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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
New supplement covers current knowledge and methods for management of AAICH

New supplement covers current knowledge and methods for management of AAICH

The Journal of Neurosurgery is pleased to announce today's publication of a supplement to the August issue entitled "Race Against the Clock: Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Anticoagulant-Associated Intracerebral Hemorrhage. [More]
Study confirms benefit of surgical treatment for migraines

Study confirms benefit of surgical treatment for migraines

Dr. Oren Tessler, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine, is part of a team of plastic and reconstructive surgeons who report a high success rate using a method to screen and select patients for a specific surgical migraine treatment technique. [More]
Scientists unravel neural circuit that could play important role in autism

Scientists unravel neural circuit that could play important role in autism

The insular cortex is an integral "hub", combining sensory, emotional and cognitive content. Not surprisingly, alterations in insular structure and function have been reported in many psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety disorders, depression, addiction and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). [More]
Prolonged exposure to loud noise alters how the brain processes speech

Prolonged exposure to loud noise alters how the brain processes speech

Prolonged exposure to loud noise alters how the brain processes speech, potentially increasing the difficulty in distinguishing speech sounds, according to neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
Study shows important benefits of applying vacuum pressure after brain injury

Study shows important benefits of applying vacuum pressure after brain injury

Controlled application of vacuum pressure is a promising approach to limiting tissue damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggests an experimental study in the August issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Lack of reporting standards delays progress in developing robust therapies for SCI, TBI

Lack of reporting standards delays progress in developing robust therapies for SCI, TBI

Progress in developing robust therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI) and peripheral nerve injury has been slow. [More]
Scientists study how artificial light influences biological clock

Scientists study how artificial light influences biological clock

Researchers at Inserm, led by Claude Gronfier (Inserm Unit 846: Stem Cell and Brain Institute), have, for the first time, conducted a study under real conditions on the body clocks of members of the international polar research station Concordia. [More]
Anti-cholinergic drugs could be responsible for decline in cognitive, physical function in elderly patients

Anti-cholinergic drugs could be responsible for decline in cognitive, physical function in elderly patients

Drugs widely prescribed to the elderly could be responsible for a decline in cognitive and physical function according to research from the University of East Anglia and the Regenstrief Institute. [More]
Researchers advance stability of protein that may prevent brain damage from toxins

Researchers advance stability of protein that may prevent brain damage from toxins

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals-particularly those in pesticides and chemical weapons. [More]
Brain responses of few individuals are remarkably strong predictor

Brain responses of few individuals are remarkably strong predictor

Media and marketing experts have long sought a reliable method of forecasting responses from the general population to future products and messages. According to a study conducted at The City College of New York, it appears that the brain responses of just a few individuals are a remarkably strong predictor. [More]
New study provides insight into relationship between depression and dementia

New study provides insight into relationship between depression and dementia

A new study by neuropsychiatric researchers at Rush University Medical Center gives insight into the relationship between depression and dementia. The study is published in the July 30, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New research may provide better treatment options for children with cerebral palsy

New research may provide better treatment options for children with cerebral palsy

Of cerebral palsy, caregivers and patients know this is an understatement: it's not easy. The permanently debilitating condition, which occurs in babies from the prenatal stage to toddlers, comes with more than its fair share of lifelong challenges - from mobility problems to developmental setbacks. [More]
Researchers find differences in brain wiring between children with SPD and those with autism

Researchers find differences in brain wiring between children with SPD and those with autism

Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that children with sensory processing disorders have decreased structural brain connections in specific sensory regions different than those in autism, further establishing SPD as a clinically important neurodevelopmental disorder. [More]
Naltrexone may be effective in diminishing ICD symptoms in PD patients, study finds

Naltrexone may be effective in diminishing ICD symptoms in PD patients, study finds

Up to 20 percent of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and their families may confront a common but largely unrecognized challenge: the occurrence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) such as compulsive gambling, sexual behavior, eating, or spending. [More]
Kessler Foundation, Kessler Institute participate in NIH StrokeNet via Columbia University

Kessler Foundation, Kessler Institute participate in NIH StrokeNet via Columbia University

A new network of 25 regional stroke centers and satellite facilities - the NIH Stroke Trials Network - is working to change the way stroke research is conducted in the U.S. Despite advances of the last two decades, stroke remains a major public health problem. [More]
New IOM report includes recommendations to overhaul current graduate medical education system

New IOM report includes recommendations to overhaul current graduate medical education system

The Institute of Medicine released a report, Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation's Health Needs, which encompasses recommendations to overhaul the current graduate medical education (GME) system. [More]
Research findings suggest new therapeutic strategy for intracerebral hemorrhage

Research findings suggest new therapeutic strategy for intracerebral hemorrhage

Intracerebral hemorrhage is a type of stroke that affects two million people worldwide each year. Despite its seriousness, no effective treatment has yet been developed. But if a recent study in the journal Nanomedicine is right, good news for doctors and patients might one day arrive in a very small package: namely, a "peptide nanofiber scaffold." [More]
Obesity mutation MC4R can significantly contribute to weight gain at early age

Obesity mutation MC4R can significantly contribute to weight gain at early age

People who have the most common genetic mutation linked to obesity respond differently to pictures of appetizing foods than overweight or obese people who do not have the genetic mutation, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Post-doctoral fellows working on stem cell treatment for stroke

Post-doctoral fellows working on stem cell treatment for stroke

The San Antonio Life Sciences Institute, a joint venture between The University of Texas at San Antonio and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, has selected the winners of the Postdoc Initiative Pilot Program. [More]
More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

UEA research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems. More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer's or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA). [More]