Cerebral Palsy News and Research RSS Feed - Cerebral Palsy News and Research

Cerebral palsy refers to a number of neurological conditions that affect muscle control and movement. Children with cerebral palsy have difficulties in controlling their muscle movement as they grow and develop.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by damage to the brain which may occur before, during or after birth. The main known causes of damage include infection in early pregnancy, lack of oxygen to the brain, and abnormal brain development. Some risk factors that increase the likelihood of brain damage include a complicated or premature birth, maternal age of below 20 or over 40 years, multiple births and low birth weight.

Symptoms vary greatly depending on which type of cerebral palsy a child has. Ataxia cerebral policy affects balance and may cause difficulty in walking, while children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy may be unable to even maintain an upright position. The most common type of cerebral palsy, spastic cerebral palsy, refers to a tight and unyielding muscle tone that restricts movement and impairs mobility.

In the UK, cerebral palsy affects about one in every 400 children and approximately 1,800 babies are diagnosed with the condition each year.

There is no cure for cerebral palsy but treatments such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help relieve symptoms and increase a child's self-esteem and independence while medication can relieve muscle stiffness and spasms.
Virtual reality interface devices in reorganization of brain neural networks in neurological diseases patients

Virtual reality interface devices in reorganization of brain neural networks in neurological diseases patients

Virtual reality interface devices permit the user to interact with the virtual world in real time through a variety of multisensory channels including hearing, sight, touch and smell. [More]
Babies born to mothers who immigrated from other countries have lower rates of cerebral palsy

Babies born to mothers who immigrated from other countries have lower rates of cerebral palsy

Babies born to mothers who immigrated to Ontario from other countries have significantly lower rates of cerebral palsy than those of Canadian-born mothers, especially those from the Caribbean and East Asia, new research has found. [More]
Obesity before pregnancy can lead to preterm births

Obesity before pregnancy can lead to preterm births

Women who are obese before they become pregnant face an increased risk of delivering a very premature baby, according to a new study of nearly 1 million California births. [More]

UK’s pace of decline in mortality among children and young adults falls behind EU15+ average

The UK has failed to match the gains made in reducing deaths among children and young adults by 17 other high-income countries in the European Union, Australia, Canada, and Norway (EU15+) in the 38 years since 1970. [More]
New technology improves quality of life for kids with severe developmental disabilities

New technology improves quality of life for kids with severe developmental disabilities

A group of Kansas State University engineers and students is developing technology to improve the health and quality of life for children with severe developmental disabilities. [More]
Longer looks: Terri Schiavo case; stem cell tourism in China; fall protection for the elderly

Longer looks: Terri Schiavo case; stem cell tourism in China; fall protection for the elderly

Increasingly, Big Pharma is betting on new blockbuster cancer drugs that cost billions to develop and can be sold for thousands of dollars a dose. In 2010, each of the top 10 cancer drugs topped more than $1 billion in sales, according to Campbell Alliance, a health-care consulting firm. A decade earlier, only two of them did. [More]
Antidepressant medications during pregnancy linked with increased rates of preterm birth

Antidepressant medications during pregnancy linked with increased rates of preterm birth

Antidepressant medications taken by pregnant women are associated with increased rates of preterm birth. This finding reinforces the notion that antidepressants should not be used by pregnant women in the absence of a clear need that cannot be met through alternative approaches, say researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Vanderbilt University, MetroWest Medical Center, and Tufts Medical Center. [More]
Researchers receive grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers receive grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center received grants totaling $600,000 from the March of Dimes Foundation to advance their work in the prevention of premature birth, which affects about one out of nine babies born annually in the U.S. and is the leading cause of newborn death. [More]
Ipsen: Dysport Phase IIa clinical trial effective in treatment of NDO

Ipsen: Dysport Phase IIa clinical trial effective in treatment of NDO

Ipsen (Paris:IPN) (Euronext: IPN; ADR: IPSEY) today announced positive results from its phase IIa clinical trial assessing Dysport in the treatment of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity (NDO) in patients with urinary incontinence not adequately managed by anticholinergics. [More]
Researchers explore how genetics affects causes and prevalence of preterm birth

Researchers explore how genetics affects causes and prevalence of preterm birth

​More than 450,000 babies are born too soon each year in the U.S. Preterm birth is a serious health problem that costs the nation more than $26 billion annually, according to the Institute of Medicine, and is the leading cause of newborn death. [More]
Researchers seek to understand causes of premature birth with support from March of Dimes

Researchers seek to understand causes of premature birth with support from March of Dimes

Five researchers seeking to understand the causes of premature birth with the goal of identifying women at risk of preterm labor and developing new treatments to prevent it have been awarded grant support from the March of Dimes. [More]
Research to identify exact mechanisms behind preterm birth and fetal brain injury

Research to identify exact mechanisms behind preterm birth and fetal brain injury

An inflammatory protein that triggers a pregnant mouse's immune response to an infection or other disease appears to cause brain injury in her fetus, but not the premature birth that was long believed to be linked with such neurologic damage in both rodents and humans, new Johns Hopkins-led research suggests. [More]
Viewpoints: The evolution of Medicare; generic drugs and patient safety; new food labels

Viewpoints: The evolution of Medicare; generic drugs and patient safety; new food labels

About half a century ago, organized medicine and the hospital industry in this country struck a deal with Congress that in retrospect seems as audacious as it seems incredible: Congress was asked to surrender to these industries the keys to the United States Treasury. In return, the industries would allow Congress to pass a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act .... We have come to know it as Medicare. [More]
Experts sound alarm about the dangers of industrial chemicals on children’s health

Experts sound alarm about the dangers of industrial chemicals on children’s health

In a Review published in The Lancet Neurology, two of the world’s leading experts on the link between environment and children’s health are sounding the alarm on the dangers of industrial chemicals. They are calling on countries to transform their chemical risk-assessment procedures in order to protect children from everyday toxins that may be causing a global “silent epidemic” of brain development disorders. [More]
New prosthetic devices allow people to function more effectively in daily activities

New prosthetic devices allow people to function more effectively in daily activities

Thanks to advanced technologies, those who wear prosthetic and orthotic devices are now able to break previous activity boundaries. People with amputations now have prosthetic devices that allow them to engage in and function more effectively in a wider range of daily activities, exercise, sports, and even extreme sports, such as long-distance snowshoeing and ice climbing. [More]
Communication for people with impaired speech: an interview with Professor Mark Hawley, Professor of Health Services Research, Director of CATCH and lead researcher for VIVOCA

Communication for people with impaired speech: an interview with Professor Mark Hawley, Professor of Health Services Research, Director of CATCH and lead researcher for VIVOCA

There are many different causes of speech impairment but the one we are particularly interested in is actually the most common cause of speech impediment, which is dysarthria. [More]
Gene involved in inflammation, blood clotting associated with cerebral palsy, death in very preterm babies

Gene involved in inflammation, blood clotting associated with cerebral palsy, death in very preterm babies

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 at 2:45 p.m. CST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting-, in New Orleans, researchers will report that a variant in SERPINE1, a gene involved in inflammation and blood clotting, is associated with cerebral palsy and death in very preterm babies. [More]
Experts identify key challenges in youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities

Experts identify key challenges in youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities

In a study published today by the medical journal Paediatrics & Child Health, IRCM researchers address shortcomings in transitional care in the Canadian healthcare system. The team led by Eric Racine and Emily Bell, Montr-al neuroethics experts, identified important challenges in the transition from paediatric to adult health care, especially among youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities (such as autism spectrum disorders, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and cerebral palsy). [More]
Findings may help doctors personalize preterm birth prevention treatments

Findings may help doctors personalize preterm birth prevention treatments

New research findings may soon help doctors personalize preterm birth prevention treatments by identifying which women at higher risk for preterm birth will be helped by progesterone injections. [More]
Study reveals link between neonatal and early childhood outcomes among premature infants

Study reveals link between neonatal and early childhood outcomes among premature infants

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 at 3:15 p.m. CST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting-, in New Orleans, researchers will report on a correlation between initial neonatal and early childhood outcomes among children delivered less than 34 weeks gestation. [More]