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Researchers use hydrogel to prevent stem cells and human embryos from differentiating

Researchers use hydrogel to prevent stem cells and human embryos from differentiating

Unlike normal cells, stem cells are pluripotent -- they can become any cell type, which makes them powerful potential treatments for diseases such as diabetes, leukemia and age-related blindness. However, maintaining this versatility until the time is right is a major challenge. [More]
Study reveals association between DNA methylation and type 2 diabetes

Study reveals association between DNA methylation and type 2 diabetes

Researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute have found an epigenetic mechanism implicated in the regulation of blood sugar. The study, published in the journal Molecular Human Genetics, reveals that the methylation of the TXNIP gene is associated with diabetes mellitus type 2 and, in particular, average blood glucose levels. [More]
One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

Sanofi, Diabetes UK and JDRF today announce the publication of IMPACT 2 in the journal Diabetic Medicine. This new study shows that, if sustained, even modest improvement in blood glucose levels can provide significantly improved outcomes for the 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK. [More]
MYB-QKI fusion gene that drives pediatric low-grade gliomas poses a triple threat

MYB-QKI fusion gene that drives pediatric low-grade gliomas poses a triple threat

Oncology researchers have discovered that an abnormal fused gene that drives pediatric brain tumors poses a triple threat, operating simultaneously through three distinct biological mechanisms—the first such example in cancer biology. [More]
TPC reports first cases of illness, deaths due to Dewshine mixture in Tennessee

TPC reports first cases of illness, deaths due to Dewshine mixture in Tennessee

A lethal concoction of racing fuel and Mountain Dew claimed the lives of two Tennessee teens and has sparked the Tennessee Poison Center to warn about the lethality of what has been called "Dewshine." [More]
Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have described, for the first time, the adult brain's ability to compensate for a near-complete loss of auditory nerve fibers that link the ear to the brain. The findings, published in the current issue of Neuron, suggest that the brain's natural plasticity can compensate for inner ear damage to bring sound detection abilities back within normal limits; however, it does not recover speech intelligibility. [More]
CUMC, Iowa scientists use CRISPR to repair genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa

CUMC, Iowa scientists use CRISPR to repair genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa

Columbia University Medical Center and University of Iowa scientists have used a new gene-editing technology called CRISPR, to repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited condition that causes the retina to degrade and leads to blindness in at least 1.5 million cases worldwide. [More]
Results from STRIVE trial of enzalutamide versus bicalutamide in CRPC published in Journal of Clinical Oncology

Results from STRIVE trial of enzalutamide versus bicalutamide in CRPC published in Journal of Clinical Oncology

Astellas US LLC, a United States (U.S.) subsidiary of Tokyo-based Astellas Pharma Inc., and Medivation, Inc. today announced that results from the STRIVE trial of enzalutamide compared to bicalutamide in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Biomedical innovation in the UK: an interview with Zahid Latif

Biomedical innovation in the UK: an interview with Zahid Latif

The biomedical research base is one of the UK's strengths; over 1500 companies in the Pharmaceuticals and biotechnology area are established in the UK employing over 70,000. [More]
Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration is a condition of the macula, a tiny area of the retina at the back of the eye. Your macula is only about the size of the grain of rice, that’s about four millimeters across. [More]
First patient enrolled in ThromboGenics' Phase II CIRCLE study of ocriplasmin in NPDR patients

First patient enrolled in ThromboGenics' Phase II CIRCLE study of ocriplasmin in NPDR patients

ThromboGenics NV, an integrated biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing innovative treatments for diabetic eye disease, today announces that the first patient has been enrolled in its Phase II CIRCLE study evaluating the efficacy and safety of multiple doses of ocriplasmin in inducing total posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). [More]
New clinical study reveals previously unknown risk factors linked to keratoconus

New clinical study reveals previously unknown risk factors linked to keratoconus

A large new study reveals previously unknown risk factors associated with an eye condition that causes serious progressive nearsightedness at a relatively young age. [More]
Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have led an international effort to identify three genetic associations that influence susceptibility to primary open angle glaucoma -- the most common form of adult onset glaucoma and the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. [More]
New studies provide insights into impact of vision loss among survivors of childhood cancers

New studies provide insights into impact of vision loss among survivors of childhood cancers

Little is known about the long-term health of survivors of childhood cancers that affect vision, but two new studies provide valuable insights that could impact patient care and follow-up. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. [More]
Researchers take major step towards developing vaccine for river blindness

Researchers take major step towards developing vaccine for river blindness

The world's first vaccine for a disease that causes misery for millions in Africa could be tested within five years. [More]
New gene editing technique could hinder retinal degeneration in rats with inherited blindness

New gene editing technique could hinder retinal degeneration in rats with inherited blindness

A new technique that has the potential to treat inherited diseases by removing genetic defects has been shown for the first time to hinder retinal degeneration in rats with a type of inherited blindness, according to a Cedars-Sinai study. [More]
Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Glaucoma patients may experience increased eye pressure as the result of performing several different head-down positions while practicing yoga, according to a new study published by researchers at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
CAMH researchers identify 428 distinct disease conditions that co-occur in people with FASD

CAMH researchers identify 428 distinct disease conditions that co-occur in people with FASD

Researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health have identified 428 distinct disease conditions that co-occur in people with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), in the most comprehensive review of its kind. [More]

KNFB Reader named winner of Best Assistive iOS App of the year

The National Federation of the Blind is pleased to announce that KNFB Reader has been chosen by the AppleVis community as the winner of the Best Assistive iOS App of the year for the second year in a row. [More]
Bond villain fails neuroanatomy, says St. Michael's Hospital neurosurgeon

Bond villain fails neuroanatomy, says St. Michael's Hospital neurosurgeon

James Bond's nemesis in the most recent film likely failed neuroanatomy, said real-life neurosurgeon and scientist Dr. Michael Cusimano of St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
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