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Researchers identify bio-markers that could help detect early stage colorectal cancer

Researchers identify bio-markers that could help detect early stage colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer globally and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. The chance of a cure is high if the cancer is detected early enough, but early detection is not a given. Researchers from VIB and KU Leuven - together with various European oncology centers, including UZ Leuven - have identified bio-markers that can be incorporated in a new diagnostic test. [More]
Two scientific studies may change clinical practices regarding medical abortions, miscarriages

Two scientific studies may change clinical practices regarding medical abortions, miscarriages

Two scientific studies led by researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet are expected to form the basis of new international recommendations for the treatment of medical abortions and miscarriages. [More]
Brown fat tissue communicates with the brain through sensory nerves

Brown fat tissue communicates with the brain through sensory nerves

Brown fat tissue, the body's "good fat," communicates with the brain through sensory nerves, possibly sharing information that is important for fighting human obesity, such as how much fat we have and how much fat we've lost, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Study: Mexican Americans spend high proportion of their later years with disability

Study: Mexican Americans spend high proportion of their later years with disability

Life expectancy for Hispanics in the U.S. currently outpaces other ethnic groups, yet a new study finds that Mexican Americans -- especially women who were born in Mexico -- are spending a high proportion of their later years with some form of disability, a fact that suggests a growing need for community assistance and long-term care in the future. [More]
Study compares cost, benefits, complications of uterine-sparing treatments for fibroids

Study compares cost, benefits, complications of uterine-sparing treatments for fibroids

The relative cost, benefits, and complications of three minimally invasive techniques for reducing or eliminating symptomatic uterine fibroids are being compared in women who don't have cancer and want to preserve their uterus. [More]
CSHL professor to be honored with AACR Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research Award

CSHL professor to be honored with AACR Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research Award

The American Association for Cancer Research will honor Christopher R. Vakoc, MD, PhD, assistant professor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, with the 35th annual AACR Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Research Award at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. [More]
New study opens door to preventative treatments for congenital diaphragmatic hernia

New study opens door to preventative treatments for congenital diaphragmatic hernia

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is not as well known as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, but like them it is a life-threatening birth defect, and is just as common. Occurring in one in 3,000 births, CDH causes the guts and liver to protrude through a defective diaphragm and into the chest cavity, where they interfere with the lungs. [More]
Study demonstrates abnormal vitamin D levels in more than one-third of elite NCAA Division I athletes

Study demonstrates abnormal vitamin D levels in more than one-third of elite NCAA Division I athletes

A new study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found that more than one-third of elite, Division I college athletes may have low levels of vitamin D, which is critical in helping the body to absorb calcium needed to maintain bone mass, and to minimize musculoskeletal pain and injury risk. [More]
MDC scientists find solution to increase efficiency of precise genetic modifications

MDC scientists find solution to increase efficiency of precise genetic modifications

CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful new tool for editing the genome. For researchers around the world, the CRISPR-Cas9 technique is an exciting innovation because it is faster and cheaper than previous methods. Now, using a molecular trick, Dr. Van Trung Chu and Professor Klaus Rajewsky of the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch and Dr. Ralf Kühn, MDC and Berlin Institute of Health, have found a solution to considerably increase the efficiency of precise genetic modifications by up to eightfold. [More]
Benefits of physical activity outweigh harmful effects of air pollution

Benefits of physical activity outweigh harmful effects of air pollution

New research from the University of Copenhagen has found that the beneficial effects of exercise are more important for our health than the negative effects of air pollution, in relation to the risk of premature mortality. In other words, benefits of exercise outweigh the harmful effects of air pollution. [More]
Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

A new study from SciLifeLab at Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE shows that genes crucial for vision were multiplied in the early stages of vertebrate evolution and acquired distinct functions leading to the sophisticated mechanisms of vertebrate eyes. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

An experimental therapy developed by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University cut in half the time it takes to heal wounds compared to no treatment at all. Details of the therapy, which was successfully tested in mice, were published online in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. [More]
Iron oxide nanoparticles selectively target cell surface markers in tumor microenvironments

Iron oxide nanoparticles selectively target cell surface markers in tumor microenvironments

Nanoparticles hold great promise for cancer diagnostics and therapies, but only to the extent that they can be selectively guided to tumors and cancer cells. [More]
Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Traditionally, to understand how a gene functions, a scientist would breed an organism that lacks that gene - "knocking it out" - then ask how the organism has changed. Are its senses affected? Its behavior? [More]
First global model for predicting CVD risk

First global model for predicting CVD risk

Researchers have developed the first global model for predicting cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The model—developed by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Imperial College London, and colleagues—will be of particular help to public health professionals, clinicians, and patients in developing countries for prevention of CVD. [More]
Researchers find strong relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and behavioral impairment

Researchers find strong relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and behavioral impairment

Researchers at the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and colleagues at Columbia University's Center for Children's Environmental Health have found a powerful relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control. [More]
Study quantifies long-term effects of nutrition deprivation at different stages of pregnancy

Study quantifies long-term effects of nutrition deprivation at different stages of pregnancy

A study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues in the Netherlands evaluated the relationship between nutritional conditions in very early life and adult health, and found that famine exposure during the first pregnancy trimester was associated with increases in mortality from a variety of causes other than cancer or cardiovascular disease. [More]
UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

Amjad Javed, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has taken a major step forward in understanding the bone development function of a gene called runx2, which could lead to future ways to speed bone healing, aid bone bioengineering, stem osteoporosis and reduce arthritis. [More]
Researchers present new studies on cognition and reasoning at CNS conference in San Francisco

Researchers present new studies on cognition and reasoning at CNS conference in San Francisco

Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn't. [More]
Study suggests new approach to help prevent meningococcal outbreaks

Study suggests new approach to help prevent meningococcal outbreaks

Nasal drops of harmless bacteria can inhibit a related bug that sometimes causes meningococcal disease, according to new findings published online in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The study--conducted among college students, a group at higher risk for this often serious illness--suggests a new approach that could help suppress outbreaks of the disease, if supported by future research. [More]
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