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Researchers discover experimental drug that treats hot flashes, other menopausal symptoms without side effects

Researchers discover experimental drug that treats hot flashes, other menopausal symptoms without side effects

Researchers have discovered an experimental medication that treats hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms without the life-threatening risks of hormone replacement therapy, according to a team led by a UNT Health Science Center scientist. [More]
New survey explores US women's sexual risk-taking as tourists

New survey explores US women's sexual risk-taking as tourists

Relaxing beach vacations are perfect for sexual experimentation with a steady partner, while group tours and sightseeing trips are the ultimate contexts for casual sex with acquaintances or strangers, women said in a new survey. [More]
Additional radiation to surrounding lymph nodes provides added benefit to breast cancer patients

Additional radiation to surrounding lymph nodes provides added benefit to breast cancer patients

A study has found no increase in overall survival but a reduction in breast cancer recurrence when additional radiation is given to the lymph nodes as well as the standard treatment of whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery. [More]
Study finds that serum biomarkers can predict pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women

Study finds that serum biomarkers can predict pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women

Levels of biomarkers in the blood of pregnant women can be used to predict which women are at risk of pre-eclampsia, finds a study published today (22 July) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). ADMA and Hcy, both known to be raised in women with pre-eclampsia, are present in the blood in higher than normal concentrations a month before the onset of the condition. [More]
Important new target identified for ovarian cancer therapy

Important new target identified for ovarian cancer therapy

Scientists at Lawson Health Research Institute have uncovered an important new target for ovarian cancer therapy. Contrary to current research this new study found that LKB1, a molecule that regulates the metabolism of many adult cells, is an important molecule in the cancer's promotion and survival. [More]
Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have significantly greater volumes of fat around their hearts - a risk factor for heart disease - than their pre-menopausal counterparts, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health study has shown for the first time. [More]
Screening for HIV in pregnancy eliminates vertical transmission

Screening for HIV in pregnancy eliminates vertical transmission

Canada has almost eliminated mother-to-child HIV transmission, known as vertical transmission, in recent years by ensuring that all women have the opportunity to be screened for HIV in pregnancy and that women with the disease receive treatment before giving birth. [More]

Study: Cash to stay in school did not reduce HIV risk among young women in South Africa

A Phase III, individually randomized trial has found conditional cash transfers for school attendance did not reduce the risk of HIV among high-school aged women in South Africa, investigators from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) reported today at the 8th International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver, Canada. [More]
PolyU researchers create comprehensive breast milk nutrient database in Hong Kong

PolyU researchers create comprehensive breast milk nutrient database in Hong Kong

Breastfeeding has become more common all across the world in recent years, however, breastfeeding rate has remained low in Hong Kong. One of the main reasons is that Hong Kong mothers worry about the nutrient adequacy of their breast milk to meet the growing needs of the infant. [More]
Cellphone interventions improve health among poor, urban women at risk for diabetes during childbearing years

Cellphone interventions improve health among poor, urban women at risk for diabetes during childbearing years

In a survey of a diverse group of almost 250 young, low-income, inner-city pregnant and postpartum women, Johns Hopkins researchers have learned that more than 90 percent use smartphones or regular cellphones to give and get information. [More]
Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

The U.S. Agency for International Development has awarded $30 million to Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health to fund its Passages Project, which aims to improve healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies among youth and first-time parents in developing countries. [More]
Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

A clinical study funded by the National Institutes of Health has found that young, single black women in South Africa adhered to a daily pill regimen to prevent HIV infection--an HIV prevention strategy known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP. This finding is the first strong indication that this population at substantial HIV risk could accept and reliably adhere to daily PrEP dosing. [More]
Woman's weight during first pregnancy can negatively affect second baby

Woman's weight during first pregnancy can negatively affect second baby

A woman's weight during her first pregnancy can affect how her second baby fares, Saint Louis University research finds. [More]
Breast cancer survivors in Appalachia not taking life-saving follow-up treatment, new study finds

Breast cancer survivors in Appalachia not taking life-saving follow-up treatment, new study finds

Nearly a third of breast cancer survivors in Appalachia are not taking the critical, potentially life-saving follow-up treatment - despite having insurance that would pay for it, a troubling new study has found. [More]
State healthcare regulations linked to late-stage cancer diagnoses

State healthcare regulations linked to late-stage cancer diagnoses

States' regulations of health insurance and practitioners significantly influence when patients receive colorectal or breast cancer diagnoses, especially among people younger than the Medicare-eligible age of 65, according to a new study by researchers at Georgia State University's School of Public Health and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. [More]
Celebrity impact on breast cancer screening

Celebrity impact on breast cancer screening

Angelina Jolie received widespread media attention in 2013 when she told the public that she'd tested positive for BRCA1, a gene associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers, and subsequently had a double mastectomy. Now research shows that this publicity did influence some women's intentions to seek out similar genetic testing. [More]
Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

A new study from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found that mothers with chemical intolerances are two to three times more likely than other women to have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
NeoGenomics announces launch of new germline cancer predisposition testing services

NeoGenomics announces launch of new germline cancer predisposition testing services

NeoGenomics, Inc., a leading provider of cancer-focused genetic testing services, announced today the launch of a new line of germline cancer predisposition testing services. The new tests include comprehensive testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 encompassing an analysis of all exons and adjacent intronic regions. [More]
Self-quantification extends to the detection of depression

Self-quantification extends to the detection of depression

A small study conducted by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has shown that the time spent using a smart phone in conjunction with GPS location sensor data can be used to signal the development of depression. [More]
Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Like most health professionals, David Olson has known for some time of the dangers posed by excessive stress. His latest research, though, is giving surprising new insight into how chronic stress in childhood can have an impact years after it occurred in women giving birth. [More]
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