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Scratching itchy skin causes the brain to release serotonin, intensifies itchy feeling

Scratching itchy skin causes the brain to release serotonin, intensifies itchy feeling

Turns out your mom was right: Scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research from scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation. [More]
Einstein-Montefiore researchers to present latest finding on aging research at GSA 2014

Einstein-Montefiore researchers to present latest finding on aging research at GSA 2014

Investigators at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center will present their latest aging research at the Gerontological Society of America's 67th Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
PORT can improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer patients

PORT can improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer patients

Patients who received post-operative radiation therapy (PORT), radiation therapy after surgery, lived an average of four months longer when compared to the patients who had the same disease site, tumor histology and treatment criteria and who did not receive PORT, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology. [More]
Researchers develop new technique to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering

Researchers develop new technique to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine's significant obstacles. [More]
Men with BPH need to discuss 'male orgasmic dysfunction' with doctors prior to any treatment

Men with BPH need to discuss 'male orgasmic dysfunction' with doctors prior to any treatment

NeoTract, Inc., today welcomes the publication of a paper in the British Journal of Urology International which calls for men suffering from enlarged prostate to discuss with their doctors the likely impact of treatment options on their sexual function. Most procedures and many medications can cause sexual dysfunction. Clinical studies show that treatment with the UroLift system has not been associated with any new onset of sustained ejaculatory or erectile dysfunction. [More]
Sleep-wake cycles are genetically connected to the bladder

Sleep-wake cycles are genetically connected to the bladder

If you think sleep problems and bladder problems are a fact of life in old age, you may be right. A new report appearing in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, shows that our sleep-wake cycles are genetically connected to our bladder, and disruptions to one may cause problems with the other. [More]
Dosing of antiretroviral medication to prevent HIV infection differs by sex

Dosing of antiretroviral medication to prevent HIV infection differs by sex

A mathematical model developed by NIH grantees predicts that women must take the antiretroviral medication Truvada daily to prevent HIV infection via vaginal sex, whereas just two doses per week can protect men from HIV infection via anal sex. [More]
Insilico Medicine, CCARL and Plantbiosis partner to advance research on aging

Insilico Medicine, CCARL and Plantbiosis partner to advance research on aging

Through this unique partnership, the Baltimore-based Insilico Medicine and Lethbridge-based CCARL will provide expertise in aging research and build on the personalized medicine and drug discovery platforms OncoFinder and GeroScope to develop new systems for age-related diseases. [More]
Lab-grown tissues may provide new treatments for injuries, damage to the joints

Lab-grown tissues may provide new treatments for injuries, damage to the joints

Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments. [More]
Moffitt researcher uncovers new approach to treat cancer

Moffitt researcher uncovers new approach to treat cancer

The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. [More]
Study: Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery

Study: Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery

Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken the outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Patients with depressive symptoms had a weaker functional capacity post-surgery even five years after surgery. [More]
SCN clock isn't necessary to align body rhythms with light-dark cycle, study reveals

SCN clock isn't necessary to align body rhythms with light-dark cycle, study reveals

Circadian clocks regulate functions ranging from alertness and reaction time to body temperature and blood pressure. New research published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal further adds to our understanding of the circadian rhythm by suggesting that the suprachiasmaticus nucleus (SCN) clock, a tiny region of the hypothalamus considered to be the body's "master" timekeeper, is not necessary to align body rhythms with the light-dark cycle. [More]
Drug combination can trigger self-destruct process in lung cancer cells

Drug combination can trigger self-destruct process in lung cancer cells

Cancer Research UK scientists have found a drug combination that can trigger the self-destruct process in lung cancer cells - paving the way for new treatments, according to research that will be presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference in Liverpool next week. [More]
Reduced chemotherapy exposure after surgery could decrease overall complications

Reduced chemotherapy exposure after surgery could decrease overall complications

A study of pediatric patients with hepatoblastoma led by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) suggests an opportunity to reduce chemotherapy in up to 65 percent of patients, which could lead to a decrease in the incidence of adverse effects. [More]
New research shows link between perinatal exposure to BPA and risk of food intolerance in later life

New research shows link between perinatal exposure to BPA and risk of food intolerance in later life

If it seems like more people are allergic to, or intolerant of, more and different kinds of foods than ever before, there might be a reason why. A new research published in November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists show, for the first time, that there is a link between perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) at low doses and the risk to develop food intolerance in later life. [More]
Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and eventual paralysis of muscles throughout the body. Patients typically survive only three to five years after diagnosis. [More]
Adults with eczema at greater risk of accidental bone fractures, other injuries

Adults with eczema at greater risk of accidental bone fractures, other injuries

Intense itching and dry, irritable skin aren't the only problems adults with eczema face. They are at greater risk of accidental bone fractures and other injuries, a new Northwestern Medicine® study has found. [More]
Vibratory insoles improve balance stability for elderly fallers

Vibratory insoles improve balance stability for elderly fallers

Findings published in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation show that imperceptible vibratory stimulation applied to the soles of the feet improved balance by reducing postural sway and gait variability in elderly study participants. [More]
New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

Patients with tinnitus hear phantom noise and are sometimes so bothered by the perceived ringing in their ears, they have difficulty concentrating. A new therapy does not lessen perception of the noise but appears to help patients cope better with it in their daily lives, according to new research. [More]
BRI receives JDRF grant to explore why people with type 1 diabetes continue to produce insulin

BRI receives JDRF grant to explore why people with type 1 diabetes continue to produce insulin

Scientists at Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason are studying a critical question in type 1 diabetes: Why do some people who get type 1 diabetes continue to produce small amounts of insulin over time while others stop? Researchers have found at the time of diagnosis with type 1 diabetes that many people continue to produce small amounts of insulin. [More]