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Necrotising autoimmune myopathy requires early, aggressive treatment

Necrotising autoimmune myopathy requires early, aggressive treatment

Researchers call for the prompt recognition of necrotising autoimmune myopathy and aggressive early treatment with a combination of intravenous immune globulin, corticosteroids and a steroid-sparing agent for 3 months. [More]

New research may aid in treatment of vision problems like lazy eye

If you have two working eyes, you are live streaming two images of the world into your brain. Your brain combines the two to produce a view of the world that appears as though you had a single eye -- like the Cyclops from Greek mythology. [More]
Study reveals impact of patient navigator program on no-show rates for cervical cancer screening

Study reveals impact of patient navigator program on no-show rates for cervical cancer screening

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital reported a 20% decline in the rate of missed appointments for cervical cancer evaluation following a Pap smear when a patient navigator program was initiated at the referral center. [More]
New special issue addresses hottest areas of research in cancer and metabolism

New special issue addresses hottest areas of research in cancer and metabolism

The latest Special Issue in ecancermedicalscience collects four original articles from experts in cancer and metabolism, addressing the hottest areas of research in this rapidly developing field. [More]
New AIBS workshop report highlights barriers and solutions to complex data integration

New AIBS workshop report highlights barriers and solutions to complex data integration

The integration of data from two or more domains is required for addressing many fundamental scientific questions and understanding how to mitigate challenges impacting humanity and our planet, according to a new workshop report from the American Institute of Biological Sciences. [More]
Researchers show how genetic modification of mouse strains complicate biomedical research interpretation

Researchers show how genetic modification of mouse strains complicate biomedical research interpretation

Investigators affiliated with VIB and UGent recently achieved great success with a study involving biomedical research on mouse models. [More]
Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

There's no time to lose when an emergency doctor diagnoses „Shock lung!" at the accident scene. What physicians know as "acute lung injury" (ALI) otherwise leads to death by suffocation without immediate treatment. [More]
Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty young and promising researchers from Nijmegen - eleven from Radboud University and nine from Radboudumc - are each to receive up to 250,000. NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) is awarding the Veni grant as part of the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme. [More]
Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell? T [More]
Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. [More]
Researchers discover first fully synthetic substrate with potential to grow billions of stem cells

Researchers discover first fully synthetic substrate with potential to grow billions of stem cells

If you experience a major heart attack the damage could cost you around five billion heart cells. Future stem cell treatments will require this number and more to ensure those cells are replaced and improve your chances of survival. [More]
Simple and accurate detection system can redefine medical diagnostics field

Simple and accurate detection system can redefine medical diagnostics field

In biology and medicine, we often need to detect biological molecules. For example, in cancer diagnostics, doctors need quick and reliable ways of knowing if tumor cells are present in the patient's body. [More]
Changes in UCH-L1 and GFAP proteins linked to trauma-related brain damage

Changes in UCH-L1 and GFAP proteins linked to trauma-related brain damage

Researchers have shown that the levels of two proteins present in blood and cerebrospinal fluid increase significantly at different time points following traumatic brain injury (TBI), confirming their potential value as biomarkers of trauma-related brain damage. [More]
Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who make major medical decisions for relatives in an intensive care unit (ICU) may suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) if they cope by avoiding the situation, according to a new study by scientists at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]

Emotionally unstable people have different brain structure

We all vary in how often we become happy, sad or angry, and also in how strongly these emotions are expressed. This variability is a part of our personality and can be seen as a positive aspect that increases diversity in society. However, there are people that find it so difficult to regulate their emotions that it has a serious impact on their work, family and social life. These individuals may be given an emotional instability diagnosis such as borderline personality disorder or antisocial personality disorder. [More]
Reduced pain, disability predict satisfaction after spine surgery

Reduced pain, disability predict satisfaction after spine surgery

Patient satisfaction ratings after surgery for spinal degenerative disease—especially in terms of reduced pain and disability—are a good indicator of the procedure's effectiveness, reports a study in the August issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Prostate cancer patients more likely to receive medical care matched to level of risk

Prostate cancer patients more likely to receive medical care matched to level of risk

After decades of overtreatment for low-risk prostate cancer and inadequate management of its more aggressive forms, patients are now more likely to receive medical care matched to level of risk, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]

CU-Boulder study reveals how and when placebo effect works

You don't think you're hungry, then a friend mentions how hungry he is or you smell some freshly baked pizza and whoaaa, you suddenly feel really hungry. Or, you've had surgery and need a bit of morphine for pain. As soon as you hit that button you feel relief even though the medicine hasn't even hit your bloodstream. [More]
New findings unlock clues to disease protection

New findings unlock clues to disease protection

When disease-resistant rice is invaded by disease-causing bacteria, a small protein produced by the bacteria betrays the invader. Upon recognizing that protein, the rice plants sense that a microbial attack is underway and are able to mount an immune response to fend off bacterial infection, reports a research team led by the University of California, Davis. [More]
Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer. [More]
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