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Combination of different drugs could improve effect of immunotherapy on skin cancer

Combination of different drugs could improve effect of immunotherapy on skin cancer

The results of studies involving researchers from the MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Center show that the effect of immunotherapy on malignant melanoma (black skin cancer) can be improved by combining it with other cancer treatments. [More]
NTU scientists develop new test kit for rapid detection of inflammation in diabetic patients

NTU scientists develop new test kit for rapid detection of inflammation in diabetic patients

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have developed a new kit that will allow doctors to find out within minutes if diabetic patients are suffering from inflammation. [More]
Researchers explore reasons why many older people do not consume enough protein

Researchers explore reasons why many older people do not consume enough protein

Researchers from Bournemouth University have been exploring the reasons why many older people aren't eating as much protein as they should be. Findings from the study could go on to inform strategies to improve protein consumption. [More]
New project clarifies molecular processes involved in hidden HIV reservoir

New project clarifies molecular processes involved in hidden HIV reservoir

In spite of ever more effective therapies, HIV keeps managing to survive in the body. A comprehensive project conducted by the Austrian Science Fund FWF has clarified the molecular processes which contribute to this effect. [More]
Changes to city design, transport can have significant impact on health

Changes to city design, transport can have significant impact on health

A new Series, published in The Lancet quantifies the health gains that could be achieved if cities incentivised a shift from private car use to cycling and walking, and promoted a compact city model where distances to shops and facilities, including public transport, are shorter and within walking distance. [More]
Scientists discover trypanosomes hiding in the skin of individuals with no symptoms

Scientists discover trypanosomes hiding in the skin of individuals with no symptoms

Scientists from the Trypanosome Cell Biology Unit (Institut Pasteur/Inserm), working in collaboration with scientists from the University of Glasgow, have demonstrated the presence of a large quantity of trypanosomes – the parasites responsible for sleeping sickness – in the skin of individuals with no symptoms. [More]
Expectations of cancer patients may not match with actual results in phase I studies

Expectations of cancer patients may not match with actual results in phase I studies

In a study of cancer patients considering whether they should participate in phase I clinical trials, a high percentage were willing to participate after discussions with clinical staff, but nearly half thought that their tumors would shrink, which is much higher than what is realistically achieved. [More]
EVG brings high-volume manufacturing process solutions to biotechnology and medical device market

EVG brings high-volume manufacturing process solutions to biotechnology and medical device market

EV Group, a leading supplier of wafer bonding and lithography equipment for the MEMS, nanotechnology and semiconductor markets, today announced that it is increasing its focus on bringing its high-volume manufacturing process solutions and services to the biotechnology and medical device market. [More]
Researchers identify process in the brains of mice that may explain repetitive actions in Rett patients

Researchers identify process in the brains of mice that may explain repetitive actions in Rett patients

Three-year-old Naomi slaps her forehead a few times, bites her fingers and toddles across the doctor's office in her white and pink pajamas before turning her head into a door with a dull thud. [More]

Sustained exposure to economic hardship linked to worse cognitive function in young individuals

Poverty and perceived hardship over decades among relatively young people in the U.S. are strongly associated with worse cognitive function and may be important contributors to premature aging among disadvantaged populations, report investigators in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Intermediate risk prostate cancer patients can achieve survival benefit with brachytherapy alone

Intermediate risk prostate cancer patients can achieve survival benefit with brachytherapy alone

For men with intermediate risk prostate cancer, radiation treatment with brachytherapy alone can result in similar cancer control with fewer long-term side effects, when compared to more aggressive treatment that combines brachytherapy with external beam therapy (EBT), according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
New ABT approach results in greater weight loss than gold standard treatment, study shows

New ABT approach results in greater weight loss than gold standard treatment, study shows

A new approach to weight loss called Acceptance-Based Behavioral Treatment (ABT) helped people lose more weight and keep it off longer than those who received only Standard Behavioral Treatment (SBT) - a typical treatment plan encouraging reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity - according to a new randomized controlled clinical trial. [More]
Increasing adoption of SBRT improves survival rates for older patients with early stage lung cancer

Increasing adoption of SBRT improves survival rates for older patients with early stage lung cancer

Survival rates for elderly patients who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) rose from roughly 40 to 60 percent over the past decade, concurrent with the increasing adoption of SBRT, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Adolescent girls with family breast cancer history do not experience negative psychological effects

Adolescent girls with family breast cancer history do not experience negative psychological effects

More and more girls are expected to have to confront breast cancer fears as modern genomics technology makes it easier to detect strong risk factors such as inherited BRCA1/2 mutations. [More]
Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have identified a new form of an immune cell that protected mice from life-threatening lung infections under conditions that mimic cancer chemotherapy. [More]
Nanoparticle injections may help prevent cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis patients

Nanoparticle injections may help prevent cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis patients

Osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition that affects at least 27 million people in the United States, and at least 12 percent of osteoarthritis cases stem from earlier injuries. [More]
UNAM researchers develop edible coating to extend life of fruits and vegetables

UNAM researchers develop edible coating to extend life of fruits and vegetables

In order to extend the life of fruits and vegetables and preserve them for longer refrigeration, UNAM researchers developed an edible coating with added functional ingredients applied to freshly cut foods. [More]
Neuroscientists discover genetic 'lingua franca' that allows the brain to interpret sensory input

Neuroscientists discover genetic 'lingua franca' that allows the brain to interpret sensory input

Sight, touch and hearing are our windows to the world: these sensory channels send a constant flow of information to the brain, which acts to sort out and integrate these signals, allowing us to perceive the world and interact with our environment. [More]
Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is capable of rapid genetic adaptation in both natural environments and in humans according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by Radboud university medical center/CWZ and Wageningen University & Research. [More]
Cross-disciplinary concepts may lead to effective, personalised cancer treatments

Cross-disciplinary concepts may lead to effective, personalised cancer treatments

It is not only tumours and metastases that differ in each type of cancer and each individual sufferer but also receptors in cells. [More]
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