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Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]
Accelerated treatment regimen feasible for advanced NSCLC

Accelerated treatment regimen feasible for advanced NSCLC

A treatment strategy designed to minimise the effects of accelerated repopulation using hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy is feasible for patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer, according to UK researchers. [More]
Study explores ethnic group differences in overweight children living in Canada

Study explores ethnic group differences in overweight children living in Canada

South Asian boys are three times as likely to be overweight compared to their peers, according to a new Women's College Hospital study. [More]
UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

Scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch were recognized with prestigious awards for their contributions in research at the annual American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting. [More]
TSRI study shows how mutations in Tmie gene can cause deafness from birth

TSRI study shows how mutations in Tmie gene can cause deafness from birth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies. [More]
Month-long residential program helps young adults stay drug-free

Month-long residential program helps young adults stay drug-free

Residential treatment may be an appropriate first-line option for young adults who are dependent on opioid drugs - including prescription painkillers and heroin - and may result in higher levels of abstinence than does the outpatient treatment that is currently the standard of care. [More]
Researchers discover new method to deliver drugs into aggressive tumors

Researchers discover new method to deliver drugs into aggressive tumors

A multi-disciplinary team of Yale Cancer Center researchers has discovered a promising new method for delivering drugs into aggressive tumors by exploiting a unique feature of tumors themselves. [More]
Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Pregnant women with histories of major depression are about 40 percent less likely to relapse into depression if they practice mindfulness techniques--such as meditation, breathing exercises and yoga--along with cognitive therapy, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
MD Anderson study sheds light on little-known protein complex

MD Anderson study sheds light on little-known protein complex

A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center led by Mong-Hong Lee, Ph.D., a professor of molecular and cellular oncology, has demonstrated the significance of CSN6 in regulating Myc which may very well open up a new pathway for treating and killing tumors. [More]
Surgical membrane delivers healing action of vitamin A

Surgical membrane delivers healing action of vitamin A

When blood vessels are damaged through surgery, it can trigger an endless cycle of scarring and repair. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
New treatment for Marfan syndrome works as well as beta blockers

New treatment for Marfan syndrome works as well as beta blockers

A new treatment for Marfan syndrome, a rare genetic disease that can lead to heart problems, works as well as the currently recommended medical therapy, beta blockers, according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Kidney disease patients can benefit from simple and structured exercise

Kidney disease patients can benefit from simple and structured exercise

Simple yet structured exercise can significantly improve kidney disease patients' quality of life as well as decrease their pain, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). [More]
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Self-acupressure may be effective for treating constipation

Self-acupressure may be effective for treating constipation

About 19 percent of North Americans suffer from constipation, with the digestive condition being more common among women, non-whites, people older than 60, those who are not physically active and the poor. [More]
Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

The increase in Scandinavian snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people, according to a new report from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]
SRY protein alters specific gender-related tissue in males before birth

SRY protein alters specific gender-related tissue in males before birth

Case Western Reserve researchers have identified a protein mutation that alters specific gender-related tissue in males before birth and can contribute to the development of cancer as well as other less life-threatening challenges. [More]
Children of women who work full time get fewer hours of sleep, have higher BMIs

Children of women who work full time get fewer hours of sleep, have higher BMIs

The majority of preschoolers may not be getting the amount of sleep they need each night, placing them at higher risk of being overweight or obese within a year, according to a new study. [More]
Researchers discover a new way to combat influenza virus infection

Researchers discover a new way to combat influenza virus infection

The influenza virus, like all viruses, is a hijacker. It quietly slips its way inside cells, steals the machinery inside to make more copies of itself, and then -- having multiplied -- bursts out of the cell to find others to infect. [More]
No added benefit proven for empagliflozin in type 2 diabetes

No added benefit proven for empagliflozin in type 2 diabetes

Empagliflozin (trade name Jardiance) has been approved since May 2014 for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in whom diet and exercise alone do not provide adequate glycaemic control. [More]