Brain News and Research RSS Feed - Brain News and Research

The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Researchers discover how neurons help learn new motor skills

Researchers discover how neurons help learn new motor skills

It takes a surprisingly small cluster of brain cells deep within the cerebellum to learn how to serve a tennis ball or line up a hockey shot. Researchers at McGill University led by Kathleen Cullen from the Department of Physiology have discovered that to learn new motor skills, neurons within the cerebellum engage in elegant, virtually mathematical, computations to quickly compare expected and actual sensory feedback. They then quickly readjust, changing the strength of connections between other neurons to form new patterns in the brain in order to accomplish the task at hand. [More]
UVa researchers examine the number, severity of head impacts during collegiate football practices and games

UVa researchers examine the number, severity of head impacts during collegiate football practices and games

Researchers at the University of Virginia examined the number and severity of subconcussive head impacts sustained by college football players over an entire season during practices and games. The researchers found that the number of head impacts varied depending on the intensity of the activity. [More]
Trauma may cause long-lasting effects even in people without PTSD

Trauma may cause long-lasting effects even in people without PTSD

Trauma may cause distinct and long-lasting effects even in people who do not develop PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), according to research by scientists working at the University of Oxford's Department of Psychiatry. It is already known that stress affects brain function and may lead to PTSD, but until now the underlying brain networks have proven elusive. [More]
Research finding could help reveal how the human brain learns complex motor skills

Research finding could help reveal how the human brain learns complex motor skills

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. To learn and improve, the songbird brain needs to shake up its tried-and-true patterns with a healthy dose of creative experimentation. Until now, no one has found a specific mechanism by which this could occur. [More]
BrightFocus announces recipients of 2015 research program grants

BrightFocus announces recipients of 2015 research program grants

BrightFocus Foundation, which funds research worldwide on Alzheimer's disease, glaucoma, and macular degeneration, today announced that its 2015 research program grants have been awarded to 58 scientists in 20 states and 7 foreign countries. Part of an $11 million research investment, the grants reflect the largest annual research funding in the foundation's history. [More]
MD Anderson scientists reveal role of metabolic enzyme fumarase in DNA repair

MD Anderson scientists reveal role of metabolic enzyme fumarase in DNA repair

DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the worst possible form of genetic malfunction that can cause cancer and resistance to therapy. New information published this week reveals more about why this occurs and how these breaks can be repaired. [More]
15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium now open for registration

15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium now open for registration

Registration is now open for the 15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium, "Maximizing Independence for Optimal Aging," presented by the University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging. [More]
New MS therapies associated with risks and side effects, require active management strategy

New MS therapies associated with risks and side effects, require active management strategy

Advances in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis have been good news for patients, but side effects and risks mean that an active management strategy and constant monitoring are essential. [More]
BUSM researchers find new way to detect and treat basal-like breast cancer

BUSM researchers find new way to detect and treat basal-like breast cancer

A new way to detect - and perhaps treat - one of the deadliest types of breast cancer has been found. Led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), the study appears online in Breast Cancer Research. [More]

Physically impaired people to compete at Cybathlon 2016

Zurich will host the first Cybathlon in autumn 2016, bringing together physical-ly impaired people from all over the world to compete against each other using the latest assistive technologies. [More]
Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

When we type or perform other precise tasks, our brains and muscles usually work together effortlessly. But when a neurological disease or spinal cord injury severs the connection between the brain and limbs, once-easy motions become difficult or impossible. [More]
Researchers uncover strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy

Researchers uncover strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in children. It has historically been considered to be caused by factors such as birth asphyxia, stroke and infections in the developing brain of babies. [More]
Researchers closer to understanding complicated brain chemistry behind Alzheimer's disease

Researchers closer to understanding complicated brain chemistry behind Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have discovered that a protein involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease also has properties that could be helpful for human health. [More]
Research shows specific routes of administration can predict risk of drug addiction

Research shows specific routes of administration can predict risk of drug addiction

Abstinence is the best way to avoid drug addiction. But in many societies, drug use is the norm, not the exception, especially by youth. [More]
Atomic level images reveal how neuropeptide hormone neurotensin may activate its receptors

Atomic level images reveal how neuropeptide hormone neurotensin may activate its receptors

Many hormones and neurotransmitters work by binding to receptors on a cell's exterior surface. This activates receptors causing them to twist, turn and spark chemical reactions inside cells. [More]
3D-printed models of children's brain anatomy help reduce operative risk of complex procedures

3D-printed models of children's brain anatomy help reduce operative risk of complex procedures

Boston Children's Hospital physicians report the first cases of children benefiting from 3D printing of their anatomy before undergoing high-risk brain procedures. [More]
University of Southampton research finds that electric fields alter behaviour of fruit flies

University of Southampton research finds that electric fields alter behaviour of fruit flies

A new piece of research led by the University of Southampton has found that the behaviour of fruit flies, which are commonly used in laboratory experiments, is altered by electric fields. [More]
Study focuses on regulation of neuronal plasticity

Study focuses on regulation of neuronal plasticity

A team of scientists has linked changes in the structure of a handful of central brain neurons to understanding how animals adjust to changing seasons. Its findings enhance our understanding of the mechanisms vital to the regulation of our circadian system, or internal clock. [More]

Study: Positive reinforcement improves performance of ADHD kids on certain cognitive tasks

A little recognition for a job well done means a lot to children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) - more so than it would for typically developing kids. [More]
New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement