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Prostatitis symptoms

By Dr Ananya Mandal, MD

Prostatitis refers to inflammation of the prostate. There are two major types of prostatitis – chronic or long-term prostatitis and acute or sudden-onset prostatitis. The majority of prostatitis cases are chronic and acute prostatitis is rare. In chronic prostatitis, symptoms may last for three months or more.

Some examples of chronic prostatitis symptoms include:

  • Dull, aching pain or heaviness in the pelvic area, genitalia, lower back and buttocks
  • Discomfort in the area between the scrotum and the anus
  • Pain when urinating
  • A frequent urge to urinate
  • Difficulty starting urination and a weak flow of urine once urination is achieved
  • Inconsistent urine flow that alternates between slow and fast
  • Pain on ejaculation that may lead to erectile dysfunction
  • General symptoms such as joint pain, muscle pain and fever

Some examples of acute prostatitis symptoms include:

  • Sudden onset of pain in the lower abdomen and pain while urinating
  • Difficulty emptying the bladder
  • Repeated and frequent urges to urinate
  • Feeling of incomplete emptying of the bladder after urination
  • Frequent need to urinate during the night. This is called nocturia.
  • Nocturia also interferes with sleep and may lead to other complications such as insomnia, depression, anxiety and stress.
  • Pain felt in the penis, testicles, pelvic area, lower back, abdomen and insides of the thighs.
  • Pain on ejaculation that may lead to erectile dysfunction
  • High fever, chills and shivering
  • Feelings of general fatigue, malaise, and body aches

Reviewed by , BSc

Further Reading

Last Updated: Jan 19, 2014

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