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Research shows resveratrol in grapes inhibits bacteria that cause acne

Research shows resveratrol in grapes inhibits bacteria that cause acne

Got grapes? UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. [More]
NPI leaders to invest more than $30M to support White House BRAIN Initiative

NPI leaders to invest more than $30M to support White House BRAIN Initiative

Leaders of the National Photonics Initiative (NPI), an alliance of top scientific societies uniting industry and academia to raise awareness of photonics, launched its Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group alongside officials from the White House Office of Science and Technology (OSTP) in conjunction with today's White House BRAIN Initiative conference. [More]
Protein that plays key role in neurological diseases regulates neuronal communication by self-association

Protein that plays key role in neurological diseases regulates neuronal communication by self-association

The protein alpha-synuclein is a well-known player in Parkinson's disease and other related neurological conditions, such as dementia with Lewy bodies. Its normal functions, however, have long remained unknown. [More]
Research performed in anemic mice shows acetate stimulates the formation of red blood cells

Research performed in anemic mice shows acetate stimulates the formation of red blood cells

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers seeking novel treatments for anemia found that giving acetate, the major component of household vinegar, to anemic mice stimulated the formation of new red blood cells. [More]
Pitt researchers awarded $11.8 million NIH grant to explore genetic roots of cleft lip, palate

Pitt researchers awarded $11.8 million NIH grant to explore genetic roots of cleft lip, palate

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine have been awarded a $11.8 million, five-year grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, to continue their exploration of the genetic roots of cleft lip and cleft palate and to expand the effort to include populations in Colombia, Nigeria, the Philippines and Pennsylvania. [More]
Early exposure to marijuana can lead to immune-related diseases in adulthood

Early exposure to marijuana can lead to immune-related diseases in adulthood

When it comes to using marijuana, new research, involving mice and published in the October 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggests that just because you can do it, doesn't mean that you should. That's because a team of Italian scientists have found that using marijuana in adolescence may do serious long-term damage to the immune system. [More]
Gut microbe in patients may tip doctors about SCID

Gut microbe in patients may tip doctors about SCID

Many people recognize "the bubble boy" as an unusual character from a "Seinfeld" episode or a John Travolta movie. [More]
Trovagene begins new study to assess precision cancer monitoring technology in lung cancer management

Trovagene begins new study to assess precision cancer monitoring technology in lung cancer management

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, announced today that it has expanded its clinical program to include a study designed to evaluate use of the Company's precision cancer monitoring technology in the management of lung cancer patients. [More]
U-M researchers describe new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments

U-M researchers describe new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments

Researchers at the University of Michigan have described a new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments that requires a fraction of the time needed for more traditional methods. [More]
CNIO researchers discover new specific marker for cancer stem cells

CNIO researchers discover new specific marker for cancer stem cells

Tumours are mosaics of cells that are morphologically and molecularly very different. In this cellular heterogeneity, it is calculated that only 1-2% of the tumour mass is made up of cancer stem cells, which over the past years have been suggested to be responsible for the origin of cancer and for the resistance to conventional chemical therapies. [More]
DNA Diagnostics Center launches new Paternity Test Kit

DNA Diagnostics Center launches new Paternity Test Kit

DNA Diagnostics Center, the world's largest DNA Paternity Testing Company, announces the launch of a new Paternity Test Kit to be sold in national retail stores, expanding the company's reach in the marketplace. [More]
Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

The number of days an expectant mother was deprived of electricity during Quebec's Ice Storm (1998) predicts the epigenetic profile of her child, a new study finds. [More]
Researchers uncover molecular interaction between key proteins in cell division

Researchers uncover molecular interaction between key proteins in cell division

Researchers from Guillermo Montoya's team at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), in collaboration with Isabelle Vernos' Group from the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), have uncovered the molecular interaction between TACC3 and chTOG, key proteins in forming the internal cellular framework that enables and sustains cell division. [More]

Findings indicate that our bodies are used as perceptual "ruler" to measure the world around us

People tend to perceive their dominant hand as staying relatively the same size even when it's magnified, lending support to the idea that we use our hand as a constant perceptual "ruler" to measure the world around us. [More]
More predictive model for early stage drug screening of cancer therapeutics introduced in new application note

More predictive model for early stage drug screening of cancer therapeutics introduced in new application note

A new application note** from AMSBIO, previously presented at both the 2014 Beatson International Cancer conference and the ELRIG Drug Discovery 2014 meeting in Manchester UK, introduces a more predictive and realistic model for early stage drug screening of cancer therapeutics. [More]
TSRI study points way to potential therapies for hereditary spastic paraplegia

TSRI study points way to potential therapies for hereditary spastic paraplegia

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that a gene mutation linked to hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disabling neurological disorder, interferes with the normal breakdown of triglyceride fat molecules in the brain. The TSRI researchers found large droplets of triglycerides within the neurons of mice modeling the disease. [More]
Research: Gut bacteria may cause animals to gain weight

Research: Gut bacteria may cause animals to gain weight

A species of gut bacteria called Clostridium ramosum, coupled with a high-fat diet, may cause animals to gain weight. The work is published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Research finding opens door to potential treatment for MPS IIIB

Research finding opens door to potential treatment for MPS IIIB

MPS IIIB is a devastating and currently untreatable disease that causes progressive damage to the brain, leading to profound intellectual disability, dementia and death -- often before reaching adulthood. [More]
Three institutions collaborate to study genetics of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia

Three institutions collaborate to study genetics of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia

Researchers at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Medical School and collaborators at two other institutions will undertake the largest whole genome sequencing study funded to date, as they seek to better understand bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. [More]
Researchers explain how molecular structure of the heart muscle changes in heart failure

Researchers explain how molecular structure of the heart muscle changes in heart failure

In a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, researchers at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry have explained how the function of a key protein in the heart changes in heart failure. [More]