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Weather and pollution affect outcomes after heart attack

Weather and pollution affect outcomes after heart attack

Pollution and weather influence outcomes after a heart attack, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Ms Aneta Cislak, research fellow in the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases, Medical University of Silesia in Zabrze, Poland. [More]
Midday naps linked to reduced blood pressure levels, fewer antihypertensive medications

Midday naps linked to reduced blood pressure levels, fewer antihypertensive medications

Midday naps are associated with reduced blood pressure levels and prescription of fewer antihypertensive medications, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Manolis Kallistratos, a cardiologist at Asklepieion Voula General Hospital in Athens, Greece. [More]
Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Coffee drinking is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events (mainly heart attacks) in young adults (18-45) with mild hypertension, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos, a cardiologist at Hospital of San Daniele del Friuli in Udine, Italy. [More]
Chapman University study provides complete analysis of skill development in traditional society

Chapman University study provides complete analysis of skill development in traditional society

Chapman University's research on aging and skill development appears as the lead article in the latest issue of American Journal of Physical Anthropology. The study, called "Skill Ontogeny Among Tsimane Forager-Horticulturalists," provides the most complete analysis to date of skill development in a traditional society. [More]

Practices for expediting corporate market research approval process for faster insights

Delays in the launch and execution of critical market research projects can slow down the decision-making process, resulting in missed opportunities and increased costs. It is, therefore, absolutely critical for biopharmaceutical companies to develop a tactical approach to expedite the market research approval process for quicker and more meaningful insights. [More]
Fentanyl sold as heroin causing new wave of overdose deaths

Fentanyl sold as heroin causing new wave of overdose deaths

With the heroin epidemic in the United States reaching deadlier heights, Jacksonville-based Lakeview Health drug and alcohol treatment center's Dr. Philip Hemphill is helping to explain why fentanyl is causing a new wave of overdoses. Because Fentanyl is approximately 40 to 50 times more potent than pharmaceutical grade heroin and often illegally purchased unknowingly by recreational users as heroin, the risk of death skyrockets. [More]
Synthetic tissue environment enables spatial definition of cancer cells and macrophages

Synthetic tissue environment enables spatial definition of cancer cells and macrophages

Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat - body tissues - but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior. [More]
Study: CPR usually saves lives on TV, but not in real life

Study: CPR usually saves lives on TV, but not in real life

If you think that performing CPR on a person whose heart has stopped is a surefire way to save their life, you may be watching too much TV. [More]
Researchers examine how patients handle stigma of using medical marijuana

Researchers examine how patients handle stigma of using medical marijuana

Research recently published in Journal of Psychoactive Drugs (Routledge) examines the experiences of California residents who have been prescribed medical marijuana and the stigma they experience from public opinion. The findings indicate that the stigma of using medical marijuana may contribute to the under-treatment of those who might benefit from medical marijuana. [More]
Novel chemical virus can cross double lipid layer surrounding cells to release drugs

Novel chemical virus can cross double lipid layer surrounding cells to release drugs

Viruses are able to redirect the functioning of cells in order to infect them. Inspired by their mode of action, scientists from the CNRS and Université de Strasbourg have designed a "chemical virus" that can cross the double lipid layer that surrounds cells, and then disintegrate in the intracellular medium in order to release active compounds. [More]
Children with special health care needs in Appalachian region face similar health challenges as metropolitan counterparts

Children with special health care needs in Appalachian region face similar health challenges as metropolitan counterparts

Despite the fact that previous research shows the Appalachian region of the United States as limited in access to health care services, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital have found that children with special health care needs in Appalachian areas face similar levels of health status as their metropolitan counterparts. [More]
Probiotics do not help prevent gastrointestinal colonization with MDROs in critically ill patients

Probiotics do not help prevent gastrointestinal colonization with MDROs in critically ill patients

Probiotics show no benefit for preventing or eliminating gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant organisms in patients in the intensive care unit compared to standard care, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Oysters play important role in persistence and transmission of norovirus

Oysters play important role in persistence and transmission of norovirus

Oysters not only transmit human norovirus; they also serve as a major reservoir for these pathogens, according to research published August 28 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. "More than 80 percent of human norovirus genotypes were detected in oyster samples or oyster-related outbreaks," said corresponding author Yongjie Wang, PhD. [More]
Keratin 17 protein plays crucial role in degrading key tumor suppressor protein

Keratin 17 protein plays crucial role in degrading key tumor suppressor protein

Keratin 17 (K17), a protein previously believed to provide only mechanical support for cancer cells, appears to play a crucial role in degrading a key tumor suppressor protein in cancer cells named p27. This finding, published in the September 1 issue of Cancer Research, is based on the work of researchers in the Department of Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. [More]
People with BPD traits have lowered activity in brain regions that support empathy

People with BPD traits have lowered activity in brain regions that support empathy

Those with borderline personality disorder, or BPD, a mental illness marked by unstable moods, often experience trouble maintaining interpersonal relationships. New research from the University of Georgia indicates that this may have to do with lowered brain activity in regions important for empathy in individuals with borderline personality traits. [More]
Fetal microchimerism could be a subtle and dizzyingly complex puzzle

Fetal microchimerism could be a subtle and dizzyingly complex puzzle

Parents go to great lengths to ensure the health and well-being of their developing offspring. The favor, however, may not always be returned. [More]
OU and Mercy receive $2.5 million grant to develop new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models

OU and Mercy receive $2.5 million grant to develop new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models

The University of Oklahoma and Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City are developing new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models that aim to help increase cancer detection of breast magnetic resonance imaging screening. [More]
Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States and has a 5-year survival rate of only 6 percent, which is the lowest rate of all types of cancer according to the American Cancer Society. [More]
KAIST scientists predict how biological circuits sustain rhythms

KAIST scientists predict how biological circuits sustain rhythms

Our bodies have a variety of biological clocks that follow rhythms or oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to days. For example, our hearts beat every second, and cells divide periodically. The circadian clock located in the hypothalamus generates twenty-four hour rhythms, timing our sleep and hormone release. [More]
New non-invasive image processing technique may improve IVF success rates

New non-invasive image processing technique may improve IVF success rates

A collaboration between biologists and engineers at Monash University has led to the development of a new non-invasive image processing technique to visualise embryo formation. Researchers were able to see, for the first time, the movement of all of the cells in living mammalian embryos as they develop under the microscope. [More]
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