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Study confirms effectiveness of EKF PointMan technology for isolating low-level DNA mutations in blood

Study confirms effectiveness of EKF PointMan technology for isolating low-level DNA mutations in blood

EKF Diagnostics, the global diagnostics company, announces that the latest results from its collaboration with the Institute of Life Sciences at the University of Swansea, UK, have continued to confirm the effectiveness of its PointMan DNA enrichment technology for isolating and characterizing low-level DNA mutations in blood. [More]
Researchers uncover new schizophrenia gene links

Researchers uncover new schizophrenia gene links

The discovery of over a hundred genetic risk factors linked to schizophrenia provides vital new clues in understanding what causes the condition and will kick-start the search for new treatments, according to leading UK scientists. [More]
First diagnostic criteria proposed for Christianson Syndrome

First diagnostic criteria proposed for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. A new study that doubles the number of cases now documented in the scientific literature provides the most definitive characterization of CS to date. [More]
Saudi Arabian researchers detect genetic fragments of MERS-CoV in the air of camel barn

Saudi Arabian researchers detect genetic fragments of MERS-CoV in the air of camel barn

Saudi Arabian researchers have detected genetic fragments of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the air of a barn holding a camel infected with the virus. The work, published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, indicates that further studies are needed to see if the disease can be transmitted through the air. [More]
Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date. [More]
Beckman announces national availability of Prostate Health Index

Beckman announces national availability of Prostate Health Index

Beckman Coulter Diagnostics, a global leader in prostate cancer diagnostics, announces national availability of the Prostate Health Index (phi)*, a simple, non‐invasive blood test that is three times more specific in detecting prostate cancer1 than PSA (prostate‐specific antigen). [More]
Study in mice reveals that MSCs help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise

Study in mice reveals that MSCs help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise

A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal (mezz-EN-chem-uhl) stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise. [More]
Researchers demonstrate solid link between bad diet and loss of smell

Researchers demonstrate solid link between bad diet and loss of smell

Could stuffing yourself full of high-fat foods cause you to lose your sense of smell? A new study from Florida State University neuroscientists says so, and it has researchers taking a closer look at how our diets could impact a whole range of human functions that were not traditionally considered when examining the impact of obesity. [More]
Study recommends use of various groundcover management systems for apple orchard floors

Study recommends use of various groundcover management systems for apple orchard floors

In traditional apple orchards, effective management practices rely on two interrelated components: finding ways to manage competitive vegetation under the trees, and supplying important supplemental nutrition to trees. [More]
New insights into biology of bread wheat genome

New insights into biology of bread wheat genome

Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the most widely cultivated cereal crop in the world and provides 20 percent of the food calories consumed by humans. [More]
Right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy

Right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy

Too much dietary fat is bad for the heart, but the right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy, according to a paper published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Cystoid macular edema (CME) is a common complication of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of retinal diseases in which patients typically lose night and side vision first and then develop impaired central vision. CME can also decrease central vision. [More]
Study: Lack of sleep can lead to errors in memory

Study: Lack of sleep can lead to errors in memory

Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine. [More]
Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

The natural DNA bases that form the letters of DNA are usually referred to as G, C, A, and T. Those are only the first letters of the chemical names. They’re often called nucleotides by their scientific name and all of them have in common a phosphate part, a sugar part and a nucleobase part. [More]
New York State DOH grants RPCI approval to begin genomic testing of cancer patients

New York State DOH grants RPCI approval to begin genomic testing of cancer patients

The New York State Department of Health (DOH) has granted Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) approval to begin genomic testing of cancer patients using its OmniSeq TargetTM advanced molecular diagnostic laboratory test. [More]
Study: L-carnitine has neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats

Study: L-carnitine has neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats

Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. [More]
A personalized approach for patients with ccRCC-related mutations

A personalized approach for patients with ccRCC-related mutations

In an analysis of small molecules called metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified an enzyme key to applying the brakes on tumor growth. [More]
IL-10 enhances positive benefits of transplanted allogenic SMCs to repair cardiac tissues after MI

IL-10 enhances positive benefits of transplanted allogenic SMCs to repair cardiac tissues after MI

The long-term, positive benefits of transplanted allogenic (other-donated) smooth muscle cells (SMCs) to repair cardiac tissues after myocardial infarction (MI) have been enhanced by the addition of interleukin 10 (IL-10) to the transplanted cells, report researchers in Canada. [More]
Sciatic nerve injury can cause differential expression of microRNAs in dorsal root ganglia

Sciatic nerve injury can cause differential expression of microRNAs in dorsal root ganglia

Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 3 contains a Rho GAP domain that regulates the activities of Rho family GTPases and affects actin polymerization, which influences dendrite elaboration, neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, contributing to neural regeneration. [More]
Scientist uses samples of beating heart tissue to test effect of drugs

Scientist uses samples of beating heart tissue to test effect of drugs

A Coventry University scientist has developed a pioneering new way - using samples of beating heart tissue - to test the effect of drugs on the heart without using human or animal trials. [More]