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Scientists discover how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves, others from antibiotics

Scientists discover how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves, others from antibiotics

Scientists from the Institute of Food Research and the University of East Anglia have discovered how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves and others in the gut from antibiotics. [More]
New study identifies how SNAIL gene helps cancer cells break free from primary tumor

New study identifies how SNAIL gene helps cancer cells break free from primary tumor

More than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths are caused by the spread of cancer cells from their primary tumor site to other areas of the body. A new study has identified how one important gene helps cancer cells break free from the primary tumor. [More]
Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Johns Hopkins and University of Alberta researchers have identified a single protein as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can be found that targets the problematic protein, they say, it could help smooth treatment for patients with conditions ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes to HIV [More]
Scientists produce novel class of molecules that could help combat cancer, other diseases

Scientists produce novel class of molecules that could help combat cancer, other diseases

Promising treatments known as biologics are on the market and under development for many serious illnesses such as cancer, but some of them come with high risks, even lethal ones. Now scientists have produced a novel class of molecules that could be as effective but without the dangerous side effects. [More]
Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers look to understand the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in the hope of finding new ways to treat the disease. A new study published online today (December 17th) in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the brain that leads to ALS. [More]
Bacterial biofilms may increase colon cancer risk

Bacterial biofilms may increase colon cancer risk

Researchers from Johns Hopkins have found that dense mats of interacting bacteria, called biofilms, were present in the majority of cancers and polyps, particularly those on the right side of the colon. The presence of these bacterial bunches, they say, may represent an increased risk for colon cancer and could form the basis of new diagnostic tests. [More]
Researchers use novel technique to identify microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients

Researchers use novel technique to identify microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients

Using an innovative technique combining genetic analysis and mathematical modeling with some basic sleuthing, researchers have identified previously undescribed microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients. The millimeter-sized abnormalities may explain why areas of the brain that appear normal can produce severe seizures in many children and adults with epilepsy. [More]
UMass Amherst study: Naming between the ages of 6 and 9 months lays 'learning foundation'

UMass Amherst study: Naming between the ages of 6 and 9 months lays 'learning foundation'

In a follow-up to her earlier studies of learning in infancy, developmental psychologist Lisa Scott and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are reporting that talking to babies in their first year, in particular naming things in their world, can help them make connections between what they see and hear, and these learning benefits can be seen as much as five years later. [More]
MU researcher developing nano-scale molecules to image, treat different diseases

MU researcher developing nano-scale molecules to image, treat different diseases

Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology, or the use of microscopic structures to diagnose, image, treat and prevent disease. Current problems in nanomedicine include understanding and anticipating the potentially toxic impact these nanostructures have on the body and the environment once they're released. [More]
Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Eliminating health disparities between races is a goal of many groups and organizations, but a team of sociologists suggests that finding the reasons for the differences in the timing of black and white deaths may be trickier than once thought. [More]
Novel technique to identify biological markers in brain development

Novel technique to identify biological markers in brain development

With a unique, multi-faceted approach, researchers at the Lieber Institute for Brain Development have quantified the effect of previously unidentified anomalies in genetic expression that determine how the human brain develops from its earliest stages. [More]
Two UH researchers named fellows of National Academy of Inventors

Two UH researchers named fellows of National Academy of Inventors

Two University of Houston faculty members have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors for their contributions to scientific and technological innovation. [More]
New study reveals how the brain can distinguish between good and bad smells

New study reveals how the brain can distinguish between good and bad smells

Whether an odor is pleasant or disgusting to an organism is not just a matter of taste. Often, an organism's survival depends on its ability to make just such a discrimination, because odors can provide important information about food sources, oviposition sites or suitable mates. [More]
Tufts University researchers report that extra vitamin E can protect against pneumonia

Tufts University researchers report that extra vitamin E can protect against pneumonia

Extra vitamin E protected older mice from a bacterial infection that commonly causes pneumonia. Microbiologists and nutrition researchers from Tufts University report that the extra vitamin E helped regulate the mice's immune system. [More]
Research finding could inspire new ideas for treating type 2 oculocutaneous albinism

Research finding could inspire new ideas for treating type 2 oculocutaneous albinism

Newly published research provides the first demonstration of how a genetic mutation associated with a common form of albinism leads to the lack of melanin pigments that characterizes the condition. [More]
Two UT Arlington professors named National Academy of Inventors Fellows

Two UT Arlington professors named National Academy of Inventors Fellows

Two University of Texas at Arlington professors known for their innovation in the world of chemistry have been named Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. [More]
Stuttgart scientists reveal current state of research on catalytic micro- and nanomotors

Stuttgart scientists reveal current state of research on catalytic micro- and nanomotors

At least since the movie “The Fantastic Voyage” in 1966, in which a submarine is shrunk down and injected into the blood stream of a human, people have been toying with the idea of sending tiny “micromachines” and “nanorobots” into our organs or individual cells to carry out delicate “repairs”. [More]
Mitochondrial DNA may predict overall risk of frailty, death

Mitochondrial DNA may predict overall risk of frailty, death

New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) found in peoples’ blood directly relates to how frail they are medically. This DNA may prove to be a useful predictor of overall risk of frailty and death from any cause 10 to 15 years before symptoms appear. [More]
Study provides new evidence for anti-cirrhotic effects of GENFIT's GFT505

Study provides new evidence for anti-cirrhotic effects of GENFIT's GFT505

GENFIT, a biopharmaceutical company at the forefront of developing therapeutic and diagnostic solutions in metabolic and inflammatory diseases, that notably affect the liver or the gastrointestinal system, today announces that a recent study provides new evidence for anti-cirrhotic effects of GFT505 in the context of NASH. [More]
New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

A new study by an international team of researchers shows for the first time that people may inherit some of the intestinal bacteria that cause Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively know as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, recently published in Genome Medicine, also confirmed that antibiotics could worsen the imbalance in the gut microbes. [More]