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Melbourne researchers reveal key steps involved in programmed cell death

Melbourne researchers reveal key steps involved in programmed cell death

Melbourne researchers have uncovered key steps involved in programmed cell death, offering new targets for the treatment of diseases including lupus, cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Researchers find independent predictors of end stage renal disease in teens

Researchers find independent predictors of end stage renal disease in teens

Researchers at örebro University found that high blood pressure, being overweight, elevation of a blood marker indicating inflammation, or the presence of protein in the urine in otherwise healthy teenage males were all independent predictors of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in later in life. [More]
RDoC research initiative aims to help guide classification of patients in clinical studies

RDoC research initiative aims to help guide classification of patients in clinical studies

A new effort by the National Institutes of Health will facilitate communication among scientists, clinicians, and the public to reframe mental health research, from diagnosis to treatment. The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) unit was recently established by the National Institute of Mental Health, part of NIH, to support the development of the institute's RDoC initiative. [More]
Researchers develop mouse model to improve basic research on Ebola treatments, vaccines

Researchers develop mouse model to improve basic research on Ebola treatments, vaccines

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues have developed the first genetic strain of mice that can be infected with Ebola and display symptoms similar to those that humans experience. [More]
Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

In the first study of its kind, Rice University researchers have mapped how information flows through the genetic circuits that cause cancer cells to become metastatic. The research reveals a common pattern in the decision-making that allows cancer cells to both migrate and form new tumors. Researchers say the commonality may open the door to new drugs that interfere with the genetic switches that cancer must flip to form both cancer stem cells and circulating tumor cells -- two of the main players in cancer metastasis. [More]
Insomnia contributes to deaths caused by motor vehicle crashes, other fatal injuries

Insomnia contributes to deaths caused by motor vehicle crashes, other fatal injuries

New research suggests that insomnia is a major contributor to deaths caused by motor vehicle crashes and other unintentional fatal injuries. The results underscore the importance of the "Sleep Well, Be Well" campaign of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project. [More]
Study compares five-year DFS and OS rates for patients with AIS and MIA

Study compares five-year DFS and OS rates for patients with AIS and MIA

Lung cancer patients with minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) have similar, positive five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates as patients with adenocarcinoma in-situ (AIS), according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology. [More]
Diabetes treatment with low-cost generic drug can have positive implications for patient's quality of life

Diabetes treatment with low-cost generic drug can have positive implications for patient's quality of life

New research from CVS Health finds starting a new diabetes patient on metformin, a generic oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels, reduced the need to add on additional treatments to control the condition over time. Although there are many classes of oral diabetes medications, there has historically been little evidence available on the comparative effectiveness of treatments to help patients and providers select an initial diabetes therapy. [More]
LAMA/LABA combination better than monotherapy for severe COPD

LAMA/LABA combination better than monotherapy for severe COPD

Combination treatment with umeclidinium bromide and vilanterol offers clinically meaningful improvements over tiotropium monotherapy for patients with moderate-to-very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, study data show. [More]
Combination therapy beneficial for COPD patients

Combination therapy beneficial for COPD patients

Research published in JAMA supports the use of a combination of long-acting β-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. [More]
Severe childhood asthma linked to COPD in adult life

Severe childhood asthma linked to COPD in adult life

Children with severe asthma are at an increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adult life, show findings of an Australian study. [More]
Spirometry fails to improve quality of life in asthmatic children

Spirometry fails to improve quality of life in asthmatic children

The results of two cluster randomised controlled trials in young asthma patients reveal that regular spirometry and medical review do not significantly affect asthma-related quality of life, report Australian researchers. [More]
Accumulated environmental risks have substantial impact on schizophrenia

Accumulated environmental risks have substantial impact on schizophrenia

Accumulation of environmental risk factors has a “huge” effect on age at schizophrenia onset, German researchers report. [More]
Family therapy useful in bipolar disorder

Family therapy useful in bipolar disorder

Psychoeducational family intervention improves social functioning in patients with bipolar I disorder and reduces burden among close relatives, Italian study data show. [More]
Data reveals sustained local control for early stage lung cancer patients who receive SBRT

Data reveals sustained local control for early stage lung cancer patients who receive SBRT

Analysis of data from an institutional patient registry on stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) indicates excellent long-term, local control, 79 percent of tumors, for medically inoperable, early stage lung cancer patients treated with SBRT from 2003 to 2012, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology. [More]
Study: Vitamin D deficiency more prevalent in neuromuscular conditions

Study: Vitamin D deficiency more prevalent in neuromuscular conditions

A study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine adds more credence to a growing awareness of the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in neuromuscular disease. [More]
New consensus guidelines for toxicity testing of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics

New consensus guidelines for toxicity testing of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics

Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics present unique challenges when it comes to testing their potential to cause reproductive and developmental harm. New consensus guidelines for toxicity testing that take into consideration the combined chemical and biological characteristics of these novel biopharmaceuticals are presented in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers. [More]
Study identifies new targets for developing novel treatment for alcohol dependence

Study identifies new targets for developing novel treatment for alcohol dependence

Bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract fulfill many vital functions and are critical for digestion. Yet, these same bacteria can induce strong inflammatory responses by the immune system if they penetrate the gut and enter the bloodstream. [More]
Study opens door to new treatments for brain diseases

Study opens door to new treatments for brain diseases

Delivering life-saving drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) might become a little easier thanks to a new report published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal. [More]
Two major studies newly implicate dozens of genes in autism

Two major studies newly implicate dozens of genes in autism

Two major genetic studies of autism, led in part by UC San Francisco scientists and involving more than 50 laboratories worldwide, have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms that govern whether, when, and how genes are activated overall. [More]