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Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a lab device to give cancer researchers an unprecedented microscopic look at metastasis, the complex way that tumor cells spread through the body, causing more than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. By shedding light on precisely how tumor cells travel, the device could uncover new ways to keep cancer in check. [More]
Mediterranean diet is good for your kidneys

Mediterranean diet is good for your kidneys

New research indicates that adopting a Mediterranean-style diet can reduce the risk of developing chronic kidney disease by 50%. [More]

Challenges of maintaining enriched health care for pregnant women enrolled in Covered California

A new report by Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University examines the challenge of maintaining enriched health care for pregnant women who are enrolled in Covered California and who are also eligible for Medi-Cal, which includes the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP). [More]
Surgeons fine-tune imaging techniques to enhance visualization of breast tumors, persistent wounds

Surgeons fine-tune imaging techniques to enhance visualization of breast tumors, persistent wounds

Surgeons are tweaking existing computer technologies to enhance their visualization of cancerous tumors and persistent wounds according to two studies presented this week at the 2014 American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress. [More]
Epileptic mothers in the dark about pregnancy risk?

Epileptic mothers in the dark about pregnancy risk?

A new study has highlighted the need for more research into the safety of using anti-epileptic drugs during pregnancy. [More]
KU researchers find potential therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

KU researchers find potential therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

A team at the University of Kansas School of Medicine has identified a potential target for treating breast cancer, including a particularly deadly form of the disease. [More]
'Mentor Mothers' program improves perinatal health outcomes in South Africa

'Mentor Mothers' program improves perinatal health outcomes in South Africa

The incidence of HIV infection in South Africa tops that of any nation in the world, with some 6 million of the country's nearly 50 million residents infected. Sadly, young women — and particularly young pregnant women — suffer some of the highest rates of HIV infection. More than one-fourth of pregnant South African women are infected with the virus; in some communities, the infection rates are even higher. [More]
Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer. [More]
Fewer women than men receive dialysis treatment for chronic kidney disease

Fewer women than men receive dialysis treatment for chronic kidney disease

Women with chronic kidney disease receive dialysis treatment far less often than men. However, women suffer more commonly than men from kidney disease. A publication by the MedUni Vienna and the Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, USA, has highlighted this difference based on international patient data. [More]
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
Study sheds light on the mystery of biological clock that controls fertility in women

Study sheds light on the mystery of biological clock that controls fertility in women

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have identified the biological clock that governs female fertility. The discovery represents a major contribution to research aimed at finding medical approaches to treating infertility in women. [More]
Rapamycin and dasatinib combination may be beneficial in treating breast cancer, say scientists

Rapamycin and dasatinib combination may be beneficial in treating breast cancer, say scientists

The uncontrolled growth of cancer cells arises from their ability to hijack the cell’s normal growth program and checkpoints. Usually after therapy, a second cancer-signaling pathway will open after the primary one shuts down — creating an ingenious escape route for the cancer cell to survive. The answer, say Case Western Reserve researchers, is to anticipate and block that back-up track by prescribing two drugs from the start. [More]
Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

When heart symptoms strike, men and women go through similar stages of pain but women are more likely to delay seeking care and can put their health at risk, according to a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Japanese mushroom extract shows promise in eradicating HPV

Japanese mushroom extract shows promise in eradicating HPV

A Japanese mushroom extract appears to be effective for the eradication of human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a pilot clinical trial at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
UMass Amherst epidemiologist investigates risk of early menopause

UMass Amherst epidemiologist investigates risk of early menopause

The estimated 10 percent of women in Western nations who enter menopause before age 45 have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as lower fertility. Now epidemiologist Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is conducting the first large study to investigate whether vitamin D deficiency, inflammatory factors, hormones and other factors are associated with risk of early menopause, funded by NIH. [More]
Dietary flavonoids decrease risk of developing epithelial ovarian cancer

Dietary flavonoids decrease risk of developing epithelial ovarian cancer

Tea and citrus fruits and juices are associated with a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Generic aromatase inhibitors increase breast cancer treatment adherence by 50%

Generic aromatase inhibitors increase breast cancer treatment adherence by 50%

Although oral hormonal therapy is known to substantially reduce breast cancer recurrence in women with hormone receptor-positive tumors, about one-half of patients fail to take their medications as directed. A new study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers has found that the introduction of generic aromatase inhibitors (the most common type of hormone therapy), which are considerably less expensive than their brand name counterparts, increased treatment adherence by 50 percent. [More]
Patients who receive chest radiation for Wilms tumor face breast cancer risk later in life

Patients who receive chest radiation for Wilms tumor face breast cancer risk later in life

A new study has found that patients who received chest radiation for Wilms tumor, a rare childhood cancer, face an increased risk of developing breast cancer later in life due to their radiation exposure. [More]
Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings—part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex—outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month. [More]
Tiny nano-sized particles may play major role in detecting, tracking breast cancer

Tiny nano-sized particles may play major role in detecting, tracking breast cancer

Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA (miRNA) molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer. New research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center suggests Dicer may also serve as a biomarker for breast cancer and possibly open up new avenues for diagnosis and treatment. [More]