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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
New in vitro system could become important tool in search for potential drugs against Alzheimer’s

New in vitro system could become important tool in search for potential drugs against Alzheimer’s

A typical characteristic of the brain of an Alzheimer sufferer is the presence of insoluble Tau protein aggregates. Scientists at VIB, KU Leuven and Janssen Pharmaceutica have demonstrated that the distribution of these aggregates through the brain is facilitated by synaptic connections between brain cells. [More]
Researchers find way to prevent, reduce or delay cannabis use amongst at-risk youth

Researchers find way to prevent, reduce or delay cannabis use amongst at-risk youth

Responding to rapidly shifting legal and cultural environments, researchers at the University of Montreal and CHU Sainte-Justine Children's Hospital have found a way to prevent, reduce or delay cannabis use amongst some at-risk youth. Cannabis users are at risk of neurocognitive deficits, reduced educational and occupational attainment, motor vehicle accidents, exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms, and precipitation of psychosis. [More]
Surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for training neurosurgical residents

Surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for training neurosurgical residents

A surgical skills laboratory and corresponding dissection curricula were established in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Cleveland Clinic in the 2011-2012 academic year. The authors describe how this came about and what it has meant for neurosurgical resident training and assessment of residents' surgical skills in the following paper: "Establishing a surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for neurosurgical residency training" by James K. C. Liu, MD, and colleagues, published today online, ahead of print in the Journal of Neurosurgery. [More]
Previous motherhood alters cognition, neuroplasticity in response to hormone therapy

Previous motherhood alters cognition, neuroplasticity in response to hormone therapy

Hormone therapy (HT) is prescribed to alleviate some of the symptoms of menopause in women. Menopausal women are more likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease but not other forms of dementia, and HT has been prescribed to treat cognitive decline in post-menopausal women with variable degrees of effectiveness. [More]
Oscillations could play role in resetting sensitivity of neurons after eye movements

Oscillations could play role in resetting sensitivity of neurons after eye movements

Scientists measuring brain activity have found that in many regions, such as the sensory or motor cortex, activity sometimes oscillates at different frequencies, forming wave-like patterns. Despite the fact that such oscillations are frequently observed, and present in many brain regions, their functional role remains unclear. [More]
Essential fatty acids play crucial role in human brain growth and function

Essential fatty acids play crucial role in human brain growth and function

New research conducted in a rural community in Pakistan highlights the crucial role that essential fatty acids play in human brain growth and function. [More]
Researchers create 'brainstorm barometer' to calculate the brain functions of very premature infants

Researchers create 'brainstorm barometer' to calculate the brain functions of very premature infants

University of Helsinki researchers have partnered with Swedish and Australian researchers to create a "brainstorm barometer", which allows computers to calculate the brain functions of very premature babies during their first hours of life. [More]
Echolocators use echoes to detect multiple properties of objects through visual areas of the brain

Echolocators use echoes to detect multiple properties of objects through visual areas of the brain

Certain blind individuals have the ability to use echoes from tongue or finger clicks to recognize objects in the distance, and some use echolocation as a replacement for vision. Research done by Dr. Mel Goodale, from the University of Western Ontario, in Canada, and colleagues around the world, is showing that echolocation in blind individuals is a full form of sensory substitution, and that blind echolocation experts recruit regions of the brain normally associated with visual perception when making echo-based assessments of objects. [More]
Scientists reveal how disruption of DISC1 gene involved in mental illness affects the brain

Scientists reveal how disruption of DISC1 gene involved in mental illness affects the brain

Scientists have for the first time shown how the disruption of a key gene involved in mental illness impacts on the brain. [More]
New nationwide survey shows steady increase in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy

New nationwide survey shows steady increase in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy

Results from a new nationwide survey announced today indicate a steady increase in the number of pediatric patients who are being treated with proton radiation therapy for cancerous and non-cancerous tumors. [More]
Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

New research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experienced significantly less toxic side effects than patients treated with older radiation therapies. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. [More]

Decreased removal of toxic peptides causes onset of Alzheimer's disease

Jens Pahnke and his team at the University of Oslo has recently published results in the prestigious scientific journal 'BRAIN' showing that decreased removal of toxic peptides in the brain causes the onset and first clinical signs of Alzheimer's disease, rather than overproduction as has previously been assumed. This information can now be used to target specific genes to enhance their function in the brain of elderly or people at risk. [More]
nTMS analysis of motor areas improves prognosis of patients with malignant brain tumors

nTMS analysis of motor areas improves prognosis of patients with malignant brain tumors

A method known as navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) has been gaining importance in neurosurgery for some time now. [More]
Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered how to make adult sensory neurons from human patients simply by having them roll up their sleeve and providing a blood sample. [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Goethe University researchers find endocrine disrupting chemicals in plastic baby teethers

Goethe University researchers find endocrine disrupting chemicals in plastic baby teethers

In laboratory tests, two out of ten teethers, plastic toys used to sooth babies' teething ache, release endocrine disrupting chemicals. One product contains parabens, which are normally used as preservatives in cosmetics, while the second contains six so-far unidentified endocrine disruptors. [More]
Studies refine amyloid imaging role in dementia

Studies refine amyloid imaging role in dementia

Two meta-analyses published in JAMA help to define the role of amyloid imaging in dementia. [More]
Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease, according to a groundbreaking Iowa State University study. [More]
New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New research shows that infections can impair your cognitive ability measured on an IQ scale. The study is the largest of its kind to date, and it shows a clear correlation between infection levels and impaired cognition. [More]
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