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New ACMG guidelines recommend NIPT as optimal initial screening test for all pregnant women

New ACMG guidelines recommend NIPT as optimal initial screening test for all pregnant women

Natera, Inc., a leader in non-invasive genetic testing and the analysis of circulating cell-free DNA, applauds the new guidelines just released by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, supporting the use of non-invasive prenatal tests (NIPT/NIPS) as an optimal, initial option to screen for specific genetic conditions, such as Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) during pregnancy. [More]
NxGEN and NX Prenatal collaborate to develop blood test for identifying women at risk of preterm birth

NxGEN and NX Prenatal collaborate to develop blood test for identifying women at risk of preterm birth

In a collaborative move to expand their women's health screening and testing portfolios, NxGEN MDx, LLC., and NX Prenatal Inc., announced a joint partnership to collaborate on the development and deployment of a blood test to assess pregnancy biomarkers of preterm birth risk. [More]
Collaborative effort to assist injured women with ovarian cancer from talc-based Baby Powder

Collaborative effort to assist injured women with ovarian cancer from talc-based Baby Powder

Greg Vigna, MD, JD, founder of Life Care Solutions Group and Jane Akre, founder of Mesh Medical Device News Desk today launch a collaborative effort to educate, empower, and assist catastrophically injured women with ovarian cancer, who were exposed to Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder containing Talc. [More]
Breast cancer patients who use social media express more satisfaction about treatment decisions

Breast cancer patients who use social media express more satisfaction about treatment decisions

Women who engaged on social media after a breast cancer diagnosis expressed more deliberation about their treatment decision and more satisfaction with the path they chose, a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds. [More]
PolyU researchers discover inadequate intakes of micronutrients among Hong Kong lactating women

PolyU researchers discover inadequate intakes of micronutrients among Hong Kong lactating women

While breastfeeding has become more common across the globe in recent years, lactating women may not be aware of the nutrient adequacy of their breast milk and how their daily diet affects their nutrition intakes. [More]
University of Southampton hosts two virtual workshops to address Breastfeeding Dilemma

University of Southampton hosts two virtual workshops to address Breastfeeding Dilemma

How do we support and encourage breastfeeding, without subjecting those who are unable, or choose not to, breastfeed to shame and guilt? [More]
T-cell technology could be used to treat ovarian tumors with no adverse effects

T-cell technology could be used to treat ovarian tumors with no adverse effects

With only incremental improvements in ovarian cancer survival over the last 40 years, there is a clear need for new treatment options with long-lasting results. Many researchers have turned toward the development of immunotherapies that direct T-cells to selectively eliminate ovarian tumor cells, but an appropriate therapeutic target for ovarian cancers has remained elusive. [More]
Researchers quantify impact of hyperkyphosis on decline in pulmonary function

Researchers quantify impact of hyperkyphosis on decline in pulmonary function

Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research, have published a recent article in Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, suggesting that preventing or slowing progression of hyperkyphosis may reduce pulmonary decline in older adults. [More]
Study highlights more barriers to breast reconstruction than previously thought

Study highlights more barriers to breast reconstruction than previously thought

Women were less likely to have breast reconstruction surgery after mastectomy if they had Medicaid or Medicare rather than private insurance or if they lived 10 or more miles from a plastic surgeon's office, a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center study has found. [More]
Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Not only is breast cancer more than one disease, but a single breast cancer tumor can vary within itself, a finding that University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers discovered has the potential to lead to very different patient treatment plans depending on the tumor sample and diagnostic testing used. [More]
Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

As women enter menopause, their levels of physical activity decrease; for years scientists were unable to determine why. [More]
Updated guidelines for breast cancer increase number of patients who test HER2-positive

Updated guidelines for breast cancer increase number of patients who test HER2-positive

Changes to HER2 testing guidelines for breast cancer in 2013 significantly increased the number of patients who test HER2-positive, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Maternal HIV infection could alter gut microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants

Maternal HIV infection could alter gut microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants

A study led by researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles suggests that maternal HIV infection influences the microbiome of their HIV-uninfected infants. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new dual-targeting drug candidate for treating diabetes and bone disease

TSRI scientists develop new dual-targeting drug candidate for treating diabetes and bone disease

In addition to its more obvious ills, type 2 diabetes is a condition closely associated with bone fractures, increasing the risk of fractures twofold. To make matters worse, certain anti-diabetic drugs further increase this risk, particularly in postmenopausal women, severely limiting their treatment options. [More]
Researchers develop tiny 3-D tissue models to study how ovarian cancer develops in women

Researchers develop tiny 3-D tissue models to study how ovarian cancer develops in women

With a unique approach that draws on 3-D printing technologies, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers is developing new tools for understanding how ovarian cancer develops in women. [More]
Women who start menstruation, menopause later in life have increased odds of living to 90-years-old

Women who start menstruation, menopause later in life have increased odds of living to 90-years-old

The number of women living to age 90 in the United States has increased significantly in the past century. [More]
Study highlights need for effective support when pregnant women opt for C-section

Study highlights need for effective support when pregnant women opt for C-section

A study involving over 6,500 pregnant women from 6 countries in northern Europe highlights a clear need for appropriate support and advice when cesarean section (c-section) is elected for non-medical reasons, and for the accurate communication of the risk and benefits of c-section birth, suggests new research published in the Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology. [More]
Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Using data from the Women's Health Initiative, a new study has found that women with reproductive-period durations of less than 30 years had a 37% increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with women whose reproductive durations were somewhere in the middle (36 to 40 years). [More]
Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

The short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease following a first pregnancy is higher for women experiencing placental syndromes and a preterm birth or an infant born smaller than the usual size, a University of South Florida study reports. [More]
Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Women who begin menopause before age 46 or after 55 have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study of more than 124,000 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, a large national trial aimed at preventing disease in postmenopausal women. [More]
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