GE Capital's Healthcare Financial Services provides $9 million term loan to Cerapedics

Published on May 12, 2014 at 11:30 AM · No Comments

GE Capital's Healthcare Financial Services (HFS) business has provided a $9 million term loan to Cerapedics, Inc., a privately-held medical device company based in Westminster, CO. The funds will be used to support Cerapedics' general business operations, including the advancement of its U.S. regulatory process.

Cerapedics is an orthobiologics company focused on developing and commercializing its proprietary synthetic small peptide (P-15) technology platform. i-FACTOR bone graft is the only biologic bone graft that incorporates a small peptide as an attachment factor to stimulate the natural bone healing process. This mechanism is designed to support safer and more predictable bone formation at a lower cost compared to commercially available bone growth factors.

"Working with a lender that specializes in the healthcare industry was a great experience," said Glen Kashuba, Cerapedics' CEO. "The GE Capital deal team invested significant time up-front, asking thoughtful questions to understand our key business drivers, and then structured a credit facility that aligned well with our objectives."

"We're impressed with Cerapedics' management, investors and growth trajectory, and we're pleased to support the company's efforts during this pivotal stage of its development," said Joe Hammer, senior vice president, life sciences with GE Capital. "We're proud to support entrepreneurs who are on the forefront of medical therapies in the U.S."

Source:

GE Capital, Healthcare Financial Services

Posted in: Business / Finance

Tags: , ,

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post
You might also like... ×
Patients continue to lose bone at least 2 years after bariatric surgery, shows study