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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
MorphoSys receives clinical milestone for start of Phase 1 trial in prevention of thrombosis with novel antibody

MorphoSys receives clinical milestone for start of Phase 1 trial in prevention of thrombosis with novel antibody

MorphoSys AG announced that it has received a milestone payment from Novartis in connection with the initiation of a clinical phase 1 trial with a novel HuCAL antibody. The antibody will be tested in the field of prevention of thrombosis. This is the twelfth therapeutic antibody based on MorphoSys's technologies that Novartis is evaluating in clinical trials. Financial details were not disclosed. [More]
Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced new retrospective health economic data on H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection; RCI), which may be an option for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. [More]
Celltrion Healthcare commits to develop lab tests for evidence-based decision-making in anti-TNF treatment

Celltrion Healthcare commits to develop lab tests for evidence-based decision-making in anti-TNF treatment

Celltrion Healthcare, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced its research commitment to develop laboratory tests that will determine both drug and anti-drug antibody levels in the blood, enabling physicians to identify when patients on an anti-tumour necrosis factor drug require a change of dose or a switch to a different treatment in the class. [More]
Researchers discover human factor that drives maturation of helper T cells

Researchers discover human factor that drives maturation of helper T cells

A powerful arm of the immune system is production of antibodies that circulate through the blood and neutralize invading pathogens. Although B cells actually manufacture antibody proteins, the process is aided by neighboring T cells, which shower B cells with cytokines to make them churn out high-quality antibody proteins--and remember how to do so. [More]
Study finds preoperative falls common among adults of all age groups

Study finds preoperative falls common among adults of all age groups

In a large study of 15,000 adults undergoing elective surgery, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that falling up to six months before an operation is common and often causes serious injuries — not only in elderly patients but across all age groups. Surprisingly, the frequency of falls among middle-aged patients was slightly higher than those who were age 65 or older. [More]
New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

In a study with potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, without harming the rest of the immune system. [More]
Immunotherapy-treated cancer patients may develop rheumatic disorders

Immunotherapy-treated cancer patients may develop rheumatic disorders

Oncologists need to be aware of the potential for rheumatological diseases in patients with cancer following treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors, say US investigators. [More]
Treatment for IBS proves difficult, survey reveals

Treatment for IBS proves difficult, survey reveals

A new national survey by Health Union of more than 1,000 individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) reveals that the condition is difficult to diagnose and often even more difficult to treat. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

Want to catch a criminal? Show a mugshot on the news. Want to stop HIV infections? Get the immune system to recognize and attack the virus's tell-tale structure. That's part of the basic approach behind efforts at The Scripps Research Institute to design an AIDS vaccine. [More]
Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

In a sample study, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found an association between the makeup of an individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer, a finding that potentially advances the quest for faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
Virus-like elements within human genome linked to development of lupus and Sjogren's syndrome

Virus-like elements within human genome linked to development of lupus and Sjogren's syndrome

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have uncovered a potential genetic trigger of systemic autoimmune disease. [More]
TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein that launches cancer growth and appears to contribute to higher mortality in breast cancer patients. [More]
Novel suite of computer algorithms can accurately predict behavior of gut microbiome

Novel suite of computer algorithms can accurately predict behavior of gut microbiome

A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the University of Massachusetts have developed a suite of computer algorithms that can accurately predict the behavior of the microbiome - the vast collection of microbes living on and inside the human body. [More]
Scientists discover link between two genes involved in PD and autoimmune diseases

Scientists discover link between two genes involved in PD and autoimmune diseases

A study publish in the journal CELL indicates that two genes associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) are key regulators of the immune system, providing direct evidence linking Parkinson's to autoimmune disease. [More]
AMSBIO launches new cell lines and controls for PD-1 research

AMSBIO launches new cell lines and controls for PD-1 research

AMSBIO has introduced new cell lines and controls for Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) research, and to test inhibitors of the PD-1 / PD-L1 pathway. [More]
Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Severe paleness and photosensitivity are two symptoms of a rare group of hereditary diseases that affect haem, a substance in the blood. While these metabolic disorders - known as the porphyrias - are extremely rare, a similar effect is often deliberately triggered by dermatologists in localised areas during the treatment of pre-cancerous skin lesions and skin cancers. [More]
Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, University of California, San Diego and Illumina, Inc., has completed the first large-scale assessment of single neuronal "transcriptomes." [More]
Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Case reports on 13 cancer patients suggest that a small number of cancer patients taking the immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab may be at some higher-than-normal risk of developing autoimmune joint and tissue diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, according to a preliminary study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. [More]
ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

The American College of Physicians today provided physician perspective on the escalating cost of prescription drugs, the impact of the costs on internal medicine physicians and their patients, and support for the intent of the bipartisan Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2016 to reduce anti-competitive practices. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop mathematical model to show differences in subpopulations of tumors

Moffitt researchers develop mathematical model to show differences in subpopulations of tumors

Tumors are composed of many subpopulations of cells. A general consensus among scientists is that these subpopulations are due to random mutations. However, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers found that these assumptions may be incorrect. [More]
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