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Mayo Clinic study finds overlapping surgeries to be safe for patients

Mayo Clinic study finds overlapping surgeries to be safe for patients

A common way of scheduling surgeries to expand patient access to care and improve hospital efficiency, known as "overlapping surgeries," is as safe and provides the same outcomes for patients as non-overlapping surgeries, a Mayo Clinic study has found. [More]
Researchers assess scientific rigor in animal experimentation

Researchers assess scientific rigor in animal experimentation

The "reproducibility crisis" in biomedical research has led to questions about the scientific rigor in animal research, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments. [More]
Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

National surveys in Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Zambia reveal exceptional progress against HIV, with decreasing rates of new infection, stable numbers of people living with HIV, and more than half of all those living with HIV showing viral suppression through use of antiretroviral medication. For those on antiretroviral medication, viral suppression is close to 90 percent. [More]
Study explores fitness training approach during breast cancer treatment in multi-sport athlete

Study explores fitness training approach during breast cancer treatment in multi-sport athlete

Professional athletes undergoing treatment for cancer often are in the headlines. [More]
ACS approves $1.7 million funding for new research grants to Yale University

ACS approves $1.7 million funding for new research grants to Yale University

The American Cancer Society, the largest non-government, not-for-profit funding source of cancer research in the United States, has approved funding for three new research grants totaling over $1.7 million to investigators at Yale University. [More]

Healthcare workers at risk of witnessing abusive behavior in Canadian operating rooms, study shows

Healthcare workers in Canadian operating rooms are at a risk of witnessing physical and psychological abuse, according to a study led by a University of Manitoba research team that will be published in the Canadian Journal of Anesthesia. [More]
Study reveals new way to improve stability of common protein drugs

Study reveals new way to improve stability of common protein drugs

Gaining access to important biopharmaceuticals needed to treat illnesses and autoimmune diseases is one of the biggest obstacles developing countries face. [More]
Special article outlines recommended strategies to prevent Zika from blood transfusion

Special article outlines recommended strategies to prevent Zika from blood transfusion

As the Zika epidemic spreads to the United States, the potential for contracting the disease via blood transfusion has emerged as a serious concern. [More]
Heavy shoes cost more energy leading to changes in running performance

Heavy shoes cost more energy leading to changes in running performance

Running with heavy shoes costs more energy than running with lightweight shoes. [More]
Understanding sex differences in exercise fatigue can help develop better training strategies

Understanding sex differences in exercise fatigue can help develop better training strategies

Men are typically stronger and more powerful than women because they have more muscle mass. [More]
Study examines effects of minimalist shoes in trail runners

Study examines effects of minimalist shoes in trail runners

Minimalist shoes are a new commercially available athletic footwear now gaining strong popularity among both road and off-road runners. [More]

New insights on how fatigue impacts performance

Due to its common usage, the word fatigue has so many meanings that it is essentially meaningless. [More]
Genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissues could offer clues to tumor behavior

Genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissues could offer clues to tumor behavior

Two recently discovered genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissue cells -- an altered gene and a snippet of noncoding genetic material -- could offer clues to tumor behavior and potential new targets for therapy, Johns Hopkins scientists report. [More]
New FDA-approved drug helps patients fight against late-stage lung cancer

New FDA-approved drug helps patients fight against late-stage lung cancer

A new drug has been approved by the FDA in the fight against lung cancer. Tecentriq is being used by patients like Cornelius Bresnan, who had late-stage cancer. [More]
Replacing screen time with other sedentary behavior can improve obesity risk in children

Replacing screen time with other sedentary behavior can improve obesity risk in children

High amounts of screen-based activity, such as TV viewing, is known to be associated with higher risk of being obese in youth. [More]
Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

The inability to hear subtle changes in pitch, a common and debilitating problem for people with schizophrenia, is due to dysfunctional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) brain receptors, according to a study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
Customized tablet-based tool can help epilepsy patients to manage own unique symptoms

Customized tablet-based tool can help epilepsy patients to manage own unique symptoms

Epilepsy patients who want to learn how to manage their own unique symptoms can now get individualized information via tablet computer through a research project at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Sperm tail enzymes inspire nanobiotechnology

Sperm tail enzymes inspire nanobiotechnology

Just like workers in a factory, enzymes can create a final product more efficiently if they are stuck together in one place and pass the raw material from enzyme to enzyme, assembly line-style. [More]
Cornell researchers develop chemical probe activated by UV light to control inflammation

Cornell researchers develop chemical probe activated by UV light to control inflammation

Black light does more than make posters glow. Cornell researchers have developed a chemical tool to control inflammation that is activated by ultraviolet (UV) light. [More]
NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

Cortisol is a life sustaining adrenal hormone essential to maintaining the natural balance of the body. [More]
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