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Rockwell automation enhances pharmasuite MES software for medical device manufacturers

The PharmaSuite v7.0 software extends its proven batch track-and-trace capabilities, already used by some of the world’s largest pharmaceutical producers, into the discrete environment... [More]
Research findings could bolster efforts to develop next gen of anti-viral treatments

Research findings could bolster efforts to develop next gen of anti-viral treatments

A newly developed spectroscopy method is helping to clarify the poorly understood molecular process by which an anti-HIV drug induces lethal mutations in the virus's genetic material. [More]

Malaysia wins “International Medical Travel Journal (IMTJ), Medical Travel Destination of the Year Award 2015"

Malaysia has been proclaimed “Medical Travel Destination of the Year” at the International Medical Travel Journal (IMTJ) Medical Travel Awards 2015... [More]
Effimune obtains regulatory approval for Phase I clinical trial in humans of its new immunomodulator FR104

Effimune obtains regulatory approval for Phase I clinical trial in humans of its new immunomodulator FR104

Effimune announced today that it had received the authorization from the Belgian regulatory authority, the FAMHP (Federal Agency for Medicines and Health Products) for a Phase I clinical trial of FR104, its drug candidate for controlling the regulation of the immune system... [More]
Research: Stem cell injection may soon slow or reverse effects of age-related macular degeneration

Research: Stem cell injection may soon slow or reverse effects of age-related macular degeneration

An injection of stem cells into the eye may soon slow or reverse the effects of early-stage age-related macular degeneration, according to new research from scientists at Cedars-Sinai. Currently, there is no treatment that slows the progression of the disease, which is the leading cause of vision loss in people over 65. [More]
High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

You might think that you can get away with eating fatty foods for a few days without it making any significant changes to your body. Think again. After just five days of eating a high-fat diet, the way in which the body's muscle processes nutrients changes, which could lead to long-term problems such as weight gain, obesity, and other health issues, a new study has found. [More]
Researchers examine how probiotics can help improve health, prevent disease

Researchers examine how probiotics can help improve health, prevent disease

In recent years, research into the benefits of gut bacteria has exploded. Scientists across the globe are examining how these microbes can help improve health and prevent disease. [More]
New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

Why do smokers have a five to ten times greater risk of developing alcohol dependence than nonsmokers? Do smokers have a greater tendency toward addiction in general or does nicotine somehow reinforce alcohol consumption? Now, a study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute helps provide insight into these questions, showing that, in rat models, nicotine exposure actually promotes alcohol dependence. [More]
Lack of fish oil fatty acids can limit brain growth during fetal development and early in life

Lack of fish oil fatty acids can limit brain growth during fetal development and early in life

While recent reports question whether fish oil supplements support heart health, UC Irvine scientists have found that the fatty acids they contain are vitally important to the developing brain. [More]
MIT chemists develop portable sensor to detect spoiled meat

MIT chemists develop portable sensor to detect spoiled meat

MIT chemists have devised an inexpensive, portable sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat, allowing consumers to determine whether the meat in their grocery store or refrigerator is safe to eat. [More]
Autophagy: A new approach to fighting tuberculosis

Autophagy: A new approach to fighting tuberculosis

A new approach to combatting tuberculosis would take advantage of a complex, natural process called autophagy that the human body uses to recycle nutrients, remove damaged cell components, eliminate invading bacteria, and respond to inflammation. [More]
Study: BPA exposure during pregnancy affects fertility, reproductive function

Study: BPA exposure during pregnancy affects fertility, reproductive function

When scientists exposed pregnant mice to levels of bisphenol A equivalent to those considered safe in humans, three generations of female mouse offspring experienced significant reproductive problems, including declines in fertility, sexual maturity and pregnancy success, the scientists report in the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. [More]
New research links megalin protein with malignant melanomas

New research links megalin protein with malignant melanomas

Today it is not possible to predict spreading from malignant melanomas. Melanoma metastases are furthermore extremely difficult to eliminate as traditional treatment such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy is mostly ineffective. Only ten per cent of the patients survive once they reach an advanced stage with distant metastases. [More]
Women with ovarian cancer need to be tested for BRCA genes

Women with ovarian cancer need to be tested for BRCA genes

The genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 play a significant role in hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Recent media attention has focused on American actress Angelina Jolie's decision to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes surgically removed after genetic testing for such cancers. [More]
Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Rooted in malfunctions in the tiny power plants that energize our cells, mitochondrial disorders are notoriously complex and variable, with few effective treatments. Now, novel findings in microscopic worms may hold great promise for children and adults with mitochondrial disorders [More]

New set of molecules could carry medicines into cells

Just as a scientist dressed in a lab coat and goggles might get stuck behind the velvet rope at a trendy bar, many otherwise good drugs can't get inside cells if they don't look the part. In a report published this week in ACS Central Science, researchers report a new set of molecules that could ferry medicines into cells by taking on the right charge and shape, easily sliding past lipid membranes. [More]
SGK1 enzyme protects brain cells in animal models of Parkinson's disease

SGK1 enzyme protects brain cells in animal models of Parkinson's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found how a widely known but little-studied enzyme protects brain cells in models of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Scientists identify way to potentially predict progression in patients with early form of breast cancer

Scientists identify way to potentially predict progression in patients with early form of breast cancer

Scientists in Manchester have identified a way to potentially predict which patients with an early form of breast cancer will experience disease progression. [More]
NIST researchers develop new 2D NMR fingerprinting method to measure monoclonal antibodies

NIST researchers develop new 2D NMR fingerprinting method to measure monoclonal antibodies

National Institute of Standards and Technology researchers at the Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research have demonstrated the most precise method yet to measure the structural configuration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), an important factor in determining the safety and efficacy of these biomolecules as medicines. [More]
Houston Methodist researchers discover new, ex vivo lung cancer model to study tumor progression

Houston Methodist researchers discover new, ex vivo lung cancer model to study tumor progression

Without good models to study cancer metastasis -- the spread of cancer cells from one organ to another -- cancer researchers have struggled to understand tumor progression fully, and new therapies targeting the main causes of death are slow to come. [More]
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