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Researchers advance stability of protein that may prevent brain damage from toxins

Researchers advance stability of protein that may prevent brain damage from toxins

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals-particularly those in pesticides and chemical weapons. [More]
Brain responses of few individuals are remarkably strong predictor

Brain responses of few individuals are remarkably strong predictor

Media and marketing experts have long sought a reliable method of forecasting responses from the general population to future products and messages. According to a study conducted at The City College of New York, it appears that the brain responses of just a few individuals are a remarkably strong predictor. [More]
Researchers identify RNA that modulates action of important gene in process of programmed cell death

Researchers identify RNA that modulates action of important gene in process of programmed cell death

Researchers from the University of S-o Paulo (USP) have identified an RNA known as INXS that, although containing no instructions for the production of a protein, modulates the action of an important gene in the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. [More]
Blood-forming stem cell transplantation benefits infants with severe combined immunodeficiency

Blood-forming stem cell transplantation benefits infants with severe combined immunodeficiency

Babies who are born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully treated with a transplant of blood-forming stem cells, according to experts led by Memorial Sloan Kettering's Richard J. O'Reilly, MD, a world-renowned pioneer in the development of transplant protocols. [More]
Researchers find differences in brain wiring between children with SPD and those with autism

Researchers find differences in brain wiring between children with SPD and those with autism

Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that children with sensory processing disorders have decreased structural brain connections in specific sensory regions different than those in autism, further establishing SPD as a clinically important neurodevelopmental disorder. [More]
No two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have same genome

No two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have same genome

Just as no two people possess the same genetic makeup, a recent study has shown that no two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have an identical genome. [More]
Researchers discover new vaccine targets to combat malaria

Researchers discover new vaccine targets to combat malaria

Researchers have discovered new vaccine targets that could help in the battle against malaria. Taking a new, large-scale approach to this search, researchers tested a library of proteins from the Plasmodium falciparum parasite with antibodies produced by the immune systems of a group of infected children. [More]
Research findings suggest new therapeutic strategy for intracerebral hemorrhage

Research findings suggest new therapeutic strategy for intracerebral hemorrhage

Intracerebral hemorrhage is a type of stroke that affects two million people worldwide each year. Despite its seriousness, no effective treatment has yet been developed. But if a recent study in the journal Nanomedicine is right, good news for doctors and patients might one day arrive in a very small package: namely, a "peptide nanofiber scaffold." [More]
Obesity mutation MC4R can significantly contribute to weight gain at early age

Obesity mutation MC4R can significantly contribute to weight gain at early age

People who have the most common genetic mutation linked to obesity respond differently to pictures of appetizing foods than overweight or obese people who do not have the genetic mutation, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Post-doctoral fellows working on stem cell treatment for stroke

Post-doctoral fellows working on stem cell treatment for stroke

The San Antonio Life Sciences Institute, a joint venture between The University of Texas at San Antonio and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, has selected the winners of the Postdoc Initiative Pilot Program. [More]
Discovery could lead to development of new cancer therapies

Discovery could lead to development of new cancer therapies

DNA mutations-long known to fuel cancer as well as evolutionary changes in a living organism-had been thought to be rare events that occur randomly throughout the genome. [More]
Taking daily vitamin D supplement is best way to improve vitamin D levels in the body

Taking daily vitamin D supplement is best way to improve vitamin D levels in the body

Do you currently take a vitamin D supplement? New research says you should. A study conducted by USANA Health Sciences, in conjunction with Intermountain Healthcare's The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital (TOSH), found that taking a daily vitamin D supplement is the best way to improve vitamin D levels in the body. [More]
More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

UEA research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems. More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer's or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA). [More]
Researchers discover new function of body's most important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers discover new function of body's most important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered a new function of the body's most important tumor-suppressing protein. Called p53, this protein has been called "the guardian of the genome." [More]
Virologists find cells are having to fight virus constantly, even in dormant phase

Virologists find cells are having to fight virus constantly, even in dormant phase

Scientists investigating the herpes virus have been surprised to find an ongoing conflict in the cells of sufferers, even when the virus is apparently dormant. [More]
Scientists show for the first time how structures inside cells are regulated

Scientists show for the first time how structures inside cells are regulated

New research from scientists at the University of Kent has shown for the first time how the structures inside cells are regulated - a breakthrough that could have a major impact on cancer therapy development. [More]
Diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters

Diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters

A diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters, finds a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Alterations to single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt

Alterations to single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person's risk of attempting suicide. [More]
Researchers investigate hereditary breast cancer to find new treatment approaches

Researchers investigate hereditary breast cancer to find new treatment approaches

Deborah Kelly and Zhi Sheng, assistant professors at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, recently received a grant from the Commonwealth Health Research Board to investigate hereditary breast cancer, an effort that may lead to new treatment approaches. [More]
New electrical pattern in brains predicts how well individual animals fare in stressful situations

New electrical pattern in brains predicts how well individual animals fare in stressful situations

Some people can handle stressful situations better than others, and it's not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond. [More]