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Getting a flu vaccination helps moms help their babies

Getting a flu vaccination helps moms help their babies

Only about half of all pregnant women in the U.S. get a flu shot each season, leaving thousands of moms-to-be and their babies at increased risk of serious illness. [More]
Genetic testing for breast cancer doubled due to 'Angelina Jolie effect'

Genetic testing for breast cancer doubled due to 'Angelina Jolie effect'

In May 2013 Angelina Jolie, who was then Hollywood's highest-paid actress, underwent a double mastectomy after testing positive for a BRCA1 gene mutation that significantly increases the risk of developing breast cancer. A recent study, published by Breast Cancer Research has found that, public knowledge of her decision doubled NHS referrals for genetic testing for breast cancer risk. [More]
LSTM professor edits supplement about quality of care for maternal and newborn health

LSTM professor edits supplement about quality of care for maternal and newborn health

Head of LSTM’s Centre for Maternal and Newborn Health, Professor Nynke van den Broek, has acted as Editor for a special supplement for BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, which has been published online. [More]
Socially disadvantaged women experience poor maternal care in the UK

Socially disadvantaged women experience poor maternal care in the UK

Women from lower socioeconomic groups in the UK report a poorer experience of care during pregnancy and there needs to be a greater focus on their care, suggests a new study published today (17 September) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. [More]
Radiation and endocrine therapy combination may not be necessary for all HR+ breast cancer patients

Radiation and endocrine therapy combination may not be necessary for all HR+ breast cancer patients

Treatment with endocrine therapy and radiation therapy as part of breast conservation is the current standard of care for women with hormone-receptor positive (HR+) invasive breast cancer. A new study by researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center, however, shows that combination may not be necessary for all patient populations with the disease. [More]
Parous women have higher chance of developing estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

Parous women have higher chance of developing estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

Women who have had children (parous women) appear to have an increased risk of developing estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, the subtype that carries a higher mortality rate and is more common in women of African ancestry. [More]
High impact health interventions reduce maternal and child mortality in poor countries

High impact health interventions reduce maternal and child mortality in poor countries

New studies have uncovered the specific interventions and advances that have led to the success with these at-risk populations in the poorest countries. [More]
Curie-Cancer, Inventiva launch Epicure project that aims to develop epigenetic targets for cancer

Curie-Cancer, Inventiva launch Epicure project that aims to develop epigenetic targets for cancer

Curie-Cancer, the body responsible for developing Institut Curie’s industry partnership activities, and Inventiva, a drug discovery company that focuses on therapeutic approaches involving transcription factors and epigenetic targets, today announce the launch of the Epicure project, which has just received financial backing from France’s national research agency, the ANR [Agence Nationale pour la Recherche]. [More]
Young girls in poor households more likely than their male counterparts to become obese in midlife

Young girls in poor households more likely than their male counterparts to become obese in midlife

Adolescent girls living in economically disadvantaged families are more likely than their male counterparts to become overweight or obese, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin. [More]
Warwick researchers discover novel drug target for treating postpartum haemorrhage

Warwick researchers discover novel drug target for treating postpartum haemorrhage

Researchers at the University of Warwick have discovered a new target for drugs that could prevent the deaths of thousands of women in the developing world due to heavy blood loss after childbirth. [More]

Breast cancer screening in older women leads to overdiagnosis, say researchers

Instead, it may just lead to overdiagnosis and overtreatment, suggest the researchers, led by a team based at Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands. [More]

Web based training effective at reducing sexual assaults on U.S. campuses

Web-based training targeted at college-aged men is an effective tool for reducing the number of sexual assaults on U.S. campuses, according to a researcher in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University. [More]
Cancer-fighting cocktail shows promising results for advanced cervical cancer

Cancer-fighting cocktail shows promising results for advanced cervical cancer

Combining a standard chemotherapy drug with a second drug that stops cells from dividing improves both the survival and response rates for those with advanced cervical cancer, a new study by UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers finds. [More]
UT Southwestern offers new, innovative four-flap breast reconstruction after mastectomy

UT Southwestern offers new, innovative four-flap breast reconstruction after mastectomy

UT Southwestern Medical Center is one of only two places in the world that offers a new, innovative and highly successful approach to breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. [More]
New study examines potential impact of breast density notification legislation in U.S. women

New study examines potential impact of breast density notification legislation in U.S. women

Mammographically-dense breasts - those that show more breast and connective tissue versus fat in a mammogram image - are recognized as a risk factor for developing breast cancer and can also hamper an accurate reading of a mammogram. National legislation currently under consideration would require the disclosure of mammographic breast density information to women with dense breasts, as well as encourage the consideration of supplemental screening for those women. [More]
Four new styles of MENTOR MemoryShape Breast Implants get FDA approval

Four new styles of MENTOR MemoryShape Breast Implants get FDA approval

Mentor Worldwide LLC, the U.S. market leader in breast aesthetics, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four additional styles of the MENTOR MemoryShape Breast Implants, expanding its suite of silicone breast implant products. [More]
Missouri sets 72-hour wait for women seeking abortions

Missouri sets 72-hour wait for women seeking abortions

The Republican-controlled legislature overrode Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon's veto to enact one of the most stringent waiting periods in the nation that includes no exception for cases of rape or incest. [More]
Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites

Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites

Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit a more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites, which is associated with reduced risk for breast cancer, compared to women with less microbial variation, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). [More]
AstraZeneca is developing new PARP inhibitor for treatment of ovarian cancer

AstraZeneca is developing new PARP inhibitor for treatment of ovarian cancer

The ovarian cancer market is highly active with several promising candidates having reached the late stages of development. Three PARP inhibitors, Lynparza (AstraZeneca), niraparib (Tesaro) and rucaparib (Clovis Oncology), which induce cell death in mutated [BRCA-deficient] cancer cells, have been identified by Datamonitor Healthcare as front runners. [More]
Risk of preterm birth could be halved for specific group of "super high-risk" twin pregnancies

Risk of preterm birth could be halved for specific group of "super high-risk" twin pregnancies

International research involving the University of Adelaide has found that the risk of preterm birth could be halved for a specific group of "super high-risk" twin pregnancies. [More]