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FDA grants Breakthrough Therapy designation to Boehringer Ingelheim’s nintedanib

FDA grants Breakthrough Therapy designation to Boehringer Ingelheim’s nintedanib

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Breakthrough Therapy designation to nintedanib, an investigational therapy currently under FDA review for the treatment of people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Robot-assisted surgery to control prostate cancer effective in controlling disease for 10 years

Robot-assisted surgery to control prostate cancer effective in controlling disease for 10 years

Robot-assisted surgery to remove cancerous prostate glands is effective in controlling the disease for 10 years, according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. [More]
Anti-clotting treatment not needed for all kids who undergo spine operations

Anti-clotting treatment not needed for all kids who undergo spine operations

Blood clots occur so rarely in children undergoing spine operations that most patients require nothing more than vigilant monitoring after surgery and should be spared risky and costly anti-clotting medications, according to a new Johns Hopkins Children's Center study. [More]
Lilly, Immunocore enter into co-discovery and co-development collaboration to develop cancer therapies

Lilly, Immunocore enter into co-discovery and co-development collaboration to develop cancer therapies

Eli Lilly and Company and Immunocore Limited today announced they have entered into a co-discovery and co-development collaboration to research and potentially develop novel T cell-based cancer therapies. [More]
Many liver transplant patients want to be involved in the decision of whether to accept the organ

Many liver transplant patients want to be involved in the decision of whether to accept the organ

A novel study reveals that more than half of liver transplant patients want to be informed of donor risk at the time a liver is offered for transplantation. Nearly 80% of those patients want to be involved in the decision of whether or not to accept the organ according to findings published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society. [More]
Yashoda Cancer Institute uses Varian Clinac medical linear accelerator for radiotherapy treatments

Yashoda Cancer Institute uses Varian Clinac medical linear accelerator for radiotherapy treatments

Clinicians at a leading cancer center in India have become the first in the country to commence advanced lung, liver and brain radiotherapy treatments using an upgraded Clinac medical linear accelerator from Varian Medical Systems. [More]
Radial artery catheterization much safer for women

Radial artery catheterization much safer for women

Instead of going through the groin during heart catheterizations, physicians can now insert the catheter through a patient's wrist, a less traumatic and safer option for some patients — especially women. [More]
ADSC transplantation promotes adult neurogenesis in brains of Alzheimer's disease mice

ADSC transplantation promotes adult neurogenesis in brains of Alzheimer's disease mice

Recent evidence has demonstrated that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells can stimulate neurogenesis in the brain of adult rat or mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improve tissue and function injury under the condition of cerebral ischemia. [More]
"Expressive therapy" intervention helps HIV women, improves social support

"Expressive therapy" intervention helps HIV women, improves social support

New research from UC San Francisco shows that an "expressive therapy" group intervention conducted by The Medea Project helps women living with HIV disclose their health status and improves their social support, self-efficacy and the safety and quality of their relationships. [More]
Cataract surgery for people with dementia slows cognition decline, improves quality of life

Cataract surgery for people with dementia slows cognition decline, improves quality of life

Cataract surgery for people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias not only improves vision but can slow decline in cognition and improve quality of life for both people with the disease and their caregivers, according to clinical trial results reported today at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2014 (AAIC 2014) in Copenhagen. [More]
Veran announces positive, final results for initial study of SPiNPerc procedure

Veran announces positive, final results for initial study of SPiNPerc procedure

Veran Medical Technologies, a U.S. based medical device company, announced today the positive, cost-effective final results for the initial study of its innovative SPiNPerc procedure. [More]
Endomedix develops spray-on gel to staunch bleeding during brain surgery

Endomedix develops spray-on gel to staunch bleeding during brain surgery

Endomedix, a start-up company housed at NJIT's business incubator, received a $1.4 million federal grant to develop a spray-on gel that surgeons will use to staunch bleeding during brain surgery. [More]
Study highlights success rate of return to play following shoulder stabilization surgery

Study highlights success rate of return to play following shoulder stabilization surgery

Shoulder instability is a common injury in football players but the rate of return to play has not been regularly determined following surgery. [More]
Penn receives $8 million grant from NCI to study effects of PDT

Penn receives $8 million grant from NCI to study effects of PDT

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in collaboration with the Roswell Park Cancer Institute have received an $8 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to study the effects of photodynamic light therapy (PDT) in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma, a rare, aggressive and deadly cancer that most often manifests itself in the lining of the lungs and is caused almost exclusively by exposure to asbestos. [More]
Study: Minimally invasive aortic repair procedure safer for patients

Study: Minimally invasive aortic repair procedure safer for patients

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have documented the safety benefits of aortic stent grafts inserted during minimally invasive surgery to repair abdominal aortic aneurysms - weaknesses in the body's largest artery that can rupture, causing potentially lethal internal bleeding. [More]
Vasectomy associated with small increased risk of prostate cancer

Vasectomy associated with small increased risk of prostate cancer

Vasectomy was associated with a small increased risk of prostate cancer, and a stronger risk for advanced or lethal prostate cancer according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
Researchers evaluate surgeons' cognition during robot-assisted surgery

Researchers evaluate surgeons' cognition during robot-assisted surgery

What clues might brain metrics hold about the skill levels of surgeons who perform robot-assisted surgeries? Looking for better ways to assess the proficiency of surgeons performing these complex procedures, researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) and the University at Buffalo (UB) determined whether cognitive assessment can effectively measure the expertise of robotic surgeons with varying levels of experience. [More]
Antibiotic treatment for patients who underwent gall bladder removal does not reduce infection risk

Antibiotic treatment for patients who underwent gall bladder removal does not reduce infection risk

Among patients who underwent gall bladder removal for acute calculous cholecystitis, lack of postoperative antibiotic treatment did not result in a greater incidence of infections, according to a study in the July 9 issue of JAMA. [More]
New approach can reduce depression in patients with AMD-related low vision

New approach can reduce depression in patients with AMD-related low vision

Depression is a common risk for people who have lost their vision from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but a new study shows that a type of rehabilitation therapy can cut this risk in half. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Study: Older kidney donors enjoy similar longevity, cardiovascular health as other healthy individuals

Study: Older kidney donors enjoy similar longevity, cardiovascular health as other healthy individuals

Older kidney donors enjoy similar longevity and cardiovascular health as other healthy mature individuals, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. [More]