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22otters launches HerStory app that enables women to share health advice, stories with each other

22otters launches HerStory app that enables women to share health advice, stories with each other

HerStory, a new smartphone app that enables women to share health advice and stories with each other, was recently launched by 22otters, a Khosla Ventures-funded digital health startup. [More]
Some women may not fully understand risks of 'overdiagnosis' through breast screening programme

Some women may not fully understand risks of 'overdiagnosis' through breast screening programme

A third of women who are given information about the chance of 'overdiagnosis' through the NHS breast screening programme may not fully understand the risks involved, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer, today (Friday). [More]
Peer groups, clinicians play critical role in development of effective breastfeeding programs

Peer groups, clinicians play critical role in development of effective breastfeeding programs

The support of peer groups and clinicians is critical to the development of effective breastfeeding programs, according to recent University of Georgia research. [More]
Conventional weight loss techniques help obese women reduce weight gain during pregnancy

Conventional weight loss techniques help obese women reduce weight gain during pregnancy

A new study finds that women who are obese can limit their weight gain during pregnancy using conventional weight loss techniques, including attending weekly group support meetings, seeking advice about nutrition and diet, and keeping food and exercise journals. [More]
Millions of women suffering in silence with hot flashes

Millions of women suffering in silence with hot flashes

The steep decline in the use of hormone therapy has spawned a prevalent but preventable side effect: millions of women suffering in silence with hot flashes, according to a study by a Yale School of Medicine researcher and colleagues. [More]
Gang involvement poses serious health-related risks for African American girls

Gang involvement poses serious health-related risks for African American girls

Being involved in a gang poses considerable health-related risks for adolescent African American girls, including more casual sex partners and substance abuse combined with less testing for HIV and less knowledge about preventing sexually transmitted diseases, according to a new study. [More]
Protein p66ShcA shows promise as biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses

Protein p66ShcA shows promise as biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses

A protein named p66ShcA shows promise as a biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology. [More]
Experts available to share tips on prevention of ovarian cancer

Experts available to share tips on prevention of ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in American women, with about 22,000 diagnosed and 14,000 dying from the disease each year. September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month and Mount Sinai experts are sharing tips on prevention. [More]
Black carbon may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women

Black carbon may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women

Black carbon pollutants from wood smoke are known to trap heat near the earth's surface and warm the climate. A new study led by McGill Professor Jill Baumgartner suggests that black carbon may also increase women's risk of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Health insurance reimbursement may determine cancer screening rates

Health insurance reimbursement may determine cancer screening rates

A study published today indicates that people living in American states that offer higher Medicaid payments for office visits are more likely to have been screened for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers than those in states giving lower levels of Medicaid support. [More]
Young girls with vulvitis may be at increased risk of developing urinary tract infections

Young girls with vulvitis may be at increased risk of developing urinary tract infections

Young girls with an intense, red, itchy rash on their outer genital organs may be at increased risk of developing urinary tract infections (UTIs), according to new research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The treatment may be as simple as better hygiene and avoiding potential irritants such as bubble baths and swimming pools. [More]
Memorial Hermann, MD Anderson partner to provide breast screening services in greater Houston area

Memorial Hermann, MD Anderson partner to provide breast screening services in greater Houston area

Memorial Hermann Health System and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today announced a new partnership to provide a new level of specialized breast screening at a network of community breast care centers in the greater Houston area. [More]
Many rural health care providers do not routinely screen women for IPV, say Penn State researchers

Many rural health care providers do not routinely screen women for IPV, say Penn State researchers

Many primary care physicians in rural communities do not routinely screen women for intimate partner violence (IPV), according to Penn State medical and public health researchers. Rural women who are exposed to such violence have limited resources if they seek help. [More]
Blockbuster Fifty Shades linked with greater risk of harmful health behaviors in women

Blockbuster Fifty Shades linked with greater risk of harmful health behaviors in women

Popular fiction that normalizes and glamorizes violence against women, such as the blockbuster Fifty Shades series, may be associated with a greater risk of potentially harmful health behaviors and risks. [More]
Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

African American women born at a low or very low birth weight may be at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The findings, which appear in Diabetes Care, may explain in part the higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes in African American populations, which has a high prevalence of low birth weight. [More]
Prenatal care for pregnant women increases from 61 to 91.3%, highlights Equatorial Guinea

Prenatal care for pregnant women increases from 61 to 91.3%, highlights Equatorial Guinea

Equatorial Guinea's infant mortality rate has decreased from 111 in 1994 to 65 per one thousand in 2011, said the country's Health Secretary of State, Maria del Carmen Andeme Ela. She also reported that the percentage of pregnant women receiving prenatal care from skilled health personnel has increase from 61% in 2000 to 91.3% this year. [More]
Auxilium Pharmaceuticals' CCH drug effective against cellulite in Phase 2a study

Auxilium Pharmaceuticals' CCH drug effective against cellulite in Phase 2a study

Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced positive results from a randomized, double-blind Phase 2a study of collagenase clostridium histolyticum (or CCH) for the treatment of edematous fibrosclerotic panniculopathy (EFP), commonly known as cellulite. [More]
Researchers uncover reasons for decreasing sleep quality as we age

Researchers uncover reasons for decreasing sleep quality as we age

Researchers from the United States have shed light on why people experience more fragmented sleep as they grow older. [More]
Scientists discover predictive marker to classify breast cancer patients for effective treatment

Scientists discover predictive marker to classify breast cancer patients for effective treatment

Scientists have made it easier to predict both breast cancer relapses and responses to chemotherapy, through the identification of a unique gene. The newly found marker could help doctors classify each breast cancer patient and customise a treatment regimen that is more effective. [More]
Study links high cortisol in infants with socioeconomic status of mothers during pregnancy

Study links high cortisol in infants with socioeconomic status of mothers during pregnancy

Women who are poor experience higher cortisol levels in pregnancy and give birth to infants with elevated levels of the stress hormone, putting them at greater risk for serious disease later in life, according to a new research from the University of Colorado Denver. [More]