Androgen News and Research RSS Feed - Androgen News and Research

Study helps discover new treatments for type 2 diabetes in men with low testosterone

Study helps discover new treatments for type 2 diabetes in men with low testosterone

Doctors have long known that men with low testosterone are at greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes. For the first time, researchers have identified how testosterone helps men regulate blood sugar by triggering key signaling mechanisms in islets, clusters of cells within the pancreas that produce insulin. The findings, co-authored by Tulane University researchers, are published in the journal [More]
Testosterone may lead to greater heart attack risk in men than women

Testosterone may lead to greater heart attack risk in men than women

Testosterone might be involved in explaining why men have a greater risk of heart attacks than women of similar age, according to a study funded by the British Heart Foundation and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, could lead to new therapies to help reduce heart attack risk. [More]
MAILES study finds link between fatty diets and sleep

MAILES study finds link between fatty diets and sleep

University of Adelaide researchers have found that men who consume diets high in fat are more likely to feel sleepy during the day, to report sleep problems at night, and are also more likely to suffer from sleep apnea. [More]
Older men receiving testosterone therapy less likely to return to hospital

Older men receiving testosterone therapy less likely to return to hospital

A new large-scale population-based study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston showed for the first time that older men using testosterone therapy were less likely to have complications that require them to go back to the hospital within a month of being discharged than men not using this therapy. The study is currently available in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Cholesterol-fighting drug molecule can kill prostate cancer cells

Cholesterol-fighting drug molecule can kill prostate cancer cells

Standard treatment for prostate cancer can include chemotherapy that targets receptors on cancer cells. However, drug-resistant cancer cells can emerge during chemotherapy, limiting its effectiveness as a cancer-fighting agent. Researchers at the University of Missouri have proven that a compound initially developed as a cholesterol-fighting molecule not only halts the progression of prostate cancer, but also can kill cancerous cells. [More]
Infant daughters may show early signs of PCOS from mothers

Infant daughters may show early signs of PCOS from mothers

The infant daughters of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) show a higher level of an enzyme that activates testosterone and may be an early sign of developing the complex genetic disease, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Testosterone therapy helps reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events in elderly men

Testosterone therapy helps reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events in elderly men

A new multi-year study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City shows that testosterone therapy helped elderly men with low testosterone levels and pre-existing coronary artery disease reduce their risks of major adverse cardiovascular events — including strokes, heart attacks, and death. [More]
Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has discovered two enzymes that appear to play a role in metabolism and inflammation—and might someday be targeted with drugs to treat type 2 diabetes and inflammatory disorders. [More]
Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Researchers at UC Davis, in collaboration with the other institutions, have found that suppressing the nuclear receptor protein ROR-γ with small-molecule compounds can reduce androgen receptor (AR) levels in castration-resistant prostate cancer and stop tumor growth. [More]
FDA announces required class-wide safety labeling changes for IR opioid pain medications

FDA announces required class-wide safety labeling changes for IR opioid pain medications

In a continuing effort to educate prescribers and patients about the potential risks related to opioid use, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced required class-wide safety labeling changes for immediate-release (IR) opioid pain medications. Among the changes, the FDA is requiring a new boxed warning about the serious risks of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose and death. [More]
Research uncovers biological differences between male, female breast cancers

Research uncovers biological differences between male, female breast cancers

Male breast cancer (Male BC) has important biological differences that distinguish it from female breast cancer, but to date these have been little studied and Male BC patients have been excluded from many clinical trials in breast cancer. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop novel therapeutic strategy to keep resistant cells in check

Moffitt researchers develop novel therapeutic strategy to keep resistant cells in check

Despite numerous advances in oncology since the War on Cancer began, many patients develop resistance to standard therapies and eventually relapse. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers hope to improve treatment outcomes with development of a novel therapeutic strategy, called adaptive therapy, which is based on evolutionary principals and aims to keep resistant cells in check by maintaining a population of chemo-sensitive cells. [More]
Romosozumab for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis meets co-primary endpoints in Phase 3 study

Romosozumab for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis meets co-primary endpoints in Phase 3 study

Amgen and UCB today announced top-line results from the Phase 3 placebo-controlled FRActure study in postmenopausal woMen with ostEoporosis (FRAME). [More]
Vanderbilt physicians examine risk factors for cardiovascular disease in prostate cancer survivors

Vanderbilt physicians examine risk factors for cardiovascular disease in prostate cancer survivors

The 3 million prostate cancer survivors in the United States are likely to die from something other than cancer, thanks to early detection, effective treatment and the disease's slow progression. [More]
Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

A first-in-class sphingosine kinase 2 inhibitor slowed the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, in part by inhibiting the enzyme dihydroceramide desaturase (DEGS), but did not kill them, according to the results of preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies published in the December 2015 issue of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and others. [More]
Results from STRIVE trial of enzalutamide versus bicalutamide in CRPC published in Journal of Clinical Oncology

Results from STRIVE trial of enzalutamide versus bicalutamide in CRPC published in Journal of Clinical Oncology

Astellas US LLC, a United States (U.S.) subsidiary of Tokyo-based Astellas Pharma Inc., and Medivation, Inc. today announced that results from the STRIVE trial of enzalutamide compared to bicalutamide in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Docetaxel remains effective in prostate cancer even after treatment with androgen-deprivation therapy

Docetaxel remains effective in prostate cancer even after treatment with androgen-deprivation therapy

A study presented at the 2016 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium shows that 40 percent of patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with docetaxel following abiraterone had at least 50 percent reduction in prostate specific antigen (PSA), demonstrating the activity of this drug sequencing. [More]
Biocept introduces blood-based test for detection, monitoring of prostate cancer and breast cancer

Biocept introduces blood-based test for detection, monitoring of prostate cancer and breast cancer

Biocept, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company commercializing and developing biomarkers to improve the detection and treatment of cancer, announces the launch of the CLIA-validated androgen receptor expression assay using a patient's blood for the detection and monitoring of late-stage prostate cancer and a certain form of breast cancer. [More]
High diversity among circulating tumor cells predicts survival, treatment resistance in prostate cancer patients

High diversity among circulating tumor cells predicts survival, treatment resistance in prostate cancer patients

Research teams at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Epic Sciences have found that greater diversity among circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of advanced prostate cancer patients predicts not only shorter overall survival, but also the development of resistance to key anti-androgen therapies. [More]
New discovery may soon make prostate cancer cells easier to destroy

New discovery may soon make prostate cancer cells easier to destroy

A newly discovered connection between two common prostate cancer treatments may soon make prostate cancer cells easier to destroy. Drugs that could capitalize on the discovery are already in the pipeline, and a clinical trial to test whether the finding could improve treatments for prostate cancer patients could be only a few years away. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement