Medical Science News RSS Feed - Medical Science News

CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

The ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells in the blood-a marker of immune system health and associated with mortality risk in the general population-is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease in HIV-infected patients, according to a new study published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Specific urine proteins may be indicators of acute kidney injury in preterm infants

Specific urine proteins may be indicators of acute kidney injury in preterm infants

A new study indicates that several proteins are excreted differently in preterm infants with kidney injury compared with those with healthy kidneys. [More]
Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

A new study, which followed 180 pre-term infants from birth to age seven, found that babies who were fed more breast milk within the first 28 days of life had had larger volumes of certain regions of the brain at term equivalent and had better IQs, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function. [More]
Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

New research by University of Iowa scientists helps explain how a hormone system often targeted to treat cardiovascular disease can also lower metabolism and promote obesity. [More]
Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Not only is breast cancer more than one disease, but a single breast cancer tumor can vary within itself, a finding that University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers discovered has the potential to lead to very different patient treatment plans depending on the tumor sample and diagnostic testing used. [More]
Scientists identify new group of molecules that could slow tumour growth in prostate cancer patients

Scientists identify new group of molecules that could slow tumour growth in prostate cancer patients

Prostate cancer patients have been offered hope after scientists at Newcastle University, UK, have identified a new group of molecules that could be targeted to slow tumour growth. [More]
Human immune system proteins can help combat chlamydia infections

Human immune system proteins can help combat chlamydia infections

Scientists from Federal Research and Clinical Centre of Physical-Chemical Medicine, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology and MIPT have shown that peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) of the human immune system can play a key role in the fight against chlamydia infections. Their study was published in Infection and Immunity. [More]
New gene therapy shows promising results for treating neurodegenerative disorders

New gene therapy shows promising results for treating neurodegenerative disorders

A new gene therapy approach designed to replace the enzyme that is deficient in patients with the inherited neurodegenerative disorders Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases successfully delivered the therapeutic gene to the brains of treated mice, restored enzyme function, and extended survival by about 2.5-fold. [More]
Researchers discover genetic changes in MSH3 gene in patients with hereditary colon cancer

Researchers discover genetic changes in MSH3 gene in patients with hereditary colon cancer

The formation of large numbers of polyps in the colon has a high probability of developing into colon cancer, if left untreated. [More]
Scientists identify mutation responsible for new, rare genetic disorder

Scientists identify mutation responsible for new, rare genetic disorder

An international team of researchers has discovered the mutation responsible for a rare, newly identified genetic disorder that causes craniofacial abnormalities and developmental delays. [More]
Transcranial alternating current stimulation during sleep can enhance memory in healthy people

Transcranial alternating current stimulation during sleep can enhance memory in healthy people

When you sleep, your brain is busy storing and consolidating things you learned that day, stuff you'll need in your memory toolkit tomorrow, next week, or next year. For many people, especially those with neurological conditions, memory impairment can be a debilitating symptom that affects every-day life in profound ways [More]
Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue

Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue

Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualization of oxygen in tissue. [More]
Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

As women enter menopause, their levels of physical activity decrease; for years scientists were unable to determine why. [More]
ZMYND8 protein can suppress metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer

ZMYND8 protein can suppress metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer

Although it reads like European license plate number, a protein known as ZMYND8 has demonstrated its ability to block metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Moderately high TSH concentrations in infants linked to neurodevelopmental outcomes at school age

Moderately high TSH concentrations in infants linked to neurodevelopmental outcomes at school age

Babies born with moderately high concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone have a higher risk of poor educational and development outcomes at school age, a world-first University of Sydney study reveals. [More]
Researchers develop new test for early detection of patients' resistance to leukemia treatment

Researchers develop new test for early detection of patients' resistance to leukemia treatment

Australian researchers have made a world-first breakthrough in the early detection of patients' resistance to a common treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. [More]
Discovery of pain paradox paves way to new methods of pain control

Discovery of pain paradox paves way to new methods of pain control

A natural substance known to activate pain in the central nervous system has been found to have the opposite effect in other parts of the body, potentially paving the way to new methods of pain control. [More]
Exposure to deep space radiation could be cause for cardiovascular problems in Apollo astronauts

Exposure to deep space radiation could be cause for cardiovascular problems in Apollo astronauts

Members of the successful Apollo space program are experiencing higher rates of cardiovascular problems that are thought to be caused by their exposure to deep space radiation, according to a Florida State University researcher. [More]
Smoking-related deficits in brain dopamine return to normal after quitting, study reports

Smoking-related deficits in brain dopamine return to normal after quitting, study reports

A new study in Biological Psychiatry reports that smoking-related deficits in brain dopamine, a chemical implicated in reward and addiction, return to normal three months after quitting. [More]
Researchers identify altered activity in distinct areas of the brain during hypnosis sessions

Researchers identify altered activity in distinct areas of the brain during hypnosis sessions

Your eyelids are getting heavy, your arms are going limp and you feel like you're floating through space. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement