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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
New Colombia creates joint venture to produce cannabis and hemp based medicinal products

New Colombia creates joint venture to produce cannabis and hemp based medicinal products

New Colombia Resources, Inc., a U.S. company with coal and other resource assets in Colombia, is pleased to announce they have formed a joint venture to produce cannabis and hemp based medicinal products in Colombia in association with an indigenous community in Colombia. [More]
Scientists say fundamental theory about how thymus educates immune police appears to be wrong

Scientists say fundamental theory about how thymus educates immune police appears to be wrong

A fundamental theory about how our thymus educates our immune police appears to be wrong, scientists say. [More]
Researchers are developing compounds to combat causative agents of periodontitis

Researchers are developing compounds to combat causative agents of periodontitis

A total 12 million Germans suffer from periodontitis. If the inflammation remains untreated, this could lead to tooth loss. However, it is also suspected of triggering many other diseases, like cardiopulmonary diseases. Researchers are studying the interactions, and developing compounds to combat the causative agents. [More]
NIH announces high-risk, high-reward grants for UCSF researchers

NIH announces high-risk, high-reward grants for UCSF researchers

UC San Francisco researchers received five awards announced this week by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for high-risk, high-reward scientific research projects. Their work will focus on novel approaches for diagnosing and treating diseases ranging from autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, to cancer, diabetes and neurological disorders. [More]
Magnesium essential to the activity of vitamin D

Magnesium essential to the activity of vitamin D

Extensive research has shown that vitamin D deficiencies play a major role in the development of dozens of diseases, including breast, prostate and colon cancer, as well as diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, psoriasis and mental illness. [More]
Physical therapy before joint replacement surgery reduces need for postoperative care by nearly 30%

Physical therapy before joint replacement surgery reduces need for postoperative care by nearly 30%

Physical therapy after total hip (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) surgery is standard care for all patients. A new study, appearing in the October 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery), also found that physical therapy before joint replacement surgery, or "prehabilitation," can diminish the need for postoperative care by nearly 30 percent, saving an average of $1,215 per patient in skilled nursing facility, home health agency or other postoperative care. [More]
State highlights: States and drug prices; Ariz. limiting Sovaldi for patients; L.A. boosts uninsured care by $61 million

State highlights: States and drug prices; Ariz. limiting Sovaldi for patients; L.A. boosts uninsured care by $61 million

Because of its high cost, some state Medicaid programs and prison systems are refusing to provide Sovaldi to any but the sickest patients. Most recently, Oregon last month threatened to limit access to the drug unless it can get Sovaldi at a deeply discounted price. But Sovaldi is only the beginning. Expensive new treatments for certain cancers, rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions also have rattled Medicaid officials, patients and health care providers. What can states do to hold down drug costs? Drug pricing is a complicated and opaque process. [More]
UCSF researchers receive five NIH awards for high-risk scientific research projects

UCSF researchers receive five NIH awards for high-risk scientific research projects

UC San Francisco researchers received five awards announced this week by the National Institutes of Health for high-risk, high-reward scientific research projects. Their work will focus on novel approaches for diagnosing and treating diseases ranging from autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, to cancer, diabetes and neurological disorders. [More]
OMRF scientist selected to receive EMD Serono's Grant for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation

OMRF scientist selected to receive EMD Serono's Grant for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation

An Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist has been selected to receive one of only five Grants for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation awarded this year by the pharmaceutical company EMD Serono. [More]
Medac Pharma launches Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma launches Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma, Inc., a privately held pharmaceutical company, has announced the launch of its lead product Rasuvo (methotrexate) injection for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), poly-articular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) and psoriasis in the U.S. [More]
Experiments show that 'unsung' cells are crucial to the process of bone loss caused by bone disorder

Experiments show that 'unsung' cells are crucial to the process of bone loss caused by bone disorder

Experiments in mice with a bone disorder similar to that in women after menopause show that a scientifically overlooked group of cells are likely crucial to the process of bone loss caused by the disorder, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. [More]
Diet may influence susceptibility to autoinflammatory bone disease in at-risk individuals

Diet may influence susceptibility to autoinflammatory bone disease in at-risk individuals

Diet-induced changes in the gut's bacterial ecosystem can alter susceptibility to an autoinflammatory bone disease by modifying the immune response, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists reported. The findings appeared September 28 as an advanced online publication of the scientific journal Nature. [More]
Mission Pharmacal adds Ovace Plus Lotion to its range of product offerings

Mission Pharmacal adds Ovace Plus Lotion to its range of product offerings

Itch. Scratch. Repeat. Irritating skin conditions, such as seborrheic dermatitis (SD), can create a distracting, uncomfortable vicious circle for those affected. [More]
Sanofi, Regeneron report positive Phase 2 study of dupilumab in patients with CSwNP

Sanofi, Regeneron report positive Phase 2 study of dupilumab in patients with CSwNP

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: REGN) and Sanofi (EURONEXT: SAN and NYSE: SNY) today announced that a Phase 2a proof-of-concept study of dupilumab, an investigational therapy that blocks IL-4 and IL-13 signaling, met all primary and secondary endpoints in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic sinusitis with nasal polyps (CSwNP) who did not respond to intranasal corticosteroids. [More]
Early exposure to marijuana can lead to immune-related diseases in adulthood

Early exposure to marijuana can lead to immune-related diseases in adulthood

When it comes to using marijuana, new research, involving mice and published in the October 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggests that just because you can do it, doesn't mean that you should. That's because a team of Italian scientists have found that using marijuana in adolescence may do serious long-term damage to the immune system. [More]
First-in-kind study evaluates health outcomes of women sexual assault survivors

First-in-kind study evaluates health outcomes of women sexual assault survivors

One in 5 U.S. women experience sexual assault during their lifetime, yet little is known about the experiences and health outcomes of sexual assault survivors. A new study seeks to change that. [More]
New findings could pave way for treating autoimmune diseases

New findings could pave way for treating autoimmune diseases

Scientists from A*STAR's Bioprocessing Technology Institute (BTI) have established a clearer relationship between two cells which serve our body's natural defence mechanisms against diseases and infections. [More]
New approach to create treatments for osteoporosis, autoimmune diseases

New approach to create treatments for osteoporosis, autoimmune diseases

Scientists have developed an approach to creating treatments for osteoporosis and autoimmune diseases that may avoid the risk of infection and cancer posed by some current medications. [More]
Viewpoints: A 'success story' in McAllen, Texas; 'uniquely high prices' in health care

Viewpoints: A 'success story' in McAllen, Texas; 'uniquely high prices' in health care

It may have been the most influential magazine article of the past decade. In June of 2009, the doctor and writer Atul Gawande published a piece in The New Yorker called "The Cost Conundrum," which examined why the small border city of McAllen, Tex., was the most expensive place for health care in the United States. ... Five years later, the situation has changed. Where McAllen once illustrated the problem of American health care, the city is now showing us how the problem can be solved, largely because of the Affordable Care Act that Mr. Obama signed into law in 2010 (Bob Kocher and Farzad Mostashari, 9/23). [More]
TSRI scientists awarded DARPA grant to build artificial immune system

TSRI scientists awarded DARPA grant to build artificial immune system

Scientists from both campuses of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded a total of $7.9 million from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense. [More]