Cerebral Palsy News and Research RSS Feed - Cerebral Palsy News and Research

Cerebral palsy refers to a number of neurological conditions that affect muscle control and movement. Children with cerebral palsy have difficulties in controlling their muscle movement as they grow and develop.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by damage to the brain which may occur before, during or after birth. The main known causes of damage include infection in early pregnancy, lack of oxygen to the brain, and abnormal brain development. Some risk factors that increase the likelihood of brain damage include a complicated or premature birth, maternal age of below 20 or over 40 years, multiple births and low birth weight.

Symptoms vary greatly depending on which type of cerebral palsy a child has. Ataxia cerebral policy affects balance and may cause difficulty in walking, while children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy may be unable to even maintain an upright position. The most common type of cerebral palsy, spastic cerebral palsy, refers to a tight and unyielding muscle tone that restricts movement and impairs mobility.

In the UK, cerebral palsy affects about one in every 400 children and approximately 1,800 babies are diagnosed with the condition each year.

There is no cure for cerebral palsy but treatments such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help relieve symptoms and increase a child's self-esteem and independence while medication can relieve muscle stiffness and spasms.
UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has demonstrated in pre-clinical trials a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
Researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth using nanoparticles

Researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth using nanoparticles

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers has demonstrated in mice a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
Dysport phase III study results in children with cerebral palsy with lower limb spasticity published in Pediatrics

Dysport phase III study results in children with cerebral palsy with lower limb spasticity published in Pediatrics

Ipsen today announced that the scientific journal Pediatrics published the detailed results of the phase III randomized study showing both the efficacy and the safety of Dysport in the treatment of dynamic equinus foot deformity, a condition associated with cerebral palsy in children. [More]
Premature triplets released from Loyola University Medical Center in time for first Christmas

Premature triplets released from Loyola University Medical Center in time for first Christmas

Triplets Finn, Kyle and Ava Santiago, who were born six weeks premature and underweight, went home from Loyola University Medical Center Dec. 24, just in time to celebrate their first Christmas. [More]
New study may help doctors to better treat children who cope with chronic pain

New study may help doctors to better treat children who cope with chronic pain

A new study describes the development of pediatric pain measures for a National Institutes of Health Initiative aimed at helping doctors better evaluate and therefore better treat children who cope with chronic pain. Based on face-to-face interviews with pediatric patients, the study better captured the young patient's perspective of living with chronic pain. [More]
Preventable comorbidities common in cerebral palsy patients

Preventable comorbidities common in cerebral palsy patients

Medical comorbidities are common in patients with cerebral palsy and may impact on their mobility, report researchers. [More]

Mechatronic engineers create bracelet that makes mobility simpler and safer for blind people

The technological development has international recognition and has sparked interest for industrial production by a manufacturer in the medical sector. [More]
Researchers identify factors that increase risk of cardiac arrest during pediatric spine surgeries

Researchers identify factors that increase risk of cardiac arrest during pediatric spine surgeries

Although the vast majority of pediatric spine surgeries are safe, a handful of neuromuscular conditions seem to fuel the risk of cardiac arrest during such operations, according to research led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. [More]
March of Dimes scientists help fine-tune experiments to uncover unknown causes of preterm birth

March of Dimes scientists help fine-tune experiments to uncover unknown causes of preterm birth

A new, integrated online database of genes and other information related to pregnancy has been developed by March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center investigators to help fine-tune questions, theories, and experiments to uncover the unknown causes of preterm birth. [More]
March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card reveals racial, ethnic disparities within states

March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card reveals racial, ethnic disparities within states

Portland, Oregon has the best preterm birth rate of the top 100 cities with the most births nationwide, while Shreveport, Louisiana has the worst, according to the 2015 March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card, which for the first time graded cities and counties around the nation and revealed persistent racial, ethnic and geographic disparities within states. [More]
CPFN, Cure CP raise funds to extend research on cerebral palsy

CPFN, Cure CP raise funds to extend research on cerebral palsy

Will it one day be possible to cure cerebral palsy? Scientists working in a new field of study known as "regenerative medicine" think so. But support is needed to further the research, according to two non-profit organizations founded by parents of children with CP. [More]
Divorce rates less among couples who raise children with developmental disabilities

Divorce rates less among couples who raise children with developmental disabilities

Couples raising a child with developmental disabilities do not face a higher risk of divorce if they have larger families, according to a new study by researchers from the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. [More]
Magnesium sulfate has protective effect on maternal fever during labor

Magnesium sulfate has protective effect on maternal fever during labor

Women who received magnesium sulfate during labor were less likely to develop maternal fever, a condition that can lead to a variety of complications in newborns including difficulty breathing, seizures, cerebral palsy and a condition known as "floppy baby syndrome," characterized by inadequate muscle tone, according to a retrospective study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
Premature babies face increased risk of mental illness due to weakened connections in brain networks

Premature babies face increased risk of mental illness due to weakened connections in brain networks

Babies born prematurely face an increased risk of neurological and psychiatric problems that may be due to weakened connections in brain networks linked to attention, communication and the processing of emotions, new research shows. [More]
New design could improve safety, efficiency of spinal surgery in children with cerebral palsy

New design could improve safety, efficiency of spinal surgery in children with cerebral palsy

Researchers have designed a way to improve the safety and efficiency of a complex surgical procedure for children with cerebral palsy by using wearable technology like Google Glass. [More]
Study confirms neuroprotective effects of hypothermia in newborns with HIE

Study confirms neuroprotective effects of hypothermia in newborns with HIE

A unique study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles of newborns treated with hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) - a condition that occurs when the brain is deprived of an adequate oxygen supply - confirms its neuroprotective effects on the brain. [More]
Researchers suggest potential method of screening for jaundice in preterm infants

Researchers suggest potential method of screening for jaundice in preterm infants

A research group led by Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine Project Professor MORIOKA Ichirou and Professor IIJIMA Kazumoto (Department of Pediatrics) has suggested a potential method of screening for jaundice (hyperbilirubinemia), a cause of cerebral palsy and loss of hearing in preterm infants with kyperbilirubinemia, using painless dermal monitoring. [More]
Ultrasonic attenuation could be early indicator of preterm-birth risk

Ultrasonic attenuation could be early indicator of preterm-birth risk

Ultrasonic attenuation -- an ultrasound's gradual loss of energy as the sound waves circulate through tissue -- could be an early indicator of whether a pregnant woman is at risk for delivering prematurely, according to a new study at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing. [More]
Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Patients with scoliosis who undergo surgery may be less likely to develop an infection or other complications after the procedure when a novel wound closure technique pioneered at NYU Langone Medical Center is utilized, according to new research. [More]
Researchers uncover strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy

Researchers uncover strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in children. It has historically been considered to be caused by factors such as birth asphyxia, stroke and infections in the developing brain of babies. [More]
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