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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
USPTO issues Notice of Allowance to Can-Fite BioPharma for psoriasis patent

USPTO issues Notice of Allowance to Can-Fite BioPharma for psoriasis patent

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that are being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, announced today that it has received a Notice of Allowance from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for CF101 in the treatment of psoriasis. [More]
Researchers show how gene mutations cause common forms of cartilage tumors

Researchers show how gene mutations cause common forms of cartilage tumors

Duke Medicine researchers have shown how gene mutations may cause common forms of cartilage tumors. In a study published in the Feb. 16, 2015, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Duke researchers and their colleagues revealed that mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene contribute to the formation of benign tumors in cartilage that can be a precursor to malignancies. [More]
Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira, Inc., a world leader in the development of biosimilar therapies, today announced the launch of the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), Inflectra (infliximab), in major European markets. [More]
New research shows that psychological factors affect treatment for back-related disability

New research shows that psychological factors affect treatment for back-related disability

People with back pain who have low expectations of acupuncture before they start a course of treatment will gain less benefit than those people who believe it will work, according to new research from the University of Southampton. [More]
Techimmuna may help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis

Techimmuna may help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis

NCBJ POLATOM Radioisotope Centre has just introduced a new product to the nuclear medicine preparations market. Techimmuna will help to diagnose various cases of inflammation, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Sonoma's FibuLock Nail receives FDA clearance for treating ankle fractures

Sonoma's FibuLock Nail receives FDA clearance for treating ankle fractures

Sonoma Orthopedic Products, a medical device manufacturer specializing in minimally-invasive bone fracture repair, has received FDA 510(k) clearance for the intramedullary (within the bone canal) FibuLock Nail that offers physicians a new alternative in the way they surgically treat ankle fractures. [More]
PAH survival unaffected by rheumatoid arthritis origin

PAH survival unaffected by rheumatoid arthritis origin

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension have comparable survival to those with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, researchers report. [More]
Camp Twinkletoes improves lives of children suffering from juvenile arthritis

Camp Twinkletoes improves lives of children suffering from juvenile arthritis

Throughout NSW, there are more than 6,000 children suffering from the extreme pain and fatigue of juvenile arthritis. Usually thought of as an ‘older persons’ disease, arthritis in children is a very real condition, and in extreme cases can even result in death. [More]
Researchers develop new method for preventing destructive activity of osteoclasts

Researchers develop new method for preventing destructive activity of osteoclasts

Most existing treatments for pathological bone loss inhibit osteoclasts (bone-destroying cells) to limit bone degradation. However, by doing this, they also prevent bone formation since it is stimulated by the presence of these very same osteoclast cells. Researchers from the CNRS, Inserm and the Université de Montpellier and Université Jean Monnet - Saint-étienne have developed a new approach for preventing the destructive activity of osteoclasts without affecting their viability. [More]
Mercury associated with autoimmunity among women of childbearing age

Mercury associated with autoimmunity among women of childbearing age

One of the greatest risk factors for autoimmunity among women of childbearing age may be associated with exposure to mercury such as through seafood, a new University of Michigan study says. [More]
Physical, psychosocial factors can significantly increase risk of low back pain

Physical, psychosocial factors can significantly increase risk of low back pain

New research reveals the physical and psychosocial factors that significantly increase the risk of low back pain onset. In fact results published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, show that being engaged in manual tasks involving awkward positions will increase the risk of low back pain by eight times. Those who are distracted during activities or fatigued also significantly increase their risk of acute low back pain. [More]
Salicylates drugs reduce proliferation, viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells

Salicylates drugs reduce proliferation, viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology have demonstrated that salicylates, a class of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduced the proliferation and viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells that cause a sometimes lethal intracranial tumor that typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus. [More]
40% of prison and jail inmates have chronic medical problems, shows BJS survey

40% of prison and jail inmates have chronic medical problems, shows BJS survey

An estimated 40 percent of state and federal prisoners and jail inmates reported having a current chronic medical condition in the 2011–12 National Inmate Survey, the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. [More]
Chemotherapy or immunosuppressive treatment may reactivate HBV

Chemotherapy or immunosuppressive treatment may reactivate HBV

Individuals previously infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) who receive chemotherapy or immunosuppressive treatment may be at risk of reactivating the disease according to a summary of report from the Emerging Trends Conference, "Reactivation of Hepatitis B," and published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. [More]
Researchers identify genetic variants associated with psoriatic arthritis

Researchers identify genetic variants associated with psoriatic arthritis

PsA is a common form of inflammatory form of arthritis causing pain and stiffness in joints and tendons that can lead to joint damage. Nearly all patients with PsA also have skin psoriasis and, in many cases, the skin disease is present before the arthritis develops. However, only one third of patients with psoriasis will go on to develop PsA. [More]
Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Preventing cancer requires intimate knowledge of how cancer starts, what causes it to grow and flourish, and how to stop it in its tracks. Sometimes this comes in the form of a vaccine (the HPV vaccine for cervical and head and neck cancers), a screening (a colonoscopy for colorectal cancer) or a blood test (the PSA level test for prostate cancer). [More]
Alzheimer's brains commonly have many neurons with more DNA and genomic copies of APP gene

Alzheimer's brains commonly have many neurons with more DNA and genomic copies of APP gene

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found diverse genomic changes in single neurons from the brains of Alzheimer's patients, pointing to an unexpected factor that may underpin the most common form of the disease. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma completes patient enrollment in CF101 Phase II/III psoriasis trial

Can-Fite BioPharma completes patient enrollment in CF101 Phase II/III psoriasis trial

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today that all patients enrolled in its Phase II/III psoriasis trial for the Company's drug candidate CF101 have completed the study's 32 week treatment protocol. [More]
Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen today announced a Phase 3 study evaluating the efficacy and safety of biosimilar candidate ABP 501 compared with Humira® (adalimumab) in patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis met its primary and key secondary endpoints. [More]
New study helps explain how booster shots trigger immune 'memory' to improve

New study helps explain how booster shots trigger immune 'memory' to improve

The last time you were in the doctor's office for a vaccine booster shot, did you wonder why you needed one? Exactly how booster shots offer long-term protection from viruses has long been a mystery to scientists. [More]