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Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Over the past several decades, malaria diagnosis has changed very little. After taking a blood sample from a patient, a technician smears the blood across a glass slide, stains it with a special dye, and looks under a microscope for the Plasmodium parasite, which causes the disease. [More]
Study suggests that energy drinks can cause heart problems

Study suggests that energy drinks can cause heart problems

Energy drinks can cause heart problems according to research presented at ESC Congress 2014 today by Professor Milou-Daniel Drici from France. [More]
Invisible blood in urine: An early warning sign of bladder cancer

Invisible blood in urine: An early warning sign of bladder cancer

New research which finds that invisible blood in urine may be an early warning sign of bladder cancer is likely to shape guidelines for clinicians. [More]
University of Leicester research sniffs out smell of disease in feces

University of Leicester research sniffs out smell of disease in feces

A fast-sensitive "electronic-nose" for sniffing the highly infectious bacteria C. diff, that causes diarrhoea, temperature and stomach cramps, has been developed by a team at the University of Leicester. [More]
Tea significantly lowers risk of non-CV death, study reveals

Tea significantly lowers risk of non-CV death, study reveals

Drinking tea reduces non-cardiovascular mortality by 24%, reveals a study in 131 000 people presented at ESC Congress today by Professor Nicolas Danchin from France. [More]
Researchers identify how Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses

Researchers identify how Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses

Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies, in research results published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. [More]

Study investigates consumers' readiness to adopt insects as meat substitute

The most likely early adopters of insets as a meat substitute in Western societies are young men with weak attitudes toward meat, who are open to trying novel foods and interested in the environmental impact of their food choice. [More]
ESC launches first recommendations on use of all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism

ESC launches first recommendations on use of all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism

The first recommendations on the use of all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism are published today in new ESC Guidelines. [More]
Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Being physically active may significantly improve musculoskeletal and overall health, and minimize or delay the effects of aging, according to a review of the latest research on senior athletes (ages 65 and up) appearing in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). [More]
MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. [More]
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
Scientists identify developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces

Scientists identify developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces

Scientists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world's naturally derived antibiotic medicines. [More]
Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Human articular cartilage defects can be treated with nasal septum cells. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. [More]
Plant-based medication after cardiac surgery shows mixed results in reducing complications

Plant-based medication after cardiac surgery shows mixed results in reducing complications

Administration of colchicine, a plant-based medication commonly used to treat gout, before and after cardiac surgery showed mixed results in reducing potential complications from this type of surgery, but it did increase the risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects, according to a study published by JAMA. [More]
Special issue looks at how researchers use bioinformatics to understand plant form

Special issue looks at how researchers use bioinformatics to understand plant form

As technology advances, science has become increasingly about data-how to gather it, organize it, and analyze it. [More]
Study compares FK506 and rapamycin for Schwann cell migration, peripheral nerve regeneration

Study compares FK506 and rapamycin for Schwann cell migration, peripheral nerve regeneration

FK506 possesses a well-studied neuroregenerative effect, stimulating neurite extension in the presence of nerve growth factor in vitro, and enhancing nerve regeneration following nerve crush injury and isografting. [More]
Researchers reveal how distinct areas of frontal lobes are critical for person's ability to learn

Researchers reveal how distinct areas of frontal lobes are critical for person's ability to learn

Until the last few decades, the frontal lobes of the brain were shrouded in mystery and erroneously thought of as nonessential for normal function-hence the frequent use of lobotomies in the early 20th century to treat psychiatric disorders. [More]

Researchers examine feelings and health of old people in societies

People aged 70 and over who identify themselves as 'old' feel worse about their own health in societies where they perceive they have lower value than younger age groups. [More]
People should not rely on YouTube videos to save lives

People should not rely on YouTube videos to save lives

Only a handful of CPR and basic life support (BLS) videos available on YouTube provide instructions which are consistent with recent health guidelines, according to a new study published in Emergency Medicine Australasia, the journal for the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM). [More]

Surgical researchers rarely use female animals in medical research

A new study from Northwestern Medicine- has found that surgical researchers rarely use female animals or female cells in their published studies -- despite a huge body of evidence showing that sex differences can play a crucial role in medical research. [More]