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Gene delivery services expanded for adeno-associated virus

Gene delivery services expanded for adeno-associated virus

AMSBIO has introduced an expanded range of Adeno-associated virus (AAV) cloning and packaging services. [More]
SI-BONE announces publication of results from INSITE and SIFI studies

SI-BONE announces publication of results from INSITE and SIFI studies

SI-BONE, Inc., a medical device company that pioneered the use of the iFuse Implant System, a minimally invasive surgical (MIS) device indicated for fusion for certain disorders of the sacroiliac (SI) joint, announced the publication of one-year results from two separate prospective multicenter clinical trials as well as the publication of a systematic review of 18 MIS SI joint fusion studies. [More]
MIPT scientists reveal that weak gamma radiation doses prolong life of female fruit flies

MIPT scientists reveal that weak gamma radiation doses prolong life of female fruit flies

Scientists at MIPT have revealed that weak doses of gamma radiation prolong the life of drosophila flies (fruit flies), and that the effect is stronger in females than in males. These findings could reveal the genes that enable the prolongation of life and in the future lead to the creation of a means to prevent aging in humans. [More]
Few U.S. hospitals comply with CDC infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions

Few U.S. hospitals comply with CDC infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions

According to a survey conducted by Rhode Island Hospital researchers, there is significant variability regarding how clinicians manage catheters placed in the arteries of patients in intensive care units. Some practices may increase risk of infection associated with these catheters. Fewer than half of those surveyed complied with current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Tendon injuries, especially those acquired while engaging in sports, are not easily healed due to the fibrous nature of tendon tissues which transmit forces from muscle to bone and protect surrounding tissues against tension and compression. Tendon injuries to wrists, knees, elbows and rotator cuffs, often from over use when playing golf or tennis, are increasingly common for both professional and amateur athletes ("weekend warriors") alike. [More]
Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Patients with scoliosis who undergo surgery may be less likely to develop an infection or other complications after the procedure when a novel wound closure technique pioneered at NYU Langone Medical Center is utilized, according to new research. [More]
Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

In 2011, the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society issued a guideline recommending that neonates undergoing cardiac surgery for repair of congenital heart disease be placed on continuous encephalographic (EEG) monitoring after surgery to detect seizures. These recommendations followed reports that seizures are common in this population, may not be detected clinically, and are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes. [More]
New supercomputer models can capture the behavior of human heart valves

New supercomputer models can capture the behavior of human heart valves

New supercomputer models have come closer than ever to capturing the behavior of normal human heart valves and their replacements, according to recent studies by groups including scientists at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin and the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Iowa State University. [More]
Ancient Chinese practice lowers hypertension, may lessen risks of stroke and heart disease

Ancient Chinese practice lowers hypertension, may lessen risks of stroke and heart disease

Patients with hypertension treated with acupuncture experienced drops in their blood pressure that lasted up to a month and a half, researchers with the Susan Samueli Center for Integrative Medicine have found. [More]
Open-heart bypass surgery is not an arduous operation, says Loyola surgeon

Open-heart bypass surgery is not an arduous operation, says Loyola surgeon

Less than two months before his daughter Lauren's wedding, Tom Koegler underwent a quadruple bypass heart surgery at Loyola University Medical Center. [More]
Complete removal of visible tumor improves outcomes in children with high-grade glioma

Complete removal of visible tumor improves outcomes in children with high-grade glioma

For children with aggressive brain cancers called high-grade gliomas (HGG), the chances of survival are improved when surgery is successful in eliminating all visible cancer, reports a study in the September issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes offer hope in healing chronic wounds

Mesenchymal stem cell exosomes offer hope in healing chronic wounds

Dr. Badiavas’ research demonstrates how mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) exosomes, cell-derived vesicles that exist in biological fluids, function to repair non-healing wounds. [More]
Loyola implants new percutaneous aortic heart valve that does not require open surgery

Loyola implants new percutaneous aortic heart valve that does not require open surgery

Loyola University Medical Center is the first center in Illinois to implant a new percutaneous aortic heart valve that does not require open heart surgery. [More]
Patient satisfaction a poor proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery

Patient satisfaction a poor proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery

Patient satisfaction is a very poor proxy for quality of care comparisons in elective cranial neurosurgery. Because deaths are rare events in elective cranial neurosurgery, reporting of surgeon or even department-specific mortality figures cannot differentiate a high or low level of the quality of care. [More]
Music therapy reduces anxiety in women undergoing surgical breast biopsies

Music therapy reduces anxiety in women undergoing surgical breast biopsies

A first-of-its-kind study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology finds that music therapy lessened anxiety for women undergoing surgical breast biopsies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Urologists report success in treating bladder issues, pelvic pain through neuromodulation technique

Urologists report success in treating bladder issues, pelvic pain through neuromodulation technique

Millions of people suffer from bladder dysfunction, including about 30 million in the U.S. One in seven women experience chronic pelvic pain. These are not only health issues, but quality of life issues. [More]
MGH study reveals effects of combined radiation and chemotherapy on the brain tissue of glioblastoma patients

MGH study reveals effects of combined radiation and chemotherapy on the brain tissue of glioblastoma patients

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center researchers - the first to examine the effects of combined radiation and chemotherapy on the healthy brain tissue of glioblastoma patients - reveals not only specific structural changes within patients' brains but also that the effect of cancer therapy on the normal brain appears to be progressive and continues even after radiation therapy has ceased. [More]
Peripherally inserted central catheter use associated with lower-extremity DVT

Peripherally inserted central catheter use associated with lower-extremity DVT

Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), a type of IV typically inserted in a vein in the arm, are frequently used by healthcare professionals to obtain long-term central venous access in hospitalized patients. While there are numerous benefits associated with PICCs, a potential complication is deep vein thrombosis (DVT), or blood clots, in upper limbs. [More]
UWE Bristol signs up for latest version of simulated Eclipse Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System

UWE Bristol signs up for latest version of simulated Eclipse Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System

The University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) is the first Higher Education Institution (HEI) in the UK to sign up for the very latest version of a powerful simulated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System (RTPS), which has been futureproofed. [More]
MGH papers reveal the way anesthetics affect brains of older patients and children

MGH papers reveal the way anesthetics affect brains of older patients and children

Recent Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigations into the neurobiology underlying the effects of general anesthesia have begun to reveal the ways different anesthetic agents alter specific aspects of the brain's electrical signals, reflected by EEG (electroencephalogram) signatures. While those studies have provided information that may lead to improved techniques for monitoring the consciousness of patients receiving general anesthesia, until now they have been conducted in relatively young adult patients. [More]
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