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First licensed vaccine could reduce burden in regions with high-levels of dengue infection

First licensed vaccine could reduce burden in regions with high-levels of dengue infection

The first licensed vaccine for the potentially life-threatening dengue virus should only be used in moderate-to high impacted regions, new research has predicted. [More]
Researchers use microbubbles and ultrasound to transport drugs across blood–brain barrier

Researchers use microbubbles and ultrasound to transport drugs across blood–brain barrier

The impassable blood-brain barrier prevents microorganisms from entering our brain, however it also blocks medicines that could help treat Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Researchers find differences in use of prescription analgesics between people with and without Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers find differences in use of prescription analgesics between people with and without Alzheimer’s disease

Approximately one third of persons with Alzheimer’s disease use prescription medicines for pain after their diagnosis, reports a recent study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Researchers find way to make changes to enzyme-driven assembly line to improve antibiotics

Researchers find way to make changes to enzyme-driven assembly line to improve antibiotics

Researchers from North Carolina State University have discovered a way to make pinpoint changes to an enzyme-driven "assembly line" that will enable scientists to improve or change the properties of existing antibiotics as well as create designer compounds. [More]
Researchers come up with new approach to stabilize vaccines at room temperature

Researchers come up with new approach to stabilize vaccines at room temperature

Shipping vaccines in an unbroken temperature-controlled supply chain (a "cold chain") all the way to recipients is a major logistical and financial challenge in remote areas and developing countries. [More]
Over-the-counter and prescription pain medications linked to drug-induced liver injury

Over-the-counter and prescription pain medications linked to drug-induced liver injury

More than 1,000 medications, with acetaminophen being the most common, have been associated with drug-induced liver injury. [More]
Researchers develop virtual liver model to better understand metabolism of non-prescription painkiller

Researchers develop virtual liver model to better understand metabolism of non-prescription painkiller

Researchers at Indiana University's Biocomplexity Institute have developed a virtual model of the human liver to better understand how the organ metabolizes acetaminophen, a common non-prescription painkiller and fever-reducer used in over-the-counter drugs such as Tylenol. [More]

Study explores perceptions of college-age males about HPV

Maggie Pitts took great interest in the human papillomavirus vaccine after Virginia became the first state in the country to mandate its use among girls in the sixth grade. [More]
Study shows heart medications prevent cardiovascular damage during breast cancer treatment

Study shows heart medications prevent cardiovascular damage during breast cancer treatment

Heart medication taken in combination with chemotherapy reduces the risk of serious cardiovascular damage in patients with early-stage breast cancer, according to results from a new landmark clinical trial. [More]
Study finds link between birth defects and antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy

Study finds link between birth defects and antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy

A joint study conducted by researchers from the universities of Liverpool and Manchester has found a link between birth defects and certain types of epilepsy medication. [More]
Study sheds light on why new drug is effective in combating leukaemia

Study sheds light on why new drug is effective in combating leukaemia

Researchers at the University of Southampton have shed new light on why and how a new class of drug is effective at fighting off leukaemia. [More]
Kratom may be safer and less addictive than current treatments for pain, research suggests

Kratom may be safer and less addictive than current treatments for pain, research suggests

A delayed U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration ban on kratom would stifle scientific understanding of the herb's active chemical components and documented pharmacologic properties if implemented, according to a special report published today in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. [More]
Dirt beneath New York City may provide new weapons to fight against disease

Dirt beneath New York City may provide new weapons to fight against disease

Microbes have long been an invaluable source of new drugs. And to find more, we may have to look no further than the ground beneath our feet. [More]
Scientists develop safe, highly efficient method to improve searching of new germicides

Scientists develop safe, highly efficient method to improve searching of new germicides

Scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University in cooperation with colleagues have worked out a safe, not that expensive and highly efficient method, which allows to speed up and improve searching of new germicides. [More]
Preventative strategy in stem cell transplant recipients may help thwart C. diff infections

Preventative strategy in stem cell transplant recipients may help thwart C. diff infections

It may be possible to safely prevent one of the most common - and costly to treat - infections contracted by hospitalized patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation for the treatment of blood cancers, according to a study from the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
New appointment to accelerate discovery of patient-centred medicines

New appointment to accelerate discovery of patient-centred medicines

The new Medicines Discovery Catapult (MDC) is pleased to announce the appointment of Ed Owen to put medical research charities and patient groups at the heart of the development of new therapies in the UK. [More]
New self-regulating smart patch releases blood-thinning drugs when necessary

New self-regulating smart patch releases blood-thinning drugs when necessary

An interdisciplinary team of researchers has developed a smart patch designed to monitor a patient's blood and release blood-thinning drugs as needed to prevent the occurrence of dangerous blood clots - a condition known as thrombosis. [More]
UT Austin researchers develop new oral capsule for treating hemophilia patients

UT Austin researchers develop new oral capsule for treating hemophilia patients

In the near future, hemophiliacs could be able to treat their disease by simply swallowing a capsule. [More]
NIH-supported first HIV vaccine efficacy study begins in South Africa

NIH-supported first HIV vaccine efficacy study begins in South Africa

The first HIV vaccine efficacy study to launch anywhere in seven years is now testing whether an experimental vaccine regimen safely prevents HIV infection among South African adults. [More]
Study finds abnormally low blood flow in the brain of marijuana users

Study finds abnormally low blood flow in the brain of marijuana users

As the U.S. races to legalize marijuana for medicinal and recreational use, a new, large scale brain imaging study gives reason for caution. [More]
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