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Study: Chronic inflammation associated with aggressive prostate cancer

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]

Scientist receives $1.8M defense grant from Kessler Foundation for spinal cord injury research

Kessler Foundation has been named awardee of a three-year grant for $1.8 million from the Department of Defense Spinal Cord Injury Research Program. Gail Forrest, PT, PhD, is principal investigator for the randomized, double-blinded, controlled, multi-site clinical trial, which will test strategies to improve bone and muscle strength after spinal cord injury. Dr. Forrest is assistant director of Human Performance & Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. [More]

Queen's University professor elected as Fellow of European Academy of Cancer Sciences

Queen's University Belfast's Vice-Chancellor, Professor Patrick Johnston, whose work has transformed cancer care in Northern Ireland, has been elected as a Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences. [More]
B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

​An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process. [More]
Research: Spending time online has potential to ward off depression among retirees

Research: Spending time online has potential to ward off depression among retirees

Spending time online has the potential to ward off depression among retirees, particularly among those who live alone, according to research published online in The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences. [More]
Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Stem cells in bone marrow need to produce hydrogen sulfide in order to properly multiply and form bone tissue, according to a new study from the Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC. [More]

Princeton professor receives Agilent Thought Leader Award to research on cellular metabolism activity

Agilent Technologies Inc. today announced that Joshua Rabinowitz, M.D., Ph.D., professor at Princeton University's Department of Chemistry and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, has received an Agilent Thought Leader Award to support his work on quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism. [More]
Prenatal risk factors linked with development of chronic kidney disease in children

Prenatal risk factors linked with development of chronic kidney disease in children

Certain prenatal risk factors are associated with the development of chronic kidney disease in children, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). Future studies should investigate whether modifying these factors could help protect children's kidney health. [More]
New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. [More]
New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions worldwide every year, including more than 200,000 Americans. [More]

Research provides fresh insight into structure of sodium channels

Sodium channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as heart disease, epilepsy and pain, making them an important potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still much scientists do not know about the molecules. [More]
Fish consumption advisories for pregnant women ineffective in reducing infant exposure to POPs

Fish consumption advisories for pregnant women ineffective in reducing infant exposure to POPs

A new modeling study suggests that fish consumption advisories for expecting mothers are ineffective in reducing infant exposure to long-lived contaminants like persistent organic pollutants (POPs). [More]

Docs who treat patients with severe LAM face agonizing treatment decision

​Doctors who treat patients with a severe and progressive respiratory disease called lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) can face an agonizing treatment decision. [More]
Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C exceed deaths caused by HIV/AIDS

Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C exceed deaths caused by HIV/AIDS

Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C have surpassed HIV/AIDS in many countries, including Australia and in Western Europe, according to an analysis of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. [More]
Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Discovery could have far-reaching implications for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy

Discovery could have far-reaching implications for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy

Indiana University researchers have detected new early-warning signs of the potential loss of sight associated with diabetes. This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, potentially impacting the care of over 25 million Americans. [More]

Researchers recommend early colorectal cancer screening guidelines for cervical cancer survivors

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are the first to recommend that young women treated with radiation for cervical cancer should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier than traditionally recommended. [More]

Findings could revive use of chloroquine drug in treating, preventing mosquito-bourne disease

An anti-malarial treatment that lost its status as the leading weapon against the deadly disease could be given a new lease of life, with new research indicating it simply needs to be administered differently. [More]

SWHR co-sponsors National Institutes of Health Forum on microbiome and autoimmunity

The Society for Women's Health Research (SWHR®), the leading voice on the study of the biological differences between women and men, is co-sponsoring the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Forum on the Microbiome and Autoimmunity on Thursday, April 24, at the NIH in Bethesda, Md. [More]