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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Researchers discover novel population of neutrophils that exhibit enhanced microbial killing activity

Researchers discover novel population of neutrophils that exhibit enhanced microbial killing activity

​Case Western Reserve University researchers have discovered a novel population of neutrophils, which are the body's infection control workhorses. These cells have an enhanced microbial killing ability and are thereby better able to control infection. [More]
Concise analysis of China’s rituximab drug market

Concise analysis of China’s rituximab drug market

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Investigation Report on China Rituximab Market, 2009-2018" report to their offering. [More]
Certain drugs in Obamacare plans carry hefty pricetags

Certain drugs in Obamacare plans carry hefty pricetags

Insurers selling Obamacare plans have set drug prices according to a tiered system that in some cases requires consumers to pay as much as 50 percent of the cost, The Associated Press writes. [More]
First Edition: March 24, 2013

First Edition: March 24, 2013

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations examine the final week for health law enrollment, the Supreme Court case this week about the law's contraceptive mandate and the fourth anniversary of the enactment of the controversial overhaul. [More]
Longer looks: The politics of face and hand transplants; Apple's Healthbook; connecting income to life expectancy

Longer looks: The politics of face and hand transplants; Apple's Healthbook; connecting income to life expectancy

Fairfax County, Va., and McDowell County, W.Va., are separated by 350 miles, about a half-day's drive. Traveling west from Fairfax County, the gated communities and bland architecture of military contractors give way to exurbs, then to farmland and eventually to McDowell's coal mines and the forested slopes of the Appalachians. Perhaps the greatest distance between the two counties is this: Fairfax is a place of the haves, and McDowell of the have-nots. ... One of the starkest consequences of that divide is seen in the life expectancies of the people there. Residents of Fairfax County are among the longest-lived in the country: Men have an average life expectancy of 82 years and women, 85, about the same as in Sweden. In McDowell, the averages are 64 and 73, about the same as in Iraq (Annie Lowrey, 3/15). [More]

Horizon Pharma secures $250 million in acquisition financing from Deerfield Management

Deerfield Management Company announced today that it has provided up to $250 million in acquisition financing to Horizon Pharma, Inc. for the acquisition of Vidara Therapeutics International Ltd. [More]
Biologists discover WBC moves to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner

Biologists discover WBC moves to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner

A team of biologists and engineers at the University of California, San Diego has discovered that white blood cells, which repair damaged tissue as part of the body's immune response, move to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner. [More]

Body clock's could be utilized to improve current therapies to delay onset of chronic lung diseases

The body clock's natural rhythm could be utilized to improve current therapies to delay the onset of chronic lung diseases. [More]

Dr. Basil R. Besh honored with 2013 Compassionate Doctor Award

Vitals is pleased to announce that Dr. Basil R. Besh has been honored with the prestigious 2013 Compassionate Doctor Award. [More]
Building muscle mass important in decreasing metabolic risk

Building muscle mass important in decreasing metabolic risk

New UCLA research suggests that the more muscle mass older Americans have, the less likely they are to die prematurely. The findings add to the growing evidence that overall body composition - and not the widely used body mass index, or BMI - is a better predictor of all-cause mortality. [More]
Scientists discover key mechanism that guides balance and limb movements

Scientists discover key mechanism that guides balance and limb movements

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered an important mechanism underlying sensory feedback that guides balance and limb movements. [More]
Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

More than 1,400 sports medicine physicians from the United States and abroad will attend the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), the largest primary care sports medicine physician organization in the nation. [More]

PRP injections provide short- and long-term pain relief for patients with severe chronic hip bursitis

Chronic hip bursitis is a common yet difficult condition to treat successfully. A recent study, presented today at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, compared the results of PRP and cortisone injections in patients with severe chronic hip (greater trochanteric) bursitis. [More]
Study finds that same-day bilateral knee replacement surgery safe for select patients with RA

Study finds that same-day bilateral knee replacement surgery safe for select patients with RA

Same-day bilateral knee replacement surgery is safe for select patients with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery in New York have found. [More]

Antares Pharma reports total revenue of $4.7 million for fourth quarter 2013

Antares Pharma, Inc. today reported operating and financial results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Rheumatoid arthritis and switching TNFis: an interview with Professor Paul Emery, University of Leeds

Rheumatoid arthritis and switching TNFis: an interview with Professor Paul Emery, University of Leeds

Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFis) are used to treat inflammatory conditions, such as RA. These agents work by blocking TNF, an important mediator of inflammation in RA, in order to help reduce inflammation and stop disease progression. [More]

New MRI shows detailed image following fracture repair without any distortion by metal surgical screws

People who sustain the most common type of hip fracture, known as a femoral neck fracture, are at increased risk of complications. A special type of MRI developed at Hospital for Special Surgery in collaboration with GE Healthcare can show a detailed image following fracture repair, without the distortion caused by metal surgical screws that are problematic in standard MRIs. [More]

New MRI can show detailed image following fracture repair without distortion by metal surgical screws

People who sustain the most common type of hip fracture, known as a femoral neck fracture, are at increased risk of complications. A special type of MRI developed at Hospital for Special Surgery in collaboration with GE Healthcare can show a detailed image following fracture repair, without the distortion caused by metal surgical screws that are problematic in standard MRIs. [More]

Women are most likely to experience serious pain following knee replacement than men

Middle-aged women with rheumatoid arthritis or arthritis resulting from an injury are among the patients most likely to experience serious pain following a knee replacement, researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York have found. [More]

Total joint replacement may reduce risk for cardiac events and boost long-term survival

​Hip and knee replacements have long been known to reduce pain and increase mobility in persons with moderate-to-severe arthritis. A study presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) also found that total joint replacement (TJR) may reduce the risk for "cardiac events," including heart attack and stroke, and boost long-term survival. [More]