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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Scientists identify new biomarker linked to non-small cell lung cancer, head and neck cancers

Scientists identify new biomarker linked to non-small cell lung cancer, head and neck cancers

A team led by a scientist from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute has identified a new biomarker linked to better outcomes of patients with head and neck cancers and non-small cell lung cancer. The work could help scientists develop new diagnostics and therapies and help physicians determine the best long-term treatments for patients with these cancers. [More]
Leading experts discuss the economic burden of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis on patient and society

Leading experts discuss the economic burden of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis on patient and society

A panel of leading experts representing different sectors of the health care community met to discuss the significant and underestimated burden psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have on patients, the health care system and economy, and the impact medical innovation has on reducing these burdens. [More]
Newly identified protein markers have potential to contribute to better understanding of heart disease

Newly identified protein markers have potential to contribute to better understanding of heart disease

Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah, have discovered that elevated levels of two recently identified proteins in the body are inflammatory markers and indicators of the presence of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Mechanical circulatory assist device may have untapped potential in heart surgery patients, say physicians

Mechanical circulatory assist device may have untapped potential in heart surgery patients, say physicians

The most frequently used mechanical circulatory assist device in the world may have untapped potential, physicians say. [More]

Choosing better treatment for ankle fractures

Many people associate ankle fractures with sports, but you don't have to be an athlete to develop a serious ankle injury. Ankle fractures, in which there is a partial or complete break in a bone, can happen to anyone. People can break an ankle after a fall, car accident or twisting injury. [More]
CDC program provides natural self-management techniques for people living with arthritis

CDC program provides natural self-management techniques for people living with arthritis

In the United States, March is Women's History Month. While it is a time to reflect on the contributions women have made to the fields of politics, art, science, medicine and elsewhere, it is also a time to pay attention to the issues that women today are facing in their daily lives. [More]
Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX receives FDA approval for hemophilia B treatment

Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX receives FDA approval for hemophilia B treatment

Today Biogen Idec announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved ALPROLIX [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), Fc Fusion Protein], the first recombinant, DNA derived hemophilia B therapy with prolonged circulation in the body. [More]
Idera Pharmaceuticals reports positive top-line results from Phase 2 trial of IMO-8400

Idera Pharmaceuticals reports positive top-line results from Phase 2 trial of IMO-8400

Idera Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced positive top-line data from its randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled Phase 2 trial of IMO-8400 in 32 patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

The outbreak of dengue fever that infected some 20 people in Florida's Martin County late last year unnerved many who feared the tropical disease had once again established a foothold in Florida. The last outbreaks occurred in 2009 and 2010 in Key West—before that, the disease hadn't struck Florida in more than 70 years. [More]
CT scans allow rheumatologists to diagnose gout

CT scans allow rheumatologists to diagnose gout

Gout is on the rise among U.S. men and women, and this piercingly painful and most common form of inflammatory arthritis is turning out to be more complicated than had been thought. [More]
Study: Genetics could explain why environmental exposures can trigger onset of rheumatoid arthritis

Study: Genetics could explain why environmental exposures can trigger onset of rheumatoid arthritis

A new international study has revealed how genetics could explain why different environmental exposures can trigger the onset of different forms of rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Adult offspring of addicted parents more likely to have arthritis

Adult offspring of addicted parents more likely to have arthritis

The adult offspring of parents who were addicted to drugs or alcohol are more likely to have arthritis, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers. [More]
TG2 protein is a key mediator in Porphyromonas gingivalis infection, study finds

TG2 protein is a key mediator in Porphyromonas gingivalis infection, study finds

Scientists at Forsyth, along with a colleague from Northwestern University, have discovered that the protein, Transgultaminase 2 (TG2), is a key component in the process of gum disease. TG2 is widely distributed inside and outside of human cells. The scientists found that blocking some associations of TG2 prevents the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) from adhering to cells. This insight may one day help lead to novel therapies to prevent gum disease caused by PG. [More]
Researchers discover novel population of neutrophils that exhibit enhanced microbial killing activity

Researchers discover novel population of neutrophils that exhibit enhanced microbial killing activity

​Case Western Reserve University researchers have discovered a novel population of neutrophils, which are the body's infection control workhorses. These cells have an enhanced microbial killing ability and are thereby better able to control infection. [More]
Concise analysis of China’s rituximab drug market

Concise analysis of China’s rituximab drug market

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Investigation Report on China Rituximab Market, 2009-2018" report to their offering. [More]
Certain drugs in Obamacare plans carry hefty pricetags

Certain drugs in Obamacare plans carry hefty pricetags

Insurers selling Obamacare plans have set drug prices according to a tiered system that in some cases requires consumers to pay as much as 50 percent of the cost, The Associated Press writes. [More]

First Edition: March 24, 2013

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations examine the final week for health law enrollment, the Supreme Court case this week about the law's contraceptive mandate and the fourth anniversary of the enactment of the controversial overhaul. [More]

Longer looks: The politics of face and hand transplants; Apple's Healthbook; connecting income to life expectancy

Fairfax County, Va., and McDowell County, W.Va., are separated by 350 miles, about a half-day's drive. Traveling west from Fairfax County, the gated communities and bland architecture of military contractors give way to exurbs, then to farmland and eventually to McDowell's coal mines and the forested slopes of the Appalachians. Perhaps the greatest distance between the two counties is this: Fairfax is a place of the haves, and McDowell of the have-nots. ... One of the starkest consequences of that divide is seen in the life expectancies of the people there. Residents of Fairfax County are among the longest-lived in the country: Men have an average life expectancy of 82 years and women, 85, about the same as in Sweden. In McDowell, the averages are 64 and 73, about the same as in Iraq (Annie Lowrey, 3/15). [More]

Horizon Pharma secures $250 million in acquisition financing from Deerfield Management

Deerfield Management Company announced today that it has provided up to $250 million in acquisition financing to Horizon Pharma, Inc. for the acquisition of Vidara Therapeutics International Ltd. [More]

Biologists discover WBC moves to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner

A team of biologists and engineers at the University of California, San Diego has discovered that white blood cells, which repair damaged tissue as part of the body's immune response, move to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner. [More]