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Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have found that significant bone loss - a side effect of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - occurs during the first month of treatment, far earlier than previously assumed. Results of the study will be available online February 4, in advance of publication in the journal Bone. [More]
Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Researchers of a new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry report successful reduction of depressive symptoms in patients using a novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS. [More]
Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation eases anxiety, fatigue and pain for women undergoing breast cancer biopsies, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute. They also found that music is effective, but to a lesser extent. [More]

LivaNova's stented aortic bioprosthesis CROWN PRT now approved for treatment of aortic valve disease

LivaNova PLC, a global medical technology company and a leader in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, today announced it has been granted approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its innovative stented aortic bioprosthesis CROWN PRT for the treatment of aortic valve disease. [More]
AccuTEC Blades introduces GEM RUNNER Reloadable Safety Single-Edge Blade Dispenser

AccuTEC Blades introduces GEM RUNNER Reloadable Safety Single-Edge Blade Dispenser

AccuTEC Blades, Inc. announces the launch at MD&M West of its newest work station product - the GEM RUNNER Reloadable Safety Single-Edge Blade Dispenser, a breakthrough tool that speeds catheter production at the touch of a button. [More]
Researchers use new method to assess quality of colonoscopies performed in outpatient facilities

Researchers use new method to assess quality of colonoscopies performed in outpatient facilities

Colonoscopies are now a routine preventive diagnostic test for millions of Americans each year. While rates are low, complications like perforation, bleeding, and anesthesia-related heart failure can occur. Yale School of Medicine researchers have now developed a quality measure that uses follow-up hospital visits to track the variation in colonoscopy quality among outpatient facilities. [More]
CellSonic treatments reduce problems of muscles recovering after exertion

CellSonic treatments reduce problems of muscles recovering after exertion

Since non-invasive shockwaves were used forty years ago to remove kidney stones and became standard procedure in all hospitals worldwide for having no side effects, they have been used in many other applications. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Scientists from the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, collaborating with NYU Langone Medical Center and a multi-center team of researchers, demonstrated for the first time that the microbiome of newborn babies delivered via cesarean section (C-section) can be partially restored to resemble that of vaginally delivered infants. [More]
Radiation could increase responses to innovative immune-based therapeutic approaches to fight cancer

Radiation could increase responses to innovative immune-based therapeutic approaches to fight cancer

A team of Georgia State University researchers is fighting cancers using a combination of therapies and recently found ways that radiation could maximize responses to novel immune-based therapeutic approaches to fight cancer. [More]
Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

RNA is becoming an interesting drug target as it takes possible intervention back one step to the synthesis of a target protein, instead of trying to block or inhibit a process. [More]
UW–Madison center continues to offer accurate radiation treatment

UW–Madison center continues to offer accurate radiation treatment

As radiation sources used to map disease and attack cancer grow in number and complexity, a University of Wisconsin-Madison center continues to offer the last word on accurate radiation doses. [More]
Proton beam therapy safe for treating childhood brain cancer medulloblastoma

Proton beam therapy safe for treating childhood brain cancer medulloblastoma

Proton beam therapy--a more precise form of radiotherapy--to treat the childhood brain cancer medulloblastoma appears to be as safe as conventional radiotherapy with similar survival rates, according to new research published in The Lancet Oncology journal today. [More]
Lipofilling safe for breast reconstruction

Lipofilling safe for breast reconstruction

For women undergoing breast cancer surgery, a technique called lipofilling—using the patient's own fat cells to optimize the results of breast reconstruction—does not increase the risk of recurrent breast cancer, reports a study in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Applying ultrasound therapies for recovery of cardiac stem cells

Applying ultrasound therapies for recovery of cardiac stem cells

A joint project of researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Julius Wolff Institute and led by Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research shows that when cardiac stem cells undergo low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment, these cells can perform continuing modifications, tissue remodeling and regeneration of damaged cardiac tissue after a heart attack. [More]
Research points to potential use of radiotherapy in treating systemic cancer

Research points to potential use of radiotherapy in treating systemic cancer

An international team of researchers lead by the University of Granada has proven that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may be used as enhancer agents of local and systemic effects of radiotherapy, that is to say, those which affect the irradiated tumour and tumour cells located at a certain distance of the irradiated ones. [More]
MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

The findings of a major study led by cardiovascular imaging specialists at Allegheny General Hospital, part of the Allegheny Health Network, suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a safe and effective diagnostic procedure for patients with implantable cardiac devices. [More]
Proton radiotherapy as effective as standard photon therapy in treating pediatric brain tumor

Proton radiotherapy as effective as standard photon therapy in treating pediatric brain tumor

The use of proton radiotherapy to treat the most common malignant brain tumor in children is as effective as standard photon (x-ray) radiation therapy while causing fewer long-term side effects such as hearing loss and cognitive disorders, according to a study receiving online publication in Lancet Oncology. [More]
New technique may reduce need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia

New technique may reduce need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia

A new imaging technique could reduce the need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia, according to a study publised today in the scientific journal JACC. [More]
Upstate Medical University physicians use minimally invasive robotic surgery in complex IVC thrombus case

Upstate Medical University physicians use minimally invasive robotic surgery in complex IVC thrombus case

Physicians at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse describe in the December issue of Urology the first case ever in which doctors used minimally invasive robotic surgery to perform a radical nephrectomy (removal of entire kidney) with a level III inferior vena cava thrombectomy (removal of a tumor from the largest vein that carries blood to the heart). [More]
Poor black patients at higher risk of death following esophageal cancer surgery

Poor black patients at higher risk of death following esophageal cancer surgery

Poor black patients undergoing surgery for esophageal cancer are at higher risk for death than white patients and patients with higher socioeconomic status, according to a scientific presentation at the 52nd Annual Meeting of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. [More]
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