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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Anti-diabetic medication activates brain sensors, promotes weight gain

Anti-diabetic medication activates brain sensors, promotes weight gain

Medication used to treat patients with type II diabetes activates sensors on brain cells that increase hunger, causing people taking this drug to gain more body fat, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Oregon Health and Science University, Georgia Regents University and Charlie Norwood Veterans Administration Medical Center. [More]
Study shows high-fat diet may increase risk for depression, psychiatric disorders

Study shows high-fat diet may increase risk for depression, psychiatric disorders

Can the consumption of fatty foods change your behavior and your brain? High-fat diets have long been known to increase the risk for medical problems, including heart disease and stroke, but there is growing concern that diets high in fat might also increase the risk for depression and other psychiatric disorders. [More]

Philips enters into collaboration with Janssen to develop new handheld blood test to support care of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders

Royal Philips today announced that it has entered into a multi-year development agreement with Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V. (Janssen). [More]
Top scientists to attend 3rd annual Helmholtz-Nature Medicine Diabetes Conference

Top scientists to attend 3rd annual Helmholtz-Nature Medicine Diabetes Conference

As a unique scientific panel it brings together top scientists as well as promising young researchers from different disciplines in a personal and selected ambience. [More]
New Autism-Causing Genetic Variant Identified

New Autism-Causing Genetic Variant Identified

Using a novel approach that homes in on rare families severely affected by autism, a Johns Hopkins-led team of researchers has identified a new genetic cause of the disease. The rare genetic variant offers important insights into the root causes of autism, the researchers say. And, they suggest, their unconventional method can be used to identify other genetic causes of autism and other complex genetic conditions. [More]
Transition announces positive results from ELND005 AME and renal clearance studies

Transition announces positive results from ELND005 AME and renal clearance studies

Transition Therapeutics Inc. today announced results from two phase 1 clinical studies of neuropsychiatric drug candidate ELND005. These studies, an absorption-metabolism-excretion ("AME") study and a renal clearance study, are specialized clinical pharmacology trials that are required by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the approval of most drugs in development. [More]
Rice University study reveals carbon nanotube fibers can provide two-way connection with neurons

Rice University study reveals carbon nanotube fibers can provide two-way connection with neurons

Carbon nanotube fibers invented at Rice University may provide the best way to communicate directly with the brain. [More]
Immunotherapy reverses memory problems in animal model of Alzheimer's disease

Immunotherapy reverses memory problems in animal model of Alzheimer's disease

A new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has revealed that a single dose of an immunotherapy reverses memory problems in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. The article appears in the March 25 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
UCLA-led team validates first standardized protocol for tracking early signs of Alzheimer's disease

UCLA-led team validates first standardized protocol for tracking early signs of Alzheimer's disease

After six years of painstaking research, a UCLA-led team has validated the first standardized protocol for measuring one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease -- the atrophy of the part of the brain known as the hippocampus. [More]
Researchers identify possible blood biomarkers for concussion

Researchers identify possible blood biomarkers for concussion

By looking at the molecular aftermath of concussion in an unusual way, a team of researchers at Brown University and the Lifespan health system has developed a candidate panel of blood biomarkers that can accurately signal mild traumatic brain injury within hours using standard, widely available lab arrays. [More]
FDA approves Quadracel vaccine to protect young children from life-threatening diseases

FDA approves Quadracel vaccine to protect young children from life-threatening diseases

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved use of Quadracel (Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Absorbed and Inactivated Poliovirus; DTaP-IPV) vaccine for active immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis in children 4 through 6 years of age. [More]
Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

The fight to treat cancer and eradicate tumors will likely benefit from a new set of treatments if early development phases continue to show promise, according to Kalorama Information. The healthcare market research publisher stated that gene therapies that are able to deliver genetic material to a specific cell population or tumor that will result in the destruction of the tumor. [More]
Serious head injuries may contribute to faster brain ageing, new study reveals

Serious head injuries may contribute to faster brain ageing, new study reveals

People who have suffered serious head injuries show changes in brain structure resembling those seen in older people, according to a new study. [More]
Researchers examine neural synchronization between leaders and their followers

Researchers examine neural synchronization between leaders and their followers

Great leaders are often good communicators. In the process of communication, the relationship between leaders and their followers develops spontaneously according to new research from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and the State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research in Beijing. [More]
Only few studies demonstrate the effectiveness of marijuana

Only few studies demonstrate the effectiveness of marijuana

While many states have pushed for new laws to legalize the use of marijuana for medical reasons, there are few well-controlled studies that demonstrate its effectiveness. [More]
NIH awards K23 grant to study effects of carbon dioxide levels after cardiac arrest

NIH awards K23 grant to study effects of carbon dioxide levels after cardiac arrest

The NIH-National Heart Lung and Blood Institute has awarded Brian W. Roberts, MD, emergency medicine physician at Cooper University Health Care and Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University (CMSRU), a Mentored Patient-Oriented Career Development grant (K23) to study post-resuscitation partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. [More]
Having strong purpose in life may give you better brain health

Having strong purpose in life may give you better brain health

Having a strong sense that your life has meaning and direction may make you less likely to develop areas of brain damage caused by blockages in blood flow as you age. This research is reported in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. [More]
Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduced opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia caused by daily morphine injections in rats, according to new research. [More]
Use of balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy increases stroke risk

Use of balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy increases stroke risk

Among patients with symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis (narrowing of an artery inside the brain), the use of a balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy (clopidogrel and aspirin) resulted in an increased of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), according to a study in the March 24/31 issue of JAMA. [More]
CMV-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus

CMV-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus

A cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus, and has potential for development as a disseminating vaccine strategy to prevent ebolavirus infection of wild African ape populations. [More]
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