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Caltech researchers reveal new information that could help fight against hookworms

Caltech researchers reveal new information that could help fight against hookworms

Tiny parasitic hookworms infect nearly half a billion people worldwide--almost exclusively in developing countries--causing health problems ranging from gastrointestinal issues to cognitive impairment and stunted growth in children. By sequencing and analyzing the genome of one particular hookworm species, Caltech researchers have uncovered new information that could aid the fight against these parasites. [More]
People prone to high anxiety make bad decisions under uncertainties of life

People prone to high anxiety make bad decisions under uncertainties of life

Highly anxious people have more trouble deciding how best to handle life's uncertainties. They may even catastrophize, interpreting, say, a lovers' tiff as a doomed relationship or a workplace change as a career threat. [More]
Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in women often presents with different types of symptoms than in men and can be challenging to diagnose due to a variety of factors. A national panel of experts convened to review the latest evidence regarding CAD in women, diagnostic approaches, and new types of tests and technologies. [More]
UTHealth study focuses on new cognitive behavioral therapy to treat PTSD, substance use disorders

UTHealth study focuses on new cognitive behavioral therapy to treat PTSD, substance use disorders

A new cognitive behavioral therapy designed to treat both post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders is the focus of research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
Peanuts may lower risk of deaths from heart disease

Peanuts may lower risk of deaths from heart disease

If you're looking for a simple way to lower your risk of dying from a heart attack, consider going nuts. [More]
Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

In an advance that may potentially lead to new treatments for parasitic hookworms, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Cornell University have sequenced the genome of the hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum. [More]
New study finds increase in use of adjuvant systemic therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

New study finds increase in use of adjuvant systemic therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

A new study finds that the use of adjuvant systemic therapy for localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs ) has significantly increased over time and that patients treated with the therapy have better survival than those treated with surgery alone. [More]
Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Medicine should reconsider how it treats stroke and other neurological disorders, focusing on the intrinsic abilities of the brain and nervous system to heal themselves rather than the "modest" benefits of clot-busting drugs and other neuroprotective treatments. [More]
Data provides better understanding of genetic activity during lung cancer development

Data provides better understanding of genetic activity during lung cancer development

Scientists at the University of Granada, incollaboration with the universities of Harvard and Yale (United States) have provided new data for a better understanding of the alterations produced during the development of lung cancer, the tumour with the highest yearly death rate in Spain. [More]
Easy-to-obtain oral swab could be a game changer for TB control

Easy-to-obtain oral swab could be a game changer for TB control

Drawing inspiration from veterinary medicine, researchers at the University of Washington have helped developed a new prospective approach to diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) - easy-to-obtain oral swab samples, greatly improving on standard diagnostics. [More]
Sall4 protein helps fix DNA damage

Sall4 protein helps fix DNA damage

A protein that helps embryonic stem cells (ESCs) retain their identity also promotes DNA repair, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology. The findings raise the possibility that the protein, Sall4, performs a similar role in cancer cells, helping them fix DNA damage to survive chemotherapy. [More]
Toning down TREM2 receptor's activity may help prevent neurodegeneration in AD patients

Toning down TREM2 receptor's activity may help prevent neurodegeneration in AD patients

Tackling brain inflammation ameliorates Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
New study examines risk factors for use of synthetic marijuana among teens

New study examines risk factors for use of synthetic marijuana among teens

Synthetic cannabinoids ("synthetic marijuana"), with names like Spice, K2, Scooby Doo and hundreds of others, are often sold as a "legal" alternative to marijuana. Often perceived as a safe legal alternative to illicit drug use, synthetic marijuana use was associated with 11,561 reports of poisonings in the United States between January 2009 and April 2012. [More]
Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects is associated with a significantly higher risk for developing pneumonia in a study of more than 3,000 older Group Health patients living in the community--not in nursing homes. [More]
Higher intake of lycopene may lower risk of renal cell carcinoma in postmenopausal women

Higher intake of lycopene may lower risk of renal cell carcinoma in postmenopausal women

A higher intake by postmenopausal women of the natural antioxidant lycopene, found in foods like tomatoes, watermelon and papaya, may lower the risk of renal cell carcinoma, a type of kidney cancer. [More]
New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

A new genetic discovery in the field of Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way in determining severity of this neurological disease when using specific treatments. This study may provide insight for treatments that would be effective in slowing down or postponing the death of neurons for people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. [More]
People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes are more prone to anxiety and depression than those with other chronic diseases that require similar levels of management. The reasons for this aren't well understood, but Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have discovered one potential explanation. [More]
Nottingham researchers developing mobile phone app that could help identify premature babies

Nottingham researchers developing mobile phone app that could help identify premature babies

A mobile phone app that will identify babies born prematurely in the developing world is being developed by researchers at The University of Nottingham. [More]

AMSBIO announces the launch of mRNA-In™ and mRNA-In™ Neuro – a new range of high efficiency, targeted transfection reagents.

AMSBIO’s new mRNA-In™ transfection reagents require very low amounts of mRNA to achieve maximum transfection efficiency. Moreover, mRNA expression levels can be adjusted by just changing the amount of mRNA transfection thereby significantly minimizing unintended off-target immune activation. [More]

Handheld wireless 1D / 2D code reader

Users can now wirelessly read barcodes from Micronic or other brands of tubes and ANSI / SLAS* format compatible racks anywhere in their lab or in the field. A high capacity lithium polymer battery provides a long lasting minimum of 15,000 2D scans or approximately 17,000 ID scans per charge. [More]