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New portable device detects electrical activity emitted by mother and unborn baby’s heart

The new portable device is able to detect both the electrical activity emitted by the heart of the mom as from the unborn baby's. [More]
Genetic testing, risk factor assessment could improve prevention strategies for breast cancer

Genetic testing, risk factor assessment could improve prevention strategies for breast cancer

Scientists used mathematical models to show that analysing genetic data, alongside a range of other risk factors, could substantially improve the ability to flag up women at highest risk of developing breast cancer. [More]
Genticel completes patient enrollment for ProCervix phase II study

Genticel completes patient enrollment for ProCervix phase II study

Genticel, a French biotechnology company and leading developer of therapeutic vaccines, today announces the completion of patient enrollment of the phase II study of its lead therapeutic vaccine candidate, ProCervix. [More]
Chemotherapy drug combined with cancer-killing virus may treat recurrent ovarian cancer

Chemotherapy drug combined with cancer-killing virus may treat recurrent ovarian cancer

In six out of 10 cases, ovarian cancer is diagnosed when the disease is advanced and five-year survival is only 27 percent. [More]
Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

What makes some women more susceptible to heart disease than others? To help answer that question, researchers at Western University's Robarts Research Institute have identified that an estrogen receptor, previously shown to regulate blood pressure in women, also plays an important role in regulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. [More]
University of Leeds researchers make new synthetic anti-cancer molecule

University of Leeds researchers make new synthetic anti-cancer molecule

Researchers at the University of Leeds have made a new synthetic anti-cancer molecule that targets two key mechanisms in the spread of malignant tumours through the body. [More]
U of G research may lead to novel treatment approaches for late-stage ovarian cancer

U of G research may lead to novel treatment approaches for late-stage ovarian cancer

In a potential breakthrough against ovarian cancer, University of Guelph researchers have discovered how to both shrink tumours and improve drug delivery, allowing for lower doses of chemotherapy and reducing side effects. [More]
Skin-to-skin contact supports breastfeeding, bonding and better health outcomes

Skin-to-skin contact supports breastfeeding, bonding and better health outcomes

Research during the past 30 years has found many benefits of skin-to-skin contact between mothers and newborns immediately after birth, particularly with aiding breastfeeding. However, in some hospitals, skin-to-skin contact following cesarean birth is not implemented, due to practices around the surgery. A recent Quality Improvement (QI) project demonstrated that women's birth experiences were improved by implementing skin-to-skin contact after cesarean surgery. [More]
RPCI researchers identify two novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

RPCI researchers identify two novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

Cancer researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute have identified two independent classes of novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer, advancing efforts to develop targeted therapies for the disease. The findings resulted from two separate studies published in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE and based on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the world's largest public database on gene expression in different tumor types. [More]
Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Among approximately 26,000 women, receipt of the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy was not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery or small-for-gestational-age birth or with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, although a small increased risk of being diagnosed with chorioamnionitis (an inflammation of the membranes that surround the fetus) was observed, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Actamax reports positive results from first clinical study of novel sprayable adhesion barrier device

Actamax reports positive results from first clinical study of novel sprayable adhesion barrier device

Actamax Surgical Materials LLC, a DSM-DuPont Joint Venture focusing on the development and commercialization of resorbable, biocompatible surgical medical devices, today announced positive safety and efficacy results from the first clinical evaluation of its novel adhesion barrier device. [More]
Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

A national survey from Rite Aid and National Foundation for Infectious Diseases reveals that the majority of adult women living in the United States do not believe they are up to date on vaccinations to protect against many preventable diseases. [More]
Internet based screening mammography training: an interview with Dr. Holzhauer

Internet based screening mammography training: an interview with Dr. Holzhauer

About half of Radiologists in the USA who participate in breast imaging are estimated to read less than 2,000 screening mammograms per year. This is a suboptimal number, given that only 3-5 cancers in average are seen among 1,000 screening mammograms. [More]
Eribulin drug has minor added benefit in one patient group, indication of lesser benefit in others

Eribulin drug has minor added benefit in one patient group, indication of lesser benefit in others

Eribulin (trade name: Halaven) is approved for women with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer in whom the disease has progressed despite prior drug therapy. The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) examined in a dossier assessment whether the drug offers an added benefit over the appropriate comparator therapy in these patient groups. [More]
Single mutation in beta-catenin gene can lead to infertility

Single mutation in beta-catenin gene can lead to infertility

Scientists from the RIKEN BioResource Center in Tsukuba, Japan, have discovered that a single mutation in the beta-catenin gene, which codes a protein known to be deeply involved in a number of developmental and homeostatic processes, can lead to infertility not through a disruption of the production of egg or sperm cells, but rather by leading to abnormalities in the morphology of the sexual organs, making natural reproduction impossible. [More]
Olaparib shows promise for advanced cancers associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

Olaparib shows promise for advanced cancers associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

Olaparib, an experimental twice-daily oral cancer drug, produces an overall tumor response rate of 26 percent in several advanced cancers associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, according to new research co-led by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Journal highlights health outcomes of women veterans

Journal highlights health outcomes of women veterans

In honor of Veterans Day, the peer-reviewed journal Women's Health Issues (WHI) today released a new Special Collection on women veterans' health, with a focus on mental health. The special collection also highlights recent studies addressing healthcare services, reproductive health and cardiovascular health of women veterans. [More]
Osteoporosis drugs may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton

Osteoporosis drugs may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton

Australian researchers have shown why calcium-binding drugs commonly used to treat people with osteoporosis, or with late-stage cancers that have spread to bone, may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton, including breast cancer. [More]
Study sheds light on DCIS recurrence

Study sheds light on DCIS recurrence

Work by University of Manchester scientists has explored what allows some cases of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), a non-invasive form of breast cancer, to resist treatment and come back, as well as identifying a potential new target to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy. [More]
Joslin researcher identifies molecular pathway that causes neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies

Joslin researcher identifies molecular pathway that causes neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies

Mary R. Loeken, Ph.D., Investigator in the Section on Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology at Joslin Diabetes Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, has discovered a molecular pathway responsible for neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies. Her latest research findings in this pathway were published in the October issue of Diabetes. [More]