Medical Science News RSS Feed - Medical Science News

UT Southwestern receives CPRIT grant to expand genetic screening services in North Texas

UT Southwestern receives CPRIT grant to expand genetic screening services in North Texas

Genetic screening services for rural and underserved populations will expand from six to 22 counties in North Texas under a $1.5 million grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Study reveals subtypes, potential diagnostic and treatment clues for papillary thyroid carcinomas

Study reveals subtypes, potential diagnostic and treatment clues for papillary thyroid carcinomas

A comprehensive analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) – the most common form of thyroid cancer – has provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other genomic alterations that drive disease development. [More]
UC San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center named new 'alpha clinic'

UC San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center named new 'alpha clinic'

In a push to further speed clinical development of emerging stem cell therapies, Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center at UC San Diego Health System was named today one of three new "alpha clinics" by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state's stem cell agency. [More]
High risk for congenital heart defects in Down syndrome provides tool to identify changes in genes

High risk for congenital heart defects in Down syndrome provides tool to identify changes in genes

Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality in humans, involving a third copy of all or part of chromosome 21. In addition to intellectual disability, individuals with Down syndrome have a high risk of congenital heart defects. However, not all people with Down syndrome have them – about half have structurally normal hearts. [More]
New NIH award aims to help increase diversity in biomedicine

New NIH award aims to help increase diversity in biomedicine

The University of Alaska Fairbanks received a $23.8 million, five-year award from the National Institutes of Health to launch a new undergraduate program that will engage students from diverse backgrounds, especially those from rural Alaska, in biomedical research as a way to foster their interest and success in biomedical and health careers. [More]
Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Our immune system defends us from harmful bacteria and viruses, but, if left unchecked, the cells that destroy those invaders can turn on the body itself, causing auto-immune diseases like type-1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis. A molecule called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) boosts the body's natural defence against this 'friendly fire', scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Monterotondo, Italy, have found. [More]
Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

UNC School of Medicine researchers have pinpointed a set of intriguing characteristics in a previously unknown subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors. These cells, which mimic non-cancerous endothelial cells that normally populate blood vessels in tumors, could provide researchers with another target for cancer therapies. [More]
Nano-sized discovery helps explain bipolar disorder

Nano-sized discovery helps explain bipolar disorder

A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine® scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness. [More]
Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, shows study

Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, shows study

Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, according to a recent study published in journal Fungal Biology [More]
Infant’s cry can indicate prenatal cocaine exposure

Infant’s cry can indicate prenatal cocaine exposure

A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development. [More]
Research shows FGF21 hormone acts directly on brain to regulate obesity

Research shows FGF21 hormone acts directly on brain to regulate obesity

A hormone seen as a popular target to develop weight-loss drugs works by directly targeting the brain and triggering previously unknown activity in the nervous system, UT Southwestern Medical Center obesity researchers have found. [More]
MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process. [More]
Lucideon to run Biodensol together with the University of Lyon

Lucideon to run Biodensol together with the University of Lyon

Lucideon is pleased to announce that, together with the University of Lyon, it has been successful in its application to run ‘Biodensol’, a 7th framework European project to provide a network for initial training in the field of dentistry. [More]
New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately. [More]
Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. [More]
Study identifies new signaling pathway that leads to inflammatory bone erosion in RA patients

Study identifies new signaling pathway that leads to inflammatory bone erosion in RA patients

A new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery identifies a new signaling pathway that contributes to the development and progression of inflammatory bone erosion, which occurs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects millions of adults worldwide. [More]
Novel 'designer' nanodevice could improve cancer diagnostics, treatment

Novel 'designer' nanodevice could improve cancer diagnostics, treatment

Cancer diagnostics and treatment options could be drastically improved with the creation of a 'designer' nanodevice being developed by researchers from the UK, Italy, the US and Argentina. [More]
Walnuts may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, study finds

Walnuts may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, study finds

A new animal study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Next generation sequencing applications automated through partnership between Beckman Coulter Life Sciences and New England Biolabs

Next generation sequencing applications automated through partnership between Beckman Coulter Life Sciences and New England Biolabs

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences, through a partnership with New England Biolabs®, Inc. (NEB®), offers automated methods to improve processes and throughput in next generation sequencing (NGS) sample preparation. Under the agreement, Beckman Coulter will use its extensive experience in automated NGS sample prep to develop, distribute and support automation for NEB’s NEBNext® sample preparation reagent kits. NEB will provide technical expertise on the reagents, chemistry and protocols. [More]
Early access program for human chromosome mapping analytical service announced by Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation and OpGen

Early access program for human chromosome mapping analytical service announced by Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation and OpGen

Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation and OpGen, Inc., a leading genetic analysis company, announced the introduction of an Early Access Program for its upcoming Human Chromosome ExplorerSM, human chromosome mapping analytical service for clinical research and life science research applications. [More]