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Le Bonheur Children's takes aggressive steps to minimize blood loss during heart surgery

More than 20 percent of Le Bonheur Children's Hospital's open heart surgeries are now bloodless, meaning no blood or blood products given during surgery. The Memphis, Tenn., hospital's Heart Institute has been taking aggressive steps to minimize blood loss during surgery and reduce perioperative blood transfusions over the last 18 months. [More]

XBiotech announces results from Phase I/II oncology study

XBiotech is announcing that results from its Phase I/II oncology study conducted at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX were published today in Lancet Oncology. The featured article describes the outcome in 52 advanced cancer patients treated with Xilonix™, XBiotech's novel, non-cytotoxic, anti-tumor therapy. [More]

Study shows massage therapy improves blood flow, alleviates muscle soreness after exercise

Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]

Study quantifies adherence to recommended surveillance colonoscopy in average-risk patients

According to a new study, endoscopists' recommendations for timing of surveillance colonoscopy in average-risk patients with one to two small polyps are consistent with guideline recommendations in about 90 percent of cases. T [More]

Massage therapy alleviates muscle soreness and improves general blood flow

Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Study indicates that changes in appetite and taste are very common after gastric bypass surgery

Study indicates that changes in appetite and taste are very common after gastric bypass surgery

Changes in appetite, taste and smell are par for the course for people who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery during which one's stomach is made smaller and small intestines shortened. [More]
Physicist creates luminescent nanoparticle to use in photodynamic cancer therapy

Physicist creates luminescent nanoparticle to use in photodynamic cancer therapy

A University of Texas at Arlington physicist working to create a luminescent nanoparticle to use in security-related radiation detection may have instead happened upon an advance in photodynamic cancer therapy. [More]

Financial pressures lead patients, doctors to choose fertility treatments that raise risk of premature birth

While it is well known that fertility treatments are the leading cause of increases in multiple gestations and that multiples are at elevated risk of premature birth, these results are not inevitable, concludes an article in Fertility and Sterility. [More]

Golden Jubilee National Hospital performs first Right Anterior Thoracotomy procedure in Scotland

The Golden Jubilee National Hospital has become the first in Scotland to carry out a pioneering, minimally invasive, heart valve replacement technique. [More]

Deafness Support Network welcomes planned reforms to GP surgeries

The Northwest’s leading deafness charity Deafness Support Network, has welcomed David Cameron’s recent announcement of planned reforms to GP surgeries, suggesting it could change the lives of more than ten million people in the UK who are deaf or hard of hearing. [More]

IVF prevents multiple births in patients undergoing fertility treatments

While fertility treatments have helped many people become parents, they commonly result in multiple births, increasing the risk of prematurity, and leading to lifelong complications. [More]

Optimal use of combination therapy achieves best treatment outcomes in patients with CHB

Three new studies presented today at the International Liver CongressTM 2014 have helped clarify the optimal use of combination therapy with peginterferon and nucleoside analogues (NUCs) to achieve the best treatment outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). [More]

Researchers find link between patient satisfaction and SDM during radiation treatment

Playing an active role in their radiation treatment decisions leaves cancer patients feeling more satisfied with their care, and may even relieve psychological distress around the experience, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report in the journal Cancer. [More]

Study: Chemotherapy before surgery improves survival in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer

Contrary to treatment guidelines for high-risk bladder cancer, chemotherapy before or after surgery is not commonly used in routine clinical practice. The findings are published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. [More]

Hospital sees success by temporarily connecting major blood vessels

Doctors at Henry Ford Hospital reached a medical milestone April 3, performing the 25th successful transcatheter valve replacement using a novel way to access the heart. [More]
Oral therapy cures hepatitis C infection in more than 90% of patients with liver cirrhosis

Oral therapy cures hepatitis C infection in more than 90% of patients with liver cirrhosis

Twelve weeks of an investigational oral therapy cured hepatitis C infection in more than 90 percent of patients with liver cirrhosis and was well tolerated by these patients, according to an international study that included researchers from UT Medicine San Antonio and the Texas Liver Institute. [More]

Study shows impact of hepatic encephalopathy on liver disease patients

New data presented today at the International Liver Congress show the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on liver disease patients and healthcare systems. [More]

New procedure helps curtail complication rate associated with bone grafting

UT Arlington and Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital are investigating whether bone grown from the body's own stem cells can replace traditional types of bone grafting. [More]

Scientists report successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in laboratory

Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Cartilage cells were extracted from the patient's nasal septum, multiplied and expanded onto a collagen membrane. [More]
Acupuncture protects brain neurons against injury in rats following heroin relapse

Acupuncture protects brain neurons against injury in rats following heroin relapse

Heroin abuse can damage many brain areas, including the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus of the midbrain, the ventral tegmental area, and nucleus accumbens. Persistent use of heroin induced irreversible damage to the nervous system. [More]