Cerebral Palsy News and Research RSS Feed - Cerebral Palsy News and Research

Cerebral palsy refers to a number of neurological conditions that affect muscle control and movement. Children with cerebral palsy have difficulties in controlling their muscle movement as they grow and develop.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by damage to the brain which may occur before, during or after birth. The main known causes of damage include infection in early pregnancy, lack of oxygen to the brain, and abnormal brain development. Some risk factors that increase the likelihood of brain damage include a complicated or premature birth, maternal age of below 20 or over 40 years, multiple births and low birth weight.

Symptoms vary greatly depending on which type of cerebral palsy a child has. Ataxia cerebral policy affects balance and may cause difficulty in walking, while children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy may be unable to even maintain an upright position. The most common type of cerebral palsy, spastic cerebral palsy, refers to a tight and unyielding muscle tone that restricts movement and impairs mobility.

In the UK, cerebral palsy affects about one in every 400 children and approximately 1,800 babies are diagnosed with the condition each year.

There is no cure for cerebral palsy but treatments such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help relieve symptoms and increase a child's self-esteem and independence while medication can relieve muscle stiffness and spasms.
Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has increased significantly over the last decade. The current issue of NeuroRehabilitation features a series of insightful articles that provide examples of how the ICF can be successfully implemented in clinical practice and research related to neurorehabilitation, ultimately benefiting patient care. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $600,137 in Quality of Life grants to 75 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
New Danish study suggests that proactive labour induction practice can improve perinatal outcomes

New Danish study suggests that proactive labour induction practice can improve perinatal outcomes

A proactive labour induction practice once women are full term can improve perinatal outcomes suggests a new Danish study, published today (18 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
Research: 14% of cerebral palsy cases are linked to genetic mutation

Research: 14% of cerebral palsy cases are linked to genetic mutation

An international research group led by a team at the University of Adelaide has made what they believe could be the biggest discovery into cerebral palsy in 20 years. [More]
Vanderbilt researchers find link between the biological clock and Angelman syndrome

Vanderbilt researchers find link between the biological clock and Angelman syndrome

Monitoring participants' biological clocks may be the quickest way to determine the effectiveness of experimental drugs currently under development to treat Angelman syndrome: a debilitating genetic disorder that occurs in more than one in every 15,000 live births. [More]
Variants in fetus's DNA may trigger some early births

Variants in fetus's DNA may trigger some early births

Some babies seem to have a genetic predisposition to a higher risk of being born too soon, according to researchers in a study to be presented on Feb. 5 in an oral concurrent session at 8 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children

K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children

K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital at Jersey Shore University Medical Center introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children, a specialized, full-service, dental practice for infants, children and adolescents in a child-friendly, caring environment. [More]
Scientists identify gene that helps regulate development of central nervous system

Scientists identify gene that helps regulate development of central nervous system

Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. [More]
New way to measure upper extremity movement in muscular dystrophy patients

New way to measure upper extremity movement in muscular dystrophy patients

Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital have developed a way to measure upper extremity movement in patients with muscular dystrophy using interactive video game technology. Their hope is to expand inclusion criteria for clinical trials to incorporate patients using wheelchairs. [More]
EMA recommends orphan designation to Magnus Growth's novel therapy for placental insufficiency

EMA recommends orphan designation to Magnus Growth's novel therapy for placental insufficiency

Magnus Life Science today announces that the European Medicines Agency's Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products has reached a positive decision on recommending orphan designation to Magnus Growth's novel therapy to treat placental insufficiency. [More]
Multiple factors influence survival of extremely premature infants

Multiple factors influence survival of extremely premature infants

Multiple factors influence how well a severely premature infant (23 weeks gestation) will do after birth and over the long-term, according to researchers at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. These findings were published in the latest issue of the American Journal of Perinatology. [More]
Orthopedic surgeons recommend prompt medical attention for shoulder dislocations

Orthopedic surgeons recommend prompt medical attention for shoulder dislocations

Prompt and appropriate treatment of a dislocated shoulder--when the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) is completely knocked out of the shoulder socket (glenoid)--can minimize risk for future dislocations as well as the effects of related bone, muscle and nerve injuries, according to a literature review appearing in the December issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). [More]
Dantrolene drug may be effective treatment for rare form of diabetes

Dantrolene drug may be effective treatment for rare form of diabetes

A commonly prescribed muscle relaxant may be an effective treatment for a rare but devastating form of diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. [More]
Epilepsy: A true window on the brain

Epilepsy: A true window on the brain

Rapidly emerging technologies, novel imaging techniques, the development of new therapies and new genes, have given researchers and clinicians an extraordinary ability to explore the brain at the cellular, genetic and neural levels. While current epilepsy research may seem like it's ripped from the pages of a science fiction novel, it's real—and even pretty cool. [More]
March of Dimes calls for nationwide effort to reduce U.S. preterm births to 5.5% by 2030

March of Dimes calls for nationwide effort to reduce U.S. preterm births to 5.5% by 2030

The March of Dimes is calling for a nationwide effort to reduce U.S. preterm births to 5.5 percent of all live births by 2030. Seven other developed countries already have preterm birth rates below 6 percent, and 15 have rates below 7 percent. [More]
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
Antibiotic stewardship programs reduce length of stay and hospital readmission in children

Antibiotic stewardship programs reduce length of stay and hospital readmission in children

Hospitalized children go home sooner and are less likely to be readmitted when the hospital has an antibiotic stewardship program that's dedicated to controlling antibiotic prescriptions and treatment, according to a study being presented at IDWeek 2014-. The study is the first to show the benefits of such programs on children's health. [More]
People who practice yoga, meditation long term can learn to control computer with their minds

People who practice yoga, meditation long term can learn to control computer with their minds

New research by biomedical engineers at the University of Minnesota shows that people who practice yoga and meditation long term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation experience. [More]

Physical therapist in Southern California launches new book, Rehab the Mind

The highest rated physical therapist in Southern California, Dr. Justin C. Lin, is pleased to announce the launch of his new book, Rehab the Mind, Revive the Body, (known hereafter as the "Book" or "RR"), an inspirational account of the power of active healing based on real life stories of his patients. [More]
Highlights: Hawaii public hospital cuts; La. struggles with state worker health program costs; aging in Ky.

Highlights: Hawaii public hospital cuts; La. struggles with state worker health program costs; aging in Ky.

Public hospitals across Hawaii are finding ways to reduce staff and cut services because they don't have enough money to make ends meet. Executives from the Hawaii Health Systems Corp. told lawmakers Friday that even after layoffs they are facing a $30 million deficit in 2015. One hospital on Maui chose to close its adolescent psychology unit because it couldn't sustain the appropriate staffing levels to provide the services. It's also considering cuts to oncology and dialysis services if the situation doesn't improve (9/20). [More]