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TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein that launches cancer growth and appears to contribute to higher mortality in breast cancer patients. [More]
Researchers investigate why N14Y, N14K mutations have distinct effects in KID syndrome patients

Researchers investigate why N14Y, N14K mutations have distinct effects in KID syndrome patients

A team of New York-based researchers has compared the effects of two disease-causing mutations, potentially explaining why patients with the rare genetic disorder keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome can experience different sets of symptoms. [More]
NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano a $1.2M (3-year) grant to test whether their non-viral gene delivery method can effectively and safely treat oral cancer pain. [More]
New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

Matthew Gdovin, an associate professor in the UTSA Department of Biology, has developed a newly patented method to kill cancer cells. [More]
Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute all parts of the National Institutes of Health, describe how combining engineered anthrax toxin proteins and existing chemotherapy drugs could potentially yield a therapy to reduce or eliminate cancerous tumors. [More]
Pain reliever appears to help preserve vision in animal model of retinal degeneration

Pain reliever appears to help preserve vision in animal model of retinal degeneration

A pain medicine that potently activates a receptor vital to a healthy retina appears to help preserve vision in a model of severe retinal degeneration, scientists report. [More]
RepeatAnalyzer improves scientists' ability to identify, manage bacterial strains

RepeatAnalyzer improves scientists' ability to identify, manage bacterial strains

Washington State University researchers have developed a new software tool that will improve scientists' ability to identify and understand bacterial strains and accelerate vaccine development. [More]
Scientists detect gene networks likely to be shared by all CLL patients

Scientists detect gene networks likely to be shared by all CLL patients

Research, involving scientists and doctors at the University of Southampton and Royal Bournemouth Hospital, has identified a network of genes that are likely to be shared by all patients who have chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). [More]
ISU researchers design nanomachine capable of detecting mock version of Ebola virus

ISU researchers design nanomachine capable of detecting mock version of Ebola virus

Imagine you want to build an intricate work of architecture, like a castle. Now imagine that, once all its individual components are brought together, the castle builds itself automatically. Finally, imagine this castle is so small that it's measured on the same scale as DNA, viruses and small molecules. [More]
Advances in epigenome sequencing technologies can allow comprehensive analysis of cancers

Advances in epigenome sequencing technologies can allow comprehensive analysis of cancers

An international research collaboration led by UCL scientists has developed ways to improve the quality and accuracy of information harvested from epigenome sequencing datasets in two new research papers published jointly in Nature Biotechnology and Nature Communications today. According to the studies, epigenome sequencing technologies can allow for more comprehensive analysis of cancers - a key component in the development of targeted approaches to combat cancer. [More]
Scientists detect biological markers of chronic fatigue syndrome in gut bacteria

Scientists detect biological markers of chronic fatigue syndrome in gut bacteria

Physicians have been mystified by chronic fatigue syndrome, a condition where normal exertion leads to debilitating fatigue that isn't alleviated by rest. There are no known triggers, and diagnosis requires lengthy tests administered by an expert. [More]
Genomic techniques help scientists understand diversity of P.vivax parasites

Genomic techniques help scientists understand diversity of P.vivax parasites

While most malaria research has focused on the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which is common in Africa, another parasite, Plasmodium vivax (P.vivax) is responsible for the majority of malaria infections outside this region, causing an estimated 15.8 million clinical malaria cases each year. [More]
Food's transit time through colon affects health of digestive system

Food's transit time through colon affects health of digestive system

The time it takes for ingested food to travel through the human gut - also called transit time - affects the amount of harmful degradation products produced along the way. [More]
Disrupted fetal immune system increases later risk of neurodevelopmental diseases

Disrupted fetal immune system increases later risk of neurodevelopmental diseases

Disrupted fetal immune system development, such as that caused by viral infection in the mother, may be a key factor in the later appearance of certain neurodevelopmental disorders. [More]
Blood levels of omega-3s fatty acids linked to lower risk of deadly heart attacks

Blood levels of omega-3s fatty acids linked to lower risk of deadly heart attacks

Blood levels of seafood and plant-based omega-3 fatty acids are moderately associated with a lower risk of dying from heart attacks, according to a new epidemiological study, published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, led by Liana C. Del Gobbo, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow in the division of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and senior author Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston. [More]
New computer model shows how spleen filters misshapen red blood cells

New computer model shows how spleen filters misshapen red blood cells

Researchers, led by Carnegie Mellon University President Subra Suresh and MIT Principal Research Scientist Ming Dao, have created a new computer model that shows how tiny slits in the spleen prevent old, diseased or misshapen red blood cells from re-entering the bloodstream. [More]
Anti-anxiety medication dampens helping behavior in rats

Anti-anxiety medication dampens helping behavior in rats

Rats given midazolam, an anti-anxiety medication, were less likely to free trapped companions because the drug lessened their empathy, according to a new study by University of Chicago neuroscientists. [More]
Novel suite of computer algorithms can accurately predict behavior of gut microbiome

Novel suite of computer algorithms can accurately predict behavior of gut microbiome

A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the University of Massachusetts have developed a suite of computer algorithms that can accurately predict the behavior of the microbiome - the vast collection of microbes living on and inside the human body. [More]
3D printing with bioink may produce cartilage patches for worn out joints

3D printing with bioink may produce cartilage patches for worn out joints

Strands of cow cartilage substitute for ink in a 3D bioprinting process that may one day create cartilage patches for worn out joints, according to a team of engineers. [More]
New research shows Fukushima radioactive fallout on Tokyo enclosed in glassy microparticles

New research shows Fukushima radioactive fallout on Tokyo enclosed in glassy microparticles

New research shows that most of the radioactive fallout which landed on downtown Tokyo a few days after the Fukushima accident was concentrated and deposited in non-soluble glass microparticles, as a type of 'glassy soot'. [More]
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