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Study compares two common treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse

Study compares two common treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the pelvic organs drop from their normal position in the pelvis. [More]
Sunbed use increases number of melanoma patients and decreases age at diagnosis

Sunbed use increases number of melanoma patients and decreases age at diagnosis

Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer with the strongest increase in incidence in the last decade, and the incidence rates have never been as high as in 2014. [More]
Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

Woman's blood pressure before pregnancy may be linked to babies' sex

A new paper published in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests that a woman's blood pressure before pregnancy is related to her likelihood of giving birth to a boy or girl. [More]
Vitamin D supplements encouraged to eliminate deficiencies in new borns

Vitamin D supplements encouraged to eliminate deficiencies in new borns

New research stating mothers must take a vitamin D supplement to protect new-borns from brittle bones and rickets, has been welcomed by health experts BetterYou. [More]
Clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension, cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, study shows

Clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension, cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, study shows

Replacing biomass and kerosene cookstoves used throughout the developing world with clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension and cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Mediplus develops new silicone pessaries that eliminate clinical risks associated with surgical mesh

Mediplus develops new silicone pessaries that eliminate clinical risks associated with surgical mesh

Women who suffer from incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse from obesity, heavy lifting, smoking, chronic constipation or childbirth don’t always need surgery according to a pioneering British medical device manufacturer. [More]
Researchers develop new method to detect cannabinoids in breast milk

Researchers develop new method to detect cannabinoids in breast milk

With the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana spreading across the country, the drug's use is reportedly increasing among pregnant women. [More]
Study shows effects of intensive weight reduction on normal weight females

Study shows effects of intensive weight reduction on normal weight females

Worries about the potential negative consequences of fat loss regimens for aesthetic purposes in normal weight females have been surfacing in the media. [More]
Natural pre-pregnancy progesterone benefits women with history of unexplained miscarriages

Natural pre-pregnancy progesterone benefits women with history of unexplained miscarriages

Women who have had two or more unexplained miscarriages can benefit from natural progesterone treatment before pregnancy, a new a study shows. [More]
Childhood obesity starts in the womb?

Childhood obesity starts in the womb?

There is incontrovertible evidence that some harmful drugs and toxins can affect lifelong health. For example, if women take certain drugs in pregnancy, such as thalidomide, there are well documented effects on lifelong health. These have obvious and dramatic effects on the child... [More]
Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Despite the mandatory addition of folic acid to enriched grain products in the United States, many women still do not consume adequate amounts of this important vitamin, according to an editorial written by Laura E. Mitchell, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations women undergo make them particularly sensitive, compared to men, to the addictive properties of cocaine, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published January 10 in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Repeat cesarean delivery may result in excess morbidity and cost, UAB review shows

Repeat cesarean delivery may result in excess morbidity and cost, UAB review shows

A systematic review from the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that routinely opting for a repeat cesarean delivery over first attempting a vaginal delivery may result in excess morbidity and cost from a population perspective for women with a prior low transverse incision cesarean delivery who are likely to have a successful vaginal delivery. [More]
Risk of skin cancer does not dissuade indoor tanning habits of college students, study shows

Risk of skin cancer does not dissuade indoor tanning habits of college students, study shows

White female college students in Indiana who tan indoors know they are placing themselves at risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging, but most continue to tan indoors anyway, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. [More]
Penn study reveals key factors that influence treatment choices in women suffering miscarriage

Penn study reveals key factors that influence treatment choices in women suffering miscarriage

How women make decisions about treatment while suffering a miscarriage, and the key factors that influence their choices, are revealed in a study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers identify new subgroup of cervical cancers with different genetic features

Researchers identify new subgroup of cervical cancers with different genetic features

A team of University of South Carolina scientists led by Carolyn Banister and Phillip Buckhaults has identified a new subtype of cervical cancer that, like most cervical cancers, is triggered by human papillomavirus (HPV) but whose growth is not directed by the virus, suggesting that therapy targeting these tumors' distinct genomic pathways may improve patient outcomes over standard treatment. [More]
Antioxidant may prevent development of NAFLD in offspring of obese mothers

Antioxidant may prevent development of NAFLD in offspring of obese mothers

In new research published online in The FASEB Journal, scientists show that the antioxidant pyrroloquinoline quinone may prevent the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in offspring. [More]
Fish sauce may help provide better nutrition for mothers and young children

Fish sauce may help provide better nutrition for mothers and young children

Researchers from the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute and the University of Adelaide have found a way to provide mothers and young children in Cambodia with better nutrition through an unlikely source -- fish sauce. [More]
Telerehabilitation may help alleviate side effects linked to breast cancer

Telerehabilitation may help alleviate side effects linked to breast cancer

Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) and from hospitals Virgen de las Nieves and San Cecilio (Granada) have proved that telerehabilitation (rehabilitation with the help of the Internet, using the application Skype as a control platform) may help to alleviate the side effects associated with breast cancer and its treatment, like pain, fatigue, strength loss, deterioration of the quality of life, etc.. [More]
Progesterone hormone could offer hope for women who suffer multiple pregnancy losses

Progesterone hormone could offer hope for women who suffer multiple pregnancy losses

For women who suffer multiple pregnancy losses in the first four to six weeks of gestation, the hormone progesterone could offer hope for a successful birth, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues at University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
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