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Women whose loved ones are critical of their weight put on more pounds

Women whose loved ones are critical of their weight put on more pounds

Women whose loved ones are critical of their weight tend to put on even more pounds, says a new study on the way people's comments affect our health. [More]
FDA approves Myriad’s BRACAnalysis CDx for use with ovarian cancer drug

FDA approves Myriad’s BRACAnalysis CDx for use with ovarian cancer drug

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today announced that it has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for BRACAnalysis CDx to be used as the only companion diagnostic in conjunction with AstraZeneca’s drug Lynparza™ (olaparib). [More]
Study: Inactivating polymorphism may influence progression of ovarian and luminal breast cancer

Study: Inactivating polymorphism may influence progression of ovarian and luminal breast cancer

A common polymorphism - a variation in a person's DNA sequence that is found with regularity in the general population - can lead to a chain of events that dictates how a tumor will progress in certain types of cancer, including a form of breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer, according to new research from The Wistar Institute that was published online by the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

Stanton McHardy, associate professor of chemistry and director of the Center for Innovative Drug Discovery in The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Sciences, is partnering on a $1.9 million award to develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs. [More]
Elekta's Flexitron brachytherapy afterloading platform approved in China

Elekta's Flexitron brachytherapy afterloading platform approved in China

Elekta announces that the China Food and Drug Administration has approved Elekta's Flexitron brachytherapy afterloading platform for sale and marketing in China. [More]
Trophoblasts respond to inflammatory danger signals, find NTNU researchers

Trophoblasts respond to inflammatory danger signals, find NTNU researchers

Trophoblasts, cells that form an outer layer around a fertilized egg and develop into the major part of the placenta, have now been shown to respond to inflammatory danger signals, researchers from Norwegian University of Science and Technology found in a recent study published in Journal of Reproductive Immunology December 2014. [More]
Inovio begins hTERT DNA immunotherapy trial in adults with breast, lung and pancreatic cancer

Inovio begins hTERT DNA immunotherapy trial in adults with breast, lung and pancreatic cancer

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced it has initiated a phase I trial of its hTERT DNA immunotherapy (INO-1400) alone or in combination with Inovio's IL-12 immune activator (INO-9012) in adults with breast, lung, or pancreatic cancer at high risk of relapse after surgery and other cancer treatments. [More]
Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
Research outlines new model for measuring acceptability of contraceptive vaginal ring

Research outlines new model for measuring acceptability of contraceptive vaginal ring

The Population Council published new research in the November issue of the journal Contraception demonstrating that an investigational one-year contraceptive vaginal ring containing Nestorone and ethinyl estradiol was found to be highly acceptable among women enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. [More]
Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Premature ovarian failure, also known as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), affects 1% of all women worldwide. In most cases, the exact cause of the condition, which is often associated with infertility, is difficult to determine. [More]
New study identifies how SNAIL gene helps cancer cells break free from primary tumor

New study identifies how SNAIL gene helps cancer cells break free from primary tumor

More than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths are caused by the spread of cancer cells from their primary tumor site to other areas of the body. A new study has identified how one important gene helps cancer cells break free from the primary tumor. [More]
Emerging evidence suggests electronic cigarettes can help smokers quit

Emerging evidence suggests electronic cigarettes can help smokers quit

New Cochrane review finds emerging evidence that smokers who use electronic cigarettes can stop or reduce their smoking. [More]
Investigational drug increases PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer

Investigational drug increases PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer

In a groundbreaking study that offers new hope for women with advanced breast cancer, researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have published final clinical trial results that showed the amount of time patients were on treatment without their cancer worsening (called progression-free survival) was effectively doubled in women with advanced breast cancer who took the experimental drug palbociclib. [More]
UVA study finds that measurement of breast density better predicts woman's breast cancer risk

UVA study finds that measurement of breast density better predicts woman's breast cancer risk

A new study from UVA Cancer Center found that adding a measurement of breast density better predicts women's risk for breast cancer. Including breast density as part of risk models for breast cancer could support the development of a personalized risk model to recommend how often a woman should have a mammogram based on her unique risk factors. [More]
UTSA receives NIH grant to develop bioinformatics tools to find cause of breast cancer

UTSA receives NIH grant to develop bioinformatics tools to find cause of breast cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers, and about one in eight women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. The National Institutes of Health recently awarded a $1.08 million grant to The University of Texas at San Antonio to combine computational modeling with biological information to advance our understanding of what may cause breast cells to become cancerous. [More]
Lung cancer in women: an interview with Harold Wimmer and Chuck Brynelsen

Lung cancer in women: an interview with Harold Wimmer and Chuck Brynelsen

We at the American Lung Association know that lung cancer is the number one cancer killer among women, however, there is a startling lack of information available to the public regarding lung cancer. [More]
Curie-Cancer, GamaMabs Pharma extend partnership to develop 3C23K drug for gynecological cancers

Curie-Cancer, GamaMabs Pharma extend partnership to develop 3C23K drug for gynecological cancers

Curie-Cancer, the body responsible for developing Institut Curie’s industry partnership activities, and GamaMabs Pharma, a company specialized in the development of monoclonal antibodies for cancer, today announce the extension of their partnership to develop the 3C23K antibody for the treatment of gynecological cancers. [More]
Study provides rare evidence on effect of Iraq War on child marriage, early childbearing

Study provides rare evidence on effect of Iraq War on child marriage, early childbearing

A study published today is the first detailed assessment of whether the 8-year Iraq War had an effect on childbearing. The study found that before the war, from 1997 to 2003, adolescent fertility in Iraq was stable at just below 70 births per 1,000 girls aged 15-19. [More]
Trastuzumab drug improves long-term survival of patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer

Trastuzumab drug improves long-term survival of patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer

VCU Massey Cancer Center physician-researcher Charles E. Geyer, Jr., M.D., was the National Protocol Officer for one component of a large national study involving two National Cancer Institute-supported clinical trials that demonstrated that trastuzumab significantly improves the long-term survival of HER-2 positive breast cancer patients. [More]
Two-drug combination before surgery benefits women with triple-negative breast cancer

Two-drug combination before surgery benefits women with triple-negative breast cancer

A breast cancer specialist and clinical researcher at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island presented research yesterday at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium showing that adding either the chemotherapy drug carboplatin or the blood vessel-targeting drug bevacizumab to the standard treatment of chemotherapy before surgery helped women who have the basal-like subtype of triple-negative breast cancer. [More]