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AMSBIO launches CellMax™ Cell Pellet Slides

AMSBIO launches CellMax™ Cell Pellet Slides

AMSBIO announces the launch of CellMax™ - a new range of high quality, consistent and affordable cell line FFPE slides. [More]
Oxford Gene Technology expands portfolio of fluorescence in situ hybridisation probes

Oxford Gene Technology expands portfolio of fluorescence in situ hybridisation probes

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), The Molecular Genetics Company, is extending its portfolio of Cytocell® Pathology FISH probes with the addition of eight new probes. OGT offers the widest range of fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) probes on the market, delivering a cost-effective and reliable solution for anyone engaged in FISH. [More]
New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

Diseases like Alzheimer's are caused when proteins aggregate and clump together. In a world first, EPFL scientists have successfully distinguished between the disease-causing aggregation forms of proteins. [More]
German life sciences entrepreneurs granted option to develop Aeterna Zentaris’ oral allogenic tumor vaccine technology

German life sciences entrepreneurs granted option to develop Aeterna Zentaris’ oral allogenic tumor vaccine technology

Aeterna Zentaris Inc. today announced that it has granted to German life sciences entrepreneurs with a proven track-record of funding the development and commercialization of biotechnology, an option to license the Company's live recombinant oral allogenic tumor vaccine technology, including AEZS-120, the most advanced product candidate for prostate cancer which is ready to enter a Phase 1 clinical trial. [More]
Study findings could lead to new ways to tailor therapies for cancer

Study findings could lead to new ways to tailor therapies for cancer

By studying the yeast used in beer- and bread-making, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism by which ancient proteins repair DNA damage and how their dysfunction could lead to the development of tumors. [More]
LMU researchers reveal role of mutations in development of Ewing's sarcoma

LMU researchers reveal role of mutations in development of Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have elucidated at the molecular level how an otherwise innocuous inherited mutation that is quite common in European populations interacts with a spontaneous somatic mutation to promote the development of Ewing's sarcoma. [More]
RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a protein that plays a vital role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice. The protein RGS2 can delay an egg's development into an embryo in order to allow time for sperm to arrive and merge with the egg in a healthy fertilization process. The embryo cannot survive without the male chromosomes. [More]
Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

The Genetics Society of America and the C. elegans research community are pleased to announce the recipients of the GSA poster awards at the 20th International C. elegans Meeting, which took place at the University of California, Los Angeles, June 24-28, 2015. [More]
Study provides new insights into mechanism that controls differences in gut's ability to fight infections

Study provides new insights into mechanism that controls differences in gut's ability to fight infections

Considering how many microorganisms we ingest each day, our gut has an extensive and well-developed immune system. This defense is involved in acute and chronic gut diseases, but it varies dramatically among people. A persistent question is how our genetic make-up affects our gut's ability to fight infections. EPFL scientists have found that gut immunity is not affected by single genes but by entire groups of genes. [More]

Leishmania-fighting immune cells that linger after initial infections help ward off secondary attack

Immune cells that hang around after parasitic skin infection help ward off secondary attack, according to a study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. These skin squatters may prove to be the key to successful anti-parasite vaccines. [More]
Researchers use silk fibers to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells

Researchers use silk fibers to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells

The silkworm, which produces the essential ingredient for fine silk fabric, also plays a critical role in a new process designed to provide relief for millions of individuals with dry mouth, a devastating oral and systemic health issue. [More]
Innovative approach to treating AAT deficiency

Innovative approach to treating AAT deficiency

Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of delivering an RNA that encodes for the protein alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT)--which is missing or nonfunctional in the genetic disorder AAT deficiency--into cells in the laboratory, enabling the cells to produce highly functional AAT. [More]
New technology enhances investigations of epigenomes

New technology enhances investigations of epigenomes

A new technology that will dramatically enhance investigations of epigenomes, the machinery that turns on and off genes and a very prominent field of study in diseases such as stem cell differentiation, inflammation and cancer, is reported on today in the research journal Nature Methods. [More]
UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health, with the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has entered into a multi-year affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology designed to deepen existing collaborative relationships, boost basic research of diseases of the immune system and more quickly introduce new clinical treatments and therapies. [More]
Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. [More]
Brazilian cardiovascular researcher receives Georg Forster Research Award

Brazilian cardiovascular researcher receives Georg Forster Research Award

The cardiovascular researcher Professor Robson Augusto Souza dos Santos of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, has been awarded the Georg Forster Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. [More]
New technique improves survival time for glioblastoma patients by 50%

New technique improves survival time for glioblastoma patients by 50%

The rapid spread of a common and deadly brain tumor has been slowed down significantly in a mouse model by cutting off the way some cancer cells communicate, according to a team of researchers that includes UF Health faculty. [More]
Yale researchers confirm NF1 gene as major player in development of skin cancer

Yale researchers confirm NF1 gene as major player in development of skin cancer

A multidisciplinary team at Yale, led by Yale Cancer Center members, has defined a subgroup of genetic mutations that are present in a significant number of melanoma skin cancer cases. Their findings shed light on an important mutation in this deadly disease, and may lead to more targeted anti-cancer therapies. [More]
New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

The fact that obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers is well known. But a new Iowa State University study adds to the growing evidence that memory loss should also be a top concern. [More]
Scientists reveal potential therapeutic approach to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Scientists reveal potential therapeutic approach to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a very aggressive form of pulmonary fibrosis and has a particularly poor prognosis. This fatal disease, for which so far no causal therapies exist, is characterized by a massive deposition of connective and scar tissue in the lung, which leads to a progressive loss of lung function and ultimately death. [More]
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