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Scientists discover new way to control inflammation during worm infections and allergies

Scientists discover new way to control inflammation during worm infections and allergies

Research from The University of Manchester is bringing scientists a step closer to developing new therapies for controlling the body's response to allergies and parasitic worm infections. [More]
New computational model helps study how emerging metastatic tumors interact with immune system

New computational model helps study how emerging metastatic tumors interact with immune system

You think that your immune system is there to protect you. But what happens when it starts working against you? In the earliest stages of cancer formation, the immune system is forced to make a momentous decision. It either activates and suppresses tumor growth to help the body fight disease, or it becomes dysfunctional, helping the tumor grow and making treatment more difficult. Because this tipping point occurs before a person even realizes something is wrong, doctors are unable to directly observe this critical stage. [More]
Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

One in three Americans has high blood pressure, a long-term constriction of arteries that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke. [More]
Discovery offers simpler, more cost-effective way to grow stem cells

Discovery offers simpler, more cost-effective way to grow stem cells

Stem cells naturally cling to feeder cells as they grow in petri dishes. Scientists have thought for years that this attachment occurs because feeder cells serve as a support system, providing stems cells with essential nutrients. [More]
Researchers identify potential treatment target for fragile X carriers

Researchers identify potential treatment target for fragile X carriers

Fragile X syndrome, an inherited cause of autism and intellectual disability, can have consequences even for carriers of the disorder who don't have full-blown symptoms. [More]
Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Ahmad M. Khalil, PhD, knew the odds were against him -- as in thousands upon thousands to one. Yet he and his team never wavered from their quest to identify the parts of the body responsible for revving up one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer, HER2+. This month in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Khalil and his colleagues at Case Western Reserve University proved the power of persistence; from a pool of more than 30,000 possibilities, they found 38 genes and molecules that most likely trigger HER2+ cancer cells to spread. [More]
Understanding how nerve cells in the brain produce energy required to function

Understanding how nerve cells in the brain produce energy required to function

New research published today in the journal Nature Communications represents a potentially fundamental shift in our understanding of how nerve cells in the brain generate the energy needed to function. The study shows neurons are more independent than previously believed and this research has implications for a range of neurological disorders. [More]
New method could help scientists spot source of disease-causing mutations in enhancers

New method could help scientists spot source of disease-causing mutations in enhancers

A new technique that identifies how genes are controlled could help scientists spot errors in the genetic code which trigger disease, a study suggests. [More]
Study identifies BLU-554 as potential treatment option for HCC patients

Study identifies BLU-554 as potential treatment option for HCC patients

Findings were presented today at The International Liver CongressTM 2015 on a novel therapeutic candidate for a genomically defined subset of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with an aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) pathway. [More]
Xstrahl introduces Phtotoelectric therapy to the European market at ESTRO 2015

Xstrahl introduces Phtotoelectric therapy to the European market at ESTRO 2015

Utilising trusted and clinically proven low energy photons, in a dedicated treatment system. Photoelectric Therapy provides a pain free, non-surgical alternative for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, especially those found in sensitive areas of the head and neck... [More]
New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

An enzyme secreted by the body's fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body's fat tissue in controlling the brain's response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an optimal amount of body fat for maximizing health and longevity. [More]
Fruit fly study shows that extra sleep helps the brain overcome neurological defects

Fruit fly study shows that extra sleep helps the brain overcome neurological defects

Many studies have linked more sleep to better memory, but new research in fruit flies demonstrates that extra sleep helps the brain overcome catastrophic neurological defects that otherwise would block memory formation, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
UO researchers uncover how the brain encodes and translates sounds

UO researchers uncover how the brain encodes and translates sounds

When people hear the sound of footsteps or the drilling of a woodpecker, the rhythmic structure of the sounds is striking, says Michael Wehr, a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. [More]
Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

A new study led by University of Toronto researcher Dr. David Lam has discovered the trigger behind the most severe forms of cancer pain. Released in top journal Pain this month, the study points to TMPRSS2 as the culprit: a gene that is also responsible for some of the most aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers. [More]
Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Like a beloved pair of jeans, human DNA accumulates damage over time, and older people's bodies can't repair it as well. Many scientists believe a build up of damage can cause cells to enter an irreversible dormant state known as senescence. Cellular senescence is believed to be responsible for some of the telltale signs of aging, such as weakened bones, less resilient skin and slow-downs in organ function. [More]
Scientists identify possible new genes that could change benign skin growths into fatal melanomas

Scientists identify possible new genes that could change benign skin growths into fatal melanomas

A Houston Methodist-led team of international scientists has identified hundreds of possible new genes in mice that could transform benign skin growths into deadly melanomas. [More]
Bacterial imbalance in the gut can lead to inflammation similar to Crohn's disease

Bacterial imbalance in the gut can lead to inflammation similar to Crohn's disease

Crohn's disease is one of a family of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While it has already been proven to have genetic causes, scientists have now shown that the presence of certain intestinal bacteria also plays a role. [More]
Common tapeworm drug effectively treats MRSA superbugs in lab

Common tapeworm drug effectively treats MRSA superbugs in lab

A new study provides evidence from lab experiments that a drug already used in people to fight tapeworms might also prove effective against strains of the superbug MRSA, which kills thousands of people a year in the United States. [More]
Eppendorf launches mobile app

Eppendorf launches mobile app

Eppendorf AG's new app offers a variety of useful aids for everyday laboratory work in addition to product information that has been optimized for mobile devices. [More]
New method offers quick spectral analysis of blood and melanin contents in skin sites

New method offers quick spectral analysis of blood and melanin contents in skin sites

Many factors can change skin pigmentation, including aging, exposure to UV light, certain drugs, as well as certain diseases. A simple technique for measuring skin pigmentation could be a helpful tool for research and diagnostics. The same goes for measuring the skin blood content. [More]
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