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Researchers examine effects of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Africa

Researchers examine effects of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Africa

Researchers from the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group conducted a review of the effects of introducing rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for diagnosing malaria in primary healthcare settings in Africa where laboratory services are unavailable. [More]

Vice-Chancellor of Queen’s University elected as Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences

Queen's University Belfast's Vice-Chancellor, Professor Patrick Johnston, whose work has transformed cancer care in Northern Ireland, has been elected as a Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences. [More]
John Hopkins researchers create novel optical imaging equipment for use on SARRP research platform

John Hopkins researchers create novel optical imaging equipment for use on SARRP research platform

Researchers from John Hopkins University have created an innovative piece of optical imaging equipment for use on-board the Xstrahl Small Animal Radiation Research Platform. [More]
Research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in sub-Saharan Africa children

Research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in sub-Saharan Africa children

Paper shows that more work is needed to fully understand the consequences of coinfection. Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]

Special supplement explores the causes of distracted driving among teens

Motor vehicle crashes rank as the leading cause of teen deaths and in 2008, 16% of all distraction-related fatal automobile crashes involved drivers under 20 years of age. [More]
Study provides better understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited, infectious diseases

Study provides better understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited, infectious diseases

The "brush border" - a densely packed array of finger-like projections called microvilli - covers the surfaces of the cells that line our intestines. [More]

Study shows how environmental factors can influence skull measurements

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Tennessee have found that environmental stressors - from the Trail of Tears to the Civil War - led to significant changes in the shape of skulls in the eastern and western bands of the Cherokee people. [More]

Study reveals factors that contribute to eye mobility disorder

Imagine you cannot move your eyes up, and you cannot lift your upper eyelid. You walk through life with your head tilted upward so that your eyes look straight when they are rolled down in the eye socket. [More]
Structural changes in hippocampus region improve memory function in children

Structural changes in hippocampus region improve memory function in children

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. [More]
Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer

Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer

It's long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development - by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates. [More]
Study shows R9-caPep compound blocks PCNA actions in neuroblastoma cells

Study shows R9-caPep compound blocks PCNA actions in neuroblastoma cells

Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliest childhood cancers, accounting for 15 percent of pediatric cancer deaths. For patients with high-risk neuroblastomas, the five-year survival rate is 40 to 50 percent even with the most rigorous treatments available today. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]
Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

A team that includes scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Johns Hopkins University and St. Mary's University reported the structure of a protein that helps a common fungus to infect the body. [More]
Scientists create new model of memory that provides complete picture of how memory works

Scientists create new model of memory that provides complete picture of how memory works

Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. [More]
Findings offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and development of new contraceptives

Findings offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and development of new contraceptives

​Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered interacting proteins on the surface of the sperm and the egg essential to begin mammalian life. These proteins, which allow the sperm and egg to recognize one another, offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and the development of new contraceptives. [More]

Neurovive presents new breakthrough on energy regulation at cellular level

NeuroVive, a leading mitochondrial medicine company, is presenting a breakthrough in the company's work on energy regulation at the cellular level. [More]
Researchers develop new technique for discovering natural compounds that form basis of novel therapeutic drugs

Researchers develop new technique for discovering natural compounds that form basis of novel therapeutic drugs

Researchers at Griffith University's Eskitis Institute have developed a new technique for discovering natural compounds which could form the basis of novel therapeutic drugs. [More]

Massage therapy alleviates muscle soreness and improves general blood flow

Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Study indicates that changes in appetite and taste are very common after gastric bypass surgery

Study indicates that changes in appetite and taste are very common after gastric bypass surgery

Changes in appetite, taste and smell are par for the course for people who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery during which one's stomach is made smaller and small intestines shortened. [More]

Waves in brain make smells stick to memories and inner maps, says study

Waves in your brain make smells stick to your memories and inner maps. When I was a child I used to sit in my grandfather's workshop, playing with wood shavings. Freshly shaven wood has a distinct smell of childhood happiness, and whenever I get a whiff of that scent my brain immediately conjures up images of my grandfather at his working bench, the heat from the fireplace and the dog next to it. [More]