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MGH study reveals effects of obesity on pancreatic and breast cancer

MGH study reveals effects of obesity on pancreatic and breast cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may have uncovered a novel mechanism behind the ability of obesity to promote cancer progression. In their report published online in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, the research team describes finding an association between obesity and an overabundance of a factor called PlGF (placental growth factor) and that PlGF's binding to its receptor VEGFR-1, which is expressed on immune cells within tumors, promotes tumor progression. [More]

Philadelphia jury returned $13.5 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson's Ethicon subsidiary

Legal-Bay LLC, The Lawsuit Settlement Funding Company, reported today that a Philadelphia jury returned a $13.5 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson's Ethicon subsidiary on Wednesday, making this the second substantial verdict award in favor of the plaintiffs in recent months. [More]
Atypical heart attack symptoms lead to delayed treatment, increased injury in women

Atypical heart attack symptoms lead to delayed treatment, increased injury in women

When having a heart attack, most people will experience some kind of chest pain or pressure that worsens. Pain and pressure, along with sweating, shortness of breath and pain that migrates into the arms or neck are the typical heart attack symptoms. [More]
Research summit to explore gender differences of female brain injuries

Research summit to explore gender differences of female brain injuries

PINKconcussions and Georgetown University Medical Center, with support for the NCAA Sports Science Institute and US Lacrosse, are hosting the first summit to explore gender differences of female brain injuries including symptoms, treatment and recovery to develop a better model of care. [More]
Interplay between gene variant and socio-economic environment may determine girls' food choices

Interplay between gene variant and socio-economic environment may determine girls' food choices

If you're fat, can you blame it on your genes? The answer is a qualified yes. Maybe. Under certain circumstances. Researchers are moving towards a better understanding of some of the roots of obesity. [More]
ASTRO's new research journal 'Advances in Radiation Oncology' closes first issue

ASTRO's new research journal 'Advances in Radiation Oncology' closes first issue

Advances in Radiation Oncology, ASTRO's new original research journal, has closed its first issue with research including a phase II clinical trial in prostate cancer, a prospective trial in quality of life for breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy and several clinical and medical physics reports on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy. [More]
Higher intake of food-based vitamin D during pregnancy linked to reduced risk of allergies in children

Higher intake of food-based vitamin D during pregnancy linked to reduced risk of allergies in children

Higher intake of foods containing vitamin D during pregnancy - but not supplemental vitamin D intake - was associated with reduced risk of development of allergies in children, according to a study led by an investigator from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Strategy for improving maternal and child health in South Asia

Strategy for improving maternal and child health in South Asia

In several South Asian countries, midwifery is not an established profession. As a result, complications in both mothers and newborns are extremely common. Malin Bogren has been commissioned by the UN to work in Nepal, Afghanistan and Bangladesh. In her thesis, she presents a strategy on how the midwifery profession can be established in low-income countries - and in this way, improve the health of mothers and newborns. [More]
Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Previous research has established a link between genetic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to an increased risk of developing ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer in women. [More]
Pregnancy may reduce PTSD symptoms in at-risk women

Pregnancy may reduce PTSD symptoms in at-risk women

For most women, expecting a baby brings intense joy --and a fair amount of worry. But what about women who have lived through something awful enough to cause post-traumatic stress disorder? Contrary to what researchers expected, a new study shows that pregnancy may actually reduce their PTSD symptoms. Or at the least, it won't cause a flare-up. [More]
Cranberry capsules more effective in lowering UTI risk than juice

Cranberry capsules more effective in lowering UTI risk than juice

A UTI is an infection in any part of the urinary system, kidneys, bladder or urethra. They are more common in women and affect more than 3 million Americans per year. Many in the population will turn to sipping on a cranberry juice cocktail to alleviate their symptoms, but, according to a Texas A&M Health Science Center urologist, drinking cranberry juice to treat a UTI is little more than an old wives' tale. [More]
2020 dementia challenge to be tackled by MOOC

2020 dementia challenge to be tackled by MOOC

The University of Derby’s Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) titled ‘Bridging the Dementia Divide’ is back by popular demand after the University received high levels of requests to run the course again. [More]
Researchers show how antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV infection in female reproductive tract

Researchers show how antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV infection in female reproductive tract

For the first time, investigators in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have determined how antiretroviral therapy (ART) affects the way HIV disseminates and establishes infection in the female reproductive tract. [More]
New evidence highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh for surgical repair of vaginal prolapse

New evidence highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh for surgical repair of vaginal prolapse

New evidence published today highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh when compared with tissue repair in the surgical treatment of vaginal prolapse. Slightly better repair with mesh needs to be weighed carefully against increased risk of harms. [More]
IDMC recommends continuation of PM1183 Phase III trial in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients

IDMC recommends continuation of PM1183 Phase III trial in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients

PharmaMar announced today that the Independent Data Monitoring Committee has notified the Company of its recommendation that the Phase III (CORAIL) trial currently under way with PM1183 in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients should continue without any changes. [More]
Study shows association between traffic-related air pollution and dark spots on the skin

Study shows association between traffic-related air pollution and dark spots on the skin

A largescale study that included women from Germany and China has demonstrated a link between levels of traffic-related air pollution and air pollution-associated gases with the formation of dark spots on the skin, known as lentigenes. The most pronounced changes were observed on the cheeks of Asian women over the age of 50. [More]
UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has demonstrated in pre-clinical trials a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
Early use of influenza drug in pregnant women with flu may reduce length of stay in hospital

Early use of influenza drug in pregnant women with flu may reduce length of stay in hospital

Pregnant women are at higher risk for serious illness and complications, including death, from influenza. For expectant mothers hospitalized with flu, early treatment with the influenza antiviral drug oseltamivir may shorten their time in the hospital, especially in severe cases, suggests a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases and available online. [More]
Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies. [More]
Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation eases anxiety, fatigue and pain for women undergoing breast cancer biopsies, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute. They also found that music is effective, but to a lesser extent. [More]
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