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New study finds high mortality risks from alcohol and drug abuse among ex-prisoners

New study finds high mortality risks from alcohol and drug abuse among ex-prisoners

Alcohol and drug misuse are responsible for around a third of all deaths in former male prisoners and half in female ex-prisoners, a new study of almost 48000 ex-prisoners published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal has found. Moreover, the research shows that a substantial proportion of these deaths are from preventable causes, including accidents and suicide (42% in men and 70% in women). [More]
New method offers quick spectral analysis of blood and melanin contents in skin sites

New method offers quick spectral analysis of blood and melanin contents in skin sites

Many factors can change skin pigmentation, including aging, exposure to UV light, certain drugs, as well as certain diseases. A simple technique for measuring skin pigmentation could be a helpful tool for research and diagnostics. The same goes for measuring the skin blood content. [More]
Glide's solid dose formulation of teriparatide achieves successful results in pre-clinical study

Glide's solid dose formulation of teriparatide achieves successful results in pre-clinical study

Glide Technologies, the development company focused on solid dose formulations of therapeutics and vaccines and non-invasive diagnostics, today announced that its novel solid dose formulation of teriparatide (parathyroid hormone) achieved successful results in a pre-clinical proof-of-concept study comparing it with the currently marketed liquid product (Forteo/Forsteo). [More]

Glide's solid dose formulation of teriparatide achieves successful results in pre-clinical study

Glide Technologies, the development company focused on solid dose formulations of therapeutics and vaccines and non-invasive diagnostics, today announced that its novel solid dose formulation of teriparatide (parathyroid hormone) achieved successful results in a pre-clinical proof-of-concept study comparing it with the currently marketed liquid product (Forteo/Forsteo). [More]
Cardiff scientists make breakthrough asthma discovery

Cardiff scientists make breakthrough asthma discovery

Cardiff University scientists have for the first time identified the potential root cause of asthma and an existing drug that offers a new treatment. [More]
Twins pilot study shows genes may make some people more attractive to mosquitoes

Twins pilot study shows genes may make some people more attractive to mosquitoes

The likelihood of being bitten by mosquitoes could be down to our genes, according to a study carried out on twins. Research from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine found, for the first time, an underlying genetic component to how attractive we are to mosquitoes and this is likely to be caused by genetic control of our body odour. [More]
Eating yogurt regularly may not improve your health

Eating yogurt regularly may not improve your health

Eating yogurt on a regular basis does not necessarily improve health-related quality of life, report Spanish researchers... [More]
Calorie restriction can improve muscle metabolism during middle age

Calorie restriction can improve muscle metabolism during middle age

Calorie restriction has long been studied as a way to extend lifespan in animals. It has been associated with the ability to reduce the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases and to improve overall health. [More]
Case Western Reserve and MIT receive $1.7 million to explore potential treatments for Down syndrome

Case Western Reserve and MIT receive $1.7 million to explore potential treatments for Down syndrome

Thanks to the generosity of a philanthropy dedicated to children's issues, renowned Down syndrome researcher Alberto Costa, MD, PhD, has taken yet another step toward making Northeast Ohio the nation's leader in exploring potential treatments of the genetic condition that affects 400,000 people in the U.S. [More]
Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that while a large majority of newborns are exposed in their earliest days to bisphenol A (BPA), a much-studied chemical used in plastics and in food and soda can linings, they can chemically alter and rid their bodies of it. [More]
New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research from Sweden published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that serious life events (SLEs) in childhood, such as death or illness in the family, divorce/separation, a new child or adult in the family, and conflicts in the family, can triple the risk of subsequently developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). [More]
VTT develops easy-to-use ketosis test that can benefit diabetics and dieters

VTT develops easy-to-use ketosis test that can benefit diabetics and dieters

VTT has developed a quick, easy-to-use ketosis test for consumers that can detect acetone on exhaled breath. The test will benefit diabetics and dieters in particular, but it can easily be adapted to other uses as well, such as the detection of the air pollutants formaldehyde or acetaldehyde. VTT is now seeking a partner to commercialise the product. [More]

Study show that silymarin may be a useful treatment for NASH

Results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of silymarin, which is derived from the milk thistle plant, have shown that this herbal remedy may be a useful treatment option for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). [More]
Exome sequencing helps identify link between environmental exposures and mutational patterns in HCC

Exome sequencing helps identify link between environmental exposures and mutational patterns in HCC

A new study presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 shows that by using genomic analyses to understand how and when carcinogenic mutations occur in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is possible to identify specific molecular profiles. It is hoped that these molecular profiles will help identify which patients would benefit from specific anticancer treatments. [More]
Long-term ETV or TDF therapy improves survival rate for Caucasian patients with CHB

Long-term ETV or TDF therapy improves survival rate for Caucasian patients with CHB

Data revealed today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that the long-term use of entecavir (ETV) or tenofovir (TDF) results in excellent 5-year survival for Caucasian patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), with more than 95% of patients surviving at 5 years and a significant proportion of deaths coming from liver-unrelated causes. [More]

Study calls for better surveillance to prevent spread of viral hepatitis in WHO European Region

Many countries in the World Health Organization European Region are facing limitations in conducting chronic viral hepatitis disease surveillance, assessing the burden of disease and measuring the impact of interventions, according to results revealed today at The International Liver Congress 2015. [More]
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can promote development of coronary artery calcification

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can promote development of coronary artery calcification

Data revealed today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) plays a role in the early stages of coronary atherosclerosis and in its more severe form it can also promote the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). [More]
Physical forces can affect development of limbs in embryos

Physical forces can affect development of limbs in embryos

University of Toronto engineers and a pediatric surgeon have joined forces to discover that physical forces like pressure and tension affect the development of limbs in embryos--research that could someday be used to help prevent birth defects. [More]
Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Robyn Wing, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Hasbro Children's Hospital, recently led a study that found children who were exposed to an adverse childhood experience (ACE) were 28 percent more likely to develop asthma. [More]
WPI researchers receive NIH grant to develop new class of tissue-engineered heart valves

WPI researchers receive NIH grant to develop new class of tissue-engineered heart valves

With a $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute will analyze how mechanical forces and cellular growth factors affect the growth and development of human heart valves to advance the long-term goal of using tissue engineering to develop replacement valves that are more natural and longer-lasting than current replacement valves. [More]
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