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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has discovered two enzymes that appear to play a role in metabolism and inflammation—and might someday be targeted with drugs to treat type 2 diabetes and inflammatory disorders. [More]
Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Researchers at UC Davis, in collaboration with the other institutions, have found that suppressing the nuclear receptor protein ROR-γ with small-molecule compounds can reduce androgen receptor (AR) levels in castration-resistant prostate cancer and stop tumor growth. [More]
Engineered HIV vaccine protein may prevent HIV infection

Engineered HIV vaccine protein may prevent HIV infection

Some people infected with HIV naturally produce antibodies that effectively neutralize many strains of the rapidly mutating virus, and scientists are working to develop a vaccine capable of inducing such "broadly neutralizing" antibodies that can prevent HIV infection. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new process to synthesize naturally occurring compound phorbol

TSRI scientists develop new process to synthesize naturally occurring compound phorbol

In a landmark feat of chemical synthesis, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a 19-step process for making the naturally occurring compound phorbol in the laboratory, in quantities that are useful for pharmaceutical research. [More]
Researchers use DNA sequencing technology to identify gene variants that affect susceptibility to SLE

Researchers use DNA sequencing technology to identify gene variants that affect susceptibility to SLE

Demonstrating the potential of precision medicine, an international study based at UT Southwestern Medical Center used next-generation DNA sequencing technology to identify more than 1,000 gene variants that affect susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). [More]
St. Luke’s surgeon first in world to implant Medtronic’s new, MRI-compatible neurostimulator system

St. Luke’s surgeon first in world to implant Medtronic’s new, MRI-compatible neurostimulator system

Steven Falowski, MD, Chief of Functional Neurosurgery at St. Luke’s University Health Network in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania today was the first surgeon in the world to implant Medtronic’s brand new, full-body, MRI-compatible paddle electrode leads for the Restore neurostimulator system. [More]
LEO Pharma announces scientific approval of Enstilar for treatment of people living with psoriasis in EU

LEO Pharma announces scientific approval of Enstilar for treatment of people living with psoriasis in EU

LEO Pharma today announced that it received scientific approval of Enstilar (calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate 50 micrograms/g / 0,5 mg/g) for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris in patients 18 years of age or older. [More]
Women taking birth control pill less likely to suffer serious knee injuries

Women taking birth control pill less likely to suffer serious knee injuries

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that women who take the birth control pill, which lessen and stabilize estrogen levels, were less likely to suffer serious knee injuries. The findings are currently available in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine. [More]
Older types of arthritis medicine appear to be dangerous for the heart

Older types of arthritis medicine appear to be dangerous for the heart

Many Danes are prescribed NSAIDs for the treatment of painful conditions, fever and inflammation. But the treatment also comes with side effects, including the risk of ulcers and increased blood pressure. [More]
Psoriasis patients experience widespread bone loss

Psoriasis patients experience widespread bone loss

Researchers from the Genes, Development and Disease Group, headed by Erwin Wagner at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre have discovered that psoriasis patients experience a widespread bone loss as a result of the disease. [More]
Global research links genes to five common, hard-to-treat inflammatory diseases

Global research links genes to five common, hard-to-treat inflammatory diseases

A global study involving 50 different research centres has found hundreds of genes which cause five common, hard-to-treat and debilitating inflammatory diseases, paving the way to new treatments for these conditions [More]
IUPUI researchers examine pain experience, pain management among Hispanic Americans

IUPUI researchers examine pain experience, pain management among Hispanic Americans

Hispanic Americans report fewer pain conditions compared with non-Hispanic white or black Americans, according to a critical review and analysis of more than 100 studies on pain experience and pain management among Hispanic Americans. [More]
Combination drug therapy may stop KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma

Combination drug therapy may stop KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma

Researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus have shut down one of the most common and lethal forms of lung cancer by combining the rheumatoid arthritis drug auranofin with an experimental targeted agent. [More]
Tai chi exercise improves outcomes in older fallers

Tai chi exercise improves outcomes in older fallers

Recently, researchers compared the effects of tai chi to leg strengthening exercises (a physical therapy called "lower extremity training," or LET) in reducing falls. Falls are a leading cause of serious injuries in older adults and can lead to hospitalization, nursing home admission, and even death. [More]
NLRX1 protein could be new biomarker for colorectal cancer, find UNC Lineberger researchers

NLRX1 protein could be new biomarker for colorectal cancer, find UNC Lineberger researchers

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have discovered that a deficiency in a key protein that regulates immune system warning signals could be a new biomarker for colorectal cancer, the second largest cancer killer in the United States. They believe the marker could be used to gauge response to a potential new treatment for the disease. [More]
Phase 3 study: Sarilumab monotherapy meets primary endpoint in active rheumatoid arthritis patients

Phase 3 study: Sarilumab monotherapy meets primary endpoint in active rheumatoid arthritis patients

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that a Phase 3 monotherapy study met its primary endpoint demonstrating that sarilumab was superior to adalimumab (marketed by AbbVie as HUMIRA) in improving signs and symptoms in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at Week 24. [More]
Study reveals direct regulatory role of serotonin in rheumatoid arthritis

Study reveals direct regulatory role of serotonin in rheumatoid arthritis

For the first time, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been directly implicated in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although 5-HT is predominantly known as a neurotransmitter within the central nervous system, new evidence points to additional important functions for serotonin in the periphery. [More]
Minimally invasive approach to ACL surgery reduces recovery time

Minimally invasive approach to ACL surgery reduces recovery time

Kaniya Brown of Accokeek, Maryland, has returned to running after a devastating knee injury. The track star tore her anterior cruciate ligament while playing soccer. ACL tears are common sports injuries that often require surgery, followed by months of rehabilitation. Instead, Kaniya underwent an innovative procedure that repairs the ACL, allowing for quicker recovery and less pain. [More]
Patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis achieve significant improvement with ixekizumab

Patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis achieve significant improvement with ixekizumab

Eli Lilly and Company announced today that patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis who did not respond to treatment with etanercept achieved significant improvement in their psoriasis plaques when treated with ixekizumab in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Detailed results of the UNCOVER-2 study were presented during the American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting taking place March 4-8 in Washington, D.C. [More]
Xencor begins XmAb5871 Phase 2 trials in patients with IgG4-RD and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Xencor begins XmAb5871 Phase 2 trials in patients with IgG4-RD and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Xencor, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing engineered monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, asthma and allergic diseases and cancer, today announced dosing the first patient in a Phase 2 trial of XmAb5871 in patients with IgG4-Related Disease (IgG4-RD). [More]
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