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NEI to discuss research advances in regenerative medicine for eye disease at ARVO 2016

NEI to discuss research advances in regenerative medicine for eye disease at ARVO 2016

The National Eye Institute (NEI), part of NIH, is participating in the Inaugural Press Conference from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Annual Meeting (ARVO 2016), the largest gathering of eye and vision researchers in the world, attracting over 11,000 attendees from more than 75 countries. [More]
Scientists find way to reduce need for secondary cataract surgery

Scientists find way to reduce need for secondary cataract surgery

Scientists at the University of East Anglia may have found a way to prevent complications from surgery to treat cataract - the world's leading cause of blindness. [More]
Pioneering gene therapy may lead to potential cure for common causes of vision loss

Pioneering gene therapy may lead to potential cure for common causes of vision loss

Pioneering gene therapy has restored some vision to patients with a rare form of genetic blindness for as long as four years, raising hopes it could be used to cure common causes of vision loss, new University of Oxford research published today shows. [More]
Diabetic patients at risk for developing retinal diabetic neuropathy

Diabetic patients at risk for developing retinal diabetic neuropathy

A University of Iowa-led study of diabetes-related vision impairment holds good news -- and some bad news -- for patients with signs of these disorders. [More]
International researchers make crucial discovery on formation, growth of blood vessels

International researchers make crucial discovery on formation, growth of blood vessels

As blood vessels grow, the cells that compose them must make a choice between forming side-branches or expanding the vessel surface and increasing its diameter. Now Prof. Holger Gerhardt at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in the Helmholtz Association and his international research teams have made a crucial disovery about this process: the cells can behave as a collective, moving in the same direction together. [More]
TKCI outlines plan to curb corneal blindness worldwide by 2030

TKCI outlines plan to curb corneal blindness worldwide by 2030

The Tej Kohli Cornea Institute in partnership with the world-renowned LV Prasad Eye Institute, has today laid out its plan to control corneal blindness, globally, by 2030. [More]
Newly developed smartphone application may potentially benefit low-vision users

Newly developed smartphone application may potentially benefit low-vision users

Researchers from the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have developed a smartphone application that projects a magnified smartphone screen to Google Glass, which users can navigate using head movements to view a corresponding portion of the magnified screen. They have shown that the technology can potentially benefit low-vision users, many of whom find the smartphone's built-in zoom feature to be difficult to use due to the loss of context. Their results are published online in the journal IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering. [More]
Study points to novel way to treat diabetes in some patients

Study points to novel way to treat diabetes in some patients

Blocking the hormone that raises sugar levels in the blood could increase insulin levels while keeping blood sugar levels down. [More]
Study shows children with rare eye disease have greatest benefit from gene therapy

Study shows children with rare eye disease have greatest benefit from gene therapy

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University's Casey Eye Institute and Baylor College of Medicine's Cullen Eye Institute published findings from a two-year Phase I clinical trial in the journal Ophthalmology, which showed that children had the greatest benefit from gene therapy for treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) or severe early childhood onset retinal degeneration (SECORD). [More]
Investigators find tacrolimus to be very effective in reducing ocular symptoms of GVHD

Investigators find tacrolimus to be very effective in reducing ocular symptoms of GVHD

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have conducted a clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of topical tacrolimus, an immunosuppressive therapy, and topical methylprednisolone, a steroid medication, in patients with ocular graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) -- a complication associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplants in which the transplanted immune system's cells attack certain parts of the recipient's body, including the cornea and ocular surface. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

After an injury to tissues, such as in organ transplantation, the body grows new lymphatic vessels in a process known as lymphangiogenesis. A new study in Nature Communications reveals a mechanism involved in the regulation of this process, specifically in corneal transplants and infectious eye disease. [More]
University’s blindness therapy comes a step closer following landmark licensing deal with US firm

University’s blindness therapy comes a step closer following landmark licensing deal with US firm

Hundreds of thousands of people worldwide, who have a disease that can lead to blindness, could have their sight restored after The University of Manchester entered into a technology license with Seattle-based company Acucela Inc. [More]

University's blindness therapy comes a step closer following landmark licensing deal with US firm

Hundreds of thousands of people worldwide, who have a disease that can lead to blindness, could have their sight restored after The University of Manchester entered into a technology license with Seattle-based company Acucela Inc. [More]
PATH and SD/Alere announce commercial availability of two diagnostic tools for NTDs

PATH and SD/Alere announce commercial availability of two diagnostic tools for NTDs

PATH and Standard Diagnostics/Alere announced today the commercial availability of two rapid diagnostic tools for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Designed for use in disease surveillance, the antibody-based tests are part of a suite of diagnostic innovations intended to support the elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), a group of illnesses that affect more than a billion people worldwide. [More]
Newly developed light-activated tool could pave way for new generation of anti-diabetic drugs

Newly developed light-activated tool could pave way for new generation of anti-diabetic drugs

Researchers have developed a light-activated tool to show how drugs need to be adapted to combat type 2 diabetes. [More]
Research suggests new pathway for preventing optic nerve damage in KPro recipients

Research suggests new pathway for preventing optic nerve damage in KPro recipients

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have identified inflammatory factors that cause optic neuropathy in the back of the eye following implantation of a keratoprosthesis (KPro) — similar to what glaucoma patients experience, without the rise of pressure in the eye — and have shown that blocking one of those factors, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa), successfully halts the development of optic nerve damage in a mouse model. [More]
WHO marks annual World Health Day, calls for global action on diabetes

WHO marks annual World Health Day, calls for global action on diabetes

The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, WHO announced ahead of World Health Day. [More]
Increasing exposure to outdoor light key to reducing short-sightedness in children

Increasing exposure to outdoor light key to reducing short-sightedness in children

Increasing exposure to outdoor light is the key to reducing the myopia (short-sightedness) epidemic in children, according to ground-breaking research by Australian optometrists. [More]
Forensic scientists find that HSV-1 strains could be useful for tracing a person's history

Forensic scientists find that HSV-1 strains could be useful for tracing a person's history

The genomes of two distinct strains of the virus that causes the common lip cold sore, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), have been identified within the same person -- an achievement that could be useful to forensic scientists for tracing a person's history. [More]
Familiar gene manages transport of proteins around the cell

Familiar gene manages transport of proteins around the cell

How do cells avoid growing topsy-turvy? Growing so your top, front, bottom and back all wind up on the correct side requires a good sense of direction at the cellular level. A Hiroshima University research group has identified a familiar gene with an unexpected role in directing proteins around the cell. [More]
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