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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty in the homes of people with sickle cell disease could reduce debilitating attacks and save significant money for the NHS, according to a study by Sheffield Hallam University funded by the Chesshire Lehmann Fund. [More]
ScinoPharm Taiwan, Raffles PharmaTech collaborate to manufacture Celecoxib

ScinoPharm Taiwan, Raffles PharmaTech collaborate to manufacture Celecoxib

ScinoPharm Taiwan, Ltd. and Raffles PharmaTech announced today the collaboration to manufacture "Celecoxib," a non-steroidal and anti-inflammatory analgesic active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). [More]
Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

One of the body's tools for fighting off infection in a wound may actually slow down the healing process, according to new research by a team of Harvard University, Boston Children's Hospital, and Penn State University scientists. [More]
Experimental AIDS vaccine candidate stimulates immune system to block infection in animal model

Experimental AIDS vaccine candidate stimulates immune system to block infection in animal model

New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative and The Rockefeller University shows that an experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate the immune system to block HIV infection in mice. [More]
Autoantibodies play major role in IPF patients with acute exacerbations

Autoantibodies play major role in IPF patients with acute exacerbations

Patients with acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis responded well to therapies similar to those used to treat autoimmune diseases, according to findings published today in PLOS ONE. The study suggests that autoantibodies — implicated in many autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus — also play an important role in patients with acute exacerbations of IPF, a devastating lung disease. [More]
Findings could lead to treatments for chronic pain caused by nerve damage

Findings could lead to treatments for chronic pain caused by nerve damage

Non-narcotic treatments for chronic pain that work well in people, not just mice, are sorely needed. Drawing from human pain genetics, an international team led by Boston Children's Hospital demonstrates a way to break the cycle of pain hypersensitivity without the development of addiction, tolerance or side effects. [More]

Cryoport to provide cryogenic logistics solutions to support personalized medicine efforts of CaRE Arthritis

Cryoport, Inc., the leading provider of advanced cryogenic logistics solutions for the life sciences industry, serving markets including immunotherapies, stem cells, cell lines, clinical research organizations, vaccine manufacturers, animal health, and reproductive medicine, today announced that the Company is the preferred cryogenic logistics provider to CaRE Arthritis. [More]
New form of talking therapy shows promise for people suffering from chronic low back pain

New form of talking therapy shows promise for people suffering from chronic low back pain

New research from Royal Holloway, University of London has found that a new form of talking therapy is a credible and promising treatment for people with chronic low back pain who are also suffering from related psychological stress. [More]

TSRI chemists invent scalable method for synthesizing brain-protecting compound

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute have invented the first practical, scalable method for synthesizing jiadifenolide, a plant-derived molecule that may have powerful brain-protecting properties. [More]
TUSM researchers reveal how scratching evokes pleasurable sensation in chronic itch patients

TUSM researchers reveal how scratching evokes pleasurable sensation in chronic itch patients

It's long been known that scratching evokes a rewarding and pleasurable sensation in patients with chronic itch. Now, researchers in the Department of Dermatology and Temple Itch Center at Temple University School of Medicine may be closer to understanding why. [More]
Researchers suggest link between solar storms and incidences of RA and GCA

Researchers suggest link between solar storms and incidences of RA and GCA

What began as a chat between husband and wife has evolved into an intriguing scientific discovery. The results, published in May in BMJ (formerly British Medical Journal) Open, show a "highly significant" correlation between periodic solar storms and incidences of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and giant cell arteritis (GCA), two potentially debilitating autoimmune diseases. [More]
Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses. [More]
Study shows that TNFi dose reduction strategy can help in optimal management of RA

Study shows that TNFi dose reduction strategy can help in optimal management of RA

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) showed that, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, a good clinical response to maintenance treatment with a tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) was maintained even when the dose was reduced by one-third. [More]
People with rheumatoid arthritis less likely to benefit from hepatitis B vaccine

People with rheumatoid arthritis less likely to benefit from hepatitis B vaccine

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) Press Conference showed that people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less likely to be protected by hepatitis B vaccination than the general population. [More]
Hydroxychloroquine drug fails to reduce mild-moderate pain from primary hand osteoarthritis

Hydroxychloroquine drug fails to reduce mild-moderate pain from primary hand osteoarthritis

The results of an interventional trial presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) showed that use of the disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug hydroxychloroquine for 24 weeks did not diminish mild-moderate pain from primary hand osteoarthritis (OA). [More]
New TSRI study integrates neuroscience and psychological research to understand sleep, memory

New TSRI study integrates neuroscience and psychological research to understand sleep, memory

In Macbeth, Shakespeare describes sleep as "the death of each day's life," but he may have gotten it wrong. Sleep, as it turns out, may be the one thing that keeps our memories alive and intact. [More]
Study identifies unique bacterial signature in people with systemic sclerosis

Study identifies unique bacterial signature in people with systemic sclerosis

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) Press Conference showed that people with systemic sclerosis (SSc) have a unique bacterial signature in their colon, when compared with healthy people. [More]
NSAIDs significantly inhibit ovulation in women with mild musculoskeletal pain

NSAIDs significantly inhibit ovulation in women with mild musculoskeletal pain

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) show that diclofenac, naproxen and etoricoxib significantly inhibit ovulation in women with mild musculoskeletal pain. Of the women receiving NSAIDs, only 6.3 percent (diclofenac), 25 percent (naproxen) and 27.3 percent (etoricoxib) ovulated, compared with 100 percent of the control group. [More]
Study shows that ankylosing spondylitis can be predicted by low birth weight

Study shows that ankylosing spondylitis can be predicted by low birth weight

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) Press Conference showed that a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) can be predicted by low birth weight, having older siblings and hospitalisation for infection between the ages of 5-16 years. [More]
Initial therapy with DMARDs improves disease activity, functional ability in patients with early RA

Initial therapy with DMARDs improves disease activity, functional ability in patients with early RA

The results of the tREACH trial presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) Press Conference showed that initial therapy with combination DMARDs significantly improves measures of disease activity and functional ability in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
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