Cerebral Palsy News and Research RSS Feed - Cerebral Palsy News and Research

Cerebral palsy refers to a number of neurological conditions that affect muscle control and movement. Children with cerebral palsy have difficulties in controlling their muscle movement as they grow and develop.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by damage to the brain which may occur before, during or after birth. The main known causes of damage include infection in early pregnancy, lack of oxygen to the brain, and abnormal brain development. Some risk factors that increase the likelihood of brain damage include a complicated or premature birth, maternal age of below 20 or over 40 years, multiple births and low birth weight.

Symptoms vary greatly depending on which type of cerebral palsy a child has. Ataxia cerebral policy affects balance and may cause difficulty in walking, while children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy may be unable to even maintain an upright position. The most common type of cerebral palsy, spastic cerebral palsy, refers to a tight and unyielding muscle tone that restricts movement and impairs mobility.

In the UK, cerebral palsy affects about one in every 400 children and approximately 1,800 babies are diagnosed with the condition each year.

There is no cure for cerebral palsy but treatments such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help relieve symptoms and increase a child's self-esteem and independence while medication can relieve muscle stiffness and spasms.
Empire State Building towers to go purple on 6th annual World Prematurity Day

Empire State Building towers to go purple on 6th annual World Prematurity Day

The Empire State Building towers will light purple today in honor of the 6th annual World Prematurity Day (WPD) tomorrow. Parent groups and organizations worldwide join together on WPD to raise awareness of the serious problem of premature birth. [More]
Congenital CMV infection highly common among children with cerebral palsy, study finds

Congenital CMV infection highly common among children with cerebral palsy, study finds

Cytomegalovirus is a common herpesvirus that can cross the placenta, infect the fetus and cause damage to the developing brain. [More]
Specialist receives nearly $2.8 million grant to determine effective treatment for perinatal brain injury

Specialist receives nearly $2.8 million grant to determine effective treatment for perinatal brain injury

Barbara Stonestreet, MD, a neonatal-perinatal specialist at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, and professor of pediatrics at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, has received a five-year, nearly $2.8 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for her research into determining the most effective strategies for the treatment of perinatal brain injury in full-term and premature infants. [More]
Second annual conference at UofL focuses on improving access to quality health care for adults with IDD

Second annual conference at UofL focuses on improving access to quality health care for adults with IDD

Thanks to advances in medical science and a highly developed network of specialized pediatric health care services, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are much more likely to live into adulthood than they were several decades ago. [More]
PathMaker Neurosystems receives 2016 Universal Biotech Innovation Prize

PathMaker Neurosystems receives 2016 Universal Biotech Innovation Prize

PathMaker Neurosystems, a clinical-stage neurotechnology company developing non-invasive neurotherapy systems to treat neuromotor disorders, has been named as the Recipient of the Universal Biotech Innovation Prize 2016 in the global competition that offers "a glimpse of the future of life sciences." [More]
Young physician-scientists win Harry Winston Fellowships for innovative pediatric research

Young physician-scientists win Harry Winston Fellowships for innovative pediatric research

Dr. Claire Baldauf, Dr. Marjorie-Anne Guerra and Dr. Manal Habib have been named the recipients of the 2016-2017 Harry Winston Fellowships. [More]
Researchers to evaluate new treatment strategy for treating infants with perinatal brain injury

Researchers to evaluate new treatment strategy for treating infants with perinatal brain injury

Perinatal brain injury often results in severe developmental disabilities, including neurodevelopmental delay and cerebral palsy. [More]
Hyaluronidase enzyme may be effective treatment option for spasticity caused by neurological injury

Hyaluronidase enzyme may be effective treatment option for spasticity caused by neurological injury

A naturally occurring enzyme called hyaluronidase may be an effective alternative treatment for spasticity, or muscle stiffness, a disabling condition in people who have had a stroke or other brain injury. [More]
Special review highlights benefits of using botulinum neurotoxin for treating facial wrinkles

Special review highlights benefits of using botulinum neurotoxin for treating facial wrinkles

Botox and other botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) products are widely known for their use in treating facial wrinkles--but they can also be used to treat a wide range of non-cosmetic problems. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a national nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $575,704 in Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions

Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions

It appears that acupuncture may be a viable option for pain management when it comes to pediatric patients who have complex medical conditions, according to new research published by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul, Minnesota. [More]
Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

On January 24, 2013, Iris Vega-Figueroa's life changed completely. That's the day she gave birth to her twin girls, Iris and Geraldine. The twins were monoamniotic-monochorionic, meaning they shared one amniotic sack and one placenta in the womb. These rare pregnancies are considered high risk because of the uneven blood flow that occurs between the infants through the placenta. [More]
AOFAS volunteers travel to Vietnam for treating people with lower extremity deformities

AOFAS volunteers travel to Vietnam for treating people with lower extremity deformities

Volunteers from the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society returned to Vietnam this year to provide corrective surgery for children and adults with lower extremity deformities and disabilities. [More]
Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

A new study, which followed 180 pre-term infants from birth to age seven, found that babies who were fed more breast milk within the first 28 days of life had had larger volumes of certain regions of the brain at term equivalent and had better IQs, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function. [More]
New method could help detect unconjugated bilirubin in newborn infants

New method could help detect unconjugated bilirubin in newborn infants

A research group led by Project Professor Morioka Ichiro and Assistant Professor Iwatani Sota in collaboration with Doctor Miyawaki Atsushi have clinically proven that a fluorescent protein sourced from Japanese eel muscles can be used to accurately detect unconjugated bilirubin in newborns. [More]

Researchers investigate neural patterns underlying development of walking behaviours

Even before they stand up, infants have a rough idea of how to walk; they just need some time to lay down the right neural wiring. Understanding how babies take their first steps can also help us to improve the rehabilitation of patients recovering from spinal cord injury, and children with cerebral palsy. [More]
Innovative advances in medical paediatric orthotics shared at Primary Care and Public Health 2016

Innovative advances in medical paediatric orthotics shared at Primary Care and Public Health 2016

Innovative, clinician-led advances in orthotic techniques have the capacity to dramatically improve short term progress and long term outcomes for selective dorsal rhizotomy and scoliosis patients as well as patients with neurological disorders affecting movement. [More]
New autism classification system defines social communication ability levels among ASD children

New autism classification system defines social communication ability levels among ASD children

Children with autism have a wide range of ability to talk with other people, but it has been difficult to group children by their specific skills. [More]
Early high-dose rhEPO fails to improve neurodevelopment in very preterm infants

Early high-dose rhEPO fails to improve neurodevelopment in very preterm infants

Very preterm infants do not gain protection against neurodevelopmental delay with early prophylactic high-dose recombinant human erythropoietin, researchers report. [More]
Researchers design questionnaire to screen CP patients for sleep apnea

Researchers design questionnaire to screen CP patients for sleep apnea

When people think of sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), images of middle aged adults likely come to mind. However, a recent study by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare sheds light on another population of people who are affected by the disorder: children who have cerebral palsy (CP). [More]
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