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Pioglitazone effective in diabetes patients with NASH

Pioglitazone effective in diabetes patients with NASH

Pioglitazone may halt the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in patients with prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes, a randomised trial shows. [More]
Elevated troponin I should not rule out donor hearts

Elevated troponin I should not rule out donor hearts

Donor cardiac troponin I level is not associated with intermediate-term mortality, cardiac allograft vasculopathy or primary graft failure in patients receiving heart transplants, US researchers report. [More]
'Novel' analysis addresses antiplatelet benefits in real-world CHD patients

'Novel' analysis addresses antiplatelet benefits in real-world CHD patients

Researchers demonstrate a means of gauging the effects of drugs tested in randomised trials in real-world patients. [More]
Vitamin D sufficiency linked to better pancreatic cancer survival

Vitamin D sufficiency linked to better pancreatic cancer survival

Survival is improved in pancreatic cancer patients with sufficient versus deficient plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as assessed prior to diagnosis. [More]
Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

About 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, half of whom will die from the disease within 5 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Virtual tissue technology helps identify new drug target to combat polycystic kidney disease

Virtual tissue technology helps identify new drug target to combat polycystic kidney disease

Using virtual tissue technology, researchers at Indiana University have identified a potential new drug target in the fight against polycystic kidney disease, an illness with no effective FDA-approved treatment that affects 200,000 people per year in the United States. [More]
Researchers identify exact origin of 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic

Researchers identify exact origin of 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic

The 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic — responsible for more than 17,000 deaths worldwide — originated in pigs from a very small region in central Mexico, a research team headed by investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is reporting. [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
Laundry pods more likely to cause poisoning injuries in small children than nonpod detergents

Laundry pods more likely to cause poisoning injuries in small children than nonpod detergents

Laundry pod detergents are far more likely to cause poisoning injuries in young children than are nonpod laundry detergents, and are four times more likely to lead to hospitalization, according to findings published today from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

David Killilea, PhD, a staff scientist at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute- the research arm of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland - co-authored a study into the causes of kidney stones. [More]
Virus-like elements within human genome linked to development of lupus and Sjogren's syndrome

Virus-like elements within human genome linked to development of lupus and Sjogren's syndrome

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have uncovered a potential genetic trigger of systemic autoimmune disease. [More]
The scent dogs smell on diabetics’ breath could offer key to new tests

The scent dogs smell on diabetics’ breath could offer key to new tests

An increase in the level of the chemical isoprene may be the warning sign some dogs can detect in the breath of patients with type 1 diabetes who are reaching risky low levels of blood sugar, according to research by the University of Cambridge. [More]
LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

In one of the largest, most representative health surveys conducted to date, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults reported substantially higher rates of severe psychological distress, heavy drinking and smoking, and impaired physical health than did heterosexuals. [More]
Study offers array of new insights into nature of Plasmodium vivax

Study offers array of new insights into nature of Plasmodium vivax

A team of scientists has uncovered the global, evolving, and historic make-up of Plasmodium vivax, one of the five species of malaria that infect humans. [More]
TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein that launches cancer growth and appears to contribute to higher mortality in breast cancer patients. [More]
Researchers investigate why N14Y, N14K mutations have distinct effects in KID syndrome patients

Researchers investigate why N14Y, N14K mutations have distinct effects in KID syndrome patients

A team of New York-based researchers has compared the effects of two disease-causing mutations, potentially explaining why patients with the rare genetic disorder keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome can experience different sets of symptoms. [More]
NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano a $1.2M (3-year) grant to test whether their non-viral gene delivery method can effectively and safely treat oral cancer pain. [More]
New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

Matthew Gdovin, an associate professor in the UTSA Department of Biology, has developed a newly patented method to kill cancer cells. [More]
Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute all parts of the National Institutes of Health, describe how combining engineered anthrax toxin proteins and existing chemotherapy drugs could potentially yield a therapy to reduce or eliminate cancerous tumors. [More]
Researchers test new drug with potential to reverse or slow progression of asthma

Researchers test new drug with potential to reverse or slow progression of asthma

A new drug with the potential to reverse or slow the development of asthma is being tested by researchers at The University of Queensland. [More]
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