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Courtagen collaborates with CCMC to identify alterations in genes associated with ASD

Courtagen Life Sciences, Inc., an innovative molecular information company, announced today a collaboration with Connecticut Children's Medical Center to utilize Courtagen's sophisticated Next Generation Sequencing assays to help identify and characterize alterations found in genes associated with ASD. [More]
Sleeping more than 8 hours favours development of cognitive impairment in people over 65

Sleeping more than 8 hours favours development of cognitive impairment in people over 65

Sleeping more than 8 hours and less than 6 and the lack of cognitive stimulation such as reading favours the development of cognitive impairment in people over 65. This is the main conclusion of a study carried out by researchers from the Department of Pharmacy at the University CEU Cardenal Herrera and pharmacists in the Valencian Region (Spain). [More]
91% of Americans know genetic information has important utility in managing health

91% of Americans know genetic information has important utility in managing health

23andMe, the leading personal genetics company, is celebrating National DNA Day by taking an in-depth look at what Americans know about their DNA and how genetics play a role in our everyday lives. The survey found that 91 percent of Americans know that their genetic information has important utility in managing their health. [More]

TSRI scientists identify protein complex that plays critical role in learning and memory formation

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein complex that plays a critical but previously unknown role in learning and memory formation. [More]

Exposure to microgravity can simulate aging for immune cells

Telling someone to "act your age" is another way of asking him or her to behave better. Age, however, does not always bring improvements. [More]

Researchers examine interaction between alcohol and tobacco in risk of ESCC

The rate of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) nearly doubles in those who both smoke and drink compared to those who only smoke or drink, according to new research published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. [More]

Study suggests that variant of cell surface protein is ideal target to treat gastric cancer

New study by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and National University Hospital Singapore suggests that a variant of a cell surface protein is an ideal target for developing drugs to treat gastric cancer [More]
Scientists develop DNA nanodevices that survive body's immune defenses

Scientists develop DNA nanodevices that survive body's immune defenses

It's a familiar trope in science fiction: In enemy territory, activate your cloaking device. And real-world viruses use similar tactics to make themselves invisible to the immune system. [More]
Uncontrollable sweating of hyperhidrosis can have serious impact on person

Uncontrollable sweating of hyperhidrosis can have serious impact on person

Sweating is a natural function of the body to cool it down during physical exertion or from a warm environment or to even help cope with emotional situations. [More]

Investigators use computer-assisted approach to identify and rank new clock genes

Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression. [More]

Study: Added benefit of turoctocog alfa is not proven

Turoctocog alfa (trade name: NovoEight) has been approved since November 2013 for the prevention and treatment of bleeding in patients with haemophilia A. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]

Exposure to environmental enrichment can induce neurogenesis of hippocampal region

Many studies have shown that exposure to environmental enrichment can induce neurogenesis of the hippocampal region, thus improving learning and memory. [More]
Bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes, say researchers

Bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes, say researchers

Bariatric surgery has positive effects not only on weight loss but also on diabetes and heart disease. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy and University of Cincinnati have shown that the health benefits are not caused by a reduction in the stomach size but by increased levels of bile acids in the blood. [More]

Studies identify 2 genes highly associated with IBD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestine that result in painful and debilitating complications, affects over 1.4 million people in the U.S., and while there are treatments to reduce inflammation for patients, there is no cure. [More]

OGT releases new application note detailing performance of two DNA labelling kits

Oxford Gene Technology, The Molecular Genetics Company, has released a new application note detailing the technical evaluation of two DNA labelling kits, where OGT’s CytoSure Genomic DNA Labelling Kits were found to be quicker and more accurate than a leading alternative. [More]
New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. [More]
Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Brain activity of babies in developing countries could be monitored from birth to reveal the first signs of cognitive dysfunction, using a new technique piloted by a London-based university collaboration. [More]
OncoSec to present update of data from Phase 2 melanoma study at ASCO Annual Meeting

OncoSec to present update of data from Phase 2 melanoma study at ASCO Annual Meeting

OncoSec Medical Inc., a company developing its ImmunoPulse DNA-based immunotherapy to treat solid tumors, will present an update of data from their Phase 2 melanoma study at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 50th Annual Meeting, taking place May 30-June 3, 2014, at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. [More]