Blindness News and Research RSS Feed - Blindness News and Research

Study pinpoints how immune abnormalities in retina may lead to macular degeneration

Study pinpoints how immune abnormalities in retina may lead to macular degeneration

In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a University of Wisconsin-Madison research team pinpoints how immune abnormalities beneath the retina result in macular degeneration, a common condition that often causes blindness. [More]
Researchers develop first protective vaccine against insidious STI

Researchers develop first protective vaccine against insidious STI

The first steps towards developing a vaccine against an insidious sexual transmitted infection (STI) have been accomplished by researchers at McMaster University. [More]
IU researchers create virtual tissue model of diabetic retinopathy

IU researchers create virtual tissue model of diabetic retinopathy

By combining data on optometry patient's eyes with advanced computational methods, Indiana University researchers have created a virtual tissue model of diabetes in the eye. [More]
Interim results from clinical trial demonstrate safety of cell-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

Interim results from clinical trial demonstrate safety of cell-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

Regenerative medicine company jCyte and the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center at the University of California, Irvine report that their investigational therapy for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) has demonstrated a favorable safety and tolerability profile in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial. [More]
New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

A new, minimally invasive procedure appears to be effective for many patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy (FED), a common eye disease, without the potential side effects and cost of the current standard of care, a cornea transplant. [More]
New eye test could help detect glaucoma earlier than current techniques

New eye test could help detect glaucoma earlier than current techniques

UNSW Australia scientists have developed a testing protocol that identifies the blinding eye disease glaucoma four years earlier than current techniques. [More]
Scientists succeed in restoring multiple key aspects of vision in mice

Scientists succeed in restoring multiple key aspects of vision in mice

Experiments conducted under the leadership of a Stanford University School of Medicine investigator have succeeded, for the first time, in restoring multiple key aspects of vision in mammals. [More]
Medical marijuana reduces use of prescription drugs, research finds

Medical marijuana reduces use of prescription drugs, research finds

Medical marijuana is having a positive impact on the bottom line of Medicare's prescription drug benefit program in states that have legalized its use for medicinal purposes, according to University of Georgia researchers in a study published today in the July issue of Health Affairs. [More]
New genetic test provides rapid diagnosis of mitochondrial disease

New genetic test provides rapid diagnosis of mitochondrial disease

Newcastle researchers have developed a genetic test providing a rapid diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders to identify the first patients with inherited mutations in a new disease gene. [More]
TKCI Srujana Innovation Award launched to combat corneal blindness

TKCI Srujana Innovation Award launched to combat corneal blindness

The Tej Kohli Cornea Institute [TKCI] in partnership with world-renowned LV Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) is proud to announce the launch of the TKCI Srujana Innovation Award. The award encourages ideas that will lead to the next big breakthrough in treatment of corneal blindness. It launches in conjunction with the fourth annual ‘Engineering The Eye Workshop’ at which LVPEI clinicians and MIT engineers meet every July in Hyderabad, India. [More]
Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

The risk of blindness caused by spinal fusion, one of the most common surgeries performed in the U.S., has dropped almost three-fold since the late 1990s, according to the largest study of the topic to date. [More]

Researchers develop 2D culture system that mimics development of the whole eye

Research groups led by Professor Kohji Nishida of the Department of Ophthalmology and Endowed Associate Professor Ryuhei Hayashi of the Department of Stem Cells and Applied Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, developed a 2D culture system which mimics the development of the whole eye by promoting cell-autonomous differentiation of human iPS cells. [More]
Transorbital ACS can improve vision in patients with glaucoma, optic nerve damage

Transorbital ACS can improve vision in patients with glaucoma, optic nerve damage

Vision loss due to glaucoma or optic nerve damage is generally considered irreversible. Now a new prospective, randomized, multi-center clinical trial demonstrates significant vision improvement in partially blind patients after 10 days of noninvasive, transorbital alternating current stimulation. [More]
New AAV 3.0 program to create next-generation viral vectors for better treatment of inherited diseases

New AAV 3.0 program to create next-generation viral vectors for better treatment of inherited diseases

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has launched a new program, called AAV 3.0, to create new viral vectors to find quicker and better treatments for an array of diseases. James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, a professor of Medicine and director of the Orphan Disease Center, will lead an interdisciplinary team of over 30 scientists to create this new technology platform with support provided by the University of Pennsylvania Health System. [More]
Experts compile model list of essential diagnostic tests aiming to improve global health

Experts compile model list of essential diagnostic tests aiming to improve global health

In a western doctor's office or hospital, patients don't think twice about giving a blood or urine sample that can tell if they have a disease or infection, or show if their medicines are working. The samples get rushed to a testing lab with modern equipment that's held to high quality standards. [More]
Pain reliever appears to help preserve vision in animal model of retinal degeneration

Pain reliever appears to help preserve vision in animal model of retinal degeneration

A pain medicine that potently activates a receptor vital to a healthy retina appears to help preserve vision in a model of severe retinal degeneration, scientists report. [More]
Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

The German Institute of Human Nutrition has updated the online version of its German Diabetes Risk Score and has optimized it for mobile devices. [More]
Study estimates real-world prevalence of myopic choroidal neovascularization in the U.S.

Study estimates real-world prevalence of myopic choroidal neovascularization in the U.S.

A new study estimates that 9.6 million adults in the United States are highly myopic, or severely nearsighted. Of those, nearly 820,000 have a degenerative form of the disease and more than 41,000 suffer a complication called myopic choroidal neovascularization that could cause long-term vision loss, with women at higher risk. [More]
Delayed healing linked to weaker electrical currents in diabetic wounds

Delayed healing linked to weaker electrical currents in diabetic wounds

People with diabetes often suffer from wounds that are slow to heal and can lead to ulcers, gangrene and amputation. New research from an international group led by Min Zhao, professor of ophthalmology and of dermatology at the University of California, Davis, shows that, in animal models of diabetes, slow healing is associated with weaker electrical currents in wounds. [More]
Researchers develop new method to combat VR sickness

Researchers develop new method to combat VR sickness

Columbia Engineering Professor Steven K. Feiner and Ajoy Fernandes MS'16 have developed a method of combating virtual reality (VR) sickness that can be applied to consumer head-worn VR displays, such as the Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, Sony PlayStation VR, and Google Cardboard. [More]
Advertisement