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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
FDA approves MagVenture MagVita TMS Therapy system for treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

FDA approves MagVenture MagVita TMS Therapy system for treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

On July 31, 2015 the US Food and Drug Administration cleared the MagVita TMS Therapy system for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in adult patients who have failed to receive satisfactory improvement from prior antidepressant medication in the current episode. [More]
Cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain broadcast message throughout the cerebral cortex

Cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain broadcast message throughout the cerebral cortex

When a large combat unit, widely dispersed in dense jungle, goes to battle, no single soldier knows precisely how his actions are affecting the unit's success or failure. But in modern armies, every soldier is connected via an audio link that can instantly receive broadcasts - reporting both positive and negative surprises - based on new intelligence. The real-time broadcasts enable dispersed troops to learn from these reports and can be critical since no solider has an overview of the entire unit's situation. [More]
Consumers willing to pay 30% more for Fair Trade products, study finds

Consumers willing to pay 30% more for Fair Trade products, study finds

Products labeled with a Fair Trade logo cause prospective buyers to dig deeper into their pockets. In an experiment conducted at the University of Bonn, participants were willing to pay on average 30 percent more for ethically produced goods, compared to their conventionally produced counterparts. [More]
New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

Annually, hundreds of thousands of patients battling cancer undergo chemotherapy, which often results in poorly tolerated side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and loss of the desire to eat. [More]
Aphantasia: A condition that describes people born with diminished visual imagery ability

Aphantasia: A condition that describes people born with diminished visual imagery ability

If counting sheep is an abstract concept, or you are unable to visualise the faces of loved ones, you could have aphantasia - a newly defined condition to describe people who are born without a "mind's eye". [More]
Multiple IV administration of adipose-derived MSCs may extend healthy life and lifespan

Multiple IV administration of adipose-derived MSCs may extend healthy life and lifespan

Researchers in Korea have determined the possibility that adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may extend healthy life and lifespan by intravenous injections. [More]
Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

The fungus Cryptococcus causes meningitis, a brain disease that kills about 1 million people each year — mainly those with impaired immune systems due to AIDS, cancer treatment or an organ transplant. [More]
Powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare prompt urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear

Powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare prompt urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear

Battle-inflicted head injuries are as old as war itself, evidenced by the copper helmets worn by Bronze Age soldiers to deflect blows from spears and axes. Over the ensuing millennia, as weapons evolved, so did armor. Today, the powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare have once again raised the stakes, prompting urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear. [More]
Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV leads to development of AIDS

Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV leads to development of AIDS

Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes have revealed that HIV does not cause AIDS by the virus's direct effect on the host's immune cells, but rather through the cells' lethal influence on one another. [More]
Researchers find fatty acid deposits in brains of Alzheimer's patients

Researchers find fatty acid deposits in brains of Alzheimer's patients

People with Alzheimer's disease have fat deposits in the brain. For the first time since the disease was described 109 years ago, researchers affiliated with the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have discovered accumulations of fat droplets in the brain of patients who died from the disease and have identified the nature of the fat. [More]
Brain scans may help predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment

Brain scans may help predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered that brain scans can be used to predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment. The findings are published online in the latest issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry. [More]
Brain cells in Parkinson's disease die prematurely, burning out like an overheating motor

Brain cells in Parkinson's disease die prematurely, burning out like an overheating motor

The death of brain cells in Parkinson's disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers at the University of Montreal reported today. [More]
SLU study finds that length of stay in ED makes no real difference in mortality of trauma patient

SLU study finds that length of stay in ED makes no real difference in mortality of trauma patient

The amount of time a trauma patient stays in the emergency department (ED) makes no real difference in the patient's mortality, researchers at Saint Louis University found in a recent study. [More]

Alzheimer's Association urges people to participate in ‘Walk to End Alzheimer's’

The Alzheimer's Association® is calling on people to "get in the Purple Zone" and get behind the cause that affects more than 5 million people in the U.S. [More]
Children exposed to toxic air pollutants at home more likely to have lower GPAs

Children exposed to toxic air pollutants at home more likely to have lower GPAs

A University of Texas at El Paso study on children's health has found that fourth and fifth graders who are exposed to toxic air pollutants at home are more likely to have lower GPAs. [More]

Brainbow technique reveals surprising data about brain's visual circuitry

Neuroscientists know that some connections in the brain are pruned through neural development. Function gives rise to structure, according to the textbooks. But scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have discovered that the textbooks might be wrong. [More]
Experimental gene therapy may prevent neuronal degeneration in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Experimental gene therapy may prevent neuronal degeneration in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Degenerating neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) measurably responded to an experimental gene therapy in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was injected into their brains, report researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in the current issue of JAMA Neurology. [More]
UiO researchers test new nasal spray device for treating mental illness

UiO researchers test new nasal spray device for treating mental illness

Researchers at the University of Oslo have tested a new device for delivering hormone treatments for mental illness through the nose. This method was found to deliver medicine to the brain with few side effects. [More]
Young adults diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence show differences in brain structure, memory

Young adults diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence show differences in brain structure, memory

Young adults diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adolescence show differences in brain structure and perform poorly in memory tests compared to their peers, according to new research from the University of Cambridge, UK, and the University of Oulu, Finland. [More]
Mental focussing may trigger learning mechanisms

Mental focussing may trigger learning mechanisms

A study conducted with experienced scholars of Zen-Meditation shows that mental focussing can induce learning mechanisms, similar to physical training. Researchers at the Ruhr-University Bochum and the Ludwig-Maximilians-University München discovered this phenomenon during a scientifically monitored meditation retreat. The journal "Scientific Reports", from the makers of "Nature", has now published their new findings on the plasticity of the brain. [More]
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