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Lab-grown tissues may provide new treatments for injuries, damage to the joints

Lab-grown tissues may provide new treatments for injuries, damage to the joints

Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments. [More]
Moffitt researcher uncovers new approach to treat cancer

Moffitt researcher uncovers new approach to treat cancer

The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. [More]
SCN clock isn't necessary to align body rhythms with light-dark cycle, study reveals

SCN clock isn't necessary to align body rhythms with light-dark cycle, study reveals

Circadian clocks regulate functions ranging from alertness and reaction time to body temperature and blood pressure. New research published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal further adds to our understanding of the circadian rhythm by suggesting that the suprachiasmaticus nucleus (SCN) clock, a tiny region of the hypothalamus considered to be the body's "master" timekeeper, is not necessary to align body rhythms with the light-dark cycle. [More]
Drug combination can trigger self-destruct process in lung cancer cells

Drug combination can trigger self-destruct process in lung cancer cells

Cancer Research UK scientists have found a drug combination that can trigger the self-destruct process in lung cancer cells - paving the way for new treatments, according to research that will be presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference in Liverpool next week. [More]
New research shows link between perinatal exposure to BPA and risk of food intolerance in later life

New research shows link between perinatal exposure to BPA and risk of food intolerance in later life

If it seems like more people are allergic to, or intolerant of, more and different kinds of foods than ever before, there might be a reason why. A new research published in November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists show, for the first time, that there is a link between perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) at low doses and the risk to develop food intolerance in later life. [More]
Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and eventual paralysis of muscles throughout the body. Patients typically survive only three to five years after diagnosis. [More]
BRI receives JDRF grant to explore why people with type 1 diabetes continue to produce insulin

BRI receives JDRF grant to explore why people with type 1 diabetes continue to produce insulin

Scientists at Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason are studying a critical question in type 1 diabetes: Why do some people who get type 1 diabetes continue to produce small amounts of insulin over time while others stop? Researchers have found at the time of diagnosis with type 1 diabetes that many people continue to produce small amounts of insulin. [More]
Changes in cell metabolism slow growth of colorectal cancer

Changes in cell metabolism slow growth of colorectal cancer

Cancer is an unwanted experiment in progress. As the disease advances, tumor cells accumulate mutations, eventually arriving at ones that give them the insidious power to grow uncontrollably and spread. Distinguishing drivers of cancer from benign mutations open opportunities for developing targeted cancer therapies. [More]
Researchers discover link between seizures and migraines

Researchers discover link between seizures and migraines

Seizures and migraines have always been considered separate physiological events in the brain, but now a team of engineers and neuroscientists looking at the brain from a physics viewpoint discovered a link between these and related phenomena. [More]
Researchers explore association between vitamin A and neonatal health

Researchers explore association between vitamin A and neonatal health

The impact vitamin A has on newborns is virtually unknown, but Penn State nutrition researchers have published two papers that may provide a framework for future investigations of the vitamin and neonatal health. [More]
UAlberta researchers discover link between pulmonary hypertension, diabetes and cancer

UAlberta researchers discover link between pulmonary hypertension, diabetes and cancer

A UAlberta team has discovered that a protein that plays a critical role in metabolism, the process by which the cell generates energy from foods, is important for the development of pulmonary hypertension, a deadly disease. [More]
Research shows that copper could help to prevent Ebola spread

Research shows that copper could help to prevent Ebola spread

Research from the University of Southampton has indicated that copper could help to prevent the spread of Ebola. [More]
Study on papillary thyroid carcinoma to be presented at 84th Annual Meeting of the ATA

Study on papillary thyroid carcinoma to be presented at 84th Annual Meeting of the ATA

The prevalence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer, is increasing rapidly. New research to determine the impact of radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy on survival in PTC, describing a novel blood test able to detect circulating BRAFV600E-positive tumor DNA, and identifying a long non-coding RNA specifically associated with the thyroid that is down-regulated in PTC compared to normal thyroid tissue in patient-derived clinical specimens and cell cultures will be featured in oral presentations delivered at the 84th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association, October 29-November 2, 2014, in Coronado, California. [More]
KU researchers find potential therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

KU researchers find potential therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

A team at the University of Kansas School of Medicine has identified a potential target for treating breast cancer, including a particularly deadly form of the disease. [More]
BloodCenter of Wisconsin announces availability of cancer mutation HemeOnc Panel

BloodCenter of Wisconsin announces availability of cancer mutation HemeOnc Panel

BloodCenter of Wisconsin's Diagnostic Laboratories today announced the availability of a comprehensive cancer mutation HemeOnc Panel using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. The NGS panel developed by BloodCenter of Wisconsin is designed to detect variants in 30 genes that are either prognostic or diagnostic for 10 different myeloid hematologic malignancies. [More]
New research findings on Graves' disease to be highlighted at ATA meeting

New research findings on Graves' disease to be highlighted at ATA meeting

A unique mouse model of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism, and new research findings that may help improve the treatment of Graves' disease will be highlighted in oral and poster presentations at the 84th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association, October 29-November 2, 2014, in Coronado, California. [More]
WUSM researchers sequence genome of enterovirus D68 samples from patients

WUSM researchers sequence genome of enterovirus D68 samples from patients

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have sequenced the genome of enterovirus D68 sampled from patients treated at St. Louis Children's Hospital. Nationwide, the virus has spread rapidly in recent months and caused severe respiratory illness in young children, with some patients requiring hospitalization. [More]
Nanostructures around brain cells may have role in central nervous system function

Nanostructures around brain cells may have role in central nervous system function

An accumulation of a protein called amyloid-beta into large insoluble deposits called plaques is known to cause Alzheimer's disease. One aspect of this illness that has not received much attention is which role the structure of the brain environment plays. [More]
Prof. Mary-Claire King receives 2014 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science

Prof. Mary-Claire King receives 2014 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science

At a ceremony held in New York City on September 19, 2014, leading geneticist and humanitarian Prof. Mary-Claire King, the American Cancer Society Professor of Genome Sciences and Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle and 2008 Honorary Doctor of Philosophy of Tel Aviv University, was awarded the 2014 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science. [More]
New study pinpoints complex genetic origins for autoimmune diseases

New study pinpoints complex genetic origins for autoimmune diseases

Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans — ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis (MS), to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma — mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments. [More]