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Women need more propofol to stay sedated during oral surgery

Women need more propofol to stay sedated during oral surgery

Anesthesia Progress – The stress that oral surgery patients experience during a procedure can cause elevated heart rates and blood pressure during operations. [More]
Microbial community less stable and less diverse in antibiotic-treated children

Microbial community less stable and less diverse in antibiotic-treated children

The DIABIMMUNE project followed the development of 39 Finnish infants from birth to the age of three. Half of the children received 9-15 antibiotic treatments during the research period, and the other half did not receive any such treatments. [More]
ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

The American College of Physicians today provided physician perspective on the escalating cost of prescription drugs, the impact of the costs on internal medicine physicians and their patients, and support for the intent of the bipartisan Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2016 to reduce anti-competitive practices. [More]
New study reveals conversion of oral cannabidiol to THC by acidic fluids in the stomach

New study reveals conversion of oral cannabidiol to THC by acidic fluids in the stomach

A new study demonstrating the conversion of oral cannabidiol (CBD) to the psychoactive component tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the presence of gastric fluids could explain why children given CBD to treat epilepsy had an unexpectedly high rate of adverse effects such as sleepiness and fatigue. [More]
Molecular map of transporter proteins could be vital step toward drug discovery against zinc-related diseases

Molecular map of transporter proteins could be vital step toward drug discovery against zinc-related diseases

Mapping the molecular structure where medicine goes to work is a crucial step toward drug discovery against deadly diseases. [More]
Study shows Alzheimer's disease can lead to diabetes

Study shows Alzheimer's disease can lead to diabetes

Drugs used to treat diabetes could also be used to treat Alzheimer's disease, and vice versa, according to new research from the University of Aberdeen. [More]
Cardiac surgery patients who received omega-3 supplementation experience reduced hospital stays

Cardiac surgery patients who received omega-3 supplementation experience reduced hospital stays

A new meta-analysis published in Clinical Nutrition found that cardiac surgery patients who received omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (compared to placebo) in advance of surgery experienced reduced postoperative cardiac arrhythmias and significantly reduced the length of hospital stay by up to 2.4 days. The results are based on 11 RCT's with 1038 patients. [More]
Unmanned drones could be economical to deliver vaccines quickly in developing countries

Unmanned drones could be economical to deliver vaccines quickly in developing countries

Using unmanned drones to deliver vaccines in low- and middle-income countries may save money and improve vaccination rates, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center suggests. [More]
New Aspirin-Guide mobile app helps clinicians and patients make informed decisions about aspirin use

New Aspirin-Guide mobile app helps clinicians and patients make informed decisions about aspirin use

Low dose aspirin is recommended by clinicians as a preventive measure for patients who have already had a heart attack or stroke, but the risk of taking low-dose aspirin to prevent or delay a first heart attack or stroke is less clear, as the benefit for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) must be balanced with the increased risk of gastrointestinal or other bleeding. [More]
Mayo Clinic highlights potential merits of individualizing treatment for patients taking antidepressants

Mayo Clinic highlights potential merits of individualizing treatment for patients taking antidepressants

Mayo Clinic is highlighting the potential merits of using precision medicine in prescribing antidepressants. Details appear in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Potential therapeutic approaches to combat chronic myeloid leukemia

Potential therapeutic approaches to combat chronic myeloid leukemia

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) develops through chromosomal alterations in blood-forming cells of the bone marrow and usually occurs in older persons. Around 20 percent of adults diagnosed with leukemia suffer from this type of blood cancer. [More]
Researchers aim to improve medical treatment for people with insect venom allergy

Researchers aim to improve medical treatment for people with insect venom allergy

A team of researchers has elucidated individual profiles of allergy reactivity in patients that are not protected after treatment with immunotherapy. The aim is to improve medical treatment of people who are allergic to insect stings. [More]
Fixed-dose combination of sacubitril and valsartan for heart failure shows differing added benefit

Fixed-dose combination of sacubitril and valsartan for heart failure shows differing added benefit

The fixed-dose combination of sacubitril and valsartan (trade name: Entresto) has been approved since November 2015 for adults with symptomatic chronic heart failure with reduced pump function. [More]
Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

In a small study looking at pain assessments in adults with sickle cell disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins says overall, those treated long-term with opioids often fared worse in measures of pain, fatigue and curtailed daily activities than those not on long-term opioids. [More]
AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine report that more than 1 in 3 atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at intermediate to high risk for stroke are treated with aspirin alone, despite previous data showing this therapy to be inferior to blood thinners. [More]
Fractional dosing approach could be used to control yellow fever outbreaks during vaccine shortages

Fractional dosing approach could be used to control yellow fever outbreaks during vaccine shortages

The yellow fever vaccine given as one fifth of the regular dose could be used to control an outbreak in case of vaccine shortages. [More]
TUM researchers uncover molecular mechanism of thalidomide

TUM researchers uncover molecular mechanism of thalidomide

In the 1950s, thalidomide (Contergan) was prescribed as a sedative drug to pregnant women, resulting in a great number of infants with serious malformations. Up to now, the reasons for these disastrous birth defects have remained unclear. [More]
Watchman device for irregular heart rhythms may be preferable to standard blood thinning medications

Watchman device for irregular heart rhythms may be preferable to standard blood thinning medications

A new study by a Yale researcher may support the use of a device for patients suffering from irregular heart rhythms. [More]
Statins can lower infection risk by 58% in stroke patients

Statins can lower infection risk by 58% in stroke patients

A Washington State University researcher has found that statin drugs can dramatically lower the risk of infections in stroke patients. [More]
NPS MedicineWise urges Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for colds and flu

NPS MedicineWise urges Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for colds and flu

With new findings launched today showing that antimicrobial use in the community in Australia is higher than in England, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands—and that the number of antimicrobials being prescribed in Australia continues to grow—NPS MedicineWise is again urging Australians to stop expecting antibiotics for viruses such as colds and flu. [More]
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