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Endogenous retroviruses also play critical role in the body's immune defense against pathogens

Endogenous retroviruses also play critical role in the body's immune defense against pathogens

Retroviruses are best known for causing contagious scourges such as AIDS, or more sporadically, cancer. [More]
UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

Stanton McHardy, associate professor of chemistry and director of the Center for Innovative Drug Discovery in The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Sciences, is partnering on a $1.9 million award to develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs. [More]
Scientists develop new system for studying how proteins, other biological molecules unfold and refold

Scientists develop new system for studying how proteins, other biological molecules unfold and refold

Collaborating scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the University of California San Diego have developed a powerful new system for studying how proteins and other biological molecules form and lose their natural folded structures. [More]
Single biopsy site may reveal all lung adenocarcinoma genetic mutations

Single biopsy site may reveal all lung adenocarcinoma genetic mutations

Genetic sequencing of a single tumour site sample may be adequate for identifying cancer gene mutations in patients with lung andenocarcinoma, research published in Science suggests. [More]
Knowledge and access barriers bar epilepsy patients from surgery

Knowledge and access barriers bar epilepsy patients from surgery

The unfamiliarity of some neurologists with recommended practice standards, coupled with access barriers, may be preventing eligible patients with epilepsy from undergoing surgical treatment, survey findings suggest. [More]
Social environment not linked to UHR psychosis transition

Social environment not linked to UHR psychosis transition

Research indicates that social deprivation and migrant status do not influence the risk of transition to psychosis in ultra-high-risk individuals. [More]
Multifaceted intervention helps bipolar disorder patients lose weight

Multifaceted intervention helps bipolar disorder patients lose weight

An Integrated Risk Reduction Intervention can help overweight and obese patients with bipolar disorder to reduce their body mass index, US researchers report. [More]
Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published online in Diabetes. [More]
TUM researchers discover new mechanism for regulating programmed cell death

TUM researchers discover new mechanism for regulating programmed cell death

Programmed cell death is a mechanism that causes defective and potentially harmful cells to destroy themselves. It serves a number of purposes in the body, including the prevention of malignant tumor growth. Now, researchers at Technische Universität München have discovered a previously unknown mechanism for regulating programmed cell death. [More]
Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

The enzyme telomerase repairs cell damage produced by ageing, and has been used successfully in therapies to lengthen the life of mice. Now it has been observed that it could also be used to cure illnesses related to the ageing process. [More]
Even men undergo hormonal changes on way to fatherhood, study finds

Even men undergo hormonal changes on way to fatherhood, study finds

Impending fatherhood can lower two hormones--testosterone and estradiol--for men, even before their babies are born, a new University of Michigan study found. [More]
Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million, and the process took a decade to complete. Microbes have genomes, too, and the first reference genome for a malaria parasite was completed in 2002 at a cost of roughly $15 million. But today researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just a few thousand dollars. Related technologies make it possible to capture information about all genes in the genome, in all tissues, from multiple individuals. [More]
CF patients require close monitoring for resistance to ganciclovir after lung transplantation

CF patients require close monitoring for resistance to ganciclovir after lung transplantation

A drug called ganciclovir is given to lung transplant patients to protect against a life-threatening virus that is common after transplantation. [More]
U-M researchers devise reliable way to grow tumor cells

U-M researchers devise reliable way to grow tumor cells

In a development that could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease, University of Michigan researchers have devised a reliable way to grow a certain type of cancer cells from patients outside the body for study. [More]
Researchers find link between ferrets and humans

Researchers find link between ferrets and humans

Research that provides a new understanding as to why ferrets are similar to humans is set to have major implications for the development of novel drugs and treatment strategies. [More]
New study highlights importance of generating awareness about HCV testing, support and care

New study highlights importance of generating awareness about HCV testing, support and care

A new study shows that many patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are lost during different stages of health care to manage the disease. This real-life' view of the HCV patient care continuum in a major U.S. urban area is published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and highlights the importance of generating awareness among clinicians and at-risk groups about appropriate HCV testing, referral, support and care. [More]
Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Self-reported moderate to vigorous exercise was associated with lower blood pressure and blood glucose levels in a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. [More]
Trophoblasts respond to inflammatory danger signals, find NTNU researchers

Trophoblasts respond to inflammatory danger signals, find NTNU researchers

Trophoblasts, cells that form an outer layer around a fertilized egg and develop into the major part of the placenta, have now been shown to respond to inflammatory danger signals, researchers from Norwegian University of Science and Technology found in a recent study published in Journal of Reproductive Immunology December 2014. [More]
Eating bilberries reduces adverse effects of high-fat diets

Eating bilberries reduces adverse effects of high-fat diets

Eating bilberries diminishes the adverse effects of a high-fat diet, according to a recent study at the University of Eastern Finland. For the first time, bilberries were shown to have beneficial effects on both blood pressure and nutrition-derived inflammatory responses. [More]
Columbia University researchers analyze results of Oregon Health Experiment

Columbia University researchers analyze results of Oregon Health Experiment

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the results of the Oregon Health Experiment, where eligible uninsured individuals were randomly assigned Medicaid or to stay with their current care. Considered controversial because the experiment found no measurable gains for physical health it did reveal benefits for mental health, financial wellbeing, and preventive screening. [More]