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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Kessler Institute provides tips to help reduce risk of injury during winter months

Kessler Institute provides tips to help reduce risk of injury during winter months

Winter appears to have arrived early, bringing with it record snowfalls and cold temperatures across the country. It also brings an increased risk for injuries. Whether shoveling snow, dealing with icy roads, or simply trying to walk on wet, slippery pavement, caution is the key word. [More]
Drinking 3-5 cups of coffee per day may protect against Alzheimer’s Disease

Drinking 3-5 cups of coffee per day may protect against Alzheimer’s Disease

Drinking 3-5 cups of coffee per day may help to protect against Alzheimer’s Disease, according to research highlighted in an Alzheimer Europe session report published by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee, a not-for-profit organisation devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to coffee and health. [More]
Researchers discover molecular switch that triggers stress processes in the brain

Researchers discover molecular switch that triggers stress processes in the brain

At the Center for Brain Research at the MedUni Vienna an important factor for stress has been identified in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm (Sweden). This is the protein secretagogin that plays an important role in the release of the stress hormone CRH and which only then enables stress processes in the brain to be transmitted to the pituitary gland and then onwards to the organs. [More]
New eye test objectively measures level of fatigue that doctors may feel after long shifts

New eye test objectively measures level of fatigue that doctors may feel after long shifts

An international team of scientists which includes researchers from the U. of Granada has demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to establish in an objective way the level of fatigue in physicians after long shifts through their eye movement. [More]
Assessing patient's decision-making capacity

Assessing patient's decision-making capacity

Physicians often find it hard to tell if a patient suffering from dementia or depression is capable of making sound judgements. This is shown by a study conducted within the scope of the National Research Programme "End of Life" (NRP 67). The Central Ethics Committee of the Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences now aims to elaborate new assessment principles. [More]
Functional connectivity loss may underlie Parkinson’s cognitive decline

Functional connectivity loss may underlie Parkinson’s cognitive decline

Patients with Parkinson’s disease have deceases in functional connectivity over time and these correlate closely with cognitive decline, research shows. [More]
Researchers identify key molecule that drives excess protein production in Fragile X patients' brain

Researchers identify key molecule that drives excess protein production in Fragile X patients' brain

People affected by a common inherited form of autism could be helped by a drug that is being tested as a treatment for cancer. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism linked to brain damage

Researchers identify mechanism linked to brain damage

Researchers have discovered a mechanism linked to the brain damage often suffered by stroke victims--and are now searching for drugs to block it. [More]
55% of people with dementia have never seen a doctor, shows study

55% of people with dementia have never seen a doctor, shows study

The majority of people with dementia have never seen a doctor about their memory and thinking problems, according to a new study published in the November 26, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center releases November tip sheet of story ideas

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center releases November tip sheet of story ideas

Following is the November 2014 tip sheet of story ideas from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. [More]
US Special Forces funding breakthrough drug therapy for treating wounded soldiers

US Special Forces funding breakthrough drug therapy for treating wounded soldiers

US Special Forces are funding a world first, breakthrough drug therapy for treating battle casualties that's being developed by James Cook University scientists in Australia. [More]
GABA injections prevent and reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice

GABA injections prevent and reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice

A chemical produced in the pancreas that prevented and even reversed Type 1 diabetes in mice had the same effect on human beta cells transplanted into mice, new research has found. [More]
Many older adults with memory problems and dementia go unscreened, untreated

Many older adults with memory problems and dementia go unscreened, untreated

Despite clear signs that their memory and thinking abilities have gone downhill, more than half of seniors with these symptoms haven't seen a doctor about them, a new study finds. [More]
Cognitive test battery developed to measure impact of spaceflight stressors on cognitive performance

Cognitive test battery developed to measure impact of spaceflight stressors on cognitive performance

Space is one of the most demanding and unforgiving environments. Human exploration of space requires astronauts to maintain consistently high levels of cognitive performance to ensure mission safety and success, and prevent potential errors and accidents. Despite the importance of cognitive performance for mission success, little is known about how cognition is affected by prolonged spaceflight, and what aspects of cognition are primarily affected. [More]
Gothenburg study shows epilepsy surgery is a low-risk procedure

Gothenburg study shows epilepsy surgery is a low-risk procedure

A study at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, has found that epilepsy surgery is a safe, effective and low-risk procedure. Nevertheless, few Swedes have the operation, and those who are interested may have to wait a long time for presurgical counseling. [More]
Current evidence does not support routine minimally invasive disc surgery, say researchers

Current evidence does not support routine minimally invasive disc surgery, say researchers

McMaster University researchers have found that current evidence does not support the routine use of minimally invasive surgery to remove herniated disc material pressing on the nerve root or spinal cord in the neck or lower back. [More]
Proper copper levels essential to health of the brain at rest, new study finds

Proper copper levels essential to health of the brain at rest, new study finds

In recent years it has been established that copper plays an essential role in the health of the human brain. Improper copper oxidation has been linked to several neurological disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Menkes' and Wilson's. [More]
CMU scientists use Harry Potter book to identify brain activity

CMU scientists use Harry Potter book to identify brain activity

Some people say that reading "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" taught them the importance of friends, or that easy decisions are seldom right. Carnegie Mellon University scientists used a chapter of that book to learn a different lesson: identifying what different regions of the brain are doing when people read. [More]

European scientists develop, test drug that could reduce harmful side-effects of 'binge drinking'

A drug that could reduce the harmful side-effects of 'binge drinking', especially by teenagers, has been successfully developed and tested by a team of European scientists, including the University of Huddersfield's Professor Mike Page and Dr Karl Hemming. There is also the potential for new ways to treat Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases that damage the brain. [More]
Researchers find unusual role of lactate in metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma

Researchers find unusual role of lactate in metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma

Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah discovered the unusual role of lactate in the metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS), a rare, aggressive cancer that primarily affects adolescents and young adults. The study also confirmed that a fusion gene is the cancer-causing agent in this disease. [More]