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Global 'Call to Action Summit 2015' adopts DELHI DECLARATION to end preventable maternal and child deaths

Global 'Call to Action Summit 2015' adopts DELHI DECLARATION to end preventable maternal and child deaths

The two-day global 'Call to Action Summit 2015' concluded today with Health Ministers and heads of country delegations from 22 countries adopting the DELHI DECLARATION on 'ending preventable maternal and child deaths'. The declaration was developed as an outcome of the high-level ministerial conclave held yesterday during the summit. [More]
New non-invasive image processing technique may improve IVF success rates

New non-invasive image processing technique may improve IVF success rates

A collaboration between biologists and engineers at Monash University has led to the development of a new non-invasive image processing technique to visualise embryo formation. Researchers were able to see, for the first time, the movement of all of the cells in living mammalian embryos as they develop under the microscope. [More]

Gender harassment equally damaging to working women’s individual health

Frequent sexist wisecracks, comments and office cultures where women are ignored are just as damaging to women as single instances of sexual coercion and unwanted sexual attention, according to a new study out today in The Psychology of Women Quarterly (a SAGE Journal). [More]
UVA researchers reveal how sperm use 'harpoon' to facilitate fertilization

UVA researchers reveal how sperm use 'harpoon' to facilitate fertilization

Could the sperm harpoon the egg to facilitate fertilization? That's the intriguing possibility raised by the University of Virginia School of Medicine's discovery that a protein within the head of the sperm forms spiky filaments, suggesting that these tiny filaments may lash together the sperm and its target. [More]
Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting bacterial and viral infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after birth, beginning at puberty. [More]
History of oral contraceptive use influences survival in ovarian cancer patients

History of oral contraceptive use influences survival in ovarian cancer patients

A history of oral contraceptive use and having at least one child increased longevity by nearly three years in patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, according to a Roswell Park Cancer Institute study recently published online ahead of print in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. [More]
Melatonin hormone can help prevent cardiovascular disease risk in children born through ART

Melatonin hormone can help prevent cardiovascular disease risk in children born through ART

Studies are revealing that children born through assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The increased risk is due to changes in the expression of the genes important for vascular health. These studies suggest that the composition of the solutions in which embryo fertilization and culturing are done is to blame. [More]
Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

About 10 percent of mothers experienced chronic, persistent depressive symptoms two years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people, displacing hundreds of thousands and causing widespread damage estimated at more than $100 billion, according to a Georgia State University study. [More]
New test predicts breast cancer relapse months in advance

New test predicts breast cancer relapse months in advance

UK-based researchers have developed a blood test that can predict whether patients with breast cancer will experience a relapse after receiving treatment, months before tumors are visible using hospital scans. [More]
Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

New research published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that pregnant women in Sweden had inadequate levels of iodine in their diets. Proper iodine nutrition is necessary for neurological development of the fetus. [More]
Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Women who are obese have a higher risk and a worse prognosis for breast cancer, but the reasons why remain unclear. A Cornell study published this month in Science Translational Medicine explains how obesity changes the consistency of breast tissue in ways that are similar to tumors, thereby promoting disease. [More]
Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team earns NCQA recognition

Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team earns NCQA recognition

The Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team has been designated a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. The patient-centered medical home model of care emphasizes using coordination and communication to transform primary care to accommodate patients' needs. Having a nurse care manager work one on one with high-risk patients who have chronic conditions leads to a higher quality, better patient experience and reduced costs. Level 3 is NCQA's highest designation in its recognition program. [More]
New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

Obese women are nearly twice as likely as their lean counterparts to have stillborn babies for several specific, potentially preventable medical reasons, a new University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis reveals. [More]
Researchers report new optical method for quickly and accurately diagnosing breast cancer

Researchers report new optical method for quickly and accurately diagnosing breast cancer

A new optical method for more quickly and accurately determining whether breast tissue lesions are cancerous is described by University of Illinois researchers in the Journal of Biomedical Optics, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. [More]
ASTRO awards $675,000 to seven physician-researchers to advance radiation oncology research

ASTRO awards $675,000 to seven physician-researchers to advance radiation oncology research

The American Society for Radiation Oncology has selected seven leading physician-researchers to receive a total of $675,000 in awards and grants to advance radiation oncology research. Together, the seven funding grants, including ASTRO Junior Faculty Career Research Training Award, the ASTRO Residents/Fellows in Radiation Oncology Research Seed Award and the ASTRO/Radiation Oncology Institute Comparative Effectiveness Research Award, will support studies in radiation and cancer biology, radiation physics, translational research, outcomes/health services research and comparative effectiveness research within radiation oncology. [More]
New studies evaluate viral suppression rate of HIV-infected pregnant women at delivery

New studies evaluate viral suppression rate of HIV-infected pregnant women at delivery

Pregnancy could be a turning point for HIV-infected women, when they have the opportunity to manage their infection, prevent transmission to their new baby and enter a long-term pattern of maintenance of HIV care after giving birth--but most HIV-infected women aren't getting that chance. [More]
Moffitt researchers discover high BRCA mutation frequency in young black women with breast cancer

Moffitt researchers discover high BRCA mutation frequency in young black women with breast cancer

Women who have inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are more likely to develop breast cancer or ovarian cancer, especially at a younger age. Approximately 5 percent of women with breast cancer in the United States have mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 based on estimates in non-Hispanic white women. [More]
New research provides hope that women undergoing fertility treatment can avoid unpleasant hormonal gel

New research provides hope that women undergoing fertility treatment can avoid unpleasant hormonal gel

Since the early days of fertility treatment, women undergoing IVF treatment have had to place a hormonal gel in their vagina on a daily basis for at least 14 days after embryo transfer. The hormone is necessary to increase the chances of pregnancy, but it may also cause some side effects in the form of irritation and leaky discharge. [More]
AirXpanders' pivotal XPAND trial meets primary endpoint in patients who have undergone mastectomy

AirXpanders' pivotal XPAND trial meets primary endpoint in patients who have undergone mastectomy

AirXpanders Inc., a medical device company focused on the design, manufacture, sale and distribution of the AeroForm Tissue Expander, is pleased to report that its pivotal XPAND trial has met its primary endpoint in patients who have undergone a mastectomy. [More]
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