Cerebral Palsy News and Research RSS Feed - Cerebral Palsy News and Research

Cerebral palsy refers to a number of neurological conditions that affect muscle control and movement. Children with cerebral palsy have difficulties in controlling their muscle movement as they grow and develop.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by damage to the brain which may occur before, during or after birth. The main known causes of damage include infection in early pregnancy, lack of oxygen to the brain, and abnormal brain development. Some risk factors that increase the likelihood of brain damage include a complicated or premature birth, maternal age of below 20 or over 40 years, multiple births and low birth weight.

Symptoms vary greatly depending on which type of cerebral palsy a child has. Ataxia cerebral policy affects balance and may cause difficulty in walking, while children with dyskinetic cerebral palsy may be unable to even maintain an upright position. The most common type of cerebral palsy, spastic cerebral palsy, refers to a tight and unyielding muscle tone that restricts movement and impairs mobility.

In the UK, cerebral palsy affects about one in every 400 children and approximately 1,800 babies are diagnosed with the condition each year.

There is no cure for cerebral palsy but treatments such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help relieve symptoms and increase a child's self-esteem and independence while medication can relieve muscle stiffness and spasms.
Special review highlights benefits of using botulinum neurotoxin for treating facial wrinkles

Special review highlights benefits of using botulinum neurotoxin for treating facial wrinkles

Botox and other botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) products are widely known for their use in treating facial wrinkles--but they can also be used to treat a wide range of non-cosmetic problems. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a national nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $575,704 in Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions

Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions

It appears that acupuncture may be a viable option for pain management when it comes to pediatric patients who have complex medical conditions, according to new research published by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul, Minnesota. [More]
Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

On January 24, 2013, Iris Vega-Figueroa's life changed completely. That's the day she gave birth to her twin girls, Iris and Geraldine. The twins were monoamniotic-monochorionic, meaning they shared one amniotic sack and one placenta in the womb. These rare pregnancies are considered high risk because of the uneven blood flow that occurs between the infants through the placenta. [More]
AOFAS volunteers travel to Vietnam for treating people with lower extremity deformities

AOFAS volunteers travel to Vietnam for treating people with lower extremity deformities

Volunteers from the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society returned to Vietnam this year to provide corrective surgery for children and adults with lower extremity deformities and disabilities. [More]
Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

A new study, which followed 180 pre-term infants from birth to age seven, found that babies who were fed more breast milk within the first 28 days of life had had larger volumes of certain regions of the brain at term equivalent and had better IQs, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function. [More]
New method could help detect unconjugated bilirubin in newborn infants

New method could help detect unconjugated bilirubin in newborn infants

A research group led by Project Professor Morioka Ichiro and Assistant Professor Iwatani Sota in collaboration with Doctor Miyawaki Atsushi have clinically proven that a fluorescent protein sourced from Japanese eel muscles can be used to accurately detect unconjugated bilirubin in newborns. [More]
Researchers investigate neural patterns underlying development of walking behaviours

Researchers investigate neural patterns underlying development of walking behaviours

Even before they stand up, infants have a rough idea of how to walk; they just need some time to lay down the right neural wiring. Understanding how babies take their first steps can also help us to improve the rehabilitation of patients recovering from spinal cord injury, and children with cerebral palsy. [More]
Innovative advances in medical paediatric orthotics shared at Primary Care and Public Health 2016

Innovative advances in medical paediatric orthotics shared at Primary Care and Public Health 2016

Innovative, clinician-led advances in orthotic techniques have the capacity to dramatically improve short term progress and long term outcomes for selective dorsal rhizotomy and scoliosis patients as well as patients with neurological disorders affecting movement. [More]
New autism classification system defines social communication ability levels among ASD children

New autism classification system defines social communication ability levels among ASD children

Children with autism have a wide range of ability to talk with other people, but it has been difficult to group children by their specific skills. [More]
Early high-dose rhEPO fails to improve neurodevelopment in very preterm infants

Early high-dose rhEPO fails to improve neurodevelopment in very preterm infants

Very preterm infants do not gain protection against neurodevelopmental delay with early prophylactic high-dose recombinant human erythropoietin, researchers report. [More]
Researchers design questionnaire to screen CP patients for sleep apnea

Researchers design questionnaire to screen CP patients for sleep apnea

When people think of sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), images of middle aged adults likely come to mind. However, a recent study by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare sheds light on another population of people who are affected by the disorder: children who have cerebral palsy (CP). [More]
Scientists make breakthrough in understanding senses of touch and movement

Scientists make breakthrough in understanding senses of touch and movement

Scientists investigating the little-understood senses of touch and movement have made a breakthrough that could eventually benefit people with movement disorders, spinal injuries, high blood pressure and even improve the design of robotics and prosthetics. [More]
Researchers find way to selectively deliver drugs to placenta without harming fetus

Researchers find way to selectively deliver drugs to placenta without harming fetus

Nearly 10 percent of babies born in the United States are born premature, according to the March of Dimes. The underlying cause of many complications during pregnancy is often a poorly functioning placenta, the organ that nourishes and maintains the fetus. [More]
High levels of exercise from young age can benefit patients with cerebral palsy

High levels of exercise from young age can benefit patients with cerebral palsy

For highly trained Paralympic athletes with cerebral palsy (CP), bone mineral density and other measures of body composition are similar to those of able-bodied adults of similar age, reports a study in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. [More]
Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth, compared with babies given little or no breast milk. [More]
Researchers develop new quantitative assessment of motor control in kids with cerebral palsy

Researchers develop new quantitative assessment of motor control in kids with cerebral palsy

Children with cerebral palsy frequently undergo invasive surgeries -- lengthening tendons, rotating bones, transferring muscles to new locations -- in hopes of improving their physical ability to walk or move. [More]
N-KICS tool helps describe intensity of nursing care for children with CMC

N-KICS tool helps describe intensity of nursing care for children with CMC

Recent medical advances have resulted in increased survival of children with complex medical conditions (CMC), such as cerebral palsy, complex chromosomal anomalies, major congenital heart diseases and respiratory disease. [More]

Kansas State University engineers developing technology to help children with special needs

A Kansas State University engineering team is developing a technology collection that can make a big difference in the lives of children with developmental disabilities. [More]
NAU researcher calls for greater public awareness of cytomegalovirus

NAU researcher calls for greater public awareness of cytomegalovirus

As the Zika virus continues to spread across the globe, and gain worldwide attention for its' potential birth defects, an NAU researcher is calling for greater public awareness of cytomegalovirus—the most common viral cause of birth defects in the United States. [More]
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