Cerebral Palsy News and Research RSS Feed - Cerebral Palsy News and Research

Cerebral palsy refers to a number of neurological conditions that affect muscle control and movement. Children with cerebral palsy have difficulties in controlling their muscle movement as they grow and develop.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by damage to the brain which may occur before, during or after birth. The main known causes of damage include infection in early pregnancy, lack of oxygen to the brain, and abnormal brain development. Some risk factors that increase the likelihood of brain damage include a complicated or premature birth, maternal age of below 20 or over 40 years, multiple births and low birth weight.

Symptoms vary greatly depending on which type of cerebral palsy a child has. Ataxia cerebral policy affects balance and may cause difficulty in walking, while children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy may be unable to even maintain an upright position. The most common type of cerebral palsy, spastic cerebral palsy, refers to a tight and unyielding muscle tone that restricts movement and impairs mobility.

In the UK, cerebral palsy affects about one in every 400 children and approximately 1,800 babies are diagnosed with the condition each year.

There is no cure for cerebral palsy but treatments such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help relieve symptoms and increase a child's self-esteem and independence while medication can relieve muscle stiffness and spasms.
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
Antibiotic stewardship programs reduce length of stay and hospital readmission in children

Antibiotic stewardship programs reduce length of stay and hospital readmission in children

Hospitalized children go home sooner and are less likely to be readmitted when the hospital has an antibiotic stewardship program that's dedicated to controlling antibiotic prescriptions and treatment, according to a study being presented at IDWeek 2014-. The study is the first to show the benefits of such programs on children's health. [More]
People who practice yoga, meditation long term can learn to control computer with their minds

People who practice yoga, meditation long term can learn to control computer with their minds

New research by biomedical engineers at the University of Minnesota shows that people who practice yoga and meditation long term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation experience. [More]

Physical therapist in Southern California launches new book, Rehab the Mind

The highest rated physical therapist in Southern California, Dr. Justin C. Lin, is pleased to announce the launch of his new book, Rehab the Mind, Revive the Body, (known hereafter as the "Book" or "RR"), an inspirational account of the power of active healing based on real life stories of his patients. [More]
Highlights: Hawaii public hospital cuts; La. struggles with state worker health program costs; aging in Ky.

Highlights: Hawaii public hospital cuts; La. struggles with state worker health program costs; aging in Ky.

Public hospitals across Hawaii are finding ways to reduce staff and cut services because they don't have enough money to make ends meet. Executives from the Hawaii Health Systems Corp. told lawmakers Friday that even after layoffs they are facing a $30 million deficit in 2015. One hospital on Maui chose to close its adolescent psychology unit because it couldn't sustain the appropriate staffing levels to provide the services. It's also considering cuts to oncology and dialysis services if the situation doesn't improve (9/20). [More]

New football game for people with cerebral palsy

Final year student in the University of Alicante's Multimedia Engineering degree Roberto Gómez has designed a football game adapted for people with cerebral palsy which is operated with a foot switch, a push rod head switch and a hand switch. [More]
Penn Medicine launches CAROT to build novel therapies for retinal and ocular disorders

Penn Medicine launches CAROT to build novel therapies for retinal and ocular disorders

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has launched the Penn Center for Advanced Retinal and Ocular Therapeutics (CAROT) to build on its previous success developing novel therapies for the personalized diagnosis and treatment of retinal and ocular disorders. [More]
Health institutions tackle high rate of preterm birth

Health institutions tackle high rate of preterm birth

An estimated 15 million babies are born preterm every year and more than one million die within the first 30 days after birth. [More]
Only 52% of women receive low-cost treatment to prevent babies death

Only 52% of women receive low-cost treatment to prevent babies death

A major international study of more than 303 000 births in 29 low-income and middle-income countries has found that only half (52%) of women who are eligible to receive a simple, effective, low-cost treatment to prevent death and disability in their newborn babies are getting it. [More]
Australia introducing breakthrough cerebral palsy treatment

Australia introducing breakthrough cerebral palsy treatment

"If Id had a stroke, I wouldn't be happy waiting two years for a diagnosis and treatment, by which time the damage would have become permanent" says Professor Nadia Badawi, Macquarie Group Foundation Chair of cerebral palsy and Head of Research with Cerebral Palsy Alliance "Well that's what we accept with children with cerebral palsy when early intervention in infancy could re-shape their brains, for example using what's called a motor learning approach, where we train the brain to learn new movements." [More]
New research may provide better treatment options for children with cerebral palsy

New research may provide better treatment options for children with cerebral palsy

Of cerebral palsy, caregivers and patients know this is an understatement: it's not easy. The permanently debilitating condition, which occurs in babies from the prenatal stage to toddlers, comes with more than its fair share of lifelong challenges - from mobility problems to developmental setbacks. [More]
Medical malpractice attorney establishes Birth Injury Scholarship

Medical malpractice attorney establishes Birth Injury Scholarship

The tragedy of a medical error resulting in a birth injury extends long past the insurance settlement. Victims and their families deal with the disability or the death of an infant for a lifetime. [More]
Virtual reality interface devices in reorganization of brain neural networks in neurological diseases patients

Virtual reality interface devices in reorganization of brain neural networks in neurological diseases patients

Virtual reality interface devices permit the user to interact with the virtual world in real time through a variety of multisensory channels including hearing, sight, touch and smell. [More]
Babies born to mothers who immigrated from other countries have lower rates of cerebral palsy

Babies born to mothers who immigrated from other countries have lower rates of cerebral palsy

Babies born to mothers who immigrated to Ontario from other countries have significantly lower rates of cerebral palsy than those of Canadian-born mothers, especially those from the Caribbean and East Asia, new research has found. [More]
Obesity before pregnancy can lead to preterm births

Obesity before pregnancy can lead to preterm births

Women who are obese before they become pregnant face an increased risk of delivering a very premature baby, according to a new study of nearly 1 million California births. [More]

UK’s pace of decline in mortality among children and young adults falls behind EU15+ average

The UK has failed to match the gains made in reducing deaths among children and young adults by 17 other high-income countries in the European Union, Australia, Canada, and Norway (EU15+) in the 38 years since 1970. [More]
New technology improves quality of life for kids with severe developmental disabilities

New technology improves quality of life for kids with severe developmental disabilities

A group of Kansas State University engineers and students is developing technology to improve the health and quality of life for children with severe developmental disabilities. [More]
Longer looks: Terri Schiavo case; stem cell tourism in China; fall protection for the elderly

Longer looks: Terri Schiavo case; stem cell tourism in China; fall protection for the elderly

Increasingly, Big Pharma is betting on new blockbuster cancer drugs that cost billions to develop and can be sold for thousands of dollars a dose. In 2010, each of the top 10 cancer drugs topped more than $1 billion in sales, according to Campbell Alliance, a health-care consulting firm. A decade earlier, only two of them did. [More]
Antidepressant medications during pregnancy linked with increased rates of preterm birth

Antidepressant medications during pregnancy linked with increased rates of preterm birth

Antidepressant medications taken by pregnant women are associated with increased rates of preterm birth. This finding reinforces the notion that antidepressants should not be used by pregnant women in the absence of a clear need that cannot be met through alternative approaches, say researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Vanderbilt University, MetroWest Medical Center, and Tufts Medical Center. [More]
Researchers receive grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers receive grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center received grants totaling $600,000 from the March of Dimes Foundation to advance their work in the prevention of premature birth, which affects about one out of nine babies born annually in the U.S. and is the leading cause of newborn death. [More]