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New article highlights success of Spanish system in deceased organ donation

New article highlights success of Spanish system in deceased organ donation

Spain is leading the world in deceased organ donation. A new article published in the American Journal of Transplantation contains important information that can help other countries learn from the success of the Spanish system to help address the worldwide problem of transplant organ shortages. [More]
New study explores impact of Affordable Care Act on socioeconomic disparities in cancer screening

New study explores impact of Affordable Care Act on socioeconomic disparities in cancer screening

Out-of-pocket expenditures are thought to be a significant barrier to receiving cancer preventive services, especially for individuals of lower socioeconomic status. A new study looks at how the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which eliminated such out-of-pocket expenditures, has affected the use of mammography and colonoscopy. [More]
Experimental treatment shows early promise for improving Parkinson's symptoms

Experimental treatment shows early promise for improving Parkinson's symptoms

About fourteen years ago, Bill Crawford noticed a persistent twitching in one of his fingers that was interfering with his rehearsal time as the music pastor at Porter Memorial Church. [More]

Mettler Toledo announce release of new webinars with flow chemistry experts

METTLER TOLEDO has announced the availability of 2 new on-demand continuous flow chemistry webinars, featuring speakers from Snapdragon and Nalas Engineering. [More]
Studies reveal long-term effects of gastric bypass surgery in severely obese teenagers

Studies reveal long-term effects of gastric bypass surgery in severely obese teenagers

Gastric bypass surgery helps severely obese teenagers lose weight and keep it off, according to the first long-term follow-up studies of teenagers who had undergone the procedure 5-12 years earlier. [More]
Georgia Tech researchers find new way to improve treatment for inflammatory diseases

Georgia Tech researchers find new way to improve treatment for inflammatory diseases

Is a treatment only making things better or maybe also making some things a little worse? That can be a nagging question in some medical decisions, where side effects are possible. [More]
Study shows promising results for treating lymphoma patients with immune cell therapy

Study shows promising results for treating lymphoma patients with immune cell therapy

Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The disease occurs when immune cells called lymphocytes multiply uncontrollably. Cancerous lymphocytes can travel throughout the body and form lymph node tumors. [More]
FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy can shift genomic profile of non-healing wounds

FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy can shift genomic profile of non-healing wounds

Apligraf - an FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy from Organogenesis Inc. - has become the first wound-healing therapy to demonstrate a significant change in the genomic profile of a treated non-healing wound, according to new research published in the peer-reviewed journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Delayed chemotherapy after surgery may benefit lung cancer patients, new Yale study suggests

Delayed chemotherapy after surgery may benefit lung cancer patients, new Yale study suggests

A new Yale study suggests that patients with a common form of lung cancer may still benefit from delayed chemotherapy started up to four months after surgery, according to the researchers. [More]
Dense blood clots linked to increased risk of premature death in hemodialysis patients

Dense blood clots linked to increased risk of premature death in hemodialysis patients

Dialysis patients may have altered blood clots that increase their risk of dying prematurely, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology [More]
NSCLC patients treated with surgery may benefit from delayed chemotherapy, study shows

NSCLC patients treated with surgery may benefit from delayed chemotherapy, study shows

A new study suggests patients who recover slowly from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) surgery may still benefit from delayed chemotherapy started up to four months after surgery, according to a new study published online by JAMA Oncology. [More]
New research suggests novel combination approach to fight against gliomas

New research suggests novel combination approach to fight against gliomas

"Devastating" and "dismal." That's how leading researchers describe the present outlook for malignant brain tumors. The median survival rate for patients with glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM, is a mere 14.2 months. [More]
Research findings on sweat glands have potential to improve methods for culturing skin grafts

Research findings on sweat glands have potential to improve methods for culturing skin grafts

As early humans shed the hairy coats of their closest evolutionary ancestors, they also gained a distinct feature that would prove critical to their success: a type of sweat gland that allows the body to cool down quickly. Those tiny glands are enormously useful, allowing us to live in a wide variety of climates, and enabling us to run long distances. [More]
Current Chinese cesarean rate substantially lower than previously reported, new study finds

Current Chinese cesarean rate substantially lower than previously reported, new study finds

Overuse of cesarean can jeopardize the health of mothers and babies. As cesarean rates have grown in many nations, cesarean overuse has become a key public health issue. [More]
INS experts publish new consensus on neuromodulation therapy

INS experts publish new consensus on neuromodulation therapy

The International Neuromodulation Society journal Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface is publishing expert, evidence-based guidance on the safe and efficient use of neuromodulation implants in patient-centered therapy. [More]
200th live donor kidney transplant offers promise of new life for the New Year

200th live donor kidney transplant offers promise of new life for the New Year

In late December in San Antonio, Texas, a 36-year-old mother of three from Jefferson City, Missouri, gave her best friend the most precious gift of all: a healthy kidney and the promise of a new life for the New Year. [More]
Pediatric dentist performs laser lip- and tongue-tie releases for infants

Pediatric dentist performs laser lip- and tongue-tie releases for infants

Dr. Martin Kaplan, DMD, DABLS, a Stoughton, MA based pediatric dentist performs 21st century laser lip- and tongue-tie releases for infants. [More]
AAV-based gene therapy to treat liver disorders advances into human testing

AAV-based gene therapy to treat liver disorders advances into human testing

Liver-directed gene therapy delivered using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to treat diseases such as hemophilia have advanced into human testing. [More]
Researchers examine national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after noncardiac surgery

Researchers examine national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after noncardiac surgery

In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Sripal Bangalore, M.D., M.H.A., of the New York University School of Medicine, New York, and colleagues examined national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after major noncardiac surgery. [More]
Systematic use of anatomically shaped implants is not justified, says plastic surgeon

Systematic use of anatomically shaped implants is not justified, says plastic surgeon

Looking at before-and-after photos, plastic surgeons and nurses can't tell whether breast augmentation surgery was done using conventional round implants or newer anatomically shaped implants, reports a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
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