Chemotherapy News and Research RSS Feed - Chemotherapy News and Research

Chemotherapy, in its most general sense, is the treatment of disease by chemicals especially by killing micro-organisms or cancerous cells. In popular usage, it refers to antineoplastic drugs used to treat cancer or the combination of these drugs into a cytotoxic standardized treatment regimen.
Doxorubicin omission feasible for select Wilms’ tumour patients

Doxorubicin omission feasible for select Wilms’ tumour patients

Stratifying patients by histological response to preoperative chemotherapy may allow some children with Wilms’ tumour to avoid doxorubicin and its associated cardiotoxicity, suggest study findings published in The Lancet. [More]
Study: Breast cancer survivors experience post-treatment weight gain compared with cancer-free peers

Study: Breast cancer survivors experience post-treatment weight gain compared with cancer-free peers

Among women with a family history of breast cancer, those diagnosed with breast cancer gained weight at a greater rate compared with cancer-free women of the same age and menopausal status. [More]
Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

A diet that starves triple-negative breast cancer cells of an essential nutrient primes the cancer cells to be more easily killed by a targeted antibody treatment, UW Carbone Cancer Center scientists report in a recent publication. [More]
USF College of Nursing awarded NCI grant to study mindfulness-based stress reduction in breast cancer survivors

USF College of Nursing awarded NCI grant to study mindfulness-based stress reduction in breast cancer survivors

The National Cancer Institute has awarded more than $2.8 million to University of South Florida College of Nursing to study memory and concentration among breast cancer survivors using a meditation-based stress reduction intervention. [More]
Study shows that Anisina has potential to improve effectiveness of chemotherapy in children with cancer

Study shows that Anisina has potential to improve effectiveness of chemotherapy in children with cancer

US-Australian drug discovery company, Novogen Limited, today announced details of an in vivo proof of concept study that demonstrates their lead anti-tropomyosin drug candidate, Anisina, has the potential to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy in children and reduce life-long side-effects. [More]

University of Twente scientists take significant step in breast cancer research

Scientists at the research Institute MIRA at the University of Twente have been working for some time on a new technique to detect breast cancer. The technique based on the physical principle of photoacoustics, has been christened PAMmography. It uses short bursts of light that cause ultrasonic waves to be generated in places with high density of blood vessels, such as in the vicinity of malignant tumours. [More]
OncoGenex's custirsen Phase 3 ENSPIRIT trial for treatment of NSCLC patients continues as planned

OncoGenex's custirsen Phase 3 ENSPIRIT trial for treatment of NSCLC patients continues as planned

OncoGenex Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that its Phase 3 ENSPIRIT trial evaluating custirsen in the treatment of advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is continuing as planned per the recommendation of an Independent Data Monitoring Committee (IDMC). This decision was based upon completion of the second and final planned interim futility analysis. [More]
Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers have launched the world's first clinical trial of a novel investigational therapy that uses a combination of two viruses to attack and kill cancer cells, and stimulate an anti-cancer immune response. Previous research by this team and others worldwide suggests that this approach could be very powerful, and could have fewer side effects than conventional chemotherapy and radiation, although it will take years to rigorously test through this trial and others. [More]
Cedars-Sinai scientists identify genes responsible for tumor growth in high grade brain tumors

Cedars-Sinai scientists identify genes responsible for tumor growth in high grade brain tumors

After generating new brain tumor models, Cedars-Sinai scientists in the Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute identified the role of a family of genes underlying tumor growth in a wide spectrum of high grade brain tumors. [More]
Sorrento, NantBioScience form joint venture to develop targeted therapies against cancer

Sorrento, NantBioScience form joint venture to develop targeted therapies against cancer

Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc. and NantBioScience, Inc., a majority owned subsidiary of NantWorks, LLC, announced today that they have established a joint venture to focus on the development of 'first-in-class' small molecules against targets that have eluded the pharmaceutical industry to date and which may address important drivers of cancer growth including cancer stem cells. [More]
Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Silver is often used as a coating on medical equipment used for chemotherapy. The problem is that this silver coating can break down drugs. Now, researchers have found a graphene coating that will help boost chemotherapy's effects. [More]
UC San Diego, GSK collaborate to treat leukemia by eliminating cancer stem cells

UC San Diego, GSK collaborate to treat leukemia by eliminating cancer stem cells

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center are working with GSK on a bench-to-bedside project to treat leukemia and other diseases by eliminating cancer stem cells. The collaboration is part of GSK's Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) program, where academic partners become core members of drug-hunting teams. [More]
Children with Wilms tumour can now be given less intensive chemotherapy

Children with Wilms tumour can now be given less intensive chemotherapy

CHILDREN with a rare type of cancer called Wilms' tumour who are at low risk of relapsing can now be given less intensive treatment, avoiding a type of chemotherapy that can cause irreversible heart problems in later life. [More]
NSU cancer researcher selected for prestigious J. William Fulbright award

NSU cancer researcher selected for prestigious J. William Fulbright award

Nova Southeastern University cancer researcher Appu Rathinavelu, Ph.D., was selected for a prestigious J. William Fulbright award to conduct cancer research and training in India. Dr. Rathinavelu is associate dean for institutional planning and development at NSU's College of Pharmacy and executive director of NSU's Rumbaugh-Goodwin Institute for Cancer Research. [More]
LUX-Lung 8 supports afatinib in squamous NSCLC

LUX-Lung 8 supports afatinib in squamous NSCLC

Compared with erlotinib, treatment with afatinib leads to outcomes in previously treated patients with advanced squamous non-small-cell lung cancer, suggest the results of a head-to-head trial. [More]
Study aims to determine utility of Trovagene's PCM technology for predicting response to cancer immunotherapy

Study aims to determine utility of Trovagene's PCM technology for predicting response to cancer immunotherapy

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, today announced the launch of a study that aims to determine utility of the Company's Precision Cancer Monitoring (PCM) technology for predicting response to treatment in advanced melanoma patients receiving one or a combination of the novel immunotherapy agents Yervoy (ipilumumab), a CTLA-4 inhibitor, and Opdivo (nivolumab), a PD-1 inhibitor. [More]
Study: Extended-field IMRT for cervical or endometrial cancer does not increase risk of duodenal toxicity

Study: Extended-field IMRT for cervical or endometrial cancer does not increase risk of duodenal toxicity

A study of women with cervical or endometrial cancer who require treatment to the para-aortic (PA) lymph nodes can safely receive extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) without increased risk of duodenal toxicity, according to a study published in the July-August 2015 issue of Practical Radiation Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology's journal focused on the clinical practice of radiation oncology. [More]
WPI-led study provides clues to new ways to treat difficult-to-cure fungal infections

WPI-led study provides clues to new ways to treat difficult-to-cure fungal infections

A study by a multidisciplinary research team, co-directed by Worcester Polytechnic Institute, offers new insights into how virulent fungi adapt through genetic modifications to fight back against the effects of medication designed to block their spread, and how that battle leaves them temporarily weakened. These insights may provide clues to new ways to treat notoriously difficult-to-cure fungal infections like thrush and vaginitis. [More]
Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Intermittent dosing with rapamycin selectively breaks the cascade of inflammatory events that follow cellular senescence, a phenomena in which cells cease to divide in response to DNA damaging agents, including many chemotherapies. [More]

Pazopanib improves survival in soft tissue sarcoma patients without impairment of health-related quality of life

Results of EORTC trial 62072 appearing in Cancer show that in patients with soft tissue sarcoma, whose disease had progressed during or after prior chemotherapy, pazopanib improved progression-free survival but did not change health-related quality of life. This observed improvement in progression-free survival without impairment of health-related quality of life was considered a meaningful result. [More]
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