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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Animal study shows high-fat diet is more harmful to males than females

Animal study shows high-fat diet is more harmful to males than females

Male and female brains are not equal when it comes to the biological response to a high-fat diet. [More]
New drug naming system to be presented at ECNP conference in Berlin

New drug naming system to be presented at ECNP conference in Berlin

What's in a name? Doctors have found that the name of the drug you are prescribed significantly influences how the patient sees the treatment. [More]
Low vitamin D levels linked to poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest

Low vitamin D levels linked to poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest

Vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest by seven-fold, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Dr Jin Wi from Korea. Vitamin D deficiency also led to a higher chance of dying after sudden cardiac arrest. [More]
MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma. Through a series of sophisticated experiments, researchers reporting in The American Journal of Pathology suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays a pivotal role in disruption of the brain/spinal cord barrier (BSCB), cell death, and functional deficits after SCI. [More]
Researchers receive NIH grant to study mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome

Researchers receive NIH grant to study mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder in humans that causes social impairments and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. [More]
Newly developed agent filters out toxins from body in the event of overdose

Newly developed agent filters out toxins from body in the event of overdose

Every minute counts in the event of an overdose. ETH professor Jean-Christophe Leroux and his team have developed an agent to filter out toxins from the body more quickly and efficiently. [More]
Early detection, increased public awareness can prevent suicide among youth

Early detection, increased public awareness can prevent suicide among youth

Although progress has been made in recent years, the matter of youth suicide in Quebec still needs to be more effectively addressed. [More]
Nurses play key role in assessing impact of head injury on patients, families

Nurses play key role in assessing impact of head injury on patients, families

Families of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) may expect them to return to normal quickly—after all, it's "just a concussion." But mild TBI can have a lasting impact on families as well as patients, according to a review in the November issue of American Journal of Nursing. [More]
Mediso launches MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT for research applications

Mediso launches MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT for research applications

Mediso announces the MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT, the first member of the MultiScan product line dedicated to research applications for both clinical and pre-clinical imaging. The LFER 150 (Large Field of view Extreme Resolution) with 20 cm axial and 15 cm transaxial field of view (FOV), sub-mm PET resolution and 5% sensitivity is aimed at pre-clinical brain research. [More]
Parental understanding regarding daily experiences may affect adolescent health, well-being

Parental understanding regarding daily experiences may affect adolescent health, well-being

Adolescents whose parents better understand their daily experiences have better psychological adjustment, suggests a study in the October issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

An oral biologic medication has successfully treated chronic, precancerous inflammation in the intestine, according to results of an animal study authored by an MD/PhD student in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
UWM study supports the hypothesis that links autism to air pollutants

UWM study supports the hypothesis that links autism to air pollutants

A researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has added to a growing body of evidence that links autism to air pollutants such as those generated by cars and trucks. [More]
Rose Medical Center experts perform LARIAT procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Rose Medical Center experts perform LARIAT procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Rose Medical Center is now performing a groundbreaking procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) that may reduce their risk for stroke when they cannot take blood thinners due to special circumstances. [More]
NIH presents 2014 New Innovator Award to Penn Medicine researcher

NIH presents 2014 New Innovator Award to Penn Medicine researcher

Roberto Bonasio, PhD, an assistant professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a core member of the Penn Epigenetics Program is one of the recipients of a 2014 New Innovator Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). [More]
Otoharmonics receives Class 2 medical device license for Levo system from Health Canada

Otoharmonics receives Class 2 medical device license for Levo system from Health Canada

Otoharmonics Corporation, announces that it has received a Class 2 medical device license from Health Canada for the Levo system, a personalized neuroscience-based sound therapy for use in the temporary relief of tinnitus symptoms. [More]
Eating high-protein breakfast reduces food cravings, overeating later on

Eating high-protein breakfast reduces food cravings, overeating later on

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, many teens skip breakfast, which increases their likelihood of overeating and eventual weight gain. Statistics show that the number of adolescents struggling with obesity, which elevates the risk for chronic health problems, has quadrupled in the past three decades. [More]
Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Planning to travel outside the U.S. this holiday season? Check with your primary care provider or travel clinic when you book your flight. [More]
Research on zebrafish helps identify cause of unknown genetic disorder

Research on zebrafish helps identify cause of unknown genetic disorder

Research in zebrafish has helped identify the cause of an unknown genetic disorder affecting a boy and two of his uncles, scientists report in an article published October 14 in the journal GENETICS. [More]

Vanderbilt engineers develop robotic device for less invasive epilepsy surgery

For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate - invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. [More]
Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Parkinson's Disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. In Germany alone, almost half a million people are affected. The focus of the disease is the progressive degeneration of dopamine-producing nerve cells in a certain region of the midbrain, the substantia nigra. Misfolded proteins are the cause. Until recently, it was unclear why damage is confined to specific nerve cells. [More]