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New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New research shows that infections can impair your cognitive ability measured on an IQ scale. The study is the largest of its kind to date, and it shows a clear correlation between infection levels and impaired cognition. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists safely use immune cells to treat multiple myeloma

Johns Hopkins scientists safely use immune cells to treat multiple myeloma

In a report on what is believed to be the first small clinical trial of its kind, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have safely used immune cells grown from patients' own bone marrow to treat multiple myeloma, a cancer of white blood cells. [More]

Linkam launch the WS37 Warm Stage for life cell research - applications in andrology

At the 2015 and 10th anniversary annual meeting of the Association of Biomedical Andrologists, Linkam have introduced a new solution for embryologists seeking a better solution for the evaluation and quantification of sperm... [More]
Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a second-generation antibiotic that shows early effectiveness against common bacterial infections that pose a serious health threat to children and adults. [More]
RepliCel's autologous cell treatment for Achilles tendinosis to be presented at ISCT 2015

RepliCel's autologous cell treatment for Achilles tendinosis to be presented at ISCT 2015

RepliCel Life Sciences Inc., a clinical stage regenerative medicine company focused on the development of autologous cell therapies, announced today an upcoming poster presentation at the International Society for Cellular Therapy on RepliCel's autologous cell treatment for chronic Achilles tendinosis currently in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial. [More]
Novel drug target identified for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Novel drug target identified for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, in collaboration with colleagues the University of California, San Diego, identified a novel drug target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that focuses on the cells that are directly responsible for the cartilage damage in affected joints. [More]
Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

A drug that could halt the progression of multiple sclerosis may soon be developed thanks to a discovery by a team at the CHUM Research Centre and the University of Montreal. The researchers have identified a molecule called MCAM, and they have shown that blocking this molecule could delay the onset of the disease and significantly slow its progression. [More]
Non-coding micro RNA molecule may control chemotherapy resistance among ovarian cancer patients

Non-coding micro RNA molecule may control chemotherapy resistance among ovarian cancer patients

A molecule that helps control gene expression may play a role in controlling chemotherapy resistance among patients with the most common form of ovarian cancer. [More]
First-of-its-kind DNA bank aims at advancing research into genetics of stuttering

First-of-its-kind DNA bank aims at advancing research into genetics of stuttering

Scientists at the University of Alberta's Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research want Albertans to give a spit -- five millilitres to be precise -- to help find the cause and a cure for stuttering. [More]
Scientists reveal how lymphatic system develops in embryo

Scientists reveal how lymphatic system develops in embryo

For over one hundred years, scientists have debated the question of the origins of the lymphatic system - a parallel system to the blood vessels that serves as a conduit for everything from immune cells to fat molecules to cancer cells. This issue has now been resolved by Dr. Karina Yaniv of Weizmann Institute's Biological Regulation Department. In a study reported online today in Nature, she and her team revealed how the lymphatic system develops in the embryo and for the first time managed to grow lymphatic cells in the lab. [More]
Researchers develop way to potentially predict future infectious disease outbreaks in humans

Researchers develop way to potentially predict future infectious disease outbreaks in humans

Researchers at the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology have developed a way to predict which species of rodents are likeliest to be sources of new disease outbreaks in humans. Their study, which includes maps showing potential future disease hot spots, appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Research may offer new targets for diagnosing, treating advanced prostate cancer

Research may offer new targets for diagnosing, treating advanced prostate cancer

Researchers with the Indiana University School of Medicine have identified a molecule that promotes metastasis of advanced prostate cancer to the bone, an incurable condition that significantly decreases quality of life. [More]
Celgene to use Cypher's Coral technology to find novel genomic biomarkers

Celgene to use Cypher's Coral technology to find novel genomic biomarkers

Cypher Genomics, Inc., a leading genome informatics company, today announced a collaboration with Celgene Corporation to apply Cypher's Coral technology to discover novel genomic biomarkers that associate with patient response to innovative medicines. [More]

Scientists find key to light-induced color change in fish skin

The neon tetra fish from the Amazonas River, along with some reptiles, amphibians, and other fish, takes advantage of structural colors in its skin to change its appearance in response to a triggering signal. In the light-adapted state, its lateral stripe shimmers blue-green, in the dark it is indigo. Scientists from Israel have now found an unambiguous answer to how this intriguing mechanism works. They present their results, which favor the so-called "Venetian blind" model, in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [More]
IDT facilitates versatile, scalable solution to enrich enhancer:promoter interactions

IDT facilitates versatile, scalable solution to enrich enhancer:promoter interactions

Advancing the development of novel methods for understanding gene expression, Integrated DNA Technologies has enabled Dr Jim Hughes, Associate Professor at the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford, UK, to optimize his unique Capture-C method, based on Chromosomal Conformational Capture (3C). [More]
Research shows how immune system controls biological clock in times of inflammation, infection

Research shows how immune system controls biological clock in times of inflammation, infection

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of Pennsylvania have uncovered an important link between our body clock and the immune system that will have relevance to the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases. [More]
UK Medical Device Companies in the Spotlight at the Medilink UK Awards 2015

UK Medical Device Companies in the Spotlight at the Medilink UK Awards 2015

News-Medical.net was proud to sponsor this year’s Medilink UK Innovation Award. The Innovation Award was presented to The Learning Clinic for their VitalPAC Nurse software platform which is used to capture patient observations in real time... [More]
New study suggests ways to accelerate recovery from dangerous diarrheal disease

New study suggests ways to accelerate recovery from dangerous diarrheal disease

A new study delineates a sequential pattern of changes in the intestinal microbial population of patients recovering from cholera in Bangladesh, findings that may point to ways of speeding recovery from the dangerous diarrheal disease. [More]
Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower performance on a test of "cognitive processing speed" are more likely to have depression and anxiety symptoms as adults, reports a paper in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Specific bacterial community in female genital tract induces inflammation, increases HIV risk

Specific bacterial community in female genital tract induces inflammation, increases HIV risk

A team led by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard has found that the most common bacterial community in the genital tract among healthy South Africa women not only is significantly different from that of women in developed countries but also leads to elevated levels of inflammatory proteins. [More]
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