve quality of donor limb, tissue for transplant

Researchers receive grant to improve quality of donor limb, tissue for transplant

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine faculty member has received $998,500 from the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a new approach to improve the quality and quantity of limbs and tissues obtained from brain dead organ donors. [More]
Eye donations: what stops people? An interview with Rory Passmore

Eye donations: what stops people? An interview with Rory Passmore

Despite a shortage of corneas for transplant purposes, our new research reveals that eyes are the one body part we are least likely to donate. [More]
NYU Lutheran helps patients fight prostate cancer with latest diagnostic and robotic surgery technology

NYU Lutheran helps patients fight prostate cancer with latest diagnostic and robotic surgery technology

Leading NYU Lutheran's fight is Marc Bjurlin, DO, the hospital's newly appointed director of urologic oncology and clinical assistant professor of urology at NYU School of Medicine. [More]
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