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Researchers invent new imaging system to help detect malignant tissue during surgery

Researchers invent new imaging system to help detect malignant tissue during surgery

With the goal of making it easier for surgeons to detect malignant tissue during surgery and hopefully reduce the rate of cancer recurrence, scientists have invented a new imaging system that causes tumors to "light up" when a hand-held laser is directed at them. [More]
St. Luke’s offers Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery for treatment of brain tumors

St. Luke’s offers Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery for treatment of brain tumors

Some treatments for brain and spine tumors traditionally have involved restraining a patient with a heavy immobilization device and pins that pierce the skin and embed into the skull to ensure the accuracy and precision of a treatment. Doctors say the pins can add considerable anxiety. [More]
Doctors carry out first organ transplant from UK newborn

Doctors carry out first organ transplant from UK newborn

The very first successful organ donation from a newborn carried out in the UK is reported in the Fetal & Neonatal Edition of Archives of Disease in Childhood. [More]
Patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers more likely to develop severe primary graft dysfunction

Patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers more likely to develop severe primary graft dysfunction

Lung transplant patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers are nearly nine times more likely to experience a life-threatening complication called primary graft dysfunction, a Loyola University Medical Center study has found. [More]
Platelet transfusion treatment increases death in people with certain rare blood cell disorders

Platelet transfusion treatment increases death in people with certain rare blood cell disorders

People hospitalized with certain rare blood cell disorders frequently receive a treatment that is associated with a two- to fivefold increase in death, according to a new study that reviewed hospital records nationwide. The study authors recommend that for these rare disorders, doctors should administer the treatment, a platelet transfusion, only in exceptional circumstances. [More]
Leading cardiac specialists propose new guidelines for donor heart allocation

Leading cardiac specialists propose new guidelines for donor heart allocation

A group of leading cardiac specialists has proposed new guidelines for the allocation of donor hearts to patients awaiting transplant. The changes are aimed at improving the organ distribution process to increase the survival rate of patients awaiting transplant and posttransplant. [More]
Study finds increase in overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Study finds increase in overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

With the dawn of the modern era of new chemotherapeutic and biologic agents available for managing their disease, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer are undergoing less surgery for the removal of their primary tumors, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Use of common obstetric procedure declines between 2006 and 2012 in the U.S.

Use of common obstetric procedure declines between 2006 and 2012 in the U.S.

Between 2006 and 2012 in the U.S., there was a decline in rates of episiotomy, a surgical procedure for widening the outlet of the birth canal to make it easier for the mother to give birth, according to a study in the January 13 issue of JAMA. [More]

Researchers develop novel method to predict risk of liver cancer recurrence after transplantation

UCLA transplantation researchers have developed a novel method that more accurately calculates the risk of disease recurrence in liver cancer patients who have undergone a liver transplant, providing a new tool to help physicians make treatment and surveillance decisions. [More]
DMEK eye surgery at University Hospitals makes a world of difference for Ohio resident

DMEK eye surgery at University Hospitals makes a world of difference for Ohio resident

"I was blind as a bat," said 73-year-old Parma, Ohio, resident John Barsa, who suffered from corneal edema, causing an abnormal accumulation of liquid in the eye leading to swelling of the cornea. [More]
ASA offers tips for safe surgery, anesthesia experience

ASA offers tips for safe surgery, anesthesia experience

Surgery and anesthesia are safer than ever, but most patients don't know about the steps they can and should take to make their experience safer and more comfortable. [More]
Dallas Cowboys timekeeper ready to get back to work after kidney transplant at UT Southwestern

Dallas Cowboys timekeeper ready to get back to work after kidney transplant at UT Southwestern

Jim Ely tackles life like Mean Joe Greene tackled running backs. A banker, he also worked weekends as a football referee for 38 years and still, at age 83, works as home-game timekeeper for the Dallas Cowboys. [More]
MID completes enrollment in STASIS trial of Permaseal

MID completes enrollment in STASIS trial of Permaseal

Micro Interventional Devices, Inc. has completed enrollment in its Secure Transapical Access and Closure Study. STASIS is a non-randomized, multi-center, CE-Mark study, evaluating the safety and performance of Permaseal the world's first automated direct myocardial ventricular access and closure technology especially designed for use in transcatheter valve replacement procedures (TAVR and TMVR). [More]
Researchers report that weight-reducing bariatric surgery fuels job discrimination

Researchers report that weight-reducing bariatric surgery fuels job discrimination

People say that they would be more likely to hire someone who has lost weight through exercise and dieting than through surgery. This is just one of the stigmas faced by obese people who undergo weight-reducing bariatric surgery, reports Robert Carels of East Carolina University in the US and his team of researchers. [More]
Study finds unnecessary hysterectomy in 1 out of 5 cases

Study finds unnecessary hysterectomy in 1 out of 5 cases

It is estimated that one in three women in the United States will have had a hysterectomy by the age of 60. Although the numbers of hysterectomies are decreasing, a new study of more than three thousand women in Michigan who underwent hysterectomy for benign indications reveals that alternatives to hysterectomy are being underused and that treatment guidelines are often not followed. [More]
Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves older men with prostate cancer

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves older men with prostate cancer

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves more lives among older men with locally advanced prostate therapy than hormone therapy alone, according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology this week from Penn Medicine researchers. [More]
Many breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy surgery benefit from new intra-operative technology

Many breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy surgery benefit from new intra-operative technology

Many patients undergoing lumpectomy surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center for the removal of an early detected breast tumor - the surgical option of choice for this diagnosis -- are benefitting from new intra-operative technology that detects microscopic amounts of cancer cells on removed tumor tissue not visible during or following surgical intervention. [More]
Amedica's CASCADE data shows silicon nitride spacers are comparable to hollow-body PEEK spacers

Amedica's CASCADE data shows silicon nitride spacers are comparable to hollow-body PEEK spacers

Amedica Corporation, a biomaterial company that develops and commercializes silicon nitride ceramics, today released the results of its CASCADE study, a blinded, randomized clinical trial that compared outcomes of spinal fusion surgery between its composite silicon nitride spacers manufactured with a central core of cancellous structured ceramic (CsC), to the gold standard, i.e., PEEK (polyether ether ketone plastic) spacers filled with bone autograft. [More]
New treatment approach may improve survival rates for certain patients with stage 4 lung cancer

New treatment approach may improve survival rates for certain patients with stage 4 lung cancer

A clinical trial that combined stereotactic body radiation therapy with a specific chemotherapy regimen more than doubled survival rates for certain stage 4 lung cancer patients, UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers report. [More]
Study shows that reprogramming stem cells can prevent cancer following full body radiation

Study shows that reprogramming stem cells can prevent cancer following full body radiation

The body has evolved ways to get rid of faulty stem cells. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Stem Cells shows that one of these ways is a "program" that makes stem cells damaged by radiation differentiate into other cells that can no longer survive forever. [More]