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Deadly C. difficile affected almost half a million in the U.S over one year

The deadly bug Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infected more than 450,000 people in the U.S in a single year, according to new research funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). [More]
Patients with Parkinson's disease often face difficulties with reduced visual contrast acuity

Patients with Parkinson's disease often face difficulties with reduced visual contrast acuity

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often have difficulties with visual acuity in low-contrast images. Because they may have normal high-contrast vision, this is often overlooked during routine eye exams. In the current issue of the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, researchers report that PD patients had significantly worse vision for low-contrast images at close (40 cm) and far (2 m) distances. Even for high-contrast images, PD patients' vision was deficient at far distances. [More]
Predicting the development of type 1 diabetes is possible, shows TEDDY study

Predicting the development of type 1 diabetes is possible, shows TEDDY study

New research shows that it is possible to predict the development of type 1 diabetes. By measuring the presence of autoantibodies in the blood, it is possible to detect whether the immune system has begun to break down the body's own insulin cells. [More]
Study may give health workers vital new evidence in fight against Ebola

Study may give health workers vital new evidence in fight against Ebola

One year after the first Ebola cases started to surface in Guinea, the latest findings from a Cochrane review show new ways of hydrating patients in critical care environments across the world. [More]
Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome, new research shows. [More]
UMass Amherst biologist partners with Chinese scientist to develop novel drug platform

UMass Amherst biologist partners with Chinese scientist to develop novel drug platform

Margaret Riley, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and pioneer in fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria, announced this week that she is partnering with a Chinese scientist to develop a new drug platform, pheromonicins. The Chinese government is committing $400 million per year to support the newly created Pheromonicin Institute of Beijing. [More]

Unique research consortium focuses on musculoskeletal disorders and diseases

The Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, the University of Missouri – Kansas City and the University of Kansas Medical Center proudly announce a research consortium among the three Kansas City-area institutions. The consortium brings together scientists and resources focused on the research of musculoskeletal disorders and diseases. [More]
Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

With the chill of winter comes a spike in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which spreads more easily as people retreat indoors and come into close contact. The lung infection triggers persistent coughing, chest pain, fever, and difficulty breathing, and is particularly hard on the very young and the very old. In fact, pneumonia is the leading cause of hospitalization among U.S. children, with estimated medical costs of $1 billion annually. [More]
RowanSOM researcher awarded NINDS grant to develop stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease

RowanSOM researcher awarded NINDS grant to develop stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease

Paola Leone, PhD, the director of the Cell and Gene Therapy Center and a professor of Cell Biology at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, has been awarded a three-year, $477,000 grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to develop a stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease, a rare but devastating neurological disorder in children that typically takes a child's life by age 10. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Preliminary NIBIB-funded study may improve prediction of mild traumatic brain injury

Preliminary NIBIB-funded study may improve prediction of mild traumatic brain injury

A preliminary study conducted by researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering may improve our prediction of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Every year more than 40 million people worldwide suffer from mTBI. 3.8 million concussions occur in the US each year during sports and recreation alone. [More]

Underage drinkers of flavored alcoholic beverages at increased risk of alcohol-related injuries

Underage drinkers of flavored alcoholic beverages who exclusively consume the supersized versions are more than six times as likely to report suffering alcohol-related injuries compared to underage youth who drink other types of alcoholic beverages, according to a new study from researchers with the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Boston University School of Public Health. [More]
Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Respiratory viruses, not bacterial infections, are the most commonly detected causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to new research released Feb. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Scientists find new links between inflammation and tissue regeneration

Scientists find new links between inflammation and tissue regeneration

Almost all injuries, even minor skin scratches, trigger an inflammatory response, which provides protection against invading microbes but also turns on regenerative signals needed for healing and injury repair - a process that is generally understood but remains mysterious in its particulars. [More]
Hospira launches first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb) InflectraTM (infliximab) in the UK

Hospira launches first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb) InflectraTM (infliximab) in the UK

Inflectra is licensed for the treatment of inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, adult and paediatric Crohn’s disease, adult and paediatric ulcerative colitis and plaque psoriasis. [More]
UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists have developed a peptide that sticks to the protein that causes Parkinson's disease, stopping it from killing brain cells. The research highlights a potential new route for slowing the progress of this incurable disease. [More]
Researchers introduce the idea of using sewage to study human microbiome

Researchers introduce the idea of using sewage to study human microbiome

A new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria from millions of people. Researchers say the information gleaned from the work provides a unique opportunity to monitor, through gut microbes, the public health of a large population without compromising the privacy of individuals. [More]
Cook Medical Launches SialoCath™ Salivary Duct Catheter

Cook Medical Launches SialoCath™ Salivary Duct Catheter

SialoCath is one device in a growing suite of Cook Medical sialendoscopy access and interventional tools that are now available to clinicians in the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy and North America. [More]
Trained navigators can help patients overcome inequities in healthcare system

Trained navigators can help patients overcome inequities in healthcare system

Traversing the healthcare system can be daunting for almost anyone. Add in the many obstacles that low-income uninsured populations face, and it becomes tremendously more difficult. But a new Northwestern Medicine study shows that guidance from trained navigators can help patients overcome healthcare inequities. [More]
TSRI study finds no evidence of increased aggressive behavior toward strangers in autism model

TSRI study finds no evidence of increased aggressive behavior toward strangers in autism model

While aggression toward caregivers and peers is a challenge faced by many individuals and families dealing with autism, there has been much speculation in the media over the possibility of generally heightened aggression in those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. A new study by scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute found no evidence of increased aggressive behavior toward strangers in an animal model of the condition. [More]