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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism responsible for steroid resistance in leukemia patients

Researchers identify mechanism responsible for steroid resistance in leukemia patients

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a mechanism that helps leukemia cells resist glucocorticoids, a finding that lays the foundation for more effective treatment of cancer and possibly a host of autoimmune diseases. [More]
Study explores non-biological factors that may cause fewer men to seek bariatric surgery

Study explores non-biological factors that may cause fewer men to seek bariatric surgery

A new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified demographic, socioeconomic and cultural factors that contribute to a major gender disparity among U.S. men and women undergoing weight loss surgeries. Men undergo the surgeries in far lower numbers than women. [More]
UI orthopedics researchers working on injectable, bioactive gel that can repair cartilage damage

UI orthopedics researchers working on injectable, bioactive gel that can repair cartilage damage

Knee injuries are the bane of athletes everywhere, from professionals and college stars to weekend warriors. Current surgical options for repairing damaged cartilage caused by knee injuries are costly, can have complications, and often are not very effective in the long run. Even after surgery, cartilage degeneration can progress leading to painful arthritis. [More]
Scientists identify new way to predict disease outcomes in people with rheumatoid arthritis

Scientists identify new way to predict disease outcomes in people with rheumatoid arthritis

Arthritis Research UK-funded scientists at The University of Manchester have identified a new way in which genotyping can be used to predict disease outcomes among sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
New TSRI study points to promising new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease

New TSRI study points to promising new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease

Taking a new approach, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have uncovered some surprising details of a group of compounds that have shown significant potential in stimulating the growth of brain cells and memory restoration in animal models that mimic Alzheimer's disease. [More]
TSRI study provides new insight into preventing diseases that cause vision loss in adults

TSRI study provides new insight into preventing diseases that cause vision loss in adults

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute shows that nerve cells and blood vessels in the eye constantly "talk" to each other to maintain healthy blood flow and prevent disease. [More]
Can-Fite announces favorable data from further analysis of CF101 Phase II/III study in patients with psoriasis

Can-Fite announces favorable data from further analysis of CF101 Phase II/III study in patients with psoriasis

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd. (NYSE MKT: CANF) (TASE: CFBI), a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today favorable data from further analysis of its Phase II/III double-blind, placebo-controlled study designed to test the efficacy of CF101 in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
Epigenetic processes influence children's later ability to learn and cognitive performance

Epigenetic processes influence children's later ability to learn and cognitive performance

Although it is now widely recognised that a poor start to life has long-term effects on a child's later ability to learn, the mechanisms by which the environment in early life affects later life chances are poorly understood. [More]
Scientists identify missing genetic link in common variable immunodeficiency disorder

Scientists identify missing genetic link in common variable immunodeficiency disorder

In the largest genetic study to date of a challenging immunodeficiency disorder, scientists have identified a gene that may be a "missing link" between overactive and underactive immune activity. The gene candidate also plays a key role in autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and allergies. [More]
Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin, a protein found in the body, has been identified as the key driver behind the bone loss associated with the world's most common inflammatory disease: gum disease, or periodontitis. [More]
University of Birmingham researchers identify new way to tackle chronic diseases

University of Birmingham researchers identify new way to tackle chronic diseases

Researchers from the University of Birmingham have identified an important new way in which our immune systems are regulated, and hope that understanding it will help tackle the debilitating effects of type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and other serious diseases. [More]
Latest genome sequencing techniques help identify new autoimmune syndrome in children

Latest genome sequencing techniques help identify new autoimmune syndrome in children

Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team led by scientists from UC San Francisco, Baylor College of Medicine, and Texas Children's Hospital has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis that currently has no therapy. [More]
Can-Fite seeks EMA Orphan Drug Designation for CF102 in HCC

Can-Fite seeks EMA Orphan Drug Designation for CF102 in HCC

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that are being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, announced today it has submitted an application to the European Medicines Agency for Orphan Drug Designation for its drug candidate CF102 in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. [More]
Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Scraped from the gums, teeth and tongue in the form of plaque, the researchers behind Canada's first plaque bank are betting that the bacterial content of plaque will open up a new frontier of medicine. [More]
Researchers explore benefits and risks of biosimilar antibodies

Researchers explore benefits and risks of biosimilar antibodies

In the emerging biosimilar market, biosimilar antibodies are being developed to treat conditions currently addressed by their original, targeted biological therapy. Only a few biosimilars are approved by the EMA, and just one has been approved by the FDA. In a review article, researchers used the clinical development data from one drug to explore the broader benefits and risks of these cost-effective, but as yet unfamiliar treatment options. [More]
Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease, according to a study published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
DPS Health introduces Virtual Lifestyle Management, forms partnership with Stanford Patient Education Research Center

DPS Health introduces Virtual Lifestyle Management, forms partnership with Stanford Patient Education Research Center

DPS Health, a leader in digital behavior change interventions for emergent-risk populations, announced today the launch of its health self-management solution. Designed for health plans, providers systems and employers that are setting population health strategies for the emergent-risk population – adults with one or more pre-chronic or early-stage chronic conditions – the solution includes multi-channel consumer engagement to educate and enroll populations, Virtual Lifestyle ManagementTM to help individuals embrace healthy lifestyles, and a suite of condition-based, self-management programs to help the same individuals manage the impact of one or more conditions. [More]
OSU study finds that injury prevention programs are not being used in high schools

OSU study finds that injury prevention programs are not being used in high schools

Injury prevention programs can help reduce ankle, knee and other lower extremity injuries in sports, but the programs are not being widely used in high schools, a new study from Oregon State University has found. [More]
Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

The first-ever systematic study of the genomes of patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a particularly aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, shows that many cases of the disease are driven by alterations in the JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway. [More]
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