Women's Health News RSS Feed - Women's Health News

Study finds correlations between seasonal ambient air pollutants and pregnancy loss in Mongolia

Study finds correlations between seasonal ambient air pollutants and pregnancy loss in Mongolia

Burning coal for domestic heating may contribute to early fetal death according to a new study by experts from The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - the coldest capital city in the world. [More]
Roche's cobas HPV Test gets FDA approval for first-line primary screening for cervical cancer

Roche's cobas HPV Test gets FDA approval for first-line primary screening for cervical cancer

Roche announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the cobas HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Test for use as a first-line primary screening test for cervical cancer in women 25 and older. The approval follows the March 12 unanimous recommendation from the Microbiology Devices Panel of the FDA's Medical Devices Advisory Committee, making the cobas HPV Test the first and only HPV test in the United States approved for first-line primary screening. [More]

Iron consumption can increase risk for heart disease

A new study from the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington has bolstered the link between red meat consumption and heart disease by finding a strong association between heme iron, found only in meat, and potentially deadly coronary heart disease. [More]
Glaucoma drug may help reverse obesity-related vision loss in women

Glaucoma drug may help reverse obesity-related vision loss in women

An inexpensive glaucoma drug, when added to a weight loss plan, can improve vision for women with a disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]

Study finds higher risk of pregnancy with newer sterilization method

The risk of pregnancy among women using a newer method of planned sterilization called hysteroscopic sterilization is more than 10 times greater over a 10-year period than using the more commonly performed laparoscopic sterilization, a study by researchers at Yale University and UC Davis has found. [More]
Anxiety experienced with false-positive mammogram does not negatively impact woman's well-being

Anxiety experienced with false-positive mammogram does not negatively impact woman's well-being

Dartmouth researchers have found that the anxiety experienced with a false-positive mammogram is temporary and does not negatively impact a woman's overall well-being. Their findings are reported in "Consequences of False-Positive Screening Mammograms," which was published online in the April 21, 2014 JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
IMPAKT breast cancer conference abstracts online

IMPAKT breast cancer conference abstracts online

Xenografts and mathematical modelling; liquid biopsy; nanotechnology; next generation genomics- Science is running fast and the impact of new technologies in the care of patients with breast cancer will be at the core of the sixth edition of the IMPAKT conference on translational research in breast cancer. [More]
ACR, SBI oppose NEJM article on ending breast cancer screening programs

ACR, SBI oppose NEJM article on ending breast cancer screening programs

The American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) agree with statements by Andorno and Jüni, in their recent article published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), that women need clear information with which to discuss mammography with their doctor. [More]
Researchers develop effective behavioral economic approach that offers women financial incentives to quit smoking

Researchers develop effective behavioral economic approach that offers women financial incentives to quit smoking

Smoking during pregnancy - particularly among economically-disadvantaged women - leads to a host of poor pregnancy outcomes, including miscarriage, preterm birth, SIDS, and additional adverse effects later in life. Without a formal treatment intervention, women in this population continue to smoke, and their babies suffer. [More]
Vivere-Winter Park recognizes 25th Annual National Infertility Awareness Week

Vivere-Winter Park recognizes 25th Annual National Infertility Awareness Week

Infertility is a disease affecting more than 7 million people across the U.S., according to the National Survey of Family Growth. That number represents 12 percent of women of childbearing age or one in eight couples. [More]
BRI scientists receive grant to study new approach to blocking metastatic breast cancer

BRI scientists receive grant to study new approach to blocking metastatic breast cancer

Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason recently received a grant to research how blocking a particular molecule in metastatic breast cancer reduces both the growth of primary tumors and the number of lung metastases. [More]

Study: Maternal diet could have impact on food allergy in later life of children

About 20 million Europeans are subject to food allergies. Now scientists are looking at these allergies in new ways. It involves the food industry in its work and pays special attention to the link between early diets and allergy in later life. Clare Mills, professor of allergy in the university's Institute of Inflammation and Repair, at the University of Manchester, UK, is the coordinator of iFAAM. [More]
Edna Adan named inaugural recipient of Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health

Edna Adan named inaugural recipient of Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health

Following an intense selection process, Edna Adan has been named the inaugural recipient of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health. The award will be presented to Adan on May 15, 2014 and includes a $100,000 cash prize which will be presented biennially to a leader in the field of global women's health. [More]
Survey finds counterfeit and defective emergency contraceptives in Peru

Survey finds counterfeit and defective emergency contraceptives in Peru

A survey of emergency contraceptive pills in Peru found that 28 percent of the batches studied were either of substandard quality or falsified. Many pills released the active ingredient too slowly. Others had the wrong active ingredient. One batch had no active ingredient at all. [More]

IMA World Health offers Safe Motherhood Kits this Mother's Day

Every minute, a woman dies of complications from pregnancy or childbirth and many more suffer infection or injury. [More]

Researchers recommend early colorectal cancer screening guidelines for cervical cancer survivors

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are the first to recommend that young women treated with radiation for cervical cancer should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier than traditionally recommended. [More]

Study indicates that culture or genetics could be blamed for obesity disparities in women

Racial disparities in obesity rates among the third of U.S. adults considered obese are often blamed on socioeconomic status because of its influence on diet and physical activity, but new findings from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in Obesity suggest otherwise — particularly for women. [More]
Study: HIV-positive women respond well to vaccine against human papillomavirus

Study: HIV-positive women respond well to vaccine against human papillomavirus

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. [More]
Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

A study of predominantly white women finds a larger waist circumference is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but not beyond its contribution to BMI. The study, by American Cancer Society researchers, fails to confirm previous findings that body shape itself is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. The current study appears in the April 2014 issue of Cancer Causes, and Control. [More]

Adolescent girls having romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined

A new study reveals that for adolescent girls, having a romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined it would has negative implications for their mental health. [More]