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Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
Robert Hunter receives Harlan J. Spjut Award and Gold-Headed Cane Award

Robert Hunter receives Harlan J. Spjut Award and Gold-Headed Cane Award

Robert Hunter Jr., M.D., Ph.D., Distinguished Chair in Molecular Pathology and chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has received two prestigious awards. [More]
HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the retrovirus that leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Globally, about 35 million people are living with HIV, which constantly adapts and mutates creating challenges for researchers. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain its vital role in the virus' life cycle. [More]
Lucideon welcomes students on 7th framework European project ‘Biodensol’

Lucideon welcomes students on 7th framework European project ‘Biodensol’

Lucideon, the international materials technology company, welcomes three international students on the 7th framework European project ‘Biodensol’. The three students involved with the project have now begun an intense training period before they embark on developing novel glass, ceramic and sol-gel powders with dental applications. [More]
R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named R. Rodney Howell, MD, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Chairman Emeritus of Pediatrics, and Member of the Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, as the first recipient of its new, annual Advocacy Award. [More]
Law enforcement now has Snapshot DNA Phenotyping Service that helps nab suspects, close cases

Law enforcement now has Snapshot DNA Phenotyping Service that helps nab suspects, close cases

Law enforcement now has a new DNA tool that helps nab suspects and close cases. The service, developed by Parabon NanoLabs of Reston, Virginia, is called Snapshot DNA Phenotyping Service. 'Snapshot' predicts the physical appearance of individuals from the smallest of DNA evidence samples, creating a composite image from any DNA source. [More]
IBI scientists make progress in identifying new biomarkers for preventing colorectal cancer

IBI scientists make progress in identifying new biomarkers for preventing colorectal cancer

Scientists from the Instituto de Investigación Biomédica [Institute of Biomedical Research], in Galicia (Spain), have made progress in the identification of new biomarkers for improving prevention of colorectal cancer. [More]
Live imaging study reveals link between wound-associated inflammation and skin cancer risk

Live imaging study reveals link between wound-associated inflammation and skin cancer risk

Researchers in the United Kingdom and Denmark have studied the "see-through" larvae of zebrafish to reveal how wound healing leads to skin cancer. Live imaging shows neutrophils, the protective inflammatory cells of the body's immune system, diverted from an induced wound to any nearby precancerous skin cells. [More]
University of Oslo researchers find the cause of coeliac disease

University of Oslo researchers find the cause of coeliac disease

Professor Ludvig M. Sollid and his colleagues at the University of Oslo have found the cause of coeliac disease. To do so required really going into depth, right down to molecular level. [More]
Scientists develop olfactory fingerprint test to identify individuals from sense of smell

Scientists develop olfactory fingerprint test to identify individuals from sense of smell

Each of us has, in our nose, about six million smell receptors of around four hundred different types. The distribution of these receptors varies from person to person - so much so that each person's sense of smell may be unique. [More]
Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Nanoparticles packed with a clinically used chemotherapy drug and coated with an oligosaccharide derived from the carapace of crustaceans might effectively target and kill cancer stem-like cells, according to a recent study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Study offers potential ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for people in low-resistance environments

Study offers potential ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for people in low-resistance environments

It is well known that muscles need resistance (gravity) to maintain optimal health, and when they do not have this resistance, they deteriorate. A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal, however, suggests that this might not be true for all muscles, offering hope that there may be ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for individuals in low-resistance environments, whether it be the microgravity of space, extended periods in a hospital bed, or a 9-5 job behind a desk. [More]
Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists from the University of Leeds and The Institute of Cancer Research, London, have discovered a new protein which triggers the growth of blood vessels in breast cancer tumours which have spread to the brain, a common location which breast cancer can spread to. [More]
Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Recent Weizmann Institute studies are revealing a complex picture of cancer progression in which certain genes that drive tumor growth in the earlier stages get suppressed in later stages - taking a step back to move forward. [More]
Researchers use pioneering stem cell techniques to better understand causes of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Researchers use pioneering stem cell techniques to better understand causes of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

New research from the Advanced Gene and Cell Therapy Lab at Royal Holloway, University of London has used pioneering stem cell techniques to better understand why certain cells are more at risk of degenerating in Spinal Muscular Atrophy than others. [More]
University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

University of Georgia's Lynn Bailey leads international paper on folate biomarkers

A University of Georgia researcher is lead author on an international paper on folate biomarkers as part of an initiative to provide evidence-based guidance for the global nutrition and public health community. [More]
UVA Health System opens high-tech clinical genomics lab

UVA Health System opens high-tech clinical genomics lab

The University of Virginia Health System has opened a high-tech clinical genomics lab that will personalize care for patients, help doctors determine the best treatments for cancers and other diseases, and allow UVA to offer the most cutting-edge clinical trials. [More]
UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

Advances in nanotechnology and nano-fabrication are fundamentally changing the future of medicine, enabling more effective diagnostics and targeted drugs, and new bioactive materials that can help repair our bodies. [More]
Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea Biotechnologies Inc. announced today that it is partnering with Aelan Cell Technologies Inc. (San Francisco, California) for the development, validation and commercialization of novel biomarker tests and companion diagnostics using human STEM cells as models. [More]

smFRET method takes measurements of distances between molecules

Have a look round your living room. Everything around you is made up of molecules - just as you are. When they are put together, the molecules act as the building blocks of life. [More]
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