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Yale Cancer Center researchers identify cause of myeloma

Yale Cancer Center researchers identify cause of myeloma

Yale Cancer Center researchers have identified what causes a third of all myelomas, a type of cancer affecting plasma cells. The findings, published in the Feb. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, could fundamentally change the way this cancer and others are treated. [More]
Simple physics may play key role in helping the body to fight infection

Simple physics may play key role in helping the body to fight infection

Simple physics may play a larger role than previously thought in helping control key bodily processes - such as how the body fights infection. [More]
CHLA researchers develop novel model for studying neonatal lung disorder

CHLA researchers develop novel model for studying neonatal lung disorder

Investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have created a novel model for studying a lung disorder of newborn babies. Their study, published in PLOS ONE on February 10, describes the first model that allows investigators to consider the chronic effects of developmental lung disease. [More]
Alcohol appears to impair the body's ability to keep gut bacteria in check

Alcohol appears to impair the body's ability to keep gut bacteria in check

Alcohol itself can directly damage liver cells. Now researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report evidence that alcohol is also harmful to the liver for a second reason — it allows gut bacteria to migrate to the liver, promoting alcohol-induced liver disease. [More]
Penn investigators explore new treatment option for cocaine dependence

Penn investigators explore new treatment option for cocaine dependence

In the ongoing fight against drug addiction, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Nursing and Perelman School of Medicine have discovered a unique application for an FDA-approved drug currently used for obese patients and type 2 diabetics: treatment for cocaine dependence. [More]
Cardiac MRI imaging assesses myocardial damage

Cardiac MRI imaging assesses myocardial damage

In a world-first, researchers from Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) have performed cardiac MRI imaging using a 7T MRI scanner in a patient-based study. [More]
Study provides new insight into how drug addicts' brains wired differently

Study provides new insight into how drug addicts' brains wired differently

A study out today provides new insight into how the brains of drug addicts may be wired differently. The findings, which appear in the journal Psychopharmacology, show that while drug users have very strong motivation to seek out "rewards," they exhibit an impaired ability to adjust their behavior and are less fulfilled once they have achieved what they desire. [More]
Starting marijuana at younger age may hinder brain development

Starting marijuana at younger age may hinder brain development

The age at which an adolescent begins using marijuana may affect typical brain development, according to researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas. In a paper recently published in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, scientists describe how marijuana use, and the age at which use is initiated, may adversely alter brain structures that underlie higher order thinking. [More]
Researchers devise lipid-based diets to relieve symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise lipid-based diets to relieve symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer´s disease (AD) is the most common disease underlying memory problems and dementia in the elderly. One of the invariable pathologies in AD is degeneration of cholinergic synapses in brain cortex and hippocampus. [More]
Study holds promise for new alternatives to treat leukemia

Study holds promise for new alternatives to treat leukemia

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a type of cancer found primarily in children can grow only when signaled to do so by other nearby cells that are noncancerous. [More]
Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Previous research has established a link between genetic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to an increased risk of developing ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer in women. [More]
Boosting intrinsic growth programs can enhance axon regeneration of injured neurons

Boosting intrinsic growth programs can enhance axon regeneration of injured neurons

Damage to axons in the central nervous system (CNS) typically results in permanent functional deficits. Boosting intrinsic growth programs can dramatically augment the axon regeneration of injured neurons. If injured neurons can regenerate sufficient number of axons, the CNS may recover and overcome such functional deficits. [More]
UPMC uses simple gene test to personalize medications for patients undergoing heart catheterization

UPMC uses simple gene test to personalize medications for patients undergoing heart catheterization

Patients who go to UPMC Presbyterian for heart catheterization and who receive a stent to treat clogged arteries are now being screened with a simple blood test to determine if they have a gene variant that makes them less likely to respond to a blood-thinning medication commonly prescribed after the procedure. [More]
Scientists propose use of mathematical models to find better treatment for bladder cancer

Scientists propose use of mathematical models to find better treatment for bladder cancer

MIPT scientists together with their colleagues from St. Petersburg and Israel have analyzed more than 500 previously published scientific articles and proposed their own approach to the choice of methods used for the treatment of one of the most common cancers. [More]
Researchers identify genetic mutations that lower complications associated with diabetes

Researchers identify genetic mutations that lower complications associated with diabetes

The most significant complications of diabetes include diabetic retinal disease, or retinopathy, and diabetic kidney disease, or nephropathy. Both involve damaged capillaries. [More]
Researchers use hydrogel to prevent stem cells and human embryos from differentiating

Researchers use hydrogel to prevent stem cells and human embryos from differentiating

Unlike normal cells, stem cells are pluripotent -- they can become any cell type, which makes them powerful potential treatments for diseases such as diabetes, leukemia and age-related blindness. However, maintaining this versatility until the time is right is a major challenge. [More]
SBP researchers identify molecular switch that controls genes needed to repair skeletal muscle

SBP researchers identify molecular switch that controls genes needed to repair skeletal muscle

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Research Institute (SBP) have conclusively identified the protein complex that controls the genes needed to repair skeletal muscle. [More]
Kumamoto University researchers identify protein that limits severity of Alport syndrome

Kumamoto University researchers identify protein that limits severity of Alport syndrome

Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have identified a protein that limits the severity of Alport syndrome, a type of genetic kidney disease. The finding can provide clues that point toward new therapeutic approaches for Alport syndrome. [More]
New technique could help detect harmful PAMP molecules in certain processed foods

New technique could help detect harmful PAMP molecules in certain processed foods

Our favourite foods could be made healthier thanks to a new technique developed by the University of Leicester which has identified harmful bacterial molecules in certain processed foods such as burgers and ready meals. [More]
Drugs designed to curb Rac1 signaling pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers

Drugs designed to curb Rac1 signaling pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers

New research uncovers a cascade of reactions within nerve cells that relay sensations of pain associated with inflammation. The findings, which are published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, indicate that drugs designed to curb this pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers. [More]
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