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DePuy Synthes launches TFNA System to improve outcomes in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery

DePuy Synthes launches TFNA System to improve outcomes in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery

DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson has launched the TFN-ADVANCED Proximal Femoral Nailing System (TFNA), a nail, blade and screw system designed to improve patient outcomes by more closely matching the anatomy of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. [More]
New research shows spinal surgery improves sexual function, reduces low back pain

New research shows spinal surgery improves sexual function, reduces low back pain

Chronic low back pain can limit everyday activities, including sex. New research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), found that 70 percent of patients consider sexual activity "relevant" to their life quality, and patients who receive surgical treatment for spinal spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SS)--common degenerative conditions most often occurring in older adults--were twice as likely to report no pain during sex. [More]
Functional scores are higher in men before and after TKR surgery, shows study

Functional scores are higher in men before and after TKR surgery, shows study

While men and women have similar levels of improvement following total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, men have higher levels of function before and after TKR, according to new research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). [More]

Patients who undergo THR may safely drive by 2 weeks after surgery

Thanks to improved surgical, pain management and rehabilitation procedures, patients who undergo a total hip replacement (THR) may be able to safely drive as early as two weeks following surgery, according to new research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). [More]
Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation fare worse than their UK counterparts

Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation fare worse than their UK counterparts

Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis fare markedly worse in the long run than both publicly insured patients in the United Kingdom and privately insured Americans, according to the results of a study conducted by researchers from Johns Hopkins in Baltimore and U.K. colleagues working in that nation's government-funded National Health Service. [More]
Radiation treatment can be delayed after prostatectomy to prevent side effects, say studies

Radiation treatment can be delayed after prostatectomy to prevent side effects, say studies

Important news for men receiving treatment for prostate cancer: Two new studies from the University of Virginia School of Medicine have upended the widely held view that it's best to delay radiation treatment as long as possible after the removal of the prostate in order to prevent unwanted side effects. [More]
New study pinpoints major increase in subdural hematoma surgery by 2030

New study pinpoints major increase in subdural hematoma surgery by 2030

By 2030, chronic subdural hemorrhage (SDH) will be the most common adult brain condition requiring neurosurgical intervention in the U.S., according to a new study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Researchers examine why joint infections persist despite standards of care

Researchers examine why joint infections persist despite standards of care

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University and the National Institutes of Health are building on their research which seeks to understand why joint infections persist despite standards of care designed to stop them. [More]
Study finds no statistical difference between CTA and functional stress tests

Study finds no statistical difference between CTA and functional stress tests

A new type of CT scan initially costs slightly less than the traditional stress test to diagnose blocked coronary arteries in patients with chest pain, but its lower cost did not translate into medical care savings over time, according to an analysis by Duke Medicine researchers. [More]
Using arm as access point for catheter-based heart procedures lowers risk of major bleeding, death

Using arm as access point for catheter-based heart procedures lowers risk of major bleeding, death

Patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing coronary angiogram, a procedure used to assess blockages in the heart's arteries, had a significantly lower risk of major bleeding and death if their interventional cardiologist accessed the heart through an artery in the arm rather than the groin, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Two-year data show continued survival advantage for self-expanding TAVR

Two-year data show continued survival advantage for self-expanding TAVR

Two-year data show a continued survival advantage for self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) over standard surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New anti-clotting therapy no better than established anticoagulants

New anti-clotting therapy no better than established anticoagulants

A novel therapy that would allow doctors to turn the body's blood-clotting ability off and on in a more controlled way was about as effective as established anticoagulants in patients undergoing angioplasty but was associated with higher rates of moderate to severe bleeding, according to an analysis of data from a terminated Phase III trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
3D printed heart models to aid doctors plan for complex ops'

3D printed heart models to aid doctors plan for complex ops'

A team of doctors at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center are exploring new avenues to improve surgical preparations and patient care. The hospital recently partnered with the University of Cincinnati’s College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) to produce a 3D printed heart model of a patient with a rare, life-threatening heart condition. 3D printed anatomical models derived from patient scans enable doctors to “practice” surgery in advance and assess possible complications for delicate procedures, improving the outcome of operations. [More]
LDLT effective for treating patients suffering from acute liver failure

LDLT effective for treating patients suffering from acute liver failure

When patients develop acute liver failure, severe complications arise rapidly after the first signs of liver disease, and patients' health can deteriorate rapidly. New research published in the American Journal of Transplantation indicates that emergency evaluations of living liver donors can be conducted safely to allow acute liver failure patients to undergo transplantation before their condition worsens. [More]
Cardiac catheterization performed through wrist can reduce bleeding, lower mortality

Cardiac catheterization performed through wrist can reduce bleeding, lower mortality

The groin is the usual access point for investigating or treating the heart with a catheter, but using the wrist as access point reduces bleeding and lowers mortality. These findings are from an international study with major involvement from the University of Bern published today in the Lancet. [More]
Catheter ablation more beneficial to heart failure patients than Amiodarone treatment

Catheter ablation more beneficial to heart failure patients than Amiodarone treatment

Among patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation, those who underwent catheter ablation were less likely to die, be hospitalized or have recurrent atrial fibrillation than patients taking a heart rhythm regulating drug, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New bone marrow transplant unit launched in Bangalore, India

New bone marrow transplant unit launched in Bangalore, India

A bone marrow transplant can mean the difference between life and death for people with blood cancers and related disorders. But many patients in India can't afford the high treatment costs, and for them a transplant is not an option. This is changing thanks to a newly launched bone marrow transplant unit at M.S. Ramaiah Medical College in Bangalore. [More]
New radiation treatment for brain cancer implanted in first human being at CTRC

New radiation treatment for brain cancer implanted in first human being at CTRC

David Williams is the first human being ever to have a new radiation treatment implanted in the center of his brain tumor. [More]
Patients who experience deadliest form of heart attack may benefit from angioplasty

Patients who experience deadliest form of heart attack may benefit from angioplasty

Patients who experience the deadliest form of heart attack--ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)--and suffer from substantial narrowing in multiple heart arteries may benefit from receiving angioplasty in constricted arteries not affected by the heart attack, thereby reducing the need for future angioplasty, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Medigus announces completion of three MUSE procedures for GERD treatment in Italy

Medigus announces completion of three MUSE procedures for GERD treatment in Italy

Medigus Ltd., a medical device company developing minimally invasive endosurgical tools and a leader in direct visualization technology, announced the completion of three MUSE procedures in Italy by renowned gastroenterologist, Professor Pier Alberto Testoni, Director of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy IRCCS at San Raffaele Hospital in Milan. [More]
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