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Heart surgery patients who receive home visits from PAs less likely to be readmitted to hospital

Heart surgery patients who receive home visits from PAs less likely to be readmitted to hospital

Two home visits by a physician's assistant (PA) during the week after hospital discharge significantly reduces the chance that a heart surgery patient will be readmitted, and reduces overall costs associated with the heart surgery, according to a scientific presentation at the 52nd Annual Meeting of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. [More]
BMI affects outcomes following lung cancer surgery

BMI affects outcomes following lung cancer surgery

Body mass index (BMI) affects outcomes following lung resection (removal of part of the lung) for lung cancer. Patients with very high or very low BMIs (a measure of body mass based on height and weight) have the highest risks for complications, according to a scientific presentation at the 52nd Annual Meeting of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. [More]
High intensity focused ultrasound provides important treatment for men with prostate cancer

High intensity focused ultrasound provides important treatment for men with prostate cancer

For the estimated 220,000 men who will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year, deciding on a method of treatment can be a challenge. Some with early-stage cancer pursue a "wait and watch" option, also called active surveillance, while others with more severe cancer immediately pursue surgery, including prostatectomy (removal of the prostate). [More]
Involuntarily childless couples could be helped with extra sperm analysis

Involuntarily childless couples could be helped with extra sperm analysis

New research findings from Lund University in Sweden show that a simple analysis of chromosomal breaks in sperms can facilitate choice of the most efficient treatment and, thereby, increase chances of successful assisted reproduction in involuntary childless couples. [More]
Specific genetic pattern in the womb could predict IVF treatment outcome

Specific genetic pattern in the womb could predict IVF treatment outcome

Fertility experts in Southampton and the Netherlands have identified a specific genetic pattern in the womb that could predict whether or not IVF treatment is likely to be successful. [More]
Spotting the symptoms of cervical cancer

Spotting the symptoms of cervical cancer

Every year, around 3,000 women in the UK are diagnosed with cervical cancer. Whilst rare, cervical cancer can be a life-changing and dangerous disease. [More]

‘Strategy for Safer Surgery’ to be presented at Doctors Updates 2016

Consultant Urological Surgeon Martin Moody FRCS, to present case for safer surgery alongside Henry Schniewind of HAT in Val d’Isère during the medical conference, Doctors Updates. [More]
Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program releases new standards document

Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program releases new standards document

The Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program, a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, has released its latest standards document, Optimal Resources for Children's Surgical Care. [More]
Colon cancer patients lacking CDX2 protein more likely to benefit from chemotherapy

Colon cancer patients lacking CDX2 protein more likely to benefit from chemotherapy

Using a new computer science approach, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Columbia University and Stanford University discovered a distinctive molecular feature — a biomarker — that identified colon cancer patients who were most likely to remain disease-free up to five years after surgery. [More]
Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Previous research studies have linked obesity to adverse outcomes and increased costs following total knee replacement surgery (TKR). A new, computer model-based evaluation appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, supports bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis (loss of cartilage and joint pain, caused by aging and use) prior to TKR. [More]
Blocking class II MHC molecules on graft endothelium limits acute rejection

Blocking class II MHC molecules on graft endothelium limits acute rejection

A limitation of organ transplant is acute rejection of the graft by the host immune system. Graft rejection is mediated by the development of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells that target donor MHC class I molecules, and in animal models, these cells have been shown to develop in secondary lymphoid organs. [More]
Fibrosis in kidney transplants driven by continuous injury

Fibrosis in kidney transplants driven by continuous injury

Clinically, kidney fibrosis can be used to assess stage, progression, and prognosis for both kidney transplants and kidney disease. There is debate as to whether kidney fibrosis is a maladaptive, injury-triggered process that inherently progresses to kidney failure or an adaptive wound-healing process that stabilizes the injury site. [More]
Centinel Spine reports FDA clearance and first surgical implantation of ALTOS system

Centinel Spine reports FDA clearance and first surgical implantation of ALTOS system

Centinel Spine, Inc., announces the U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance of ALTOS, a posterior cervical thoracic stabilization system indicated for use in either the lateral masses of the cervical spine or the pedicles of the cervical-thoracic spine. The first surgical implantation of the ALTOS system was performed by Gery Hsu, MD, CRMC Medical Associates, Coffeyville, KS on January 4, 2016. [More]
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty treatment may offer new solution for obese patients

Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty treatment may offer new solution for obese patients

In the fight against obesity, bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment; however, only 1 to 2 percent of qualified patients receive this surgery due to limited access, patient choice, associated risks and the high costs. A novel treatment method -- endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty -- might offer a new solution for obese patients. [More]
Prostate cancer patients living in metropolitan areas more likely to be treated with radiation or surgery

Prostate cancer patients living in metropolitan areas more likely to be treated with radiation or surgery

A new study suggests that men with localized prostate cancer living in more highly populated areas are more likely to be treated with surgery or radiation compared to men residing in less populated areas. [More]
Mayo Clinic study finds no association between surgical anesthesia and development of MCI later in life

Mayo Clinic study finds no association between surgical anesthesia and development of MCI later in life

A Mayo Clinic study of people who received anesthesia for surgery after age 40 found no association between the anesthesia and development of mild cognitive impairment later in life. Mild cognitive impairment is a stage between the normal cognitive decline of aging and dementia. [More]
Traditional acupuncture no better than fake acupuncture for treating menopause symptoms

Traditional acupuncture no better than fake acupuncture for treating menopause symptoms

A new study has revealed traditional Chinese acupuncture treatments are no better than fake acupuncture for treating menopause symptoms. [More]
Physiotherapy and occupational therapy not effective in patients with Parkinson's disease

Physiotherapy and occupational therapy not effective in patients with Parkinson's disease

New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that physiotherapy and occupational therapy do not produce improvements in quality of life for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease. [More]
Animal antibodies help identify diseased cells during immunohistology procedures

Animal antibodies help identify diseased cells during immunohistology procedures

We all know it from biology lessons at school: Antibodies help us to ward off disease and are essential components of our immune system. What many people do not know is that physicians and scientists use animal antibodies to identify diseased or mutated cells. [More]
Needle-free administration of anesthetic in the mouth could save costs, improve patient compliance

Needle-free administration of anesthetic in the mouth could save costs, improve patient compliance

If you're scared of the dentist's needles you're not alone - but new research means you might not have to put off that appointment again. A study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces reveals how the dentist could give you anesthetic using a tiny electric current instead of a needle. [More]
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