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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Georgia State hosts 21st World Meeting of the International Society for Research on Aggression

Georgia State hosts 21st World Meeting of the International Society for Research on Aggression

More than 200 experts on aggression, who research issues ranging from child abuse to urban street violence, will attend the 21st World Meeting of the International Society for Research on Aggression (ISRA) at the Loews Atlanta Hotel, July 15-19. [More]
Mice fed with omega 3 fatty acids have healthier joints

Mice fed with omega 3 fatty acids have healthier joints

Mice consuming a supplement of omega 3 fatty acids had healthier joints than those fed diets high in saturated fats and omega 6 fatty acids, according to Duke Medicine researchers. [More]
Lower back pain not triggered by weather changes according to new study

Lower back pain not triggered by weather changes according to new study

Episodes of lower back pain are not triggered by changes in weather conditions, say Australian researchers. [More]
Can-Fite's CF102 drug gets approval in Israel for patient with hepatocellular carcinoma

Can-Fite's CF102 drug gets approval in Israel for patient with hepatocellular carcinoma

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today that the Israeli Ministry of Health has approved the use of its drug CF102 for a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer, under the country's Compassionate Use Program. [More]
New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

Inflammatory diseases can occur simultaneously in distinct sites in the same patient, complicating treatment because a medication effective for one disorder may exacerbate the other. [More]
New study reveals unique health challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada

New study reveals unique health challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada

For the first time, researchers have access to detailed information about how an urban Aboriginal population in Canada uses health care. A new study, called Our Health Counts, uses this health database to clearly demonstrate the unique challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada - according to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
Acute episodes of low back pain not linked to weather conditions

Acute episodes of low back pain not linked to weather conditions

Australian researchers reveal that sudden, acute episodes of low back pain are not linked to weather conditions such as temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation. [More]
Keck Medicine of USC study identifies potential therapeutic target for inflammation

Keck Medicine of USC study identifies potential therapeutic target for inflammation

Molecular microbiologists from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California have discovered that mice lacking a specific component of the immune system are completely resistant to sepsis, a potentially fatal complication of infection. [More]
Exeter scientists find health benefits in rotten egg gas

Exeter scientists find health benefits in rotten egg gas

It may smell of flatulence and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia. A new compound (AP39), designed and made at the University of Exeter, could hold the key to future therapies, by targeting delivery of very small amounts of the substance to the right (or key) places inside cells. [More]
Regeneron, Sanofi report positive results from dupilumab Phase 2b study in moderate-to-severe AD

Regeneron, Sanofi report positive results from dupilumab Phase 2b study in moderate-to-severe AD

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced positive results from a Phase 2b dose-ranging study of dupilumab, an investigational therapy, in adult patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD), a serious, chronic form of eczema. [More]
Penrose Senior Care Auditors, The Caregiver Partnership join forces to improve lives of aging seniors

Penrose Senior Care Auditors, The Caregiver Partnership join forces to improve lives of aging seniors

Penrose Senior Care Auditors, the only national company that checks on seniors and their living conditions, and reports back to their loved-ones, is pleased to announce a partnership with The Caregiver Partnership, a leading online resource for home health care products, services and family caregiving information. [More]
Researchers identify new genes that likely contribute to asthma

Researchers identify new genes that likely contribute to asthma

In a study published yesterday in the scientific journal Nature Immunology, a group at the La Jolla Institute (LJI) led by Pandurangan Vijayanand, Ph.D. identify new genes that likely contribute to asthma, a disease that currently affects over 200 million people world wide. [More]
Complications from partial knee replacement is very small than total knee replacement

Complications from partial knee replacement is very small than total knee replacement

Partial knee replacement surgery is safer than total knee replacement, according to a new study published in The Lancet today (July 8). [More]
Treating ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease: an interview with Dr. Stephen Hanauer, Medical Director, Digestive Health Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Treating ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease: an interview with Dr. Stephen Hanauer, Medical Director, Digestive Health Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are idiopathic (we don’t know the cause) inflammatory diseases (IBD) of the colon and/or small bowel. They are chronic in that we do not have a medical cure and are differentiated from IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) by inflammation that causes ulcerations of the GI tract. [More]
Keele University professor receives £1.8M grant to improve primary care of sciatica patients

Keele University professor receives £1.8M grant to improve primary care of sciatica patients

Professor Nadine Foster, of the Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre at Keele University, Staffordshire, UK, has been awarded an National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment grant of £1.18 million for a randomised trial that seeks to improve the primary care management of patients with sciatica and suspected sciatica through a new approach called stratified care. [More]
UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical leader, and Dermira, Inc., a privately held US-based dermatology company, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive licensing agreement for the development and future commercialization of Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) in dermatology. [More]
Group that once supported healthier school lunches has about-face

Group that once supported healthier school lunches has about-face

The School Nutrition Association now says the new rules are too costly. Meanwhile, NPR looks at the difficulties for employers to deal with workers' weight problems and the increasing number of obese seniors. [More]
Arthritis Foundation raises public awareness about juvenile arthritis

Arthritis Foundation raises public awareness about juvenile arthritis

Juvenile arthritis (JA) is one of the most common, chronic childhood diseases in the U.S., affecting nearly 300,000 children. During Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month, the Arthritis Foundation raises public awareness about this painful and debilitating disease—a disease that currently has no cure and can affect children for a lifetime. [More]
Research on inflammasomes lays foundations for developing new RA treatments

Research on inflammasomes lays foundations for developing new RA treatments

Patients with more or less severe forms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have the same painful symptoms, but does this mean that the cause of their illness is the same? And therefore that they should all receive the same treatment? Scientists at VIB and Ghent University have demonstrated with their research into inflammasomes that RA should be considered as a syndrome rather than a single disease. [More]
Researchers find unique cell type that can protect against uveitis

Researchers find unique cell type that can protect against uveitis

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have found a unique cell type that, in tests on mice, can protect against uveitis—a group of inflammatory diseases that affect the eye and can cause vision loss. [More]