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New study shows mechanism behind tubulin transport in cilia

New study shows mechanism behind tubulin transport in cilia

Defective cilia can lead to a host of diseases and conditions in the human body--from rare, inherited bone malformations to blindness, male infertility, kidney disease and obesity. Scientists knew that somehow these tiny cell organelles become deformed and cause these diseases because of a problem related to their assembly, which requires the translocation of vast quantities of the vital cell protein tubulin. [More]
Pollinator decline could increase risk of malnutrition, disease

Pollinator decline could increase risk of malnutrition, disease

A new study shows that more than half the people in some developing countries could become newly at risk for malnutrition if crop-pollinating animals -- like bees -- continue to decline. [More]
Researchers devise novel way to generate corneal stem cells for treating corneal blindness

Researchers devise novel way to generate corneal stem cells for treating corneal blindness

Researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute have devised a novel way to generate transplantable corneal stem cells that may eventually benefit patients suffering from life-altering forms of blindness. [More]
Tackling preventable blindness: a House of Commons reception review

Tackling preventable blindness: a House of Commons reception review

“Macular degeneration is not life threatening, but it is life changing,” these were the words of Michael Valenzia, of the Macular Society at the recent House of Commons Reception held by AMD Alliance International. [More]
University of Colorado, Mile High Ophthalmics sign licensing agreement for new cataract surgery device

University of Colorado, Mile High Ophthalmics sign licensing agreement for new cataract surgery device

A new device designed to perform safer, more effective cataract surgery is going on the market following a licensing agreement between the University of Colorado and Mile High Ophthalmics LLC. [More]
Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

For those with diabetes, managing blood sugar is a balancing act -- if blood sugar is too high it raises the risk for nerve damage, blindness, kidney failure, and heart trouble, and if too low it can lead to a seizure or unconsciousness. [More]
New Baylor research explores novel non-invasive technology for pediatric eye exams

New Baylor research explores novel non-invasive technology for pediatric eye exams

Picture a toddler getting his first eye exam. He's seated in a strange room, with strange instruments and strange bright lights. He can't sit still or open his eyes long enough for that diagnostic poof of air - especially if he has trouble seeing anyway, as children with achromatopsia do. [More]
Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate linked to AMD development

Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate linked to AMD development

Microscopic spheres of calcium phosphate have been linked to the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of blindness, by UCL-led research. [More]
Penn, Spark Therapeutics expand strategic relationship to develop treatment for progressive blindness

Penn, Spark Therapeutics expand strategic relationship to develop treatment for progressive blindness

The University of Pennsylvania has announced an expanded relationship with Spark Therapeutics, a late-stage gene therapy company developing treatments for debilitating, genetic diseases. [More]
Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

New research from scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may be an important triggering factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative eye disease that can cause severe vision loss and blindness. [More]
Scientists explore how the brain adapts to visual restoration

Scientists explore how the brain adapts to visual restoration

Recent scientific advances have meant that eyesight can be partially restored to those who previously would have been blind for life. However, scientists at the University of Montreal and the University of Trento have discovered that the rewiring of the senses that occurs in the brains of the long-term blind means that visual restoration may never be complete. [More]
Researchers uncover new gene tied to incurable eye disorder

Researchers uncover new gene tied to incurable eye disorder

An exhaustive hereditary analysis of a large Louisiana family with vision issues has uncovered a new gene tied to an incurable eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa, according to an examination led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Simulated sightlessness can have negative effects on people's perceptions of visually impaired

Simulated sightlessness can have negative effects on people's perceptions of visually impaired

Using simulation to walk in the shoes of a person who is blind -- such as wearing a blindfold while performing everyday tasks -- has negative effects on people's perceptions of the visually impaired, according to a University of Colorado Boulder study. [More]
Two UTHealth professors selected as AAAS Fellows for their efforts to prevent blindness

Two UTHealth professors selected as AAAS Fellows for their efforts to prevent blindness

Two professors in the School of Public Health at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston - Stephen Daiger, Ph.D., and Robert Hardy, Ph.D. - have been elected to the rank of Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science for their efforts to prevent blindness. [More]
Genetic finding could lead to new treatments for people living with blindness, vision loss

Genetic finding could lead to new treatments for people living with blindness, vision loss

Finding genes for retinal degenerations has immediate benefits for people living with blindness and vision loss, their families, and their physicians. Establishing a genetic cause confirms the clinical diagnosis at the molecular level, helps predict the future visual prognosis, suggests therapies, and allows some patients to join clinical trials. While more than 200 genes for retinal degenerations have been identified, approximately 40-50% of cases remain a mystery. [More]
Carl Zeiss Meditec to invest in Oraya Therapy for treatment of wet AMD

Carl Zeiss Meditec to invest in Oraya Therapy for treatment of wet AMD

Carl Zeiss Meditec AG and Oraya Therapeutics, Inc. jointly announced today that the companies have entered into a collaboration agreement under which Carl Zeiss Meditec will provide funding to Oraya over a period of up to two years for the implementation of Oraya’s growth strategy, and in turn receive rights in the company reaching up to a majority stake after two years. [More]
Glaucoma Awareness Month: Mount Sinai ophthalmologists offer tips for glaucoma prevention

Glaucoma Awareness Month: Mount Sinai ophthalmologists offer tips for glaucoma prevention

Glaucoma, a degenerative eye disease that causes damage to the optic nerve, is the second leading cause of blindness in the world, according to the World Health Organization. To observe Glaucoma Awareness Month, ophthalmologists at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System are offering tips for prevention and early detection of the condition. [More]
Chronic hypertension increases glaucoma risk

Chronic hypertension increases glaucoma risk

A new study published in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science has found that chronic (long term) hypertension increases a person's susceptibility to glaucoma. These results suggest that doctors should consider a patient's blood pressure levels in managing the potentially blinding eye disorder. [More]
Careful blink assessment essential to preserve vision in face transplant procedures

Careful blink assessment essential to preserve vision in face transplant procedures

Face transplantation can dramatically enhance a patient's quality of life after severe facial trauma, but lack of attention to eyelid function and vision can leave patients with impaired vision, corneal exposure, eyelid retraction that occurs when the upper or lower eyelid pulls away from the eyeball, and other eyelid-related complications. [More]

Prostaglandin analogue eye drops reduce risk of vision loss in OAG patients

Prostaglandin analogue eye drops, the most commonly prescribed treatment for glaucoma, can greatly reduce risk of vision loss in people with open angle glaucoma (OAG), one of the leading causes of blindness, according to the first placebo-controlled trial to assess their vision-preserving effect published in The Lancet. [More]