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People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according to researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
Finding could improve treatment, diagnosis of common reading disorders

Finding could improve treatment, diagnosis of common reading disorders

A neuroimaging study by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that phonics, a method of learning to read using knowledge of word sounds, shouldn't be overlooked in favor of a whole-language technique that focuses on visually memorizing word patterns, a finding that could help improve treatment and diagnosis of common reading disorders such as dyslexia. [More]

Young Researcher's Meeting on Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia to be held in Bern, Switzerland

Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disorder that affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals. [More]
Day-to-day chemical exposures linked to earlier menopause

Day-to-day chemical exposures linked to earlier menopause

Women whose bodies have high levels of chemicals found in plastics, personal-care products, common household items and the environment experience menopause two to four years earlier than women with lower levels of these chemicals, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Researchers receive DoD grant to develop new therapy against nerve agent exposure

Researchers receive DoD grant to develop new therapy against nerve agent exposure

University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers have received a $1.9 million grant from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a new therapy to protect military members from nerve agent exposure. [More]
Online social connectedness promotes weight loss, shows study

Online social connectedness promotes weight loss, shows study

If you want to lose pounds using an online weight management program, don't be a wallflower. A new Northwestern University study shows that online dieters with high social embeddedness -- who logged in regularly, recorded their weigh-ins and 'friended' other members -- lost more than 8 percent of their body weight in six months. [More]
Study: Green tea compound may activate a cycle that kills oral cancer cells

Study: Green tea compound may activate a cycle that kills oral cancer cells

A compound found in green tea may trigger a cycle that kills oral cancer cells while leaving healthy cells alone, according to Penn State food scientists. The research could lead to treatments for oral cancer, as well as other types of cancer. [More]
GW Cancer Institute selected to study health disparities in cancer care

GW Cancer Institute selected to study health disparities in cancer care

The George Washington University Cancer Institute received a $97K grant from Genentech to address health disparities in cancer care. [More]
CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

Full implementation of new hypertension guidelines could prevent 56,000 cardiovascular disease events (mostly heart attacks and strokes) and 13,000 deaths each year, without increasing overall health care costs, an analysis conducted by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found. [More]
Researchers discover novel compound that helps curtail progression of temporal lobe epilepsy

Researchers discover novel compound that helps curtail progression of temporal lobe epilepsy

Researchers at the LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence have found that a novel compound they discovered helps curtail the onset and progression of temporal lobe epilepsy. [More]
Maternal exposure to flame-retardants may contribute to preterm births

Maternal exposure to flame-retardants may contribute to preterm births

Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch have determined that maternal exposure to high levels of flame-retardants may be a contributing factor in preterm births. [More]
Researchers one step closer to identifying how lung cancer cells metastasize

Researchers one step closer to identifying how lung cancer cells metastasize

Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, and it is estimated that more than 159,000 people in the United States died from the disease last year. Most of these deaths were because the cancer had spread to other organ sites. Following their recent discovery of a protein pathway, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are one step closer to understanding how lung cancer cells metastasize. [More]
EGFR–TKI response worse in NSCLC patients with rare EGFR mutations

EGFR–TKI response worse in NSCLC patients with rare EGFR mutations

In patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, rare epidermal growth factor receptor mutations are associated with a poorer response to EGFR–tyrosine kinase inhibitors compared with frequently occurring ones, according to a study published in Lung Cancer. [More]
Chemotherapy plus radiation improves survival in R1 NSCLC patients

Chemotherapy plus radiation improves survival in R1 NSCLC patients

US researchers have identified a survival benefit of postoperative combination chemotherapy and radiation treatment in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer who have microscopically positive surgical margins, regardless of pathological stage. [More]
Age and HBsAg level predict NA-induced HBeAg seroconversion durability

Age and HBsAg level predict NA-induced HBeAg seroconversion durability

The combination of age and baseline hepatitis B s-antigen level can help predict hepatitis B virus relapse in patients who achieve hepatitis B e-antigen loss or seroconversion following nucleos(t)ide analogue (NA) treatment, researchers report. [More]
Tenofovir stems treatment-induced kidney toxicity in HBV-related chronic hepatitis

Tenofovir stems treatment-induced kidney toxicity in HBV-related chronic hepatitis

Switching to tenofovir may stave further kidney and bone impairment in patients with hepatitis B virus-related chronic hepatitis taking adefovir-based therapy, retrospective study findings suggest. [More]
Long-term TDF therapy offers sustained HBV suppression without resistance

Long-term TDF therapy offers sustained HBV suppression without resistance

Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection can achieve sustained viral suppression with long-term tenofovir disoproxil fumarate treatment without developing resistance, shows a 7-year study. [More]
Promising results for stem cell therapy in MS

Promising results for stem cell therapy in MS

Preliminary findings suggest that nonmyeloablative haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may arrest, or even reverse, the progress of disease among patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. [More]
Alectinib active against leptomeningeal metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC

Alectinib active against leptomeningeal metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC

Patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer who have leptomeningeal metastases may benefit from treatment with the second-generation ALK inhibitor alectinib, a case series suggests. [More]
VATS lobectomy best for NSCLC patient short-term outcomes

VATS lobectomy best for NSCLC patient short-term outcomes

Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy offers better short-term outcomes for patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer than open lobectomy, multi-institutional research confirms. [More]