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Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Technology Centre launched in Ireland

The Minister for Skills, Research and Innovation, Damien English TD, today (Friday 12th September 2014) launched the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Technology Centre (PMTC). [More]
UC San Francisco researchers use brain scans to predict reading difficulties in young children

UC San Francisco researchers use brain scans to predict reading difficulties in young children

UC San Francisco researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges. [More]
Early-stage Hodgkin's disease patients who receive radiation therapy have better survival rate

Early-stage Hodgkin's disease patients who receive radiation therapy have better survival rate

Patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's Disease who receive radiation therapy (RT) have a higher 10-year survival rate -- 84 percent compared to 76 percent - than those who do not, according to a study presented by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO's) 56th Annual Meeting today. [More]
T-bet protein fights off hepatitis infections

T-bet protein fights off hepatitis infections

A single protein may tip the balance between ridding the body of a dangerous virus and enduring life-long chronic infection, according to a report appearing in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
New research shows schizophrenia comprises 8 genetically distinct disorders

New research shows schizophrenia comprises 8 genetically distinct disorders

New research shows that schizophrenia isn't a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness. [More]
Blocking bacteria's access to iron: an interview with Dr. Laxminarayana Devireddy

Blocking bacteria's access to iron: an interview with Dr. Laxminarayana Devireddy

Iron is a key nutrient for nearly all living organisms, including bacteria. Iron is a cofactor for many enzymes necessary for basic metabolic reactions such as DNA synthesis and electron transport. Iron serves as the conduit for the electron transport chain that generates the energy necessary to drive the bacterial cell. [More]
Collaborative study takes important step toward finding targeted treatments for bladder cancer

Collaborative study takes important step toward finding targeted treatments for bladder cancer

The story of cancer care seems so simple: find the mutated gene that causes cancer and turn it off or fix it. But rarely does a single gene cause cancer. More often, many genes are altered together to drive the disease. So the challenge becomes sorting out which altered genes are the most to blame in which cancers. [More]
Researchers find new method to measure modified protein structures in biological sample

Researchers find new method to measure modified protein structures in biological sample

Cells regulate protein functions in a wide variety of ways, including by modifying the protein structure. In an instant, a protein can take on another form and perform no or even the "wrong" function: in humans, proteins that fold wrongly can cause serious diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or cystic fibrosis. [More]
Assessing genetic variants can help identify men with increased risk of prostate cancer

Assessing genetic variants can help identify men with increased risk of prostate cancer

Scientists can now explain a third of the inherited risk of prostate cancer, after a major international study identified 23 new genetic variants associated with increased risk of the disease. [More]
Benefits of blood pressure lowering drugs for low risk patients 'still open to question'

Benefits of blood pressure lowering drugs for low risk patients 'still open to question'

Dr Stephen Martin and colleagues argue that this strategy is failing patients and wasting healthcare resources. They call for a re-examination of the threshold and urge clinicians to be cautious about treating low risk patients with blood pressure lowering drugs. [More]
Cochrane Review rejects safety concerns regarding cheap alternative drug for treating eye disease

Cochrane Review rejects safety concerns regarding cheap alternative drug for treating eye disease

Health policies which favour using ranibizumab for treating eye disease in older people over safety concerns for a cheaper alternative should take account of a new Cochrane Review published today. [More]
MU researchers make new breakthrough in spinal muscular atrophy drug

MU researchers make new breakthrough in spinal muscular atrophy drug

According to recent studies, approximately one out of every 40 individuals in the United States is a carrier of the gene responsible for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disease that causes muscles to weaken over time. [More]
GHIT Fund announces new grants to tackle malaria, chagas disease and dengue

GHIT Fund announces new grants to tackle malaria, chagas disease and dengue

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced seven grant investments totaling US$15.3 million to speed the development of promising drugs and vaccines to battle three insect-borne diseases-malaria, dengue and Chagas disease. [More]

Hudson Robotics awarded NIH grant to develop HTS system for in vivo studies of zebrafish

Hudson Robotics, Inc., of Springfield, NJ, in cooperation with Johns Hopkins University, has recently been awarded an NIH grant to develop a commercially viable high-throughput screening (HTS) system for in vivo studies of zebrafish. [More]
New study examines potential impact of breast density notification legislation in U.S. women

New study examines potential impact of breast density notification legislation in U.S. women

Mammographically-dense breasts - those that show more breast and connective tissue versus fat in a mammogram image - are recognized as a risk factor for developing breast cancer and can also hamper an accurate reading of a mammogram. National legislation currently under consideration would require the disclosure of mammographic breast density information to women with dense breasts, as well as encourage the consideration of supplemental screening for those women. [More]
Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Building on a successful three-year pilot project, the National Institutes of Health has awarded more than $64 million to six research institutions to create a database of human cellular responses, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures. [More]
Scientists measure responses to rewards during nicotine withdrawal across species

Scientists measure responses to rewards during nicotine withdrawal across species

Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide and is associated with approximately 440,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population continues to smoke cigarettes. [More]
Global study shows accuracy of RNA genomic sequencing techniques

Global study shows accuracy of RNA genomic sequencing techniques

Physicians envision a future in which genomic data from patients is heavily used to manage care - but experts have questioned the accuracy and reliability of these analyses. Now, a study by 150 researchers in 12 countries finds real strength and agreement across RNA genomic sequencing techniques and laboratories - as well as ways to improve what little variability exists to set a new high standard. [More]
New study measures neurodevelopment in schizophrenia

New study measures neurodevelopment in schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is generally considered to be a disorder of brain development and it shares many risk factors, both genetic and environmental, with other neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and intellectual disability. [More]
BGI-VPC Joint Research Laboratory to apply genome research to develop new cancer therapies

BGI-VPC Joint Research Laboratory to apply genome research to develop new cancer therapies

BGI, the world’s largest genomics organization, based in China, and The Vancouver Prostate Centre, a global leader in translational research in cancer, today announced the establishment of the BGI-VPC Joint Research Laboratory, a sequencing and translational research facility, to jointly discover and advance basic and translational programs in oncology, including personalized oncology. [More]