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Study sheds light on neuronal circuits during risky behavior

Study sheds light on neuronal circuits during risky behavior

New research sheds light on what's going on inside our heads as we decide whether to take a risk or play it safe. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis located a region of the brain involved in decisions made under conditions of uncertainty, and identified some of the cells involved in the decision-making process. [More]
EEG could be strong indicator of awareness levels in patients with disorders of consciousness

EEG could be strong indicator of awareness levels in patients with disorders of consciousness

New research suggests that an electroencephalogram (EEG) could be a strong indicator of the level of awareness of patients in a vegetative state after a severe brain injury. [More]
New combination treatment improves overall survival in patients with malignant melanoma

New combination treatment improves overall survival in patients with malignant melanoma

Among patients with melanoma, those who received both ipilimumab (Yervoy) and local peripheral treatments such as radiotherapy or electrochemotherapy had significantly prolonged overall survival compared with those who received only ipilimumab, according to a retrospective clinical study. [More]
Online behavioural intervention provides long-term, sustainable ways to lose weight

Online behavioural intervention provides long-term, sustainable ways to lose weight

New research, led by the University of Southampton, has found that an online behavioural counselling tool is effective at helping people lose weight. [More]
Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

The short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease following a first pregnancy is higher for women experiencing placental syndromes and a preterm birth or an infant born smaller than the usual size, a University of South Florida study reports. [More]
Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Women who begin menopause before age 46 or after 55 have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study of more than 124,000 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, a large national trial aimed at preventing disease in postmenopausal women. [More]
Penn study sheds new light on biology of fatty liver disease

Penn study sheds new light on biology of fatty liver disease

A new appreciation for the interplay between two cell nucleus proteins that lead both intertwined and separate lives is helping researchers better understand fatty liver disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
FDA-approved nerve ablation procedure may offer new treatment option for low back pain

FDA-approved nerve ablation procedure may offer new treatment option for low back pain

It's the most common reason people go to their doctors - back pain. According to the National Institutes of Health, 80 percent of adults will experience low back pain some time in their lives. [More]
Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

Novel noninvasive scoring system can help predict strength and health of vascular network in the brain

A new study presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's 13th Annual Meeting in Boston found that the Opercular Score Index (OIS) is a practical, noninvasive scoring system that can be used to predict the strength and health of the vascular network in the brain (known as collateral robustness) and good clinical outcome among stroke patients undergoing endovascular recanalization. [More]
Genetic profiling offers new avenues for treatment of cancer, study finds

Genetic profiling offers new avenues for treatment of cancer, study finds

Genetic profiling of cancer tumors provides new avenues for treatment of the disease, according to a study conducted by Sanford Health and recognized by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Researchers study link between health insurance, tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women

Researchers study link between health insurance, tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health studied the relationship between health insurance coverage and tobacco and alcohol use among reproductive age women in the United States, and whether there were differences according to pregnancy status. [More]
Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Physicians from Carolinas HealthCare System's Neurosciences Institute and Levine Cancer Institute are among the authors of a study that was accepted for publication by the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study, released on July 26, 2016, shows that patients with the most common form of brain tumor can be treated in an effective and substantially less toxic way by omitting a widely used portion of radiation therapy. [More]
Study provides key insights for effective treatment of individuals with HFpEF

Study provides key insights for effective treatment of individuals with HFpEF

The number of patients hospitalized with HFpEF is now comparable to those with traditional heart failure with a reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and is projected to exceed that of HFrEF within the next few years. [More]
Study shows how Medicaid expansion affects health insurance coverage of liver transplant recipients

Study shows how Medicaid expansion affects health insurance coverage of liver transplant recipients

Researchers have found that Medicaid expansion increased Medicaid enrollment among people who received liver transplants funded by commercial insurance. The findings are published inLiver Transplantation. [More]
Researchers discover pathway linking oxidative stress and cysteine in Huntington's disease

Researchers discover pathway linking oxidative stress and cysteine in Huntington's disease

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have identified a biochemical pathway linking oxidative stress and the amino acid cysteine in Huntington's disease. [More]
New insights into RNA-protein interactions may lead to cure for heart disease

New insights into RNA-protein interactions may lead to cure for heart disease

Research led by The Australian National University has uncovered new insights into how the human genome gets through the daily grind with the help of RNA-binding proteins, in a discovery which could ultimately lead to a cure for heart disease. [More]
Community-based lifestyle programs can also improve health-related quality of life

Community-based lifestyle programs can also improve health-related quality of life

The value of a healthy lifestyle isn't reflected only in the numbers on the scale or the blood pressure cuff. [More]
Shrinkage in hippocampal volume linked to stress-induced memory loss

Shrinkage in hippocampal volume linked to stress-induced memory loss

"My workload has shot up after my last promotion, I know that I'm stressed out," says a management executive from Delhi. [More]
Pew survey shows Americans worry about using emerging technologies for human enhancement

Pew survey shows Americans worry about using emerging technologies for human enhancement

Many in the general public think scientific and technological innovations bring helpful change to society, but they are more concerned than excited when it comes to the potential use of emerging technologies to make people's minds sharper, their bodies stronger and healthier than ever before, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. [More]
Researchers find genetic variability in frozen vials of cells purchased from same cell bank

Researchers find genetic variability in frozen vials of cells purchased from same cell bank

In a surprise finding, researchers working with breast cancer cells purchased at the same time from the same cell bank discovered that the cells responded differently to chemicals, even though the researchers had not detected any difference when they tested them for authenticity at the time of purchase. [More]
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