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Cytoreductive nephrectomy can benefit patients with mRCC

Cytoreductive nephrectomy can benefit patients with mRCC

Patients treated with targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma may derive significant survival benefit from cytoreductive nephrectomy, particularly if their initial prognosis is good, study findings indicate. [More]
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. [More]
Partial nephrectomy retains edge over radical nephrectomy in larger renal tumors

Partial nephrectomy retains edge over radical nephrectomy in larger renal tumors

Patients with renal cell carcinoma tumours larger than 4 cm benefit from undergoing elective partial nephrectomy rather than radical nephrectomy surgery, a study has found. [More]
Alternative sunitinib treatment schedules for mRCC may be worth the switch

Alternative sunitinib treatment schedules for mRCC may be worth the switch

Some patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who are switched from a traditional sunitinib treatment schedule to an alternative schedule fare better on survival measures and suffer fewer adverse events, a Japanese study has found. [More]
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. Targeting CTR2 was shown to decrease drug resistance to cisplatin. [More]
Exercise-induced wheezing risk increases with asthma severity

Exercise-induced wheezing risk increases with asthma severity

Exercise-induced wheezing is associated with the severity of asthma, according to the findings of a large, cross-sectional survey conducted in Japanese children. [More]
Combination superior to monotherapy for COPD

Combination superior to monotherapy for COPD

Combination treatment with umeclidinium plus vilanterol improves lung function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to a greater extent than with VI or tiotropium monotherapy, results show. [More]
Long-acting inhaled combination therapy best for COPD

Long-acting inhaled combination therapy best for COPD

The combination of a long-acting β22-agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid may be the best choice for some patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who need more than short-acting bronchodilators, suggest the results of a Cochrane Collaboration network meta-analysis. [More]
Surrogate marker identified for airway obstruction and asthma control

Surrogate marker identified for airway obstruction and asthma control

Researchers have identified a potential biomarker for airway obstruction in patients with asthma that not only reflects airflow limitation but also asthma control. [More]
Site of eosinophilic inflammation important in asthma control

Site of eosinophilic inflammation important in asthma control

The site of eosinophilic inflammation, whether local, systemic or both, has a significant effect on lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma control, study findings show. [More]

University of Southampton receives national contract for new NIHR Dissemination Centre

The University of Southampton has been awarded a national contract worth -5.1m to share new research findings with clinicians, patients and managers in health and social care. [More]
Tiny gold particles can make cell membranes deliver drugs directly to target cells

Tiny gold particles can make cell membranes deliver drugs directly to target cells

A special class of tiny gold particles can easily slip through cell membranes, making them good candidates to deliver drugs directly to target cells. [More]

Researchers identify molecular mechanisms of cognitive decline using high-throughput proteomics

From telephone numbers to foreign vocabulary, our brains hold a seemingly endless supply of information. However, as we are getting older, our ability to learn and remember new things declines. [More]
Researchers create high-precision software for better detection of eye sensitivity

Researchers create high-precision software for better detection of eye sensitivity

Researchers at the University of Alicante have developed high-precision software for diagnosing eye sensitivity. This is a new technology that allows to quantify the degree of opacity in the posterior capsule of the eye caused by the growth of cells in the intraocular lens. [More]
Brain stimulation effective for treating depression

Brain stimulation effective for treating depression

Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. [More]

Trying harder makes it more difficult to learn certain aspects of language, shows study

When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant, but children have an uncanny ability to pick up on subtle nuances of language that often elude adults. [More]
Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Support from a network of leading researchers across Europe specialised in a rare auto-immune disease with unmet medical needs could help test several novel treatments [More]
SIV can be entrenched in tissues before virus is detectable in blood plasma

SIV can be entrenched in tissues before virus is detectable in blood plasma

Scientists have generally believed that HIV and its monkey equivalent, SIV, gain a permanent foothold in the body very early after infection, making it difficult to completely eliminate the virus even after antiretroviral therapy has controlled it. [More]
Chemclin's HIV kits for in-vitro qualitative determination of Anti-HIV 1+2

Chemclin's HIV kits for in-vitro qualitative determination of Anti-HIV 1+2

Chemclin's HIV kits are available for in-vitro qualitative determination of Antibody to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Type 2 (Anti-HIV 1+2) and P24 antigen of HIV in human serum or plasma by a sandwich chemiluminescent assay method. [More]
Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to Cleveland Clinic research published today in the online journal Nature Communications. [More]