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Endogenous retroviruses may have played significant role in development of the brain

Endogenous retroviruses may have played significant role in development of the brain

Over millions of years retroviruses have been incorporated into our human DNA, where they today make up almost 10 per cent of the total genome. [More]
Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

New research has found concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline in people who are at genetic risk for the condition. [More]
Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Increased activity in a deep-lying region of the brain called the amygdala is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study published in The Lancet.

The amygdala is known to process emotions such as fear and anger and the finding sheds light on the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), say the study authors. [More]
Scientists identify Smurf1 protein that plays role in autophagy of TB bacteria

Scientists identify Smurf1 protein that plays role in autophagy of TB bacteria

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein that is central to the immune system's ability to recognize and destroy the bacterium responsible for the global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic. [More]
Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

New concepts of infectious disease are evolving with the realization that pathogens are key players in the development of progressive chronic diseases that originally were not thought to be infectious. Infection is well-known to be associated with numerous neurological diseases for which... [More]
AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

Before epilepsy surgery, doctors may consider using brain imaging to locate language and memory functions in the brain instead of the more invasive procedure that is commonly used, according to a guideline published by the American Academy of Neurology in the January 11, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
UNICEF launches new campaign to stress importance of early childhood development

UNICEF launches new campaign to stress importance of early childhood development

UNICEF today launched #EarlyMomentsMatter, a new campaign supported by the LEGO Foundation to drive increased awareness about the importance of the first 1,000 days of a child’s life and the impact of early experiences on the developing brain. [More]
Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

In a study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget, researchers from Uppsala University show how the protein EZH2 affects the development of multiple myeloma, and that inhibition of EZH2 could be used as a new strategy to treat the disease. [More]
Neuroscientists modify MRI scanner to study workings of infants' brains

Neuroscientists modify MRI scanner to study workings of infants' brains

In adults, certain regions of the brain's visual cortex respond preferentially to specific types of input, such as faces or objects -- but how and when those preferences arise has long puzzled neuroscientists. [More]
Researchers finding way to manipulate signals in bacteria to reduce infections

Researchers finding way to manipulate signals in bacteria to reduce infections

The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy has received a five-year, $1.25 million federal grant to continue its research into how bacteria that cause streptococcal infections can be manipulated. [More]
Researchers move one step closer to regenerating heart wall using stem cells

Researchers move one step closer to regenerating heart wall using stem cells

A process using human stem cells can generate the cells that cover the external surface of a human heart -- epicardium cells -- according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers. [More]
Penn Vet researchers identify potential target to fight against Ebola

Penn Vet researchers identify potential target to fight against Ebola

Viruses and their hosts are in a eternal game of one-upmanship. If a host cell evolves a way to stop a virus from spreading, the virus will look for a new path. And so on and so forth. [More]
Novel treatment can effectively inhibit development of GVHD in mice, study shows

Novel treatment can effectively inhibit development of GVHD in mice, study shows

Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is the leading cause of non-relapse associated death in patients who receive stem cell transplants. [More]
Research findings could lead to development of novel therapeutic approaches against viral infections

Research findings could lead to development of novel therapeutic approaches against viral infections

Life is a question of balance, and the body is no exception. Expression levels of certain proteins can affect the immune system's ability to neutralize a virus. [More]
S. pneumoniae uses hosts' immune defenses to spread infection, study reveals

S. pneumoniae uses hosts' immune defenses to spread infection, study reveals

The bacteria that cause most cases of pneumonia worldwide secrete a toxin that helps them jump from one body to the next - with help from the hosts' immune defenses. This is the finding of a study led by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and published online January 11 in Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
Study identifies high levels of aluminium in the brains of familial Alzheimer's disease victims

Study identifies high levels of aluminium in the brains of familial Alzheimer's disease victims

A recently published study of the brains of familial Alzheimer's disease victims has found extremely high levels of aluminium in the tissue, announced Dr. Christopher Exley, researcher and professor at Keele University. [More]
Epigenetic modification may be cause of adult throat cancers linked to alcohol, tobacco use

Epigenetic modification may be cause of adult throat cancers linked to alcohol, tobacco use

A team of researchers at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre has found an epigenetic modification that might be the cause of 15% of adult cancers of the throat linked to alcohol and tobacco use. [More]
MUSC scientists design novel antibody-based therapy to fight against cancer

MUSC scientists design novel antibody-based therapy to fight against cancer

Scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) have designed an antibody-based therapy that could target the functions of TGF-beta that cause cancer [More]
Genetic testing at UMMC helps doctors identify effective medication for heart stent patients

Genetic testing at UMMC helps doctors identify effective medication for heart stent patients

The University of Maryland Medical Center is now offering a simple genetic test to patients who receive heart stents to determine whether they have a genetic deficiency that affects how they respond to a common drug to prevent blood clots. [More]
Genes implicated in rare pediatric epilepsy contribute to common forms of disorder, study finds

Genes implicated in rare pediatric epilepsy contribute to common forms of disorder, study finds

An international study led by Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers has found that several genes previously implicated only in rare, severe forms of pediatric epilepsy also contribute to common forms of the disorder. [More]
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