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Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
Treating obesity with therapies aimed at areas of brain

Treating obesity with therapies aimed at areas of brain

Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of obesity and dementia reside in the brain, according to a paper from American University's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. [More]
Protective effects of ischemic preconditioning on focal cerebral infarction linked with upregulation of VEGF

Protective effects of ischemic preconditioning on focal cerebral infarction linked with upregulation of VEGF

Neuroprotection by ischemic preconditioning has been confirmed by many studies, but the precise mechanism remains unclear. [More]
More than half the world’s population is host to newly described gut virus

More than half the world’s population is host to newly described gut virus

Odds are, there-s a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found that more than half the world-s population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common types of gut bacteria, Bacteroidetes. [More]
Oregano and rosemary help lower glucose in blood

Oregano and rosemary help lower glucose in blood

The popular culinary herbs oregano and rosemary are packed with healthful compounds, and now lab tests show they could work in much the same way as prescription anti-diabetic medication, scientists report. [More]
Compounds developed for cancer treatment show promise as potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's

Compounds developed for cancer treatment show promise as potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's

Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer's disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. But scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's. Their study appears in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. [More]
Researchers receive inaugural funding from AHA to prevent heart disease and stroke

Researchers receive inaugural funding from AHA to prevent heart disease and stroke

Researchers and clinicians at UT Southwestern Medical Center are among a small, select group at U.S. universities to receive inaugural funding from the American Heart Association (AHA) for work that takes aim at heart disease and stroke. [More]
New methods of dectecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing

New methods of dectecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing

Infections caused by foodborne microorganisms are an increasing public health burden. In a PhD project at the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, new methods of characterising and dectecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing and in bacteria in water, feed and food samples were studied. [More]

Researchers examine how experiences of DVA may be shaped by gender, sexuality, age

Mainstream agencies dealing with heterosexual victims of Domestic Violence and Abuse (DVA) must do more to support and build trust with victims in same sex relationships, researchers of a new book recommend. [More]
Obese people have low endurance, experience excess fatigue in workplace

Obese people have low endurance, experience excess fatigue in workplace

Workplaces may need to consider innovative meethods to prevent fatigue from developing in employees who are obese. Based on results from a new study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, workers who are obese may have significantly shorter endurance times when perfroming workplace tasks, compared with non-obese counterparts. [More]
Researchers have sequenced genetic material from caries bacterium for the first time

Researchers have sequenced genetic material from caries bacterium for the first time

Streptococcus mutans, one of the principal bacteria that cause dental caries, has increased the change in its genetic material over time, possibly coinciding with dietary change linked to the expansion of humanity. [More]
Brown recluse spider bites increases this summer, say toxicologists

Brown recluse spider bites increases this summer, say toxicologists

Vanderbilt medical toxicologists are reporting an increase in patients seen with brown recluse spider bites this summer. [More]
New research aims to estimate benefits of different ways to combat TB in people with diabetes

New research aims to estimate benefits of different ways to combat TB in people with diabetes

New research aims to estimate the benefits of different ways to carry out screening both patients with tuberculosis (TB) for diabetes and the other way around in parts of the world where both diseases are common. [More]
Researchers find that considerable proportion of infections discovered outside hospital setting

Researchers find that considerable proportion of infections discovered outside hospital setting

More than 80 percent of hospitalized patients who tested positive for Clostridium difficile were tested outside the hospital or within the first 72 hours of hospitalization, suggesting that settings outside of the hospital may play key roles in the identification, onset and possible transmission of the disease, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

A new study supports a growing body of research suggesting a safe and effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating postmenopausal breast cancer, with fewer detrimental side effects and improved health profile than with standard anti-hormone therapies. [More]
Cypher Genomics, Illumina partner to facilitate development of genomic-based biomarkers

Cypher Genomics, Illumina partner to facilitate development of genomic-based biomarkers

Cypher Genomics, Inc., the genome informatics company, announced today a co-promotion agreement with Illumina to facilitate the development of genomic-based biomarkers from whole genome sequence data for precision medicine and clinical trials. [More]
Statins reduce patient's risk of developing Barrett's esophagus

Statins reduce patient's risk of developing Barrett's esophagus

Statins, a class of drugs commonly used to lower cholesterol levels, significantly reduce a patient's risk of developing Barrett's esophagus, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Number of Americans infected with chikungunya increases, say researchers

Number of Americans infected with chikungunya increases, say researchers

In just two weeks, the number of Americans infected with the mosquito-borne virus chikungunya has almost doubled and the virus has now been found in mosquitoes in the United States, something that is very concerning to a Kansas State University professor who is a leading researcher of the virus. [More]
FDA approves Ryanodex for treatment of malignant hyperthermia linked with anesthesia

FDA approves Ryanodex for treatment of malignant hyperthermia linked with anesthesia

Eagle Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Ryanodex® (dantrolene sodium) for injectable suspension indicated for the treatment of malignant hyperthermia (MH), along with the appropriate supportive measures. [More]
Study identifies three genetic changes linked to increased risk of breast cancer in East Asian women

Study identifies three genetic changes linked to increased risk of breast cancer in East Asian women

A new study in East Asian women has identified three genetic changes linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. The research, led by Vanderbilt University investigators, was published online July 20 in Nature Genetics. [More]