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Researchers have sequenced genetic material from caries bacterium for the first time

Researchers have sequenced genetic material from caries bacterium for the first time

Streptococcus mutans, one of the principal bacteria that cause dental caries, has increased the change in its genetic material over time, possibly coinciding with dietary change linked to the expansion of humanity. [More]
Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers have uncovered a way the malaria parasite becomes resistant to an investigational drug. The discovery, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also is relevant for other infectious diseases including bacterial infections and tuberculosis. [More]
Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

A new study supports a growing body of research suggesting a safe and effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating postmenopausal breast cancer, with fewer detrimental side effects and improved health profile than with standard anti-hormone therapies. [More]
Cypher Genomics, Illumina partner to facilitate development of genomic-based biomarkers

Cypher Genomics, Illumina partner to facilitate development of genomic-based biomarkers

Cypher Genomics, Inc., the genome informatics company, announced today a co-promotion agreement with Illumina to facilitate the development of genomic-based biomarkers from whole genome sequence data for precision medicine and clinical trials. [More]
Caffeine intake may aggravate hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women

Caffeine intake may aggravate hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women

A new Mayo Clinic study, published online today by the journal Menopause, found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. [More]
Study identifies three genetic changes linked to increased risk of breast cancer in East Asian women

Study identifies three genetic changes linked to increased risk of breast cancer in East Asian women

A new study in East Asian women has identified three genetic changes linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. The research, led by Vanderbilt University investigators, was published online July 20 in Nature Genetics. [More]
George Mason University researchers use dyes to paint new picture of diseases

George Mason University researchers use dyes to paint new picture of diseases

By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease and even lung disease. [More]
People with higher levels of brown fat have better blood sugar control

People with higher levels of brown fat have better blood sugar control

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have shown for the first time that people with higher levels of brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, in their bodies have better blood sugar control, higher insulin sensitivity and a better metabolism for burning fat stores. [More]
NYSCF and Beyond Batten Disease Foundation partner to find cure for juvenile Batten disease

NYSCF and Beyond Batten Disease Foundation partner to find cure for juvenile Batten disease

The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) and Beyond Batten Disease Foundation (BBDF) have partnered to develop stem cell resources to investigate and explore new treatments and ultimately find a cure for juvenile Batten disease, a fatal illness affecting children. [More]
Capsazepine shows dramatic tumor shrinkage without damaging surrounding tissues

Capsazepine shows dramatic tumor shrinkage without damaging surrounding tissues

Mouse models of human oral cancer treated with an agent called capsazepine showed dramatic tumor shrinkage without damage to surrounding tissues, researchers from the School of Dentistry and School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found. [More]
Age of sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes in girls

Age of sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes in girls

The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published today in the journal Nature. [More]
Scientists work to detect chronic traumatic encephalopathy in earliest stages

Scientists work to detect chronic traumatic encephalopathy in earliest stages

Autopsies have shown that some high-profile athletes who suffered repeated blows to the head during their careers have unusual protein clumps in their brains. [More]
Tulane University psychiatrist to study how parental bond with children leaves lasting genetic protection

Tulane University psychiatrist to study how parental bond with children leaves lasting genetic protection

Tulane University psychiatrist Dr. Stacy Drury has been given $2.4 million by the National Institutes of Health to test a provocative new theory - how well children bond with a parent in the first year of life leaves lasting genetic protection, potentially shielding them from disease risks well into adulthood. [More]
Astrocytes may be behind mental disorders, new research reveals

Astrocytes may be behind mental disorders, new research reveals

Astrocytes, the cells that make the background of the brain and support neurons, might be behind mental disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, according to new research by a Portuguese team from the ICVS at the University of Minho. [More]
Cedars-Sinai investigators developing novel treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

Cedars-Sinai investigators developing novel treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute are developing a novel, multistep investigational treatment for one of the most complex and difficult-to-treat forms of the disease, locally advanced pancreatic cancer. [More]
Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune disorders may share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer, according to a new report by George Washington University researcher Linda Kusner, Ph.D., published in PLOS ONE on July 22. [More]
Vanderbilt-led research team identifies protein "signatures" that drive colorectal cancer

Vanderbilt-led research team identifies protein "signatures" that drive colorectal cancer

A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein "signatures" of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. [More]
Pilot study shows that anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV

Pilot study shows that anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV

A pilot study by HIV researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark has shown that an anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV. [More]
Research findings could lead to new approaches to treating schizophrenia

Research findings could lead to new approaches to treating schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date, conducted with 80,000 people. [More]
VCU awarded $3 million grant to study how childhood adverse experiences create long-term health risks

VCU awarded $3 million grant to study how childhood adverse experiences create long-term health risks

Virginia Commonwealth University has received a five-year, $3 million grant to study how adverse experiences such as severe illnesses, neglect and maltreatment during childhood leave molecular marks in DNA that predict health risks later in life. [More]