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Study aims to determine effectiveness of Stent in treatment of vein obstructions

Study aims to determine effectiveness of Stent in treatment of vein obstructions

Jobst Vascular Institute is conducting pioneering research that looks at using stents to treat blocked veins. For years, stents - small mesh tubes - have been used to treat narrowed or blocked arteries; however none are specifically designed for use in veins. [More]
Case study from Intel and UCSD highlights health sciences research

Case study from Intel and UCSD highlights health sciences research

A case study from Intel and UCSD highlights the transformative collaboration between the school's bioengineering department and the Intel® Internet of Things (IoT). [More]
Seafood mislabeling can cause unwanted exposure to harmful pollutants

Seafood mislabeling can cause unwanted exposure to harmful pollutants

New measurements from fish purchased at retail seafood counters in 10 different states show the extent to which mislabeling can expose consumers to unexpectedly high levels of mercury, a harmful pollutant. [More]
Researchers examine China's caesarean section rate

Researchers examine China's caesarean section rate

Efforts must be made to decrease China's increasing caesarean section rate, suggests a new commentary published today (20 August) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
Hartford/VA Scholars Program selects three geriatric social work researchers

Hartford/VA Scholars Program selects three geriatric social work researchers

The prestigious Hartford/VA Scholars Program has selected three geriatric social work researchers for a two-year award that provides career development and mentorship for projects that will improve health outcomes not only for older veterans, but for all older adults. [More]

Municipal zoning regulations may push marijuana dispensaries into low income, minority areas

Municipal zoning regulations may push marijuana dispensaries into low income, minority areas, according to a study just released by the University of Colorado Denver. [More]
Scientists suggest that type-1 and type-2 diabetes are result of same mechanism

Scientists suggest that type-1 and type-2 diabetes are result of same mechanism

Work by scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Auckland suggest that both major forms of diabetes are the result of the same mechanism. [More]
Longitude and NovaQuest acquire California Cryobank

Longitude and NovaQuest acquire California Cryobank

California Cryobank, a global leader in reproductive tissue donor services and storage and stem cell banking, announced today that it has been acquired by equity investors Longitude Venture Partners II, L.P. and NovaQuest Pharma Opportunities Fund III, L.P.. [More]
Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Some infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in-utero opioid exposure have a more difficult time going through withdrawal than others, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. [More]

Researchers treat common elastic bands with graphene to create flexible sensor for medical use

Although body motion sensors already exist in different forms, they have not been widely used due to their complexity and cost of production. [More]
New gene libraries of Candida glabrata yeast, laying foundations for anti-fungal medications

New gene libraries of Candida glabrata yeast, laying foundations for anti-fungal medications

A group of researchers at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories has created one of the three world's largest gene libraries for the Candida glabrata yeast, which is harmful to humans. [More]
Study measures quality indicators in cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada

Study measures quality indicators in cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada

The quality of cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada is strong, with specific criteria areas now identified as requiring further enhancement to improve patient outcomes, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, York University and UHN. [More]
Study: 15,000 pregnant women show decreased amount of prevalence of HSV type 2

Study: 15,000 pregnant women show decreased amount of prevalence of HSV type 2

In a study that included approximately 15,000 pregnant women, seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 decreased substantially between 1989 and 2010 while there was no overall decrease for HSV type 1, but a slight increase among black women, according to a study in the August 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]
KalVista begins Phase I trial of novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor for treatment of DME

KalVista begins Phase I trial of novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor for treatment of DME

KalVista Pharmaceuticals, an ophthalmology company with a focus on diabetic macular edema (DME), today announces that it has begun a Phase I, First in Human, trial of its novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor, KVD001, for the treatment of DME. [More]
Newborn screening indicates that incidence of SCID is higher than previously believed

Newborn screening indicates that incidence of SCID is higher than previously believed

Newborn screening performed in numerous states indicates that the incidence of the potentially life-threatening disorder, severe combined immunodeficiency, is higher than previously believed, at 1 in 58,000 births, although there is a high rate of survival, according to a study in the August 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
New antibodies could pave way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection

New antibodies could pave way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection

Research toward developing new antibodies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Medicine could pave the way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection. [More]
Self-reported health measures can predict Medicaid adults who need intensive health services

Self-reported health measures can predict Medicaid adults who need intensive health services

Just three types of simple self-reported health measures can predict which Medicaid-eligible adults are more likely to access intensive and costly health services over the next year, a new study in Health Services Research suggests. The findings could provide a new way to save a substantial amount of money while also providing better care for Medicaid's neediest patients. [More]
Researchers made important step towards creating medical nanorobots

Researchers made important step towards creating medical nanorobots

Researchers from the Institute of General Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and MIPT have made an important step towards creating medical nanorobots. [More]
Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to potentially unsafe levels of triclosan

Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to potentially unsafe levels of triclosan

Handwashing with antibacterial soap exposes hospital workers to significant and potentially unsafe levels of triclosan, a widely-used chemical currently under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to a study led by researchers from UC San Francisco. [More]