Cerebral Palsy News and Research RSS Feed - Cerebral Palsy News and Research

Cerebral palsy refers to a number of neurological conditions that affect muscle control and movement. Children with cerebral palsy have difficulties in controlling their muscle movement as they grow and develop.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by damage to the brain which may occur before, during or after birth. The main known causes of damage include infection in early pregnancy, lack of oxygen to the brain, and abnormal brain development. Some risk factors that increase the likelihood of brain damage include a complicated or premature birth, maternal age of below 20 or over 40 years, multiple births and low birth weight.

Symptoms vary greatly depending on which type of cerebral palsy a child has. Ataxia cerebral policy affects balance and may cause difficulty in walking, while children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy may be unable to even maintain an upright position. The most common type of cerebral palsy, spastic cerebral palsy, refers to a tight and unyielding muscle tone that restricts movement and impairs mobility.

In the UK, cerebral palsy affects about one in every 400 children and approximately 1,800 babies are diagnosed with the condition each year.

There is no cure for cerebral palsy but treatments such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help relieve symptoms and increase a child's self-esteem and independence while medication can relieve muscle stiffness and spasms.

Scientists develop communication system for people with cerebral palsy

Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation, the research company Starlab and the group BR::AC (Barcelona Research Art & Creation) of the University of Barcelona developed a device that produces sounds from brain signals. [More]
Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

A technique to increase the flow of blood from the umbilical cord into the infant's circulatory system improves blood pressure and red blood cell levels in preterm infants delivered by Cesarean section, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Americord Registry, Smart Cells International partner to educate parents on benefits of cord blood banking

Americord Registry, Smart Cells International partner to educate parents on benefits of cord blood banking

Today, Americord Registry announced a new partnership with Smart Cells International, the first cord blood company in the United Kingdom, as part of its initiatives during Cord Blood Awareness Month (July) to educate parents around the globe on the benefits of cord blood banking. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify two proteins within fetal lungs that initiate labor process

UT Southwestern researchers identify two proteins within fetal lungs that initiate labor process

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified two proteins in a fetus' lungs responsible for initiating the labor process, providing potential new targets for preventing preterm birth. [More]
University of Adelaide research shows genetics play vital role in the cause of cerebral palsy

University of Adelaide research shows genetics play vital role in the cause of cerebral palsy

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered cerebral palsy has an even stronger genetic cause than previously thought, leading them to call for an end to unnecessary caesareans and arbitrary litigation against obstetric staff. [More]
CHOP Global Health Center performs first rigorous study of CP outcomes in Africa

CHOP Global Health Center performs first rigorous study of CP outcomes in Africa

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of childhood disability in the world, affecting between 1 and 2 infants per thousand. But the neurological condition tends to be understudied, especially in developing countries. [More]
People with cognitive impairment have altered responses to pain

People with cognitive impairment have altered responses to pain

People with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment (CI) have altered responses to pain, with many conditions associated with increased pain sensitivity, concludes a research review in PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. [More]

New brain-computer interface system improves communication skills of children with cerebral palsy

The Biomechanics Institute of Valencia has coordinated the ABC project (Augmented BNCI Communication), a European initiative that has developed a new brain-computer interface system to enhance communication skills of people with cerebral palsy from childhood, improving the relationship with their environment and the expression of emotions. [More]
Study finds hospital variation in outcomes for extremely premature infants

Study finds hospital variation in outcomes for extremely premature infants

Extremely premature infants born at 22 to 25 weeks of gestation have low rates of survival, and many of those infants who live have severe or moderate neurodevelopmental impairments. Thus, clinicians and families face the extremely difficult decision to either provide active, potentially lifesaving treatment at birth, or just provide comfort care. [More]
New technologies for preventing preterm labor, inducing labor process heading to marketplace

New technologies for preventing preterm labor, inducing labor process heading to marketplace

Preventing preterm labor with light and inducing labor using a side effect-free drug are two new technologies based on Florida State University research that are heading to the marketplace. [More]
Parents share arduous, circuitous journey to get referrals for childhood epilepsy surgery

Parents share arduous, circuitous journey to get referrals for childhood epilepsy surgery

Having a child diagnosed with epilepsy can be a frightening and confusing time. Now, parents share their arduous and "circuitous" journey to get referrals for pediatric epilepsy surgery once their child's disease stops responding to anti-seizure medications. The UCLA study sheds light on the difficulties parents face obtaining specialty and sub-specialty care for their children during an already stressful time. [More]
Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

A pair of topical medicines already alleviating skin conditions each may prove to have another, even more compelling use: instructing stem cells in the brain to reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis. [More]
Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

The exchange of words, speaking and listening in conversation, may seem unremarkable for most people, but communicating with others is a challenge for people who have aphasia, an impairment of language that often happens after stroke or other brain injury. [More]
UofL-led study focuses on flu vaccine for children with neurological disorders

UofL-led study focuses on flu vaccine for children with neurological disorders

Children who have neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy or epilepsy are no more likely to be vaccinated against influenza than youngsters without these conditions, despite the increased risk for complications from flu these children experience. [More]
New osteoporosis drug may also be useful for treating brittle bone disease

New osteoporosis drug may also be useful for treating brittle bone disease

New research at the University of Michigan offers evidence that a drug being developed to treat osteoporosis may also be useful for treating osteogenesis imperfecta or brittle bone disease, a rare but potentially debilitating bone disorder that that is present from birth. [More]
TRUFFLE study evaluates monitoring techniques to identify babies with poor growth in the womb

TRUFFLE study evaluates monitoring techniques to identify babies with poor growth in the womb

Babies that grow poorly in the womb could have better outcomes if a method for the timing of delivery was used more widely, a study suggests. [More]
Researchers find that weight-loss strategies sorely lacking for individuals with neurological disabilities

Researchers find that weight-loss strategies sorely lacking for individuals with neurological disabilities

A review of nutrition and weight-loss interventions for people with impaired mobility found strategies are sorely lacking for people with neurological disabilities, according to a team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic. [More]
Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has increased significantly over the last decade. The current issue of NeuroRehabilitation features a series of insightful articles that provide examples of how the ICF can be successfully implemented in clinical practice and research related to neurorehabilitation, ultimately benefiting patient care. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $600,137 in Quality of Life grants to 75 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
New Danish study suggests that proactive labour induction practice can improve perinatal outcomes

New Danish study suggests that proactive labour induction practice can improve perinatal outcomes

A proactive labour induction practice once women are full term can improve perinatal outcomes suggests a new Danish study, published today (18 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
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