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Researcher identifies mechanisms that may cause resistance to BRAF inhibitor

Researcher identifies mechanisms that may cause resistance to BRAF inhibitor

BRAF mutation occurs in between 40% and 50% of metastasising melanomas (skin cancers), boosting tumour growth. [More]
Dr Google is here to stay - so how do you do it safely?

Dr Google is here to stay - so how do you do it safely?

Almost four out of five Australians (78%) report that they look for information about medicines on the internet, according to a new 2016 survey* released during Be Medicinewise Week (22-28 August). [More]
New study reveals physicians not discouraging Egyptian women from practicing female circumcision

New study reveals physicians not discouraging Egyptian women from practicing female circumcision

Women in Egypt are seeking out doctors' opinions on whether they should circumcise their daughters and, though it is illegal there, physicians are not discouraging the practice, giving legitimacy to a procedure that has serious medical risks, according to a new study led by a former Stanford University School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Naturally-occurring sugars in woman's breast milk may protect infants against life threatening bacteria

Naturally-occurring sugars in woman's breast milk may protect infants against life threatening bacteria

A type of sugar found naturally in some women's breast milk may protect newborn babies from infection with a potentially life threatening bacterium called Group B streptococcus, according to a new study from Imperial College London. [More]
Advanced imaging technique could help select embryos most viable for successful pregnancy

Advanced imaging technique could help select embryos most viable for successful pregnancy

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have successfully trialed a new technique that could aid the process of choosing the "best" embryo for implantation, helping to boost the chances of pregnancy success from the very first IVF cycle. [More]
Baby simulator programme ineffective in reducing risk of teenage pregnancy

Baby simulator programme ineffective in reducing risk of teenage pregnancy

A teenage pregnancy prevention programme involving a baby simulator does not appear to have any long-term effect on reducing the risk of teenage pregnancy, according to the first randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of this intervention, published in The Lancet today. [More]
Baby simulator dolls may encourage pregnancy in teenage girls

Baby simulator dolls may encourage pregnancy in teenage girls

The use of dolls that mimic real babies may encourage rather than deter teenage girls from getting pregnant according to the results of a controlled randomized trial. [More]
New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School, documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil. [More]
Developmental exposure to fracking chemicals may pose threat to fertility

Developmental exposure to fracking chemicals may pose threat to fertility

More than 15 million Americans live within a one-mile radius of unconventional oil and gas operations. UOGs combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," to release natural gas from underground rock. [More]
Genetic test may be able to predict need for chemotherapy in early-stage breast cancer

Genetic test may be able to predict need for chemotherapy in early-stage breast cancer

Patients with early stage breast cancer who have a low genetic risk of disease recurrence may not need to have chemotherapy, report researchers. [More]
New UCF technology for destroying metastatic breast cancer cells licensed for clinical trials

New UCF technology for destroying metastatic breast cancer cells licensed for clinical trials

A University of Central Florida cancer researcher has discovered a way to kill spreading breast cancer cells and her new technology has generated a licensing agreement that will accelerate the therapy's path to clinical trials. [More]
Preimplantation genetic screening using next generation sequencing: an interview with Dr Luis Alcaraz

Preimplantation genetic screening using next generation sequencing: an interview with Dr Luis Alcaraz

PGS, Preimplantation Genetic Screening, is a genetic test that analyses biopsied cells from embryos produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. PGS determines whether the embryos are chromosomally normal (euploid) or not (aneuploid), thus giving the chance to transfer chromosomally normal embryos that are more apt to successfully implant and develop into a pregnancy. [More]

Expansion of education not to blame for overall childlessness levels in European countries

The increasing proportion of the population who prefer to remain childless is a major social problem for many European countries. [More]
Breast cancer patients in the U.S. now have new surgical option that offers flexible alternative for cancer detection

Breast cancer patients in the U.S. now have new surgical option that offers flexible alternative for cancer detection

Breast cancer patients in the U.S. will have a new surgical option that eliminates exposure to radioactive materials and offers a less invasive, more flexible alternative for cancer detection. Receiving FDA approval in April and a distribution deal this month, the new device will be used to locate early stage tumors that cannot yet be felt. [More]
Melatonin appears to suppress growth of breast cancer stem cells

Melatonin appears to suppress growth of breast cancer stem cells

Melatonin, a hormone produced in the human brain, appears to suppress the growth of breast cancer tumors. [More]
Scientists discover less invasive, cheaper technique to improve woman's chances of becoming pregnant

Scientists discover less invasive, cheaper technique to improve woman's chances of becoming pregnant

For those facing infertility, IVF has long been the established option to have a baby. Now Australian and Belgian medical scientists have discovered how to improve a woman's chances of becoming pregnant using a less invasive and cheaper alternative. [More]
Umbilical cells from babies of obese mothers show impaired expression of vital genes regulating metabolism

Umbilical cells from babies of obese mothers show impaired expression of vital genes regulating metabolism

Scientists have long known that infants born to women who are obese show higher risks of obesity, but they don't fully understand what boosts those risks. [More]
Prenatal exposure to organochlorine chemicals linked to increased odds of autism in children

Prenatal exposure to organochlorine chemicals linked to increased odds of autism in children

Chemicals used in certain pesticides and as insulating material banned in the 1970s may still be haunting us, according to new research that suggests links between higher levels of exposure during pregnancy and significantly increased odds of autism spectrum disorder in children. [More]
Soluble corn fiber can help build and retain calcium in bone during adolescence and post-menopause

Soluble corn fiber can help build and retain calcium in bone during adolescence and post-menopause

Supplementing with soluble corn fiber at two critical times in a woman's life - adolescence and post-menopause - can help build and retain calcium in bone, according to new research from Purdue University. [More]
Viewing pornography may have negative effects on marital stability, study shows

Viewing pornography may have negative effects on marital stability, study shows

Beginning pornography use is associated with a substantial increase in the probability of divorce for married Americans, and this increase is especially large for women, finds a new study that will be presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]
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