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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Brookdale offers few key things to help seniors keep themselves independent

Brookdale offers few key things to help seniors keep themselves independent

Brookdale understands the importance for seniors to maintain and maximize their independence as they age. There comes a time when seniors look to others, including their adult children, for guidance and support, and Brookdale is here to help find solutions to the needs in their lives. [More]
Study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age

Study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age

As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, and tend to awaken too early in the morning. [More]
Stimulating nerves in ear could improve health of heart

Stimulating nerves in ear could improve health of heart

Stimulating nerves in your ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers have discovered. A team at the University of Leeds used a standard TENS machine like those designed to relieve labour pains to apply electrical pulses to the tragus, the small raised flap at the front of the ear immediately in front of the ear canal. [More]
Regulation of stem cells in zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into Alzheimer's Disease

Regulation of stem cells in zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into Alzheimer's Disease

New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. [More]
Researchers identify area of brain involved in multitasking and ways to train

Researchers identify area of brain involved in multitasking and ways to train

The area of the brain involved in multitasking and ways to train it have been identified by a research team at the IUGM Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal and the University of Montreal. [More]
New web-based program helps to determine deadly form of brain cancer

New web-based program helps to determine deadly form of brain cancer

A new web-based program developed by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers will provide a simple, free way for healthcare providers to determine which brain tumor cases require testing for a genetic mutation. [More]

Perampanel does not offer added benefit for patients with Epilepsy

The drug perampanel (trade name Fycompa) has been approved since July 2012 as adjunctive ("add-on") therapy for adults and children aged 12 years and older with epileptic fits (seizures). [More]
New therapeutic drug may prevent respiratory depression in patients taking opioid medication

New therapeutic drug may prevent respiratory depression in patients taking opioid medication

People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally. [More]
Dasatinib: Leukemia drug shows promise for treating skin, breast and other cancers

Dasatinib: Leukemia drug shows promise for treating skin, breast and other cancers

A leukemia drug called dasatinib shows promise for treating skin, breast and several other cancers, according to researchers at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. [More]
Research validates Myc inhibition as effective therapeutic strategy for glioma

Research validates Myc inhibition as effective therapeutic strategy for glioma

Research led by the Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO) evidence the most conclusive preclinical results to-date validating Myc inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in glioma - a highly agressive tumor type that notoriously outsmarts current anti-cancer therapies. [More]
Higher-fit children have more compact white-matter tracts in the brain than lower-fit peers

Higher-fit children have more compact white-matter tracts in the brain than lower-fit peers

A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. "White matter" describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity. [More]
Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Virginia lawmakers will convene in a special session next month to address the question of expanding Medicaid and, more broadly, the fact that hundreds of thousands of poor and disabled people in the state have no health insurance coverage. Democrats and some moderate Republicans have advanced a variety of ideas to tackle that problem. Conservative Republicans, who control the legislature in Richmond, have rejected those solutions while proposing no alternative. Does the GOP intend for the special session to be anything more than a charade at taxpayers' expense? (8/15). [More]
Researchers develop new technique to map pulse pressure and elasticity of arteries in the brain

Researchers develop new technique to map pulse pressure and elasticity of arteries in the brain

Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique that can noninvasively image the pulse pressure and elasticity of the arteries of the brain, revealing correlations between arterial health and aging. [More]
Researchers uncover role of epigenetic changes in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers uncover role of epigenetic changes in Alzheimer's disease

A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King's College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study shows bryostatin plays key role in slowing or reversing Alzheimer's disease

Study shows bryostatin plays key role in slowing or reversing Alzheimer's disease

Neurotrope, Inc. (OTCQB: NTRP) today announced that results from a new study, entitled, "PKCe Deficits in Alzheimer's Disease Brains and Skin Fibroblasts," published in the recent edition of the peer-reviewed Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and co-authored by Tapan K. Khan, Ph.D.; Abhik Sen, Ph.D.; Jarin Hongpaisan, Ph.D.; Chol S. Lim, Ph.D.; Thomas J. Nelson, Ph.D., and; Dr. Daniel L. Alkon, each of the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute (BRNI), provide further indication of the role that protein kinase C epsilon (PKCe) may play in the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Study confirms close link between immune system and adult neurogenesis

Study confirms close link between immune system and adult neurogenesis

A new study by Barbara Beltz, the Allene Lummis Russell Professor of Neuroscience at Wellesley College, and Irene Soderhall of Uppsala University, Sweden, published in the August 11 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. These cells can, in turn, create neurons in the adult animal. [More]
Hatha yoga improves sedentary older adults' cognitive performance

Hatha yoga improves sedentary older adults' cognitive performance

Practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults' performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report. [More]
Rare mutation in suspect gene disrupts brain circuitry in complex psychiatric disorders

Rare mutation in suspect gene disrupts brain circuitry in complex psychiatric disorders

Researchers have long suspected that major mental disorders are genetically-rooted diseases of synapses - the connections between neurons. [More]
Research examines evidence of damage to hearing

Research examines evidence of damage to hearing

New research examines evidence of damage to your hearing. Many people listen to loud music without realizing that this can affect their hearing. [More]
Study to explain how brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts

Study to explain how brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts

As children learn basic arithmetic, they gradually switch from solving problems by counting on their fingers to pulling facts from memory. The shift comes more easily for some kids than for others, but no one knows why. [More]